LPG, Flammable Liquids, Toxic and Corrosive Substances

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LPG, Flammable

Liquids, Toxic and

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Safe Storage and Handling

LPG, Flammable

Liquids, Toxic and

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Today’s focus is…

Dangerous substances under the Dangerous

Substances Act 1979 and Regulations that require

licensing, including:

Class 2.1

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)

Class 3

Flammable Liquids

Class 6

Toxic substances

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Dangerous Substances Act 1979 (DS Act) and

Dangerous Substances Regulations 2002 (DS Regulations)

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Division 2.1 – gases that can ignite in air on contact

with a source of ignition

Examples include propane, butane, acetylene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG)

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• Odourless in natural state. Odourant is added as a safety measure

• It is heavier than air so will sink and accumulate in low points (pits, drains etc.)

• Liquid LPG can cause severe cold burns on exposed skin

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A person may keep in any premises, without a licence the following quantities of liquefied petroleum gas:

a) up to 250 kilograms contained in cylinder or tanks

b) any quantity provided contained in disposable non refillable containers

Note: the quantity of LPG contained in cylinders or tanks will be taken to be the total capacity of all cylinders or tanks stored on the premise at any one time

LPG

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If you require a licence, you must comply with AS1596 The

storage and Handling of LP Gas

• Note. For under licence quantities, consideration should still be given to the above standard.

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• OUTSIDE!!

• Ventilated- can be natural or mechanical • Control ignition sources

• Cylinders should always be stored upright

• Cylinders, tanks and pipework needs to be protected from physical impact

• Appropriate separation distances to protected places, doors, ignition sources etc.

• Combustibles

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Class 3 – liquids, the vapours of which can ignite in air on

contact with a source of ignition and /or generate a vapour, forming a flammable mixture with air

Examples include petrol, alcohols, thinners, solvents, lacquers

Class 3 – Flammable

Liquids

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• Flammable liquids give off flammable vapours

• Under the right conditions, flammable vapours can ignite

• Heat can cause an increase in the amount of flammable liquids emitted

Properties of Flammable

Liquids

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A person may keep in any premises, without a licence

• up to 120 litres packing group I or II in no more than 60 litre packages

• up to 1200 litres of packing group III

• up to 5000 litres of packing group I or II and up to 5000 litres of

packing group III provided that the premises is rural and greater than two hectares

• Any quantity of Class 3, Packing Group I or II provided that it is contained in packaging which has a capacity not exceeding 5L and where substances as packaged are manufactured products

• Any quantity of Class 3, Packing Group III provided that it is contained in packaging which has a capacity not exceeding 25 litres and where substances as packaged manufactured products

Class 3- When is a licence

required?

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A person who keeps in any premises flammable liquids in such a quantity that a licence is required, they must comply with AS 1940 The Storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids

Note. For under licence quantities, consideration should still be given to the above standard. It has a specific section on minor storage

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• Control of ignition sources

• Ventilation

• Spill control

• Fire Safety/Prevention

• Control of temperature

• Bonding and grounding drums and associated equipment during any transfer or decanting

Safe Storage of Flammable

Liquids

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Class 6.1 – toxic substances likely to cause death or severe

injury to human or animal health if swallowed, inhaled or by skin contact

Examples include calcium cyanide and lead arsenate

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Class 8 – Solids or liquids able to cause with varying

severity, damage to living tissue, acidic or caustic in nature. In the event of a leak, these substances can also damage or destroy goods and materials or cause other hazards

Examples include: acids, sodium hydroxide

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If 𝐿𝐼+𝑆𝐼 250 + 𝐿𝐼𝐼+𝑆𝐼𝐼 2000 + 𝐿𝐼𝐼𝐼+𝑆𝐼𝐼𝐼 5000 ≤ 1

LI the volume in litres of liquids substances in packing group I

SI the mass in kg of solid substances in packing group I

LII the volume in litres of liquid substances in packing group II SII the mass in kg of solid substances in packing group II

LIII the volume in litres of liquid substances in packing group III SIII the volume in kg of solid substances in packing group III

A LICENCE IS NOT REQUIRED

Toxic and Corrosives when

is a Licence required?

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• Prescribed requirements in DS regulations

• There are requirements for small quantities (ie under licence amounts) as well as licensable quantities.

• For further information

– Australian Standard AS3780 The Storage and Handling of Corrosive Substances

– Australian Standard AS4452 The Storage and Handling of Toxic Substances

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• If storage requires a licence

 Protected from weather and secure

 Class diamond at entrance to store and premises  Stored separately from incompatibles and food

(note: Not all Class 8s are compatible)

 Tanks and packaged stores must be bunded  Spill equipment/Emergency equipment

Safe Storage of Toxic and

Corrosive Substances

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• If storage doesn’t require a licence  Protected from weather and secure

 For more than 50kg PGI, a Class diamond at entrance to store

 Stored separately from incompatibles and food  Any spills must be wholly contained on premises  Spill equipment/Emergency equipment

Safe Storage of Toxic and

Corrosive Substances

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• Having a Dangerous Substances licence is not all that you need if you store these types of chemicals in a workplace

• Still need to comply with the requirements of Work Health and Safety Regulations (covered in an earlier session)

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• www.safework.sa.gov.au

• For copies of the Australian Standards:

www.standards.org.au

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