Undergraduate Programmes in the Department of Sociology: BSc Criminology & Sociology. Handbook

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Undergraduate Programmes in the

Department of Sociology:

BSc Criminology & Sociology

Handbook 2011 - 2012

Faculty of Arts & Human Sciences Department of Sociology

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DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY: BSc CRIMINOLOGY & SOCIOLOGY

2011 - 2012

CONTENTS Page

Introduction from the programme director 3

Programme objectives, learning outcomes and structure 4

Programme specification 11

Career opportunities 12

Level One 13

Level 1 Course outline 14

Level 1 Assessment dates 15

Level 1 Module outlines 16-31

Level Two 33

Level 2 Course outline 34

Level 2 Assessment dates 35-36

Level 2 Module outlines 37-76

Professional training year 77-83

Level Three 84

Level 3 Course outline 85

Level 3 Assessment dates 86-87

The Dissertation 88-94

Level 3 Module outlines 95-126

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INTRODUCTION FROM PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

If you are in your first year, welcometo your degree programme in Criminology and Sociology. If you are in the second or final year, welcome back!

Criminology and sociology are mutually complementary subjects which together provide innovative accounts of a range of crime-related matters, such as the cause and effect of criminal actions, the form and outcome of social disorders, the policing and regulation of public order, the procedures and techniques of the criminal justice system and the relationship between behaviours and punishments.

Located in the Department of Sociology in the Faculty of Arts and Human Sciences, the BSc in Criminology and Sociology provides an opportunity for students to combine an interest crime and criminal justice alongside the detailed study of established sociological themes. The degree builds on the expertise and research strengths of the department, and provides a sound training in general sociological theory and method in addition to its specialist examination of crime and criminal justice.

The Criminology and Sociology degree alongside other degrees in the Department of Sociology, for its coverage of a wide range of research methods enabling you to develop skills in designing research, conducting fieldwork and producing data, analysing data, and disseminating research findings. You’ll also study a range of different sociological theories, which can then be applied to a range of topics, including those related to crime and justice. Finally, you’ll have the chance to study a range of different areas of sociology – and of crime and justice specifically – generating in-depth knowledge of these areas, not just in theory but also in respect of their policy significance. A further feature of the programme is that, at various points, you will spend time on project work, both as an individual and in groups. Students can take our degrees as a four year degree with the option of spending the third year in a supervised placement in which students apply their knowledge and skills in a work

environment, while also receiving training and practical experience.

This programme handbook provides specific information on the structure of the Criminology and Sociology degree. It should be used in conjunction with the General Information and Regulations handbook, which contains a variety of important information on procedures and rules affecting your degree.

I hope you all have an excellent year. Karen Bullock

Programme Director

  

Department of Sociology, University of Surrey

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information concerning the programme(s) of study and contained in this Handbook is correct at the time of going to press (September 2011). The University reserves the right to introduce changes to the information given, including the addition, withdrawal or restructuring of programmes of study. In addition it may be necessary to make changes to or not to run an option or module if an insufficient number of students wish to take it.

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BSc CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES, LEARNING OUTCOMES AND STRUCTURE Terminology

Programme (short for Programme of Study)

A term to indicate a collection of modules that lead to a particular University award: e.g. BSc Sociology, or Sociology and Social Research.

Module

A self-contained unit of assessed study and learning of defined level and credit value.

Level

The programme is divided into levels which normally equate to the year of study: Level HE1 modules are taken in Year 1, Level HE2 modules are taken in Year 2 and Level HE3 modules are taken in the Final Year. Students will normally undertake a Professional Placement between Year 2 and the Final Year of study.

Credit value

One credit equates to 10 hours of student effort. So a 15 credit module will require about 150 hours of student effort (including timetabled classes).

Assessment

A generic term encompassing all forms of evaluation of learning.

Examination

A formally convened timed assessment of a module under the direct supervision of an appointed invigilator(s).

Coursework

This term covers work which a student is required or expected to undertake but does not form part of an examination as defined above.

Unit of assessment

Taken to imply a weighted piece of assessment as specified in these Programme Regulations. E.g., Essay – 2,000 words [50%].

Senate Progression and Conferment Executive (SPACE)

A University committee responsible for the progression of all Undergraduate students within the University.

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5 Overall objectives of the Programme

Students completing the programme will:

• Have a well developed understanding of the key concepts, theories and principles of

Criminology and Sociology, and their application across a range of relevant substantive areas; • Be able to use a range of analytical tools in order to evaluate and conduct research on

contemporary issues relating to crime, deviance and social control;

• Be skilled in using quantitative and qualitative means of investigating crime and other social issues;

• Have demonstrated critical, inquisitive and independent thought when examining criminological and sociological issues;

• Possess a broad range of communicative, analytical and organisational skills, and the confidence and knowledge to apply these skills in their careers after graduation.

Students attaining a BSc Criminology and Sociology will have attained 360 credits (120 credits per HE Level) demonstrating the following learning outcomes:

Subject knowledge and understanding

By the end of the programme, students are expected to have:

• Familiarity with and critical appreciation of the key elements of Criminology and Sociology necessary for understanding of the contemporary social world;

• Familiarity with and critical appreciation of the main theoretical perspectives and debates in Criminology and Sociology and their application to the study of substantive crime and criminal justice related phenomena.

• Familiarity with and understanding of the range and application of qualitative and quantitative methods used to produce data in criminological and sociological research.

• A critical understanding of the most recent developments in criminological and sociological theory, methodology and methods.

Cognitive skills

By the end of the programme, students are expected to be able to:

• Identify, critically assess and apply key concepts in Criminology and Sociology to a range of relevant substantive areas.

• Distinguish between and evaluate different methodological approaches to the study of crime and other social issues.

• Synthesise and evaluate data from a variety of primary and secondary sources.

• Evaluate the relationship between criminological and sociological theories and concepts and empirical evidence.

• Critically evaluate, contrast and challenge different theoretical approaches within the disciplines of Criminology and Sociology

Practical skills

By the end of the programme, students are expected to be able to:

• Design and execute independent research using a variety of methods. • Produce, manage and analyze quantitative and qualitative data.

• Locate, evaluate and apply appropriate criminological and sociological theories and concepts to inform both data production and analysis.

• Identify, collect and apply relevant primary and secondary sources to inform and resolve criminological and sociological issues.

• Work individually and as part of a group to critically reflect upon key debates in Criminology and Sociology and substantive crime and criminal justice related matters.

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Key/transferable skills

By the end of the programme students are expected to be able to:

• Communicate ideas, principles and theories by oral, written and visual means. • Formulate and solve problems, both individually and as part of a team.

• Work towards targets under pressure through discipline and careful organization • Use information technologies for a variety of generic and subject specific purposes. • Apply and present basic statistical and numerical data in an appropriate way. • Carry out a set of responsibilities in a work environment (for those who undertake a

professional placement year only).

Learning outcomes for Intermediate Awards

Level HE1: Certificate in Criminology and Sociology

The table below outlines the key learning outcomes for students receiving a Level HE1 Certificate in Criminology and Sociology mapped against individual modules.

Students receiving a Certificate in Criminology and Sociology will be expected to attain 120 credits at HE Level 1 demonstrating the following:

Have acquired basic knowledge of criminological and sociological concepts and theories To be able to understand standard criminological and sociological text books

Have acquired a basic foundation of social research skills to enable them to perform simple research tasks with guidance

Have attained a reasonable level of computer literacy and study skills Be able to access learning materials from library and electronic resources

Level HE2: Diploma in Criminology and Sociology

The table below outlines the key learning outcomes for students receiving a Level HE2 Diploma in Sociology mapped against individual modules.

Students receiving a Diploma in Criminology and Sociology will be expected to attain 240 credits (at least 90 at Level HE2 or above) demonstrating the following:

Have acquired sufficient knowledge of criminological and sociological concepts and theory to be able to challenge received opinion, evaluate their own work and report effectively

Have acquired further social research skills to enable them, with autonomy, to perform straightforward research tasks

Have demonstrated an ability to utilise library and electronic learning material in self-directed learning

Be ready to develop professional working relationships

Level HE3: BSc Criminology and Sociology Ordinary Degree

The table below outlines the key learning outcomes for students receiving a Level HE3 Ordinary Degree in Criminology and Sociology mapped against individual modules.

Students receiving an Ordinary Degree in Criminology and Sociology will be expected to attain 300 credits, (at least 60 credits at Level HE3), and demonstrate the following:

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7 Structure of the Degree

The Criminology and Sociology degree programme includes four major components: modules designated as compulsory which students have to take; optional modules at Level 2 and Level 3; an optional Professional Placement Period, and a dissertation prepared during the final year. The general structure of the BSc Criminology and Sociology are presented in Figure 1 in this section of the handbook.

The structure of the programme reflects the Aims and Learning Outcomes identified for each year of the degree programme. The Department also takes account of the fact that not all of our applicants have studied Sociology as an A-level subject at Level HE1.

The organisation of the programme incorporates elements of key Criminology and Sociology throughout.

At level HE1, there is significant emphasis on facilitating students’ development of core skills in social research; criminological and sociological concepts and theory; and the enhancement of students’ general study skills. All modules at level HE1 are compulsory. Students’ level of control over the focus of their studies increases throughout the degree. Level HE2 focuses upon further development of criminological and sociological skills and knowledge through a number of

compulsory theoretical and research methods courses. Level HE2 also offers students considerably greater scope to specialise in modules via a choice of options from a range of optional modules in both Criminology and Sociology. At level HE3 credits are entirely accounted for by optional modules and a dissertation, a substantive piece of conceptual and empirical work on a topic of the student’s choice. The options provide flexibility for students who wish to specialise at this stage of their degree. Optional modules are designed to allow students to choose from both policy-oriented areas and more specialist research and theoretical topics.

Level HE1

At Level HE1 the curriculum is focused upon the development of key criminological and sociological skills and knowledge, an introduction to core concepts and themes in the study of crime and deviance and the enhancement of students general IT and study skills.

Criminology content at level HE1 is delivered in the form of three modules. Crime and Society (15 credits) provides a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of crime and deviance by exploring the distribution of crime in contemporary society across a number of substantive areas incorporating age, gender and race and ethnicity. Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (15 credits) focuses on those institutions and agencies that are collectively responsible for managing crime and disorder. It introduces students to key agencies within the contemporary criminal justice system using both historical and comparative perspectives. Introduction to Criminological Theories (15 credits) provides a exploration of the major theoretical perspectives that have been developed by both

criminologists and sociologists in relation to crime and deviance, focusing attention on developments from classical criminological theory to innovations in the UK and USA since the interwar period. Introduction to Classical Sociological Theory and Twentieth Century Sociological Theory (15 credits each) introduce students to the broad range of theoretical resources within the discipline of Sociology. The former focuses on the major theorists and schools of thought in the history of Sociology over the last two hundred years. It begins with an overview of the development of Sociology before moving on to look at the work of Marx, Weber and Durkheim. The latter module considers the Chicago school, before moving to look at Parsons, Ethnomethodology and Habermas. This module is framed in terms of discussions of social order/social change. It concludes with feminisms; asking what a feminist sociological theory may add to these debates.

Students also take three 15 credit modules focused upon developing core skills in research methods. Introduction to Research Methods provides an overview and tasters of the diversity of methods used by researchers. It considers the philosophical underpinnings of alternative approaches to social

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research and explores the relationship between theory and data. It introduces students to examples of research using an array of different approaches. With an emphasis on practice, Quantitative Methods 1 is designed to give students a basic grasp of the statistical techniques necessary for implementing and critically evaluating social research. Qualitative Field Methods introduces students to the range of qualitative research methods such as interviews and ethnography.

The teaching of ICT and study skills forms part of the Crime and Society module. This component of the module ensures that all students have the requisite ICT skills in word processing, spreadsheets, web and database browsing and email and receive an introduction to studying for a university degree in the social sciences. Students are also encouraged to attend non-compulsory non-assessed study skills sessions offered by the library. While this change to ICT and Study Skills is partly driven by the changes to 15 credit modules it is also believed that the teaching of these essential academic skills will benefit from their incorporation into a substantive core area of teaching.

Level HE2

Level HE2 focuses upon further development of core sociological skills and knowledge, but also offers students considerably greater scope to specialise through selecting options.

Level HE2 continues to develop the core general framework established at Level HE1. Students build on the core sociological knowledge gained in theory and research modules at Level HE1, extending their sociological and criminological thinking and skills in these areas. Sociological Theory: Criticisms and Descriptions (15 credits) is a compulsory module for Criminology and Sociology students and builds on Level HE1 theory teaching. It covers three related areas: the critical tradition of thought exemplified by Marxism; the critique of modernity within the work of Weber, Simmel and the Frankfurt School; and the sociology of everyday life. It then moves on to examine differences between forms of sociological explanation, in relation to such topics as the nature of social organisation, the workings of power, and modes of everyday behaviour, and to consider the relationship between overtly critical and ostensibly descriptive forms of sociological theory.

Two compulsory courses Survey Research (15 credits) and Quantitative Methods 2 (15 credits) build on Level HE1 research methods teaching by extending students’ knowledge of methodological issues and debates in quantitative and qualitative social research, as well as widening their practical skills and knowledge base in statistical techniques, and computing methods for social statistics.

On the Criminology side of the programme, Applied Criminological Theories (15 credits) is a compulsory course which develops the concepts and approaches studied in Introduction to

Criminological Theories. This module focuses on how criminological theories can be used to explain and make sense of recent changes in structures and philosophies of crime, punishment and social control. It covers for example: post-modernism and crime; Foucault and poststructuralist analyses; governance, the state and crime; environmental crimes and green criminology; and, risk and managerialism.

As noted, optionality is built into the programme at HE2. Students are required to select two Criminology options, one Sociology option and a further option which can be from either

Criminology or Sociology. The optional modules each focus on providing an introduction to theory and research in a substantive area of criminological or sociological study. The department is

continually re-evaluating and updating its option portfolio. The new degree structure has enabled the department to both revise and extend its portfolio of options modules available to students at Level

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placement may be paid or unpaid. Wherever possible, students are supported in finding a professional placement that matches their interests but they are also expected to be proactive in looking for placement opportunities. Students are visited at their placement organisation by a member of staff from the Sociology Department to monitor their progress. A return day is held in the department part way through the placement year to give an opportunity for students to discuss their placement experiences and receive information about the final year.

Students initially registered for the three year BSc Criminology & Sociology who wish to undertake a Professional Placement year should inform the placement tutor and their programme director at the beginning of level 2.

Level HE 3

Each student prepares a dissertation of 12,000 words in length, normally based on the student’s own empirical research. The dissertation generally consists of a preliminary theoretical analysis, a critical literature review, a report of the methods used and a theoretically informed analysis of findings of the research. It is weighted to represent 45 credits of the student’s work in Level 3.

Criminology and Sociology students take two or three Criminology options from the list offered by the department and two or three options from the list of Sociology options. As at HE2 the number and substantive coverage of these optional modules varies from year to year depending on staff interests and availability, and build on the knowledge and understanding students have acquired at Levels HE1 and HE2 in particular substantive areas.

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Global Graduate Award in Languages 2011-2012

The Global Graduate Award is an optional and additional area of study open to all students which aims to encourage student mobility and to support students who spend their professional training year abroad. Studying a foreign language at university will enhance your employment prospects and prove useful if you wish to work in an international environment after you graduate.

All language modules are accredited for undergraduate students and award 10 credits per course. While these credits do not count towards your degree they are recorded on your transcript as the ‘Global Graduate Award in Languages’. Modules are assessed by 40% coursework and 60% end-of-course tests (spoken and written).

The programme structure comprises one 2-hour session a week for 19 weeks over 2 semesters and information on the programme can be accessed via the University website

http://www.surrey.ac.uk/languages/study/gga/

Registration for 2011 - 2012 will open on 26 September 2011.

You should dedicate at least three hours a week to completing assignments and to independent study.

Prizes

At the end of each academic year prizes are awarded as follows:

The Jon Taylor Memorial Prize

A prize of £50, donated in memory of Jon Taylor who died during his degree programme, to the student attaining the highest standard in the second year of the Department of Sociology’s degree programmes.

.

The Sociology Dissertation Prize

A prize of £50 in book tokens awarded annually to the student who submits the best final-year dissertation to the Sociology department.

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BSC CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY – PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION (FIGURE 1)

Credit Level 3. Potential Awards – BSc (Hons) Degree

Compulsory module

Dissertation (Semester 1 &2)

Professional Year

A 46 week placement in a professional work setting.

Credit Level 2. Potential Award – Diploma in Higher Education

Compulsory modules

SEMESTER 1 Sociological Theory: Criticism and Description

Doing Research by Asking Questions

SEMESTER 2

Criminological Theories Quantitative Methods 2

Credit Level 1: Potential Award – Certificate in Higher Education

No Optional Modules at Level 1 Award Requirements 360 credits, 120 of which are required at Level 3 for an Honours degree. 300 credits, including at least 160 at Level 2 or above, and at least 60 at Level 3, are required for an Ordinary degree Progression Progression A minimum of 90 credits at Level 2 to progress to placement/Level 3 120 credits required at Level 2 to obtain Diploma in Higher Education Progression 120 credits at Level 1 to progress to Level 2 or to obtain Certificate of Higher Education Optional modules SEMESTER 1 Policing and the Police Youth, Crime and Control Cultures of Race and Racism Sociology of Childhood The Sociology of Sociology The Family and Social Reproduction

Sociology of Mental Health Medicine and the Body Popular Music and Society Cultural Organisations and Industries

SEMESTER 2 Prisons and Prisoners Crime, Ethnicity and Racism Theorising the Environment Sociology of Sexualities Advanced Qualitative Methods Work and Workers in the 21st Century

Crime and Media

Compulsory Modules

SEMESTER 1

Introduction to Classical Sociological Theory

Introduction to Research Methods Quantitative Methods 1

Crime and Society

SEMESTER 2

Introduction to 20th Century Sociological Theory: Social Order and Social Change Qualitative Field Methods:Interviews and Ethnography

Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems Introduction to Criminological Theories

Optional modules

SEMESTER 1

Crime, Community Safety and Crime Prevention

Children and Violence Sociology of Gender

Sociology of Political Systems Poverty, Welfare and the State Migration and the Politics of Identity

Sociology of the Arts Media, War and Terrorism

SEMESTER 2

Crime, Power and Justice History and Theory of Punishment

Analysing Media Sociology of Environmentalism Group Research Project Researching Bodies Sociology of Religion Sociology of Health and Illness

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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR CRIMINOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY STUDENTS

The programmes in Criminology and Sociology will prepare you for the wide range of careers which require the ability to analyse complex issues and to reach sound conclusions. As a graduate from one of our programmes, you will have good analytical skills and IT skills and will also be numerate and able to communicate effectively. Such skills are increasingly valued by employers. Your understanding of social and policy processes may lead you into a career in the public sector including central and local government, social services, the police and the health service. Graduates from our programmes also work in the commercial sector and for voluntary organisations. A number of our students go on to postgraduate study of various kinds. There is a high demand for sociology graduates with sophisticated research skills to work in government departments, local authorities, higher education, market research agencies and research departments in commercial organisations.

Whilst our degrees offer extensive employment prospects if taken in three years, students who have completed the placement are likely to be in a particularly strong position with potential employers, having skills and experience that graduates of courses elsewhere may not have. The personal development planning process which is part of the degree programme will help you to recognise and build on the skills you have gained. The University careers service offers a comprehensive library and careers counselling service as well as skills workshops and graduate recruitment events. For more information, go to the web page at:

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LEVEL HE1 COURSE OUTLINE

Credit Ratings for BSc Criminology and Sociology

Students complete 120 credits per year. All modules are 15 credits and run for a single semester.

At Level 1, all modules are compulsory

Semester 1

Module title Credits Contact hours

Introduction to Classical Sociological Theory 15 22

Introduction to Research Methods 15 22

Quantitative Methods 1 15 22

Crime and Society 15 22

Semester 2

Module title Credits Contact hours

Introduction to 20th Century Sociological Theory: Social Order and Social Change

15 22

Qualitative Field Methods: Interviews and Ethnography 15 22

Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 15 22

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ASSESSMENT DATES FOR LEVEL 1

The following table contains deadlines and expected dates for coursework return in each semester for 2011-12. The normal university expectation for marking turnaround is four weeks, but you will see that in some circumstances we aim to get work back a little faster than that.

Please note that the dates here denote normally expected time-scales but in some cases staff may turn around work quicker while in others circumstances may make slight delays unavoidable.

Unless otherwise stated (e.g. if the assessment is taking place in-class),hand-in deadlines are

Tuesdays at 4pm.

Semester 1

DEADLINE DATE MODULE ASSESSMENT RETURN/MARK

EXPECTED

Crime and Society Essay Week 8 (22 Nov)

Week 5 (01 Nov)

Crime and Society Skills Exercises Week 8 (22 Nov)

Week 7 (in class) Classical Sociological Theory Timed Essay Week 10 (06 Dec)

Week 8 (22 Nov) Intro to Research Methods Review Week 11 (13 Dec)

Week 11 (in class) Quantitative Methods 1 Test Week 12 (10 Jan)

Week 12 (10 Jan) Intro to Research Methods Proposal After Exam Board

Classical Sociological Theory Examination After Exam Board

Quantitative Methods Examination After Exam Board

Weeks 13-14 (16-28 Jan)

Crime and Society Examination After Exam Board

Semester 2

DEADLINE DATE MODULE ASSESSMENT RETURN/MARK

EXPECTED

Week 4 (28 Feb) Qualitative Field Methods Obs Report Week 8 (27 Mar)

Week 8 (27 Mar) Criminological Theories Essay Week 9 (01May)

Week 12 (22 May) Qualitative Field Methods Int. report After Exam Board

20th Century Soc Theory Examination After Exam Board

Criminological Theories Examination After Exam Board

Weeks 13-15 (28 May – 15 June)

Criminal Justice Systems Examination After Exam Board

Examinations taking place during 2011/12

Students should be aware that examinations are currently held at the end of each Semester and during the summer vacation for Late Summer assessments. There is a two week session at the end of January (Semester weeks 13 and 14, including Saturday 21 January 2012) and a three week session during May/June (End of week 12, and weeks 13, 14 and 15 including Saturday 26 May, 2 and 9 June). Late Summer assessment will take place between Monday 20 August and Friday 31 August 2012.

Exam sessions will be scheduled between 9:00am and 9:00pm, Monday to Saturday. Whilst we try to avoid students sitting two exams per day, limitations on space available for examinations means some students may find they are scheduled to sit more than one exam per day.

Students must bring their student registration card (campus card) to every examination - without this form of identification students may be refused permission to sit the exam. Students will be allocated a venue and seat number for every examination - it is their responsibility to ensure they attend the correct location and that they arrive in time for the start of the exam.

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SEMESTER 1: MODULE OUTLINES Module Code: SOC1023

Module Title: Introduction to Classical Sociological Theory Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Rob Meadows

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

1 hour timed essay 50

1 hour examination 50

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This Level 1 module will look at some of the major theorists and schools of thought in the history of sociology over the last two hundred years. We will begin with an overview of the development of the idea of ‘society’, before moving on to look at the work of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. Each of these theorists was living at a time when the world was undergoing dramatic – and often bloody – change. As we encounter each theorist we will ask a series of questions: i) what do the offer in terms of a methodology for sociology?; ii) how do they conceive of ‘society’?; and iii) how do they explain the history of society and the changes going on around them? Towards the end of the course, we will begin to explore some critical issues.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

To introduce students to the ‘founding fathers’ of sociology/sociological theory To encourage students to critically engage with these theories

To begin to explore what it means to ‘think sociologically’ and to be ‘reflexive’ about the world around us (and the discipline itself).

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this module students should:

• Have developed an initial understanding of classical sociological theory, laying the ground work for further study in this area

• Have a set of guidelines for identifying the theoretical underpinnings of the texts they will meet in their first year of sociology

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17 Module Content

1. The Enlightenment and ‘society’

2. Durkheim, Marx and Weber - ‘society’ and the rules of sociological method 3. Critical Issues 1 – where are the female thinkers? Contemporary relevance?

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 seminars

Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Selected Texts/Journals

Craib, I (1997) Classical Social Theory: An Introduction to the thought of Marx, Weber, Durkheim and Simmel, OUP

Cuff, E., E., Sharrock, W., W. and Francis, D., W. (2006) Perspectives in sociology (5th edition) London: Unwin Hyman

Lee, D. and Newby, H. (1983) The problem of sociology, London: Routledge Ritzer, G. (2008) Sociological Theory, (7th edition) McGraw Hill

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Module Code: SOC1025

Module Title: Introduction to Research Methods Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Kate Burningham

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

1500 word review of a piece of research 30

2000 word original research proposal 70

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This module provides an overview and tasters of the diversity of methods used by researchers in sociology, media studies and criminology. We begin by considering the philosophical underpinnings of alternative approaches to social research and exploring the relationship between theory and data. The course then moves on to introduce and present examples of research using an array of different approaches.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• To provide an overview of the diverse research methods used within sociology, media studies and criminology

• To familiarise students with examples of research carried out using different methods • To introduce the basics of research design

Learning Outcomes

• Have an understanding of the diversity of methods used for research in sociology, criminology and media studies

• Be able to formulate a research question and develop an appropriate research design for addressing it

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19 Module Content

• Introduction to philosophy of social science • Developing research questions

• Linking theory and data • Ethics in social research • Survey research • Ethnography • Interviews • Secondary analysis • Documentary methods • Visual methods • Mixed methods

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Module Code: SOC1027

Module Title: Quantitative Methods 1 Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Lynn Prince Cooke

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

50 minute class test 40

1 hour exam 60

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This foundation module is designed to give students a basic grasp of the statistical techniques necessary for implementing and critically evaluating social research. Emphasis will be put on when and how to use statistical techniques, and the interpretation of results, rather than on theoretical derivations. A familiarity with the SPSS for Windows computer package is also acquired during practical work.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• Provide an introduction to the statistical techniques required to critically evaluate social research

• Give a clear understanding of when and how to use particular techniques, including hands on experience with SPSS

• Offer a conceptual and theoretical outline of inferential statistics including regression and chi-square

Learning Outcomes

Having completed the module, students should:

• Have a thorough grounding in basic univariate and simple bivariate statistical techniques • Be able to read and describe simple statistical tables and graphs

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21 Module Content

• The role of statistics in modern societies • Levels of measurement and types of variable • Estimators of central tendency and dispersion • Elementary probability

• Common distributions • Sampling theory and practice

• Statistical inference, estimation and hypothesis testing • Contingency tables

• Bivariate linear regression

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 two hour lectures and 5 tutorials

Selected Texts/Journals

Agresti, A., & Finlay, B. (1997) Statistical methods for the social sciences. Prentice Hall Fielding, J., & Gilbert, N. (2000) Understanding Social Statistics. London: Sage

Healey, J. (1993) Statistics: A Tool for Social Research, 3rd ed. California: Wadsworth Publishing Co Clegg, F. (1992) Simple Statistics. Cambridge University Press

Wright, D. (2002) First Steps in Statistics. London: Sage

Vogt, W. (1993) Dictionary of Statistics and Methodology: a non-technical guide for the social science. Sage

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Module Code: SOC1034

Module Title: Crime and Society Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Ian Brunton-Smith

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

Study skills test 10

1500 word essay 40

1 hour exam 50

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This module offers students a comprehensive introduction to the sociological study of crime and deviance. The module aims to think of crime sociologically and to explore patterns of crime and deviance in relation to the organization of contemporary society. In order to do achieve this, the module will explore crime and responses to crime by focusing on a number of substantive areas. In addition you will also learn more general study skills as part of this module.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• Provide an introduction to the sociological study of crime and deviance

• Explore a range of contemporary issues in criminology, and examine how these relate to the structure of society

• To give a grounding in the core study skills required to undertake undergraduate study, including email, referencing, and issues around plagiarism

Learning Outcomes

Having completed this module, students should:

• Have developed a sociological approach to understanding crime and deviance and understand the distinctive features of this approach.

• Understand the inter-relationship between patterns of crime and the organization of contemporary society.

• Be able to understand crime in relation to the existence and organization of forms of social differentiation.

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23 Module Content

• The reporting, recording and measurement of crime • Crime and gender

• Ethnicity and crime • Childhood, age and crime • Internet crime

• Crime and the media • Victims and victimization

• Core study skills (email, referencing, note taking, exam preparation)

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures, 6 tutorials, and 5 ICT workshops Weekly readings and seminar preparation ICT assignments on Ulearn

Selected Texts/Journals

Carrabine, E. et al., (2004) Criminology: A sociological introduction. Routledge Newburn, T. (2008) Criminology. Cullompton: Willan

Croall, H. (1998) Crime and Society in Britain: An Introduction. Longman Hale, C. et al., (2005) Criminology. Oxford University Press

Maguire, M. et al., (2007) The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, 4th ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press

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Module Code: SOC1024

Module Title: Introduction to 20th Century Sociological Theory: Social Order and Social Change

Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Rob Meadows

Module Availability

Semester 2

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

Formative exercise: in-class quiz with an element of peer assessment designed to help with exam preparation.

0

2 hour seen exam 100

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

Within this module we will begin to explore 20th century sociological theory. We will begin with an examination of the Chicago school, before moving to look at Parsons, Ethnomethodology and Habermas. The intention is not to cover all aspects of these theorist’s work. Rather, we will frame our investigation around their discussions of social order/social change. We will conclude the module with two sessions on feminisms; asking what a feminist sociological theory may add to these debates.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

To introduce students to the ‘problem of order’ and to encourage them to consider this a key issue in all societies

To introduce students to key 20th century sociological theorists – and especially their work on ‘social order and social change’

To encourage students to think critically – both about these theories and 21st century societies

Learning Outcomes

Have developed an initial understanding of some key aspects of contemporary sociological theory, laying the groundwork for further study in this area

Have a good understanding of the types of questions and issues which concerned sociology/sociological theory in the 20th century

Be able to (critically) apply theory to their own sociological work Be familiar and comfortable with the notion of ‘thinking sociologically’

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25 Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 seminars

Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Students will also be asked to complete an exam question plan early in the course (formative)

Selected Texts/Journals

Craib, I. (1992) Modern Social Theory: From Parsons to Habermas, (2nd ed) Harvester/Wheatsheaf Cuff, E., E., Sharrock, W., W. and Francis, D., W. (2006) Perspectives in sociology (5th edition) London: Unwin Hyman

Lee, D. and Newby, H. (1983) The problem of sociology, London: Routledge Ritzer, G. (2008) Sociological Theory, (7th edition) McGraw Hill

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Module Code: SOC1026

Module Title: Qualitative Field Methods: Interviews and Ethnography Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Rachel Cohen

Module Availability

Semester 2

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

Observation Report (1000 words) 25

Qualitative Interviews and Analysis Report (3000 words) 75

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This module introduces students to qualitative field methods including unstructured and semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and participant and non-participant observation. Lectures will explore the particular insights generated by qualitative field methods as well as the problems and possibilities that researchers employing these methods encounter. Students will gain experience in collecting, producing, and analysing their own data.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• To provide an overview of the qualitative field methods used within sociology, media studies and criminology, especially qualitative interviewing and ethnography

• To introduce students to the practical and epistemological problems involved in conducting qualitative field methods

• To provide students with experience in conducting and writing about qualitative field research

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should:

• Understand key methodological issues in qualitative field methods

• Become familiar with designing and conducting research around a research question • Be able to carry out collection of primary qualitative data and write a report on the findings

and analysis of the data

• Develop a reflexive and self-critical perspective on their research

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27 Module Content

Topics covered include:

• Why use qualitative field methods?

• Ethical and power issues in conducting fieldwork • Choosing a research site and finding participants • Understanding through observation

• The extended-case method • Insider-outsider research

• Qualitative interviewing process and focus groups • Analyzing qualitative data

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 classes Weekly reading

Practical exercises

Selected Texts/Journals

Gilbert N. (ed) (2008) Researching Social Life 3rd Edition. London: Sage

King, N. and Horrocks, C. (2010) Interviews in Qualitative Research London: Sage Mason, J. (2002) Qualitative Researching 2nd Edition. London: Sage

Bryman, A. (2008) Social Research Methods. 3rd Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press Rubin J. and Rubin, I. (2004) Qualitative Interviewing: the art of hearing data. London: Sage

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Module Code: SOC1035

Module Title: Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Karen Bullock

Module Availability

Semester 2

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module Mark (%)

2 hour examination 100

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

The Criminal Justice System comprises those institutions and agencies that are collectively responsible for managing a state’s response to crime and disorder. This module provides an

introduction to the key agencies within contemporary criminal justice systems in England and Wales. We will focus on the role and function of the police service, prosecutors, courts, prisons and the probation service.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

This module aims to introduce students:

• To the state’s response to crime in England and Wales • To the ways that criminal justice has developed over time

• To themes and debates that characterise contemporary criminal justice

Learning Outcomes

Having completed this module, students should be able to:

• Demonstrate understanding of the individual and collective contributions of the key Criminal Justice System agencies in England and Wales

• Show awareness of the ways that the Criminal Justice system has developed and why • Demonstrate understanding of how the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

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29 Module Content

The module will cover:

• The historical development of the Criminal Justice System in England and Wales • The principles which characterise criminal justice in England and Wales

• An introduction to the role and functions of each of the key agencies including the police, the prosecution, courts, prisons and the probation service

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 x 2 hour sessions, each integrating lecture material with interactive discussions and exercises Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Selected Texts/Journals

Davies, M., Croall, H. and Tyrer, J. (2009) Criminal Justice: An Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process in England and Wales. London: Pearson

Newburn, T. (2007) Criminology. Cullompton: Willan

Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan and Robert Reiner (editors) Oxford Handbook of Criminology (4th edition, March 2007) Oxford University Press March 2007

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Module Code: SOC1036

Module Title: Introduction to Criminological Theories Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 1

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Daniel McCarthy

Module Availability

Semester 2

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

2000 word essay 50

1 hour exam 50

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This module aims to provide a comprehensive exploration of the major theoretical perspectives that have been developed by both criminologists and sociologists in relation to crime and deviance. The module will cover a number of theoretical developments from ‘classical’ criminological theory onwards, focusing in particular on innovations in the UK and USA since the 20th century inter-war period.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

Understand the historical development of key criminological and sociological theories of crime and deviance

Analyse major contentions and arguments between these key traditions

Apply a range of criminological theories to illuminate contemporary social problems

Understand the relationship between criminological theory and its impact on social policy and the criminal justice system

Learning Outcomes

Have a clear understanding of the historical development of key criminological and sociological theories of crime and deviance

Be able to critically assess key contentions and arguments between these theories.

Connect criminological theories to illuminate contemporary social problems

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31 Module Content

Classicism and the rise of modern criminology

Individual positivism

Strain theories

Theories of place, space and crime

Subcultures of deviance

Radical criminologies

Feminist approaches

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 seminars

Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Selected Texts/Journals

McLaughlin et al (2003) Criminological Perspectives, London, Sage

Carrabine et al (2009) Criminology: A Sociological Introduction, London, Routledge

Hopkins Burke, R (2009) An Introduction to Criminological Theory (3rd ed), Cullompton, Willan Tierney, J (2006) Criminology: Theory and Context (2nd ed), Harlow, Pearson

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33

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LEVEL HE2 COURSE OUTLINE

Students take four compulsory modules (those not in italics). Students then take TWO module options (in italics) in Semester 1 and TWO module options in Semester 2. Across the whole year at least 2 and a maximum of 3 options must be Criminology modules (c) and at least 1 option must be a Sociology option (s).

Semester 1

Module title Credits Contact hours

Sociological Theory: Criticism and Description 15 22

Doing Research by Asking Questions 15 22

Crime, Community Safety and Crime Prevention (c ) 15 22

Children and Violence (c ) 15 22

Sociology of Gender (s) 15 22

Sociology of Political Systems (s) 15 22

Poverty, Welfare and the State (s) 15 22

Migration and the Politics of Identity (s) 15 22

Sociology of the Arts (s) 15 22

Media, War and Terrorism (s) 15 22

Semester 2

Module title Credits Contact hours

Criminological Theories 15 22

Quantitative Methods 2

Crime, Power and Justice (c ) 15 22

Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on Punishment (c ) 15 22

Analysing Media (s) 15 22

Group Research Project (s) 15 22

Researching Bodies (s) 15 22

Sociology of Religion (s) 15 22

Sociology of Health and Illness (s) 15 22

Sociology of Work (s) 15 22

Please note that options shown here are those running in 2011-12 as a result of student choices and staffing availability. They do not represent all the options which were offered to students, or all that will be offered in future years.

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35 ASSESSMENT DATES FOR LEVEL 2

The following table contains deadlines and expected dates for coursework return in each semester for 2011-12. The normal university expectation for marking turnaround is four weeks, but you will see that in some circumstances we aim to get work back a little faster than that.

Please note that the dates here denote normally expected time-scales but in some cases staff may turn around work quicker while in others circumstances may make slight delays unavoidable.

Unless otherwise stated (e.g. if the assessment is taking place in-class),hand-in deadlines are

Tuesdays at 4pm.

Semester 1

DEADLINE DATE MODULE ASSESSMENT RETURN/MARK

EXPECTED

Week 3 (18 Oct) Doing Research by Asking Qs Survey exercise Week 6 (08 Nov) Week 5 (01 Nov) Media, War & Terrorism Annotated bib Week 8 (22 Nov)

Week 6 (08 Nov) Sociology of the Arts Essay Week 9 (29 Nov)

Week 6 (in class) Children & Violence Presentation Week 10 (06 Dec)

Doing Research by Asking Qs Sampling ex Week 10 (06 Dec)

Sociology of Gender Essay plan Week 9 (29 Nov)

Migration & Politics of Id Ess plan/ann bib Week 9 (29 Nov) Week 7 (15 Nov)

Crime, Comm. Safety & CP Essay plan Week 9 (29 Nov)

Week 8 (22 Nov) Poverty, Welfare & State Essay plan Week 9 (29 Nov)

Week 11 (13 Dec) Media, War & Terrorism Essay Week 13 (17 Jan)

Xmas 1 (20 Dec) Doing Research by asking Qs Interview exercise Week 13 (17 Jan)

Sociology of Gender Essay After Exam Board

Poverty, Welfare & the State Essay After Exam Board

Migration & the Politics of Id Essay After Exam Board

Sociology of the Arts Essay After Exam Board

Week 12 (10 Jan)

Crime, Comm. Safety & CP Essay After Exam Board

Sociological Theory Examination After Exam Board

Sociology of Political Systems Examination After Exam Board Weeks 13-14 (16-28

Jan)

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Semester 2

DEADLINE DATE MODULE ASSESSMENT RETURN/MARK

EXPECTED

Week 6 (13 Mar) Quantitative Methods Exercise Week 9 (01 May)

Week 7 (20 Mar) Crime, Power & Justice Essay Plan Week 8 (27 Mar)

Criminological Theories Essay Week 9 (01 May)

Week 8 (27 Mar)

Researching Bodies Portfolio Week 9 (01 May)

Sociology of Health & Illness Essay Week 12 (22 May)

Week 9 (01 May)

H&T Perspectives on Punishment Essay Week 12 (22 May)

Quantitative Methods Exercise After Exam Board

Analysing Media Portfolio After Exam Board

Week 11 (15 May)

Sociology of Work Portfolio After Exam Board

Week 11 (In Class) Group Research Project Presentation After Exam Board

Group Research Project Project Diary After Exam Board

Researching Bodies Essay After Exam Board

Week 12 (22 May)

Crime, Power & Justice Essay After Exam Board

Criminological Theories Examination After Exam Board

Sociology of Religion Examination After Exam Board

Sociology of Health & Illness Examination After Exam Board

Sociology of Work Examination After Exam Board

Weeks 13-15 (28 May – 15 June)

H&T Perspectives on Punishment Examination After Exam Board

Examinations taking place during 2011/12

Students should be aware that examinations are currently held at the end of each Semester and during the summer vacation for Late Summer assessments. There is a two week session at the end of January (Semester weeks 13 and 14, including Saturday 21 January 2012) and a three week session during May/June (End of week 12, and weeks 13, 14 and 15 including Saturday 26 May, 2 and 9 June ). Late Summer assessment will take place between Monday 20 August and Friday 31 August 2012.

Exam sessions will be scheduled between 9:00am and 9:00pm, Monday to Saturday. Whilst we try to avoid students sitting two exams per day, limitations on space available for examinations means some students may find they are scheduled to sit more than one exam per day.

Students must bring their student registration card (campus card) to every examination - without this form of identification students may be refused permission to sit the exam. Students will be allocated a

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37 SEMESTER 1: MODULE OUTLINES Module Code: SOC2027

Module Title: Sociological Theory: Criticism and Description Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 2

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Geoff Cooper

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

Formative exercise: in-class quiz with an element of peer assessment designed to help with exam preparation

0

One seen 2 hour examination 100

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This module builds upon the knowledge that students have developed at level 1, and focuses on some key issues within sociological theory. It examines differences between forms of sociological

explanation, in relation to such topics as the nature of social organisation, the workings of power, and modes of everyday behaviour, and considers the relationship between overtly critical and ostensibly descriptive forms of sociological theory.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• Cover some key paradigms within sociological theory • Consider the relevance today of these paradigms

• Compare and evaluate critical and descriptive forms of theory

Learning Outcomes

Having completed this module the student should:

• Have an understanding of some key theoretical traditions within sociology, and the points of contention between them

• Have a sense of the relevance today of 19th and 20th Century sociological theory • Be able to use sociological concepts and theories to question widely held cultural

assumptions and critically assess aspects of social organisation

• Appreciate the different ways in which sociological thought can illuminate everyday life • Have developed skills in writing, in exam conditions, on pre-prepared topics

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Module Content

• The critical tradition of thought exemplified by Marxism

• The critique of modernity within the work of Weber, Simmel and the Frankfurt School • The sociology of everyday life

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 seminars

Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Formative exercise to prepare students for the exam

Selected Texts/Journals

Callinicos, A (2007) Social Theory: a historical introduction (2nd edn), Polity Dodd, N (1999) Social Theory and Modernity, Polity

Jacobsen, M (ed) (2009) Encountering the Everyday, Palgrave

Lemert, C and Branaman A (eds) (1997) The Goffman Reader, Blackwell Ritzer, G (2007) Sociological Theory (7th edn), McGraw Hill

Stones, R (ed) (2008) Key Sociological Thinkers, 2nd edn, Palgrave

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39 Module Code: SOC2034

Module Title: Doing Research By Asking Questions (2010/11 ONLY) Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 2

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Rachel Cohen

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark (%)

Online survey construction exercise (750 words) 15

Sampling exercise (750 words) 15

Qualitative Interviews and Analysis Report (2500 words) 70

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

This course explores the practice and analysis of qualitative and quantitative approaches to social research. In particular the course explores the ways in which we can find out about the world, social behaviour, and audience responses through asking questions, be that in qualitative interviews or standardised surveys. The course gives students hands-on experience with interviewing, analysis, sampling and survey development.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

• To provide an overview of the different (qualitative and quantitative) methods that are used within sociology, media studies and criminology, especially methods that involve asking participants questions about what they think or believe or what they are doing or have done • To introduce students to the practical and epistemological problems involved in conducting

qualitative interviews and conducting surveys

• To provide students with experience in conducting research and writing about the research process

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Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module students should:

• Understand key methodological issues in researching society, the media or criminology • Become familiar with designing and conducting research around a research question

• Be able to carry out collection of primary qualitative data, analyse the data and write a report on the findings

• Be able to evaluate the benefits of different sampling strategies • Be able to design a (brief) online questionnaire.

• Develop a reflexive and self-critical perspective to the research process

• Appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of different methods for different research questions

Module Content

Topics covered include:

• Ethical and power issues in conducting fieldwork • Finding participants and constructing a sample • Qualitative interviewing process and focus groups • Designing and fielding a survey

• Dealing with survey bias, error and non-response • Analyzing interview data

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 lectures and 11 classes Weekly reading

Practical exercises

Selected Texts/Journals

Buckingham, A. and Saunders, P. (2004) The Survey Methods Workbook. Cambridge: Polity. De Vaus, D.A. (2002) in Surveys in Social Research, 5th Edition. London: UCL Press. Gilbert N. (ed) (2008) Researching Social Life 3rd Edition. London: Sage

Gunter, B. (2000) Media Research Methods: measuring audiences, reactions and impact. Sage. King, N. and Horrocks, C. (2010) Interviews in Qualitative Research London: Sage

Mason, J. (2002) Qualitative Researching 2nd Edition. London: Sage

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41 Module Code: SOC2061

Module Title: Crime, Community Safety and Crime Prevention Module Provider: Sociology

Level: 2

Number of Credits: 15

Module Contact Hours: 22

Module Co-ordinator: Karen Bullock

Module Availability

Semester 1

Unit(s) of Assessment Weighting Towards Module

Mark( %)

3000 word essay 90

300 word essay plan 10

Qualifying Condition(s)

A weighted aggregate mark of 40% is required to pass the module.

Module Overview

Crime prevention and community safety are areas of criminological and policy interest. This module explores the theory and practice of community safety and crime prevention. We will consider policy and practice in relation to key areas of crime reduction including the prevention of youth crime, the utility of CCTV, knowledge-based policing, the significance of victims and repeat victimisation, crime mapping and GIS. It will also examine issues to do with evaluating effectiveness of crime prevention initiatives.

Pre-requisite/Co-requisites

N/A

Module Aims

This module aims to introduce students to:

• Models of community safety and crime prevention • The techniques developed to prevent crime

• The impact of crime prevention policy and practice

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this module students will be able to:

• Understand theoretical perspectives and policy debates in policing and crime prevention in contemporary societies

• Consider the impact of various crime prevention interventions on crime problems • Critically assess evaluations of crime prevention initiatives

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Module Content

• Concepts of community and crime prevention • Situational crime prevention

• Crime, the environment and design

• The geography of crime, crime mapping and GIS

• CCTV

• Youth crime diversion and prevention

• Evidence and knowledge-based crime prevention • Victims and repeat victimisation

• Evaluation and the assessment of impact

Methods of Teaching/Learning

11 x 2 hour sessions, each integrating lecture material with interactive discussions and exercises Weekly reading and seminar preparation

Selected Texts/Journals

Tilley, N. (2005) (ed) The Handbook of Crime Prevention and Community Safety. Cullompton: Willan

Newburn T. (2009) (ed) Key Readings in Criminology. Cullompton: Willan Tilley, N. (2009) Crime Prevention. Cullompton: Willan

Figure

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References