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Faculty of Health and Human Sciences

School of Health Professions

MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-Registration)

Post Graduate Diploma Occupational

Therapy (Pre-registration)

Full-time and part-time pathway

Leading to eligibility to apply for registration with the

Health and Care Professions Council

Programme Handbook 2015-16

(Approved 2013)

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 2 If you require any part of this publication in larger print, or an alternative

format, please contact Programme Administration at:-

Faculty of Health and Human Sciences Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road

Plymouth PL6 8BH

Telephone number: 01752 588800

Faculty of Health and Human Sciences Plymouth University

Room 101

Nancy Astor Building Drake Circus

Plymouth PL4 8AA

Faculty of Health and Human Sciences Plymouth University

Knowledge Spa

Royal Cornwall Hospital Truro

TR1 3HD

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 3 Special Needs Notice

Dear Student

Important: please note

If you have a disability

The University is very supportive of students with disabilities, and year–on-year we are making adjustments to assist students with special needs. It may be that we have already put in place changes which will assist you – but unless we know what your needs might be, we cannot guarantee that that will be the case. If we can identify your needs sufficiently far in advance of when you intend to start a programme at the University, we are better able to put in place appropriate arrangements – or, if there is a health and safety issue or an issue about the expectations of students on the programme, to advise you on alternative options. However, we may not be able to do so if we do not know in advance.

If you have not told us about your disability

Please do contact the University’s Disability Assist Services on Plymouth 01752 582278 to discuss your needs. While we are making reasonable adjustments to our provision, we may not be able to meet your individual needs if we do not have the opportunity to assess them in advance, and that could impact negatively on your experience on the programme or even your ability to take up your place.

If you have told us about your disability

You may be asked for additional information or invited to attend an interview with Disability Assist Services. This is in order that we can properly assess your

individual needs and ensure that we have the best possible chance of meeting them. Please do provide any information requested and come in to see staff if asked to do so, since otherwise you – and we - could find ourselves in a position in which it is difficult or even unsafe for you to take up your place.

So please tell us about any disability – even if you do not think it will affect you while you are at the University – and respond positively to any requests for further details or for an information interview. If you do not do so, you may find yourself unable to take up your place or unable to complete the programme because we have not been able adequately to meet your needs.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 5

Contents

Special Needs Notice ... 3

Disclaimer ... 7

Useful information ... 8

Welcome and Introduction ... 10

Welcome to the Occupational Therapy Programme ... 12

Definition of Occupational Therapy and its changing applications ... 13

1. Information about the Programme ... 14

1.1 Award Title ... 14

1.2 Regulations ... 14

1.3 Exceptions to the Regulations ... 15

1.4 Key Contacts ... 15

2. Entry Requirements ... 18

2.1 Requirements for entry into the MSc Occupational Therapy registration) and Post Graduate Diploma Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) ... 18

2.2 Stepping on and off points in the Programme ... 22

3. Programme Overview ... 24

3.1 Aim ... 24

3.2 Learning Outcomes ... 25

3.3 Award Requirements ... 28

3.4 Programme Structure (Professional and Inter-Professional) ... 28

3.5 Learning, Teaching and Assessment ... 35

3.6 The Learning Environment (Campus and Practice Placements) ... 43

3.7 Modes of Learning ... 43

3.8 Career Development ... 49

3.9 Reference Points ... 50

4. Programme Policies and Guidelines ... 51

4.1 Programme Attendance and Responsibilities of Students ... 51

4.2 Incidents in the Practice Area ... 54

4.3 Accident Forms ... 54

4.4 Guidelines for dealing with unsafe practice/inappropriate professional behaviour ... 55

4.5 Withdrawing from your programme ... 55

4.6 Returning to your Programme after an Interruption ... 55

4.7 Pastoral and Counselling Services ... 56

4.8 Financial Support ... 57

4.9 Fitness to Practise Regulations ... 58

4.10 Health and Good Character ... 58

4.11 Travel Insurance ... 58

4.12 Student Safety ... 58

4.13 Uniform Policy... 58

4.14 Smoking Policy ... 59

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 6

4.16 Jury Service ... 60

4.17 Equal Opportunities ... 60

4.18 Responsibilities of Students ... 61

4.19 Employment Law Statement ... 61

5. Student Involvement ... 62

5.1 Student Representatives ... 62

5.2 Student Role on Programme Committees ... 63

5.3 Student Feedback and Evaluation ... 63

5.5 Plymouth Award ... 64

Appendices ... 65

Appendix One – Definitive Module Records ... 66

Appendix Two – Occupational Health Information ... 113

Appendix Three – Student Screening Standards ... 119

Appendix Four - Guidelines for Students as Lone Workers ... 121

Appendix Five – Assessment Guidelines ... 127

Appendix Six – IT information sheet for students ... 133

Appendix Seven – Consent to participate in activities ... 135

Feedback on the Student Programme Handbook ... 138

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 7 Disclaimer

Please note:

All students undertaking programmes delivered by the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences are reminded that any alteration to University documentation, including practice portfolios, involving forgery/falsification of a mentor’s

comments or signature/initialling will be investigated. This investigation could lead to disciplinary action, which may lead to a student being unable to

achieve professional registration.

All the information in this handbook is correct at the time of publication. Programmes are regularly reviewed and updated so details may change. Occasionally, a module listed in the Handbook may be replaced or withdrawn. Plymouth University is proud of its teaching and research and it undertakes all reasonable steps to provide educational services in the manner set out in this handbook and in any documents referred to within it. It does not, however, guarantee the provision of such services. Should industrial action or

circumstances beyond the control of the University interfere with its ability to provide educational services, the University undertakes to use all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to those services.

Update of Records (Criminal Records/Disclosure and Barring Service and Occupational Health)

A satisfactory enhanced Criminal Records check through the Disclosure and Barring service (DBS) is required to enter the MSc and Post Graduate Diploma Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) (see entry requirements).

Students will be asked each year to declare if their criminal/health status has changed as this may jeopardise their ability to undertake the practical elements of the programme and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). All students must also immediately inform Plymouth University of any changes to their criminal/health status that occur throughout the academic year.

You must keep your copy of the DBS report as you may be requested to provide this when in placement.

Mandatory Training

In order to comply with the requirements and standards of the University and placement providers, all students on this programme are required to undertake mandatory training provided by the University at the commencement of each year and/ or at other times during the year prior to practice placements. Mandatory

training includes: Moving and Handling, CPR, Fire Safety, Infection Control, Equality and Diversity, and Mental Capacity Act regulations. A record is kept of students’ attendance. Students who do not have a record of attendance for mandatory training might be refused the opportunity to go on their practice placements.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 8 Useful information

University Registration Number

Personal Tutor Name:

Office: PAHC

Telephone:

Office Hours:

Programme Administration office Reception Room FF02

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road

Derriford Plymouth PL6 8BH

Telephone: 01752 588800

Office Hours: 09.00-16.00 for students

Programme Leader Name: Rosi Raine

Office: PAHC SF27

Telephone: 01752 587591

Email : Rosi.Raine@plymouth.ac.uk

Senior Management representative Plymouth site

Name: Lyn Westcott

Office: PAHC SF16

Telephone: 01752 588819

E mail: Lyn.Westcott@plymouth.ac.uk

Plymouth University Library contact numbers, email and opening hours

Telephone: 01752 588588 (General Enquiries)

Email: subjectlibrarian@plymouth.ac.uk

Opening hours: 24 hr

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 9 Computing Services contact

number and opening hours

Telephone: 01752 588900

Opening hours: Health and Welfare Services

Student Counselling

Occupational Health

Disability Assist, 3 Portland Mews

Learning Development and Careers Service

Financial Help

The Anytime Advice Line (24/7)

01752 587701 01392 405800 01752 587676 01752 587456 01752 587680 0800 042 0134 assistance@workplaceoptions.com

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 10 Welcome and Introduction

Dear Occupational Therapy Student

I am delighted to welcome you to Plymouth University, the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, and to the School of Health Professions. I hope that you will enjoy the Occupational Therapy programme, gain a strong knowledge base and secure valuable practice experience to prepare you for the role of an autonomous

practitioner at the point of registration as an Occupational Therapist. The School of Health Professions is committed to inter-professional collaboration in both education and practice. Within your programme of study, you will learn alongside students from other Health and Social Care Professions, including Dietetics, Optometry, Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Operating Department Practitioners and Paramedicine.

Academic staff from the School are all professionally qualified and registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (or relevant registering body). In addition to developing your learning and knowledge, the academic staff will also develop your professional understanding so that you are ready to make a valuable contribution to your chosen profession when you graduate. The School of Health Professions has a faculty-leading record in delivering a high-quality educational experience, as

evidenced by recent student surveys. Many of the academic staff are involved in cutting-edge research which not only benefits practice but informs our teaching with current and innovative knowledge. We hope to see graduates from this programme returning to the School for further postgraduate studies in one of our PhD

programmes at some point in the future.

This handbook provides specific information about the organisation, assessment and module information that is specific to the MSc and PG Dip Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) full-time and part-time programmes that you are studying. It

complements the general student handbook which provides wider information about the University’s regulations and policies and should be retained for future reference. In particular, it outlines what is expected of you in order to enjoy and successfully complete the programmes. Please read it carefully, and feel free to seek clarification on any points that you wish. Plymouth University will provide you with a student handbook. Professional booklets from the College of Occupational Therapists and the Health and Care Professions Council pertinent to you, as a student occupational therapist, will also be provided during the induction to the programme. In addition to this programme handbook you will receive a handbook for each module you

undertake which will provide specific information relating to learning outcomes, assessment and delivery of the module.

I look forward to meeting you in person during the initial weeks of your course, but in the meantime the only advice I would offer is that you take full advantage of the facilities and learning environment that we endeavour to provide and that you

approach your studies with a positive attitude and an open, enquiring mind. Most of all, I hope your time with us is profitable, enjoyable and memorable.

Professor Graham Sewell Head of School

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 11 Dear Occupational Therapy Student

As the Academic Lead for Occupational Therapy here at Plymouth University, I would like to add my welcome to you as you begin your programme of study. Thank you for choosing to study here at Plymouth. As the largest provider of

occupational therapy education in the South West, we are very proud of what we do. The course that you have joined in fact began back at St Loye’s Foundation, Exeter in 1944 and was amongst the first 5 places in the UK to offer occupational therapy. We therefore have a long tradition of working to help people become occupational therapists. We are very pleased to be part of a vibrant School of Health Professions in a dynamic learning environment, and hope you will appreciate both the curriculum you have chosen to study and the resources we have to help you learn here.

The staff here not only have a wealth of experience to share with you during your study, but also enjoy good standing in the profession that you have chosen to join. Staff have joined the team from a wide range of practice areas and many retain a practice role both in statutory services, independent practice and third sector

organisations. Other staff have national and international roles in maintaining quality education for wider numbers of students at Plymouth, or in other universities in the UK and overseas – for example as critical experts at other universities or external examiners. Other staff are active members of what will become your professional bodies.

We are all committed to providing you a quality education in occupational therapy and want you enjoy your time here. We hope that you will learn to your best ability and become proud of your chosen profession.

Do come and see us if you have any queries – we will try our best to help you. I look forward to working with you on your journey towards gaining your degree in occupational therapy.

Lyn Westcott

Associate Professor and Academic Lead in Occupational Therapy Plymouth University

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 12 Welcome to the Occupational Therapy Programme Team

We also bring you a warm welcome from the teaching and programme

administration staff of the Occupational Therapy programmes. We are delighted that you have chosen to study for your intended career at Plymouth University, and we look forward to getting to know you.

The MSc and PG Dip Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programmes are an exciting new development building on the expertise of the team and our longstanding commitment to both undergraduate and postgraduate Occupational Therapy

education. These programmes have been designed to enable you to become a highly skilled and valued member of the occupational therapy profession. We know that you will have to work hard, but we also want you to enjoy your learning and time as a student. If you have any concerns or difficulties, please let us know, so that appropriate ways of resolving them can be explored with you.

Plymouth is a great city to live and to work in, with sand; sea and moors within easy reach. There are lots of things to do in the area, so we hope you will be able to develop your social life and make new friends in addition to developing your professional, academic and personal skills.

Good luck with your studies, and we hope you enjoy the experience of being a student occupational therapist.

Rosi Raine

Programme Lead for MSc & PG Dip (pre-registration) Occupational Therapy; on behalf of all the Teaching Staff & Programme Administration Staff for the Occupational Therapy Programmes.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 13 Definition of Occupational Therapy and its changing applications

You will find lots of definitions of occupational therapy in a range of texts. Here are brief summaries to help orientate you to some of our central principles from the College of Occupational Therapists’ curriculum guidance for pre-registration education (COT, 2009) and the World Federation of Occupational Therapy:

Occupational therapy is a client-centered health profession concerned with promoting health and well-being through occupation. The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. Occupational therapists achieve this outcome by working with people and communities to enhance their ability to engage in the occupations they want to, need to, or are

expected to do, or by modifying the occupation or the environment to better support their occupational engagement.

Occupational therapists have a broad education in the medical, social behavioural, psychological, psychosocial and occupational sciences which equips them with the attitudes, skills and knowledge to work collaboratively with people, individually or in groups or communities. Occupational therapists can work with all people, including those who have an impairment of body structure or function owing to a health condition, or who are restricted in their participation or who are socially excluded owing to their membership of social or cultural minority groups.

Occupational therapists believe that participation can be supported or restricted by the physical, affective or cognitive abilities of the individual, the characteristics of the occupation, or the physical, social, cultural, attitudinal and legislative environments. Therefore, occupational therapy practice is focused on enabling individuals to change aspects of their person, the occupation, the environment, or some combination of these to enhance occupational participation.

Occupational therapy is practised in a wide range of public, private and voluntary sector settings, such as, the person's home environment; schools; workplaces; health centres; supported accommodation; housing for seniors; rehabilitation centres; hospitals; and forensic services. Clients are actively involved in the occupational therapy process. The outcomes are client-driven and diverse and measured in terms of participation, satisfaction derived from occupational participation and / or improvement in occupational performance (WFOT, 2012).

Occupational therapists view people as occupational beings. People are intrinsically active and creative, needing to engage in a balanced range of activities in their daily lives in order to maintain health and wellbeing. People shape, and are shaped by, their experiences and interactions with their environments. They create identity and meaning through what they do and have the capacity to transform themselves through premeditated and autonomous action. The purpose of occupational therapy is to enable people to fulfil, or to work towards fulfilling, their potential as occupational beings. Occupational therapists promote function, quality of life and the realisation of potential in people who are experiencing occupational deprivation, imbalance or alienation. They believe that activity can be an effective medium for remediating dysfunction, facilitating adaptation and recreating identity.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 14

1.

Information about the Programme

1.1 Award Title

Successful completion of the programme leads to the award of:

MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration)

Post Graduate Diploma Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration)

These are academic qualifications, which will enable you to be eligible to apply for registration to practice. Conferment of the degree will entitle graduates to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. Intermediate awards may be given to candidates who exit the programme earlier, although these do not confer eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council, please see the diagram below.

These programmes are accredited by: Plymouth University; Pre-Registration Education and Training Working Group; College of Occupational Therapists and the Health and Care Professions Council.

1.2 Regulations

The Occupational Therapy programmes are governed by University Regulations, which you may refer to at any time during your programme of study. These regulations are updated on a regular basis and are therefore kept centrally at the following website under rules and regulations:

www.plymouth.ac.uk/studenthandbook  Assessment Regulations

 Complaints  Appeals

 Examination and Assessment Offences

 Regulations on Late Coursework and Extenuating Circumstances  Repeat with attendance

In addition to academic regulations, students on health professional programmes of study, including occupational therapy are also subject to codes of professional behaviour. These relate to the honesty, integrity and professional behaviour expected of you when you become a registered occupational therapist. A breach of an academic regulation may therefore have more serious consequences for you as a student on this programme as it could affect your future registration.

Extenuating Circumstances

Please note that in accordance with Plymouth University Regulations on Late Coursework and Extenuating Circumstances, the ability to submit late coursework will NOT apply to the resit period for which an absolute deadline is already

established, nor will it apply to any other deadline date for marks immediately prior to the Subject Assessment Panels and Award Assessment Boards.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 15 1.3 Exceptions to the Regulations

These post-graduate degrees may NOT be awarded unless all the requirements for the Award are met. Should they not be met, then the appropriate CATS award or interim exit award may be given. The normal University Regulations in respect of progression and assessment are followed, with specific exceptions*, due to the structure and professional nature of the programme, as detailed below

PLEASE NOTE CAREFULLY:

(a) The maximum duration of study for the award of MSc Occupational

Therapy Pre-registration will be four years for accelerated full time study or six years for part time study.

(b) The programme is exempt from the automatic compensation rule (c) There is no compensation between modules at any level

(d) All modules must be passed with a minimum mark of 50% overall

(e) The College of Occupational Therapists stipulate that normally 1000 hours of practice placement must be recorded.

(f) Failure in Practice: If the module is ultimately failed when the first attempt and retrieval processes for the modules have been exhausted, the student should be required to leave the course. A student may be denied the retrieval if the failure originally occurred on grounds of professional unsuitability. Practice placement hours of failed placements do not count towards the 1000 hours. Normally one placement is required to be passed at the first attempt; otherwise the student would be required to leave the course.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 16 Key Contacts

Name, phone and email Role Address

Professor Graham Sewell Tel. No. 01752 588817

graham.sewell@plymouth.ac.uk

Head of School of Health Professions

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Bernhard Haas

Tel. No. 01752 588800 bhaas@plymouth.ac.uk

Deputy Head of School Learning and Teaching

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Lyn Westcott

Tel No: 01752 588819

lyn.westcott@plymouth.ac.uk

Associate Professor & Professional Lead for OT

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Michelle Leeson Tel. No. 01752 56965 michelle.leeson@plymouth.ac.uk Programme Administrator Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Rosi Raine Tel. No. 01752 587591 rosi.raine@plymouth.ac.uk MSc & PGDip OT Programme Lead Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH

Occupational Therapy and other staff (alphabetically)

Address details and telephone numbers for Programme Administration offices can be found on page 2 of this handbook. Please see module handbooks for additional staff.

Pete Allum 01752 586505

peter.allum@plymouth.ac.uk

Programme Lead for Paramedicine

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Katrina Bannigan

Tel. No: 01752 588800

Katrina.bannigan@plymouth.ac.u k

OT Lecturer Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Rd. Plymouth PL6 8BH Miranda Cunningham

Tel no: 01752 588810

Miranda.cunningham@plymouth. ac.uk

OT Lecturer Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Rd. Plymouth PL6 8BH Patricia Eyres

Tel. No: 01752 587589

Patricia.Eyres@plymouth.ac.uk

BSc (Hons) OT Programme Lead & OT Lecturer

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Fiona Fraser Tel. No: 01752 588800 Fiona.Fraser@plymouth.ac.uk OT Lecturer Placement Lead Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Tanja Krizaj

Tel. No: 01752 588800 Tanja.Krizaj@plymouth.ac.uk

OT Lecturer Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Miriam McMullan

Tel. No: 01752 588829

miriam.mcmullan@pymouth.ac.uk

Lecturer, Podiatry Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Susan Mitchell

Tel. No: 01752 588800

Susan.Mitchell@plymouth.ac.uk

OT Lecturer Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 17 Dr Joanne Paton Tel.No. 01752 588845 Joanne.paton@plymouth.ac.uk Lecturer Podiatry Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Anne Roberts

Tel.No. 01752 588806

anne.roberts@plymouth.ac.uk

Associate Professor & Programme Lead Advanced Practice

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Mike Sheaff

Tel. No. 01752 583289 msheaff@plymouth.ac.uk

Sociology Lecturer School of Sociology, Politics and Law

Plymouth University Portland Villas

Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA Marnie Smith

Tel no: 01752 588823

Marnie.smith@plymouth.ac.uk

OT Lecturer Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Anita Slade Tel. No: 01752 588814 Anita.slade@plymouth.ac.uk OT Lecturer APP OT Programme Lead Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Bex Twinley

Tel. No: 01752 587586

rebecca.twinley@plymouth.ac.uk

OT Lecturer Faculty of Health and Human Sciences,

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Alison Warren

Tel. No: 01752 588800

Alison.warren@plymouth.ac.uk

OT Lecturer Faculty of Health and Human Sciences,

Plymouth University

Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road, Plymouth PL6 8BH

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 18

2.

Entry Requirements

2.1 Requirements for entry into the MSc and PG Dip Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programmes

Equal opportunity

It is Plymouth University policy that applications are considered on an equal basis irrespective of age, disability, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, religion, social class, nationality or ethnic origin. The occupational therapy programme complies with this as part of their professional approach and upholding the ethical values of the team. When selecting students, the team is interested only in whether an applicant has the potential to complete professional occupational therapy

education and be potentially fit for practice and award.

Applicants who have not been educated in the UK or those for whom English is not their first language will be required to undertake a recognised English language qualification which must include reading, writing, speaking and listening skills, for example the British Council /UCLES IELTS with a score of 7 or above (preference will be given to applicants with a threshold score of 7 for all levels). Applicants undertaking the TOEFL internet based test must score a minimum of 100 and those taking the TOEFL Paper Test must score a minimum of 600.

Candidates must meet the following minimum academic requirements:

Standard Criteria

A degree from an Institution of Higher Education at Second class (higher division) 2:1 or above. The degree or other recognised assessed academic study should normally be completed within the last 5 years. Whilst graduates from the fullest range of disciplines will be considered, preference will be given to degrees with a research dissertation module based on a data collection method.

In addition GCSE (or equivalent) in English and Mathematics at grade C or above, will normally be expected.

Higher Education awards may entitle the candidate to apply to Plymouth University’s consideration under their rigorous APEL procedures.

Credit for certificated prior learning may count towards the requirements for this award up to the following maxima

:

Postgraduate Certificate 30 credits, Postgraduate Diploma 80 credits, Masters degree 120 credits

European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS)

This programme is equivalent to 90 ECTS credits (second cycle) with 30 ECTS credits at post graduate certificate, 60 credits at postgraduate diploma and 90 credits at Masters degree. Each 10 credit module has the equivalent of 5 ECTS credits and assumes a notional student effort of between 100-150 hours.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 19 Conditions of Acceptance

 To meet the academic requirements of the programme

 To successfully complete an interview with the Occupational Therapy team  A satisfactory enhanced Criminal Records check through the Disclosure and

Barring service (DBS).

 To undertake Occupational Health screening and to abide by their decisions  To agree in writing to be able to undertake practice placements across the

Southwest and agree to undertake placements allocated. Students are responsible for travel and accommodation arrangements and expenses that arise.

 To sign an agreement to participate in all elements of the programme this will include anatomy practical sessions, self development activities such as creative media, moving and handling training. The University undertakes to ensure that these activities are offered in culturally sensitive way that is respectful of all students and their beliefs. Students may wish to discuss issues arising from this policy with the Programme Lead so that a way forward can be managed that is mindful of their circumstances.

Subsequent to DBS enhanced check on entry to study, students are required to sign an annual declaration at the beginning of each academic year to state that their DBS status has remained unchanged. This is kept on student file.

After extended periods of illness that interrupt study, students may be required by the Programme Lead to participate in Occupational Health Screening prior to re-commencing academic or practice placement elements of the programme.

Selection Procedure

On receipt of the UCAS form, the admissions team assesses the applicant’s achieved or predicted qualifications against the criteria set out above, and, if these are met, the application is passed to an admissions tutor who is a member of the academic team. The admissions tutor assesses and selects students based on the personal statement and reference of all applications against a set of predetermined criteria appropriate for a professional programme in occupational therapy.

Applicants will also normally be invited for interview with the Occupational Therapy staff team - they may be asked to prepare oral or written presentation materials as part of this and also to bring evidence of continuing professional development (CPD) with them. The purpose of the interview will be to assess the applicant's understanding and experience of Occupational Therapy and the demands of the programme.

Offers are made subject to satisfactorily clearance of Occupational Health and Enhanced Criminal Records check through the Disclosure and Barring service (DBS). For those situations where a disclosure is reported via the enhanced DBS check the case is discussed by a Professional Issues committee within the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences. Each case is discussed confidentially and a decision made as to whether the application can continue. The applicant is informed of the decision and may be invited to provide information to this committee should they wish. In these cases consideration will have to be made regarding potential employability and eligibility for registration with the Health and Care Professions

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 20 Council. The University reserves the right to pass on appropriate information to potential employers when a reference is requested.

Applicants with Special Needs

The University is supportive of students with disabilities. Applicants are encouraged to disclose any disability so that appropriate adjustments can be made in learning support and their individual needs met. A comprehensive procedure is in place involving Disability Assist Services, the Admissions Team and the admissions tutor to ensure that all applicants are treated equitably.

MSc Applicants with Post Graduate Diplomas in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration)

It may be that the programme attracts holders of a Post Graduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) wanting to ‘top up’ their Diploma award to a full MSc. This is possible, although individual circumstances would have to examined to see if these applicants have currency from a research proposal submitted in that award equivalent to the demands of the proposal completed for module ADV 715 (Project Design for research). This proposal would need to be able to be worked onto a suitable project for OCTP710 (Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M). If the applicant could not offer a suitable research proposal, then they may need to complete the ADV715 module in order to be able to start and complete the OCTP710 module. Here the MSc award would be in Health & Wellness Through Occupation.

The Awards and Flexible Study Considerations

The proposed programme will offer exit awards of Master’s degree in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) with an option for a Post Graduate Diploma in

Occupational Therapy (pre-registration). Only these exit awards will entitle post graduates to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. A number of other exit awards will be offered that do not offer this entitlement

Subject to successful completion of programme requirements, full time students will normally graduate with an MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) after 2 years of full time accelerated study (45 scheduled weeks a year). Post graduates

completing this route will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Part time students will normally graduate after 4 years of part time study scheduled during the 45 week academic year to be awarded the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration).

The programme (both full time and part time pathway) will also offer a range of interim exit awards for candidates who are not able to complete the entire MSc curriculum. Most exit awards will not carry a title conferring eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (see Figure 10.1 below). As such, these awards are typically designed for students who either do not

complete the study requirements to gain a pre-registration award or for students who complete necessary academic credits but do not pass placement modules. The exception to this will be a Post Graduate Diploma award in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration), as people awarded this particular Post Graduate Diploma will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. This level of award is given only to candidates who satisfy all placement standards of the

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 21 pre-registration curriculum and the required 120 academic credits outlined in Figure 10.1 below. These 120 credits must exclude OCTP710 (Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M).

Holders of a Post Graduate Diploma award in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration), are able to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council, and can also choose to ‘top up’ their Post Graduate Diploma award to a full MSc at a later date with Plymouth University. For this group under Plymouth University regulation, the award holder would receive two certificates. Here the MSc award will be in Health and Wellness Through Occupation and would stand alongside the previous award of Post Graduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration). This means these MSc graduates will retain the Diploma award and paper certificate that they have used to gain their Health and Care Professions Council registration but will gain a different MSc name to both the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) and the MSc Advanced Practitioner Occupational Therapy, that is also given by the School to registered practitioners who come onto the MSc Advanced Practitioner scheme. It may be that there may be applicants who chose to top up their post graduate diploma (pre-registration) from other programmes in the UK or after completing the ADV715 assessment option without submitting a proposal in order to achieve a full MSc from Plymouth University. Here determination would have to be made about whether the candidate needed to also sit ADV715 before being able to move onto OCTP710 (see Section 9 for details).Such candidates would be awarded the MSc award in Health & Wellness Through Occupation.

Students may be awarded a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma with Merit provided that s/he has achieved a credit-weighted average mark of 60% or above across all the academic modules. A student will be awarded a Masters degree with Merit provided that s/he has achieved a credit-weighted average mark of 60% or above across all academic modules (including the dissertation/major project) and the mark for the dissertation/major project is not less than 60%. Likewise a student may be given an exit award with Distinction if the overall mark for academic modules is above 70%.

Different entry points to these programmes are not widely envisaged due to the integrated nature of the curriculum, students are not generally foreseen as applying for Plymouth University’s APEL procedures. If any post graduate student considers that they have appropriate prior higher level study to be subject to APEL from a particular module, this will be considered according to Plymouth University regulation. This may be from students wishing to transfer from another similar programme elsewhere in the UK. (See Section 9 for details).

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 22 2.2 Stepping on and off points in the Programme

Students may under certain circumstances interrupt or step off the programme on completion of a year’s modules. Students who have stepped off the programme at the end of year 1 may be eligible to return at an educationally appropriate stage provided that it allows for completion within a four year period from date of

commencement (accelerated students) and six year period (part time students). Re - entry will be subject to contractual arrangements, numbers already within the

programme and also subject to pre entry health screening, satisfactory disclosure of Criminal Records through the Disclosure and Barring service (DBS) and review by the Programme Leader.

The programme offers a range of interim exit awards for candidates that are not able to complete the whole pre-registration curriculum or choose to study discrete

elements of the programmes. A summary of typical step on and step off points is shown on the diagram overleaf.

Exit awards given with less than 120 credits at level 7, irrespective of placement passes, do not confer eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council. Applicants who gain 120 or more credits (but less than 180 credits), with a study profile that includes a pass for OCTP710 (Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M at 60 credits), irrespective of their placement passes, cannot be considered for the Post Graduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy (pre-registration). This is because they will not have passed the academic programme for the pre-registration award; instead they will be awarded a Post Graduate Diploma in Applied Health Studies. They would not be able to apply for registration with HCPC.

Aegrotat Awards

In addition the Plymouth University may award an Aegrotat award to students enrolled on the MSc programme in exceptional circumstances. Any such award will not carry the title of Occupational Therapy and not confer eligibility to apply for registration on the Health and Care Professions Council register; the award title will be in Applied Health Studies.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 23

MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration) Stepping on and off points including interim awards

Less than 60 credits Level 7 A transcript of academic achievement for CATS purposes will be issued

Post Graduate Certificate in Applied Health Studies

60 credits Level 7 More than 60 credits

but less than 120 credits Level 7

A transcript of academic achievement for CATS purposes will be issued in addition to the Post Graduate

certificate

120 credits Level 7 but not passed all placements

in the curriculum or 120 credits include OCTP710

Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M

Post Graduate Diploma in Applied Health Studies

More than 120 credits but less than 180 credits

Level 7

A transcript of academic achievement for CATS purposes will be issued in addition to the Post Graduate

Diploma

120 credits Level 7 & passed all placements in

curriculum – 120 credits excludes OCTP710 Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M

180 credits Level 7 but not passed all placements

in the curriculum

Post Graduate Diplomain Occupational Therapy

(Pre-registration)

MSc Applied Health Studies

180 credits Level 7 & passes at all placements in

curriculum

MSc in Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration)

Holders of Post Grad Diploma Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) can study additional 60 credits at a later date to gain an MSc Health & Wellness Through Occupation award

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 24

3.

Programme Overview

The programme design has been informed by the following external and internal reference points:

External

 Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Education and Training 2012

 Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency 2012

 Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics 2012

 The College of Occupational Therapists Pre-registration Education Standards 2008

 The College of Occupational Therapists Curriculum Framework for Pre-Registration Education 2004

 The College of Occupational Therapists Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct for Occupational Therapists 2010

 Quality Assurance Agency Higher Education (QAA) Subject Benchmark Statements for Occupational Therapy 2001

 The NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework and Development Review 2003  European Network for Occupational Therapy Education Curriculum

Framework 2000

Internal

 Plymouth University Strategic Plan 2009 - 2012

 Plymouth University Teaching and Learning Strategy 2004

 Faculty of Healthand Human Sciences Teaching and Learning Strategy.  Skills Plus Policy 2007

 Plymouth University Sustainability Policy 2007. 3.1 Programme Aims

People are viewed as being driven to engage in occupation, in order to meet their biological, psychological, social and spiritual needs through environmental

exploration and adaptation. Occupational therapy uses the deceptively simple

concept of purposeful occupation to help promote and restore health and well being, thus enhancing occupational function. Occupation is a concept seen as having personal meaning to each individual and relevance to the reality of their daily lives.

The programme aims are to develop practitioners who are:

 Confident in articulating their knowledge and understanding of people as occupational beings

 Able to critically evaluate the importance of occupational engagement throughout the changing needs of the life cycle and work with this for the benefit of each individual

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 25  Highly skilled, reflective and confident in their understanding of the philosophy of

the profession, the relevant sciences that guide practice and the creative reflexivity for effecting necessary change

 Articulate and self assured in their professional identity as critical, analytical reflective lifelong learners.

 Highly proficient in synthesising the reflection on practice experience to theory, with in depth and critical understanding of contemporary professional issues.  Fit for purpose, practice and award thus meeting the requirement to be eligible to

apply for entry to the Health and Care Profession Council’s register for Occupational Therapists. They will also be recognised as having sufficient professional standing to meet the requirements of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists through accreditation of the curriculum with the College of Occupational Therapists.

3.2 Learning Outcomes

The programme outcomes are consistent with the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) occupational therapy benchmark statements. The programme provides opportunities for students to meet learning outcomes in the following areas:

A. Knowledge and understanding B. Cognitive / intellectual skills

C. Practical / professional qualities and skills D. Transferable skills

Learning Outcomes of the Programme

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, intellectual, practical and key transferable skills in the following areas:

A. Knowledge and understanding of: 1. The nature of occupation; it’s

importance to individuals within their life and culture

2. The links between participation in occupation, health and wellbeing 3. Belief in the use of occupation as a

tool for intervention 4. Through problem solving,

implementing and evaluating the occupational therapy process

5. The legislative and ethical aspects of occupational therapy

6. Techniques and methods of

intervention based on an evidence base

7. The normal structure and function of

Teaching/ learning methods and strategies

The programmes utilise a variety of learning and teaching methods.

Knowledge is gained through lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations, critique of research papers and guided study. Tutorials are used to provide students with opportunities to develop and clarify their understanding. All learning is supported by directed study of textbooks, journal articles (hard copy or electronic) and other online

resources. The research evidence available to occupational therapists is emphasised throughout the programme. Inter professional learning takes place

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 26 the human body and the effects of

pathology

8. Human behaviour, development and maturation across the life span 9. The importance of effective

communication in a professional context

10. The evolving political background of health and social care

11. The role of CPD in professional practice

across the programme in order to highlight the importance of effective teamwork in professional practice. Assessment

A variety of assessment methods are used to assess knowledge and

understanding, for example – essays, viva voces, group projects, poster presentations and practice placements are utilised to assess the knowledge, practical skills and understanding of the student. Formative and Summative assessments are used to help students to develop confidence in the

assessment process. Clear criteria are provided for all assessments in the module handbook.

B. Cognitive/ intellectual skills – able to:

1. Analyse and critically evaluate the importance of meaningful occupation in contributing to an individual’s sense of health and well being

2. Demonstrate ability to analyse and solve occupational

performance problems 3. Evaluate contemporary

occupational themes, current discourses and future directions 4. Demonstrate reflexivity in the

application of occupational therapy being sensitive to

individual and cultural boundaries 5. Demonstrate safe and competent

practice including self management

6. Prioritise responsibilities and caseload

7. Use self appraisal and reflection in order to identify future learning needs

8. Critically analyse research and incorporate research findings into practice

9. To construct a literature review and short report suitable for publication in a professional journal

Teaching/ learning methods and strategies

Reflective, analytical and critical skills are developed both in the academic and practice environment by seminars, tutorials and practicals. Lead lectures are used to identify key issues.

Sessions may be delivered by

University lecturers, outside specialists, carers or clients. The use of learning contracts and portfolios will enable students to take responsibility for their own learning. The inter-professional modules will encourage students to understand the range of roles in health and social care. Research skills will run throughout the programmes in order that students will be able to develop the intellectual skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.

Assessment

The assessment of cognitive skills is achieved by the use of individual project work, essays, practice placement

reports, viva voces and inter

professional assessments. Students will take responsibility for their own learning through the implementation of a research project with guidance from a research tutor. Inter professional group

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 27 learning will be assessed through presentations and the production of interactive online materials.

C. Practical/ professional qualities and skills – able to:

1. Demonstrate safe practice

through achieving a pass level of competency in each separate practice placement experience throughout the programme 2. Demonstrate understanding and

accountability of personal

boundaries and standards within professional practice and conduct 3. Demonstrate understanding of

appropriate delegation and accountability for professional tasks

4. Take responsibility for the

maintenance and development of professional competence and fitness for practice through lifelong learning and CPD 5. Demonstrate understanding of

the importance of engaging with the education of future

occupational therapists and other students and colleagues within the practice setting

6. Take responsibility for engaging and utilising the outcomes of research activity

7. Take responsibility for and work within the legal obligations of practice

Teaching/ learning methods and strategies

Practical and professional skills are key aspects of a professional programme and occur in all years in academic modules studied both at University and on practice placement modules with the link between them constantly

emphasised. One third of the programme is spent as practice placement in a range of health, social care and other settings across the south west peninsula. These will include

statutory and voluntary sector provision. Practice educators meet regularly with students as part of the supervision process to consider learning needs and placement objectives. Academic and Practice Educators maintain close links in order to help students integrate theory and practice throughout the curriculum.

The Practice Placement Educators across the Peninsula will be organising a range of inter-professional learning opportunities in the practice setting. Assessment

Professional skills and attributes are assessed in a range of ways including practical demonstrations, viva voces, and presentations and on practice placement through the practice

placement reports. Self appraisal and reflection are assessed through the CPD portfolio, essays and assignments. D. Transferable skills – students will

be expected to:

1. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills 2. Work effectively as a member of

a team

3. Accurately summarise information and convey

interpretations in a logical and

Teaching/ learning methods and strategies

Transferable skills are covered in a variety of modules and are developed through collaborative projects,

seminars, practicals and on practice placement. Interactive electronic resources and e learning materials are available through the University Portal

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 28 coherent manner

4. Engage in CPD and lifelong learning

5. Confidently engage with technology in order to deliver effective occupational therapy practice

6. Manage time and prioritise financial, physical and human resources to optimise

occupational therapy practice

 and VLE.

Assessment

Transferable skills are assessed in a variety of modules by essays, viva voce assessments, individual and group presentations and practice placement reports. Formative online assessments enable students to develop confidence in handling electronic resources

Transferable/key skills are generally incorporated within modules and related to relevant assessments as appropriate.

3.3 Award Requirements

On completion of all stages of the programme students will be conferred with an award from Plymouth University, MSc and PG Dip Occupational Therapy. You will then be eligible to apply to register with the Health and Care Professions Council.

3.4 Programme Structure

3.4.1 Overview of the Programme

The programme comprises theoretical, practice and therapeutic studies. The

academic base underpinning practice placement will be emphasised and integrated with practice placement throughout the programme. The programme structure also facilitates progressive development of key transferable skills. The programmes will be delivered as part of a philosophy that promotes continuing personal and

professional development.

Each year normally comprises of 45 weeks of study. To be eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council you are required to complete

successfully all campus based assessments together with completing a minimum of 1000 hours successfully assessed practice placement. Your learning and teaching will take place either in an inter-professional or Occupational Therapy specific group at the University or on practice placement.

Please see the Programme Page on Moodle for Key dates for students starting the 2015-16 academic year.

This programme is delivered in a framework of continuing personal and professional development utilising varied teaching and learning methods. Within the programme there will also be an expectation that you learn to manage your own learning. This aspect is further enhanced through practice placement learning strategies.

The table below provides module details and illustrates the pattern of teaching and learning which students will experience.

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 29 Table 1 Modules and Credits by Level

Module code

Module title Level Credits

OCTP401 Practice Placement 1 4 0

OCTP501 Practice Placement 2 5 0

OCTP601 Practice Placement 3 6 0

OCTP701 Preparation for Professional Practice M 7 10

OCTP702 Developing Self and Others 7 10

ADV703 Occupation as a focus of Contemporary Practice 7 20

OCTP704 Occupational Studies: Evaluating Occupation for Promoting Health & Wellness of Communities M

7 10

OCTP705 Occupational Studies: Evaluating Humans as Occupational Beings Through the Life Cycle M

7 10

OCTP706 Occupational Studies: Occupational Performance and Interruption M1

7 10

OCTP707 Occupational Studies: Occupational Performance and Interruption M2

7 10

OCTP708 Occupational Studies: Evaluating the Emergent Practitioner M

7 10

OCTP709 Occupational Studies: Foundations for Occupation & Well Being M

7 10

OCTP710 Occupational Studies: Research Dissertation M 7 60

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 30 3.4.2 Shared Learning and Inter-Professional Learning

When you qualify as an occupational therapist you will be working as part of a multi-professional team. Depending on the area in which you choose to work, the mix of colleagues working together will vary. In current health and social care practice, the importance of a multi-professional approach is emphasised because it means that client needs are better met if those professionals involved in their care are working not just alongside each other, but collaboratively and ‘inter-professionally’ as well.

As you are going to be working with other professions in the future, it makes sense for you to share some of your learning with students from other professions in preparation for when you are qualified. Shared learning takes place wherever the opportunity arises to develop understanding of practice where healthcare

professions work in an inter-disciplinary manner. This is in keeping with Government policy and is also an integral part of your professional development and final

qualification. You will be studying some shared curriculum with students from other programmes at Plymouth University including Business Studies, and other allied health professionals on the Integrated Masters Programme (post registration) and on occasion with the Social Work and Clinical Psychology programmes (Masters Level 7 & PhD level). You will also have some shared learning opportunities with our BSc students studying Occupational Therapy; and on occasion, Dietetics, Podiatry, Optometry, Operating Department Practitioners, Paramedics and Physiotherapy. This shared learning will differ depending on the educational need of your

programme but may involve sitting together with BSc(Hons) students in core learning events like lectures with the undergraduate occupational therapy students, before moving onto your own problem based learning tutorials, or sharing workshops and seminars to discuss issues with other post graduate learners. The strength of this programme is allowing you the opportunity to consider concepts alongside future colleagues and use information to forward your own learning at level 7.

There are two aspects of campus-based education and learning within the degree programme. These are multi-professional and inter-professional.

 Multi-professional education and learning is when you learn about particular subject areas you have in common together, rather than in separate

professional groups. The multi-professional approach should help you to understand and appreciate that there is a huge amount of underpinning foundation knowledge and skills shared by all health care professionals, and thus provide you with a common language with which to communicate with colleagues from other disciplines in the future. Multi-professional education: (may also be referred to as 'shared learning' or 'common learning'): Occasions when two or more professions learn side by side for whatever reason.

(CAIPE, 2005).

 Inter-professional education (IPE) and learning has an added dimension, and is about greater interaction to learn together, especially about each other’s roles and potential contribution to client care, and to health, social care, and education service provision. You will find that each part of the shared curriculum has aspects of both multi-professional and inter-professional learning. The exact definition of these terms is less important than the

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 31 the start of your future career. There will also be some opportunities for

shared learning in practice placements. However, the specific nature of these will depend on the type of placement you undertake.

 Barr (2002) states that the components of inter-professional education may be identified as:

“the application of principles of adult learning to interactive, group-based learning, which relates collaborative learning to collaborative practice within a coherent rationale which is informed by understanding of interpersonal, group, inter-group, organisational and inter-organisational relations and processes of professionalization.”

Programmes are encouraged to develop alternative ways of sharing learning

resources within their programmes and introducing IPE. However, sharing teaching, learning and resources does not constitute inter-professional education per se but does enhance across professional working and is therefore encouraged and valued. Inter-professional education enables students to collaborate across professions and exchange knowledge and/or develop new knowledge together to improve patient care (CIPW 2007, Recommendation 5). This means that IPE should aim to reflect current and future working practices. Through both the shared learning experience and placements the programmes within the faculty are constantly integrating and developing Inter-professional Education.

3.4.3 Programme Features

Detailed information concerning the module aims, the assessed learning outcomes and indicative syllabus content for each module is recorded on the definitive module record (DMR). Copies of the relevant DMRs are included with the module handbook for each module and are also given in Appendix 1 of this handbook.

Under Plymouth University regulation, the programme has been designed to accommodate a modular framework in accordance with the university’s credit accumulation systems. The modular format for academic study is structured within level 7, to total 180 credits (120 for those who opt out with a Post Graduate

Diploma). As this is a professional curriculum there are also 3 compulsory placement modules, assessed on a pass/fail basis at undergraduate level (one at level 4, one at level 5 and one at level 6) consisting of 29 weeks of practitioner assessed learning to achieve the 1000 hours required (WFOT 2002). Formal study begins at level 7 in year 1, with the placements integrated amongst the scheduling of the level 7 modules. See Tables 6.1, 6.2 and 6.3.

The programme enjoys shared learning experiences so that students on the MSc & PG Dip Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration) programmes join students from the BSc (Hons) programmes at the School of Health Professions, particularly those from occupational therapy, and students on the MSc Advanced Professional Practice in the School – again particularly in occupational therapy. This shared learning occurs throughout the curriculum and is a strength of the programme. It is designed to offer relevant pre-registration opportunities to engender appropriate knowledge and skills that can then be developed, discussed and assessed at a level appropriate to each student group. This design enables all occupational therapy students to work alongside colleagues from both pre-registration occupational therapy curricula, post

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MSc & PG Dip OT, Pre-reg Prog Hdbk 2015-16 Page 32 graduates that are registered practitioners as well as students from other

professions. This therefore develops pathway learning as well as inter-professional learning for the benefit of all student groups.

It is important to note that the delivery of this programme aims to meet Equality Act requirements in all aspects. Relevant information can be found on Plymouth

University website (see Programme Handbook).

Components of Programme Structure

The programme has been designed with columns of integrated modules that develop general themes. Although designed as a modular curriculum, learning is viewed as a dynamic and cumulative process, reflecting the lifelong learning skills required for registered practice. This means that students will be expected to recognise and use knowledge and skills from previous and concurrent learning in further developing their thinking and professional knowledge linked to occupational therapy. This approach is brought together in a spiral curriculum design, structured and designed for students to integrate their learning in order to further inform and develop their learning process (Westcott et al 2010). The structure also affords opportunities to learn alongside and together with different student groups in the School.

The sets of modules that form these programmes are:

Inter-professional learning in preparing for practice (OCTP701 & OCTP702) These modules are either offered alongside other pre-registration AHP students in the School or registered AHPs who enrol as Advanced Professional Practice MSc students. The modules thus offer different types of inter-professional learning by allowing the pre-registration MSc students to explore their role preparing for placement practice (term 1) or as potential leaders and managers in practice. The essence of this learning is the opportunity to discuss and debate issues with peers who are at different stages of their careers but share common learning needs. Both modules in this group offer an assessment opportunity that explores content in the context of pre-registration M level learning. In line with the concept of

inter-professional learning, students from the range of inter-professional groups participate actively with one another as an integral part of the educational process. Whilst sharing learning as students, understanding of the roles of other professional groups will be encouraged to inform future practice, alongside inter-professional working skills. This should also feed positively into other areas of the curriculum e.g. practice placement skills.

Occupational Studies (OCTP709, OCTP704, OCTP705, OCTP706, OCTP707,

OCTP708, ADV703)

A significant number of modules on this programme develop occupational thinking to inform profession specific reasoning and skills by examining topical occupational issues. These modules develop the core understanding of occupational theory, occupational science and skills that characterise the unique contribution of

occupational therapy practice within health, social care and third sector settings. The modules firstly examine theory and foundational concepts of occupation and

occupational functioning before moving onto applying occupational theory to people with occupational problems and within the local community. These modules are

Figure

Table 1 Modules and Credits by Level  Module

References

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