ANCIENT EGYPT. The History and Culture of Ancient Egypt From Its Beginnings

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

ANCIENT EGYPT 

                The History and Culture of Ancient Egypt From Its Beginnings 

 

 

 

   

    to the End of the New Kingdom 

           HIST 220505379‐Mon.‐Wed.‐ 9:25 AM‐10:40 AM                 Savitz 217               Dr. Morschauser‐morschauser@rowan.edu      "The fame of the valiant is in that which they do, it will never ever perish in the land."  Ahmose  son of Ebana (c. 1500 BCE)      A continuing spate of television documentaries, historical novels, and outlandish movies, attests  to the popular hold ancient Egypt has over modern audiences.  Perhaps like no other society in the  ancient world, the Egyptians still evoke a sense of mystery and awe, through the grandeur of the  pyramids, to (let's face it) the ghoul‐appeal of their mummies.  Their technology is still so astounding,  that many would attribute their spectacular architectural achievements to beings from Mars, telekinetic  energy, or to other equally held absurdities.  With the fascination there is a lot of fraud, nonsense, and  misconceptions about this remarkable civilization.    Yet, even more meaningful‐ ‐ ‐ if not quite as emotionally satisfying as the sight of colossal  monuments‐ ‐ is the fact that the ancient Egyptians produced what is likely the most successful political  institution in human history, lasting close to three thousand years.  The office of kingship established by  the Egyptians at the beginning of their history influenced the rest of the ancient Near East, the Greeks,  and the Romans.  The political legacy of their constitutional monarchy echoes down to us today.  And as  the Greeks, Romans, and even the ancient Israelites, acknowledged their debt to the Egyptians, we too,  are their heirs.    Our alphabet is an adaptation of their hieroglyphics (through Semitic intermediaries).  The idea  that human ethics has ultimate consequences is first seen in the Nile Valley in the concept of a "Last  Judgment."  Herodotus, Plato, and others attributed to the Egyptians, the invention of law, medicine,  and architecture.  The Egyptians, in a profound way, were the first "multi‐cultural" society‐ ‐ attested by  the country's appeal as a place of asylum in the ancient world.  Anybody who agreed to act responsibly  and uphold the welfare of the nation was welcomed and could be regarded as a citizen‐ ‐ men and  women.  Unlike other societies throughout the Bronze Age, Egyptian women could be scribes and  physicians; they could inherit, own, and dispose of their property. Females could be kings‐ ‐ ‐ not just  queens‐ ‐ ‐ kings.    This course will study ancient Egypt‐ ‐ ‐its history and culture:  from its founding as the first  nation‐state in history, through its apex and decline as an empire and world power at the end of the  New Kingdom.  We will be examining closely the African and Near Easter origins of ancient Egypt, and  the synthesis of cultures that resulted in the creation of a unique society; the institution of kingship and  royal ideology(‐ ies), and the changes and adaptations, which demonstrated Egypt's resilience,  ingenuity, and practicality.  And yes, we will look at pyramids and mummies, and the religious beliefs to  which they point. But we will endeavor above all else to understand critically, how the Egyptians  understood themselves‐ ‐ through their inscriptions, texts, and literature. 

(2)

  I. OBJECTIVES      1)  To provide an overview of ancient Egyptian history and culture from the Pre‐Dynastic Period  through the New Kingdom.    2)  To understand Egypt both within its own peculiar, indigenous setting, and within the context  of its contacts and relationships throughout the rest of Africa, the Near East, and the Mediterranean  world.    3)  To introduce students to basic problems in Egyptology:      a)  The complexities surrounding the idea of "divine kingship," and its ancient nuances;      b)  The difficulties in the nature, availability, condition, and types of ancient Egyptian    sources.      c)  The interpretation of material, whose presentation, expression, and perspective are    very different from our own, esp. in the field of religion and theological speculation.    4)  To gain a basic comprehension about the nature of ancient Egyptian society and its changes,    as opposed to modern myths and misconceptions about it; paying special attention to Afro‐   centric and post‐Modernist criticism of "Eurocentric" and "Orientalist" views of Egypt, as    well as Egyptological response to these challenges.    II. REQUIREMENTS      Students will be evaluated on the following criteria:    1)  You are required to attend class and do the readings for the course, as you attempt to comprehend  what an ancient Egyptian inscription was trying to convey to its original audience(s).  Your struggles with  these texts will be preparation for class‐discussion.    2)  You will be graded on:        A)  One Mid‐term worth 25%. The Midterm is designed to test your comprehension of the basic  terminology, concepts and chronological details of the course up until that point.  It will be combination  of objective material, along with a synthetic essay.      B)  A critical review of a film/documentary (to be watched in class).  You are to evaluate it for its  Egyptological content, not its entertainment value; 10%.      C)  A research paper dealing with a particular, and narrow theme chosen by the professor.  The  paper itself is to be 12‐15 pages in length.  It is to demonstrate your ability to conduct research, treat  critically original sources (in translation), and will involve dealing with both historical and  historiographical issues. A rough draft of 4‐6 pages will be due by March 23.  The final paper will be due  by April 20. 35%.   

(3)

  D)  A final exam, in which you will be required to identify major personages, events, sites, etc.,  as well as discussing at length, a particular issue or problem in Egyptology; 25%      D)  In‐class assignments, attendance, and in‐class quizzes are 5%.  You must do the reading and  be prepared to answer questions, which the professor shall pose to you.  There will be oral and written  assessments of assigned readings .   

  >>Although legitimate excuses such as sickness or family emergencies will be accepted, 

change of work‐schedule, cruises, and other non‐school activities will not.   

  >>All electronic equipment is to be turned off, and put away once class begins:  activity on 

cell‐phones, I‐pods, I‐phones, Blackberries, and text‐messaging will not be tolerated.   

  >>According to University regulations, you are not to bring food or beverages into the class‐ 

room.   

  >>If you have some medical problem that requires you to get up and leave, please let the 

professor know of your difficulties.  However, you are expected to show courtesy to your colleagues 

and professor, and not disrupt the class. 

  >>It is your responsibility to get to class on time:  plan ahead in terms of finding a parking 

place. 

  >>Continual lateness and absences will affect your overall grade.  Your grade will be marked 

down by a half, upon being late for three classes (e.g. from an A, to an A‐); late for six‐classes will 

result in a whole grade drop (an A to B), etc.  After three absences, your overall grade will be reduced 

by a whole letter (e.g. an A to B, etc.). 

   

III.  BOOKS   

  The following books are required: 

M. Lichtheim, Ancient Egyptian Literature I‐II(AEL)  Marc Van De Mieroop, A History of Ancient Egypt (HAE)   

However, there will be periodic assignments from articles on JSTOR and other academic sites.   

IV.  OFFICE HOURS      Mon‐Wed.‐8:30‐9:25; 10:50‐12:00    Tues‐8:30‐9:25    All other hours by appointment.    Phone‐ext. ‐3993       

(4)

V.  TENTATIVE SCHEDULE    Week      Topic    1    "The Stones Speak":  The Rediscovery of Ancient Egypt and the Beginnings of      Modern Egyptology:  Eurocentrism, Orientalism, and Afrocentrism and Ancient Egypt    2      The Land and the People:  The Ancient Egyptian World‐View        AEL I‐The Hymn to Hapy        HAE, 1‐10    3    A Multicultural Experience:  Predynastic Egypt        HAE, 21‐26    4    The Deal is Done:  Establishing Kingship and the Beginnings of Constitutional Monarchy        HAE, 27‐36    5    The Tools of Egyptology:  Primary Sources and Chronology        HAE, 10‐21      The Breaking of Consensus and Renewal‐The Archaic Period (Dyn. 1‐2)        HAE, 37‐51    6    Monuments for Eternity‐Djoser's Funerary Complex and the Beginnings of the Old       Kingdom (Dyn. 3)        HAE, 51‐57    7    The Age of Autocracy:  Khufu, Khephren, Mycerinus (Dyn. 4)        HAE, 57‐61      "Giving bread to the hungry, water to the thirsty, clothing to the naked":      The King as Good Shepherd of Re` (Dyn. 5)        AEL I:  The Memphite Theology; The Pyramid Texts; Tales of Wonder; the Book  

      of the Dead (AEL II) 

      HAE, 61‐77            8    The Impossible Possibility:  The Schism of Dyn. 6      The Longest Reign in History: Pepi II and the Disintegration of Monarchial Rule        AEL I:  Decree of Pepi I; Weni; Harkhuf        HAE, 78‐88    9    MID‐TERM EXAMINATION 

(5)

    A Land Turned "Topsy‐Turvy":  Theories and Realities of the First Intermediate Period       (Dyn. 7‐10)        AEL I:  Merikare; The Eloquent Peasant        HAE, 88‐96    10    Renegotiations:  The Ship of State Upright and the Formation of the Middle Kingdom       (Dyn. 11)      "So That One Might be Wise":  Political Literature of early Dynasty 12        AEL I: Ptahotep; Sinuhe        HAE, 97‐108    11    "Serve the King and Live":  Sesostris III and the Revival of the Autocratic Image      The Breakdown of Consensus:  The End of the Middle Kingdom and the Second         Intermediate Period (Dyn. 13‐14)        AEL I:  The Stela of Sehetpibre (the Loyalist); Hymns to Sesostris III        HAE, 108‐125    12    "Like a Cloud‐burst?"  The Hyksos Domination of Egypt (Dyn. 15‐17)      The "Champion" of Egypt:  the Rise of Thebes and the Establishment of the New        Kingdom (Early Dyn. 18)        AEL II:  Ahmose Son of Ebana        HAE, 126‐150    13    On to the Euphrates:  Thutmosis I and the Beginnings of International Hegemony      "Love the King or Die Immediately!" Power and Progaganda during the Reign of        Hatshepsut        AEL II:  Obelisk Inscription of Hatshepsut        HAE, 151‐183    14    The Great Chief:  the First "Pharaoh"‐Thutmosis III      "The Dazzling Disk of the Sun":  Amenophis III and the Age of International Stabilty      "The One God, the Only God, Besides Whom There is No Other":  the Imperial Politics of       Monotheism        AEL II:  The Annals of Thutmosis III; the Poetical Stela; Stela of Amenhotep III;        Stela of Bek and Suty        HAE, 184‐206    15    "The Horizon of the Sun":  Akhenaten, Nefertiti, and the Amarna Revolution      "The Gods Turned Their Backs on the Land":  Reaction to Amarna        AEL II:  The Great Hymn to the Aton; the Boundary Stelae; The Destruction of         Mankind 

(6)

  16    The Trials and Tribulations of Ramesses‐Not‐so‐Great (Dyn. 19)      Lost Raiders of Arks:  The Problem of the Peoples of the Sea      Assassinations, Tomb‐robberies, Inflation, and Strikes:  The Waning of the Ramessides      The Setting of the Golden Sun and an Iron Dawn:  The Decline of the New Kingdom (Dyn.      19‐20)        AEL II:  The Battle of Kadesh; the Israel Stela; The Scribal Miscellanies; the         Prayers of Penitence        HAE, 213‐239; 240‐259    FINAL EXAM 

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :