Program Report for the ADVANCED PREPARATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION EDUCATORS American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, & Dance/ National Association for Sport and Physical Education (AAHPERD/NASPE) NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF

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Program Report for the

ADVANCED PREPARATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION EDUCATORS American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, & Dance/

National Association for Sport and Physical Education (AAHPERD/NASPE)

NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION

C O V E R S H E E T

Institution Delta State University State Mississippi

Date submitted 9-11-06

Name of Preparer Milton R. Wilder

Phone # 662-846-4557 Email mwilder@deltastate.edu

Program documented in this report:

Name of institution’s program (s) M. Ed. major Physical Education Grade levels for which candidates are being prepared K-12

Degree or award level Master of Education

Is this program offered at more than one site? □ Yes ● No If yes, list the sites at which the program is offered

Title of the state license for which candidates are prepared

Program report status:

Initial Review

… Response to a Not Recognized Decision

… Response to National Recognition With Conditions

… Response to a Deferred Decision

State licensure requirement for national recognition:

NCATE requires 80% of the program completers who have taken the test to pass the applicable state licensure test for the content field, if the state has a testing requirement. Test information and data must be reported in Section III. Does your state require such a test?

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SECTION I-CONTEXT

1.Description of any state or institutional policies that may influence the application of SPA Standards.

The state and institutional policies that govern Delta State University and its educational programs reflect the unique role of the University as a regional university that “serves as an educational and cultural hub for the Mississippi Delta” (DSU Mission Statement, 2004). From its inception, in 1920 as a teacher-training institution, Delta State has grown into a multi-purpose university serving approximately 4,300 students. The College of Education (COE) is one of four academic colleges comprising the academic programs within the university. The Division of Health, Physical Education and

Recreation (HPER) which is one division within the COE, offers the Bachelor of Science in Education (BSE) with a major in K-12 physical education as well as the Master of Education (M.Ed) with a major in HPER.

Program policies for the M.Ed. with a major in HPER are directly shaped by: the Mississippi Department of Education (MDE), the state agency which establishes

requirements for teacher preparation programs; the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL), a separate state agency which oversees the degree-credit programs and the funding for state institutions of higher learning; as well as standards of professional organizations, specifically the National Association for Sport and Physical Education. Further, the program undergoes an annual process and performance review as an outgrowth of the Mississippi Educational Reform Act of 1982, which called for the setting of standards and criteria for all teacher preparation programs in Mississippi colleges and universities. The state standards used in the peer review process are rooted in the broader National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education frame of reference, focusing on the systemic and continual improvement of teacher preparation programs based on relevant and accurate data. This data driven process enables program completers to form their own practice so they have a positive impact on physical

education and physical activity in the Mississippi Delta. (Parts of this paragraph includes information obtained from NCATE documents).

2. Description of the field and clinical experiences required for the program.

The clinical practice event for the program occurs in PER 611, Current Literature and Trends in Physical Education. This event involves planning and conducting a sports event that is open to the public. In this clinical practice, the students conduct a sports tournament event that requires them to plan: what the particular event will be, the dates for the event, publicity for the event, and the eligible population. Planning involves committees for publicity, sponsors, event management, concessions, and tournament follow up including reflections of the event. Students are involved with diverse populations who both sponsor and play in the event. Diverse populations include

different races, genders, socio-economic levels, ages and physical ability. This gives the students an opportunity to encourage a wide variety of persons to be physically active and to gain experience with the differences presented by the participants, fans, officials, sponsors and the community leaders that control the facilities used for the event.

Post event follow up gives the students opportunities to reflect on different

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students realize how important early planning was to the success of the event. Finally, they are made aware, as they deal with the participants and sponsors that participate annually, how important interpersonal skills and follow up activities are to the continued success of an annual event.

3.Criteria for admission, retention, and exit from the program

Specific wording for information for this section is included as an attachment documenting specific pages from the current Delta State University Graduate Bulletin pages 20-28 & 37-38.

Applicants for the M.Ed. program in HPER must be fully admitted to the

University, hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution in HPER or related field and hold a Class A teaching certificate in physical education or complete the

certificate requirements during the course of the program. Upon recommendation of the Dept. Chair, the Dean of the College of Education may waive the certification

requirement for those students who are preparing for employment in community/senior colleges or non-public education institutions. However, these students must complete pre-requisite course work in anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology and measurement and evaluation.

Applicants must present an undergraduate transcript documenting an

undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or 2.75 on the last 64 undergraduate hours and a satisfactory score on a nationally recognized, standardized test of writing during the first term of course work. Suggested tests and the corresponding passing scores on the writing parts are: PRAXIS I 172, PRAXIS I (CBT) 318, GRE 3, MAT 30.CAAP 3.

For retention, the student’s first nine hours in the program must be required courses approved by the graduate advisor and they must earn a grade of B or better in each of these courses. Students who fail to do so but earn a grade of “C” may repeat that course one time. No other course work will be counted toward the degree until this “first nine hour” requirement is met.

Students are required to maintain a 3.0 GPA in their graduate work. Earning less than an overall 3.0 during any semester will cause the student to be placed on probation. Probation status must be removed during the succeeding term. Failure to do so, resulting in two consecutive term with an overall GPA of less that 3.0, is grounds for dismissal from the program. Students who make three grades of “C” or one grade of “D” or “F” will be also be dismissed from the program.

The University has a definitive cheating and plagiarism policy which is included in the Graduate Bulletin and in each course syllabus. Basically, it states that neither will be tolerated and that either will result in either a “0” or “F” on the assignment and possible dismissal from the program. A second offense will result in dismissal from the program

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College of Education Conceptual Framework

DELTA EDUCATION MODEL

Vision: The Delta State University College of Education promotes a vibrant

educational community committed to preparing capable and confident teacher candidates who can positively affect learning outcomes of students in the P-12 school setting. Appropriately illustrated by the Delta triangle, the model reflects teacher candidate development through the triad of preparation, performance and professionalism, supported by the larger Delta educational community (faculty, educational partners, and alumni).

Guiding Principles:

1. Education is a lifelong endeavor, requiring an ever-expanding content knowledge base, a repertoire of skills, and a broad experience

base. (GP1)

2. Education is interactive and reflective, a process that is accomplished through assessment and reflection of a collaborative nature. (GP2)

3. Education is culturally contextualized, requiring both an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of all individuals within the learning

community. (GP3)

4. Education is dynamic, with change being driven by assessment data and the needs of all segments of the educational community. (GP4)

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5. Indication of whether the program has a unique set of program assessments and their relationship of the program’s assessments to the unit’s assessment system.

Assessments in the program are consistent with assessments of the unit with some minor adjustments. Entering, continuing, and exit GPA, technology assessment,

disposition assessment and comprehensive exam requirements are consistent throughout the unit. The program does require specific undergraduate pre-requisite course work of anatomy and physiology, exercise physiology and measurement and evaluation for those admitted students who do not have an undergraduate degree in HPER or related field which would require these courses. The 33 hour M.Ed. program requires 9 core education hours, 15 program specific (HPER) hours and 9 elective hours. All students must choose one elective in HPER. The other 2 elective courses may be in any field of study with a course number of 500 (500 indicates masters level course work) or higher. For those students who do not have an undergraduate degree in HPER or related field, one HPER elective must be PER 638 Biomechanics.

The addition of the required pre-requisite courses for students without an undergraduate degree in HPER or related field was a reflection of the analysis of three consecutive years of GPA and comprehensive exam data. Students who did not have these undergraduate courses, consistently struggled with the graduate level classes and with the comprehensive exams in these areas. There seemed to be no consistent

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SECTION I - CONTEXT ATTACHMENT A

Candidate & Completers Chart Information

Directions: Provide three years of data on candidates enrolled in the program and completing the program, beginning with the most recent academic year for which numbers have been tabulated. Report the data separately for the levels/tracks (e.g., baccalaureate, post-baccalaureate, alternate routes, master’s, doctorate) being addressed in this report. Data must also be reported separately for programs offered at multiple sites. Update academic years (column 1) as appropriate for your data span. Create additional tables as necessary.

Program:

Master of Education, Major, Health & Physical Education

Academic Year # of Candidates Enrolled in the Program

# of Program Completers

2005-06 56 14

2004-05 43 21

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SECTION I - CONTEXT ATTACHMENT B

Faculty Information Faculty Member Name Highest Degree, Field, & University Assignment Indicate the role of the faculty member Faculty Rank Tenure Track (yes/no)

Scholarship, Leadership in professional Associations, and Service: List up to 3 major contributions in the past 3 years

Teaching or other professional experience in K-12 schools Alvarez, John Ph.D.

Exercise Physiology Univ. of Miss

Exercise Science/ Graduate Faculty Assoc. Professor

Yes Alvarez, J. (2006). Fitness trends in today’s youth? Mississippi Athletic Trainers Association annual meeting, Philadelphia, MS.

Research Chair for Miss. AHPERD Chair, DSU Health & Wellness Com.

3 yrs.Directing DSU Partner with Sunflower Co. Schools K-12 9 yrs. Higher Ed.

Barnes, Darvin Ed.D, HPER

Univ. of Arkansas

Div. Chair Pedagogy , Org.& Admin

Professor Yes Director, DSU Physical Ed.

Conference for K-12 Teachers ’95-’06 President, MAHPERD – ’03-04 Partner with Sunflower Co. Schools on their PEP Grant

6 yrs. K-12 30 yrs Higher Ed. 10 yrs Ed. Admin

Lee, T. Wayne Ed.D, HPER University of. Southern MS Org.& Admin Measurement & Assessment Assoc. Professor

No President, DSU Ath. Alumni Assoc. DSU Alumni, Bd. of Directors Sports Law Assoc.

10yrs K-12 37 yrs Higher Ed. 4yrs Ed. Admin.

Vanderpool, Ken Ed.D., HPER Temple University

Exercise Physiology Biomechanics

Professor Yes Papers presented at S.D. AAHPERD in Little Rock, AR, and AAHPERD convention in Chicago, IL

Member AAHPERD

39 yrs Higher Ed.

Wilder, Milton Ed.D, HPER Univ. of

Pedagogy Graduate

Professor Yes 1.Wilder, M.R. (2006). Involving future professionals in your assoc. &

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Alabama Coordinator your profession. Southern District LDC, Chattanooga, TN

2.Southern District AAHPERD, V-P for the General Division, 2004-5 3.Rep. from College of Education to University Graduate Council, 2003-06

Ed. 18 yrs.

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SECTION I – CONTEXT ATTACHMENT I PROGRAM OF STUDY

DELTA STATE UNIVERSITY

A PROPOSED PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE: MAJOR: HPER

Student:___________________________ Emphasis: HPER S.S.#_____________

Address:________________________________________ Date:____________________

CORE EDUCATION COURSES REQUIRED

Course No.

Course Title Term to be Taken

Term Completed

Grade Credit Hours

CUR 608 Foundations of Educational Thought 3

EPY 601 Psychology of Learning 3

ELR 605 Methods of Research and Statistics 3 Total 9

MAJOR FIELD COURSES

Course No.

Course Title Term to be Taken

Term Completed

Grade Credit Hours

PER 601 Administration and supervision of P.E. 3 PER 611 Current Literature and Trends in P.E. 3 PER 680 Advances Tests and Measurements 3 PER 684 Methods in Curriculum & Programs in

P.E. 3

HSE 636 Advanced Physiology of Exercise 3

Total 15 APPROVED ELECTIVES

Course No.

Course Title Term to be Taken

Term Completed

Grade Credit Hours

One must be HPER or HSE 3

3

3

Total 9 TRANSFER COURSES TO BE CONSIDERED FOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Total Hours in Program 33

Have you applied for “Admission to Candidacy” for Degree? Yes_____ No ______

APPROVED: Student:_____________________________________________

Advisor:____________________________ Date____________

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SECTION II— LIST OF ASSESSMENTS

In this section, list the 6-8 assessments that are being submitted as evidence for meeting the AAHPERD/NASPE standards. All programs must provide a minimum of six assessments. If your state does not require a state licensure test in the content area at the advanced level, you must substitute an assessment that documents candidate attainment of content knowledge in #1 below. For each assessment, indicate the type or form of the assessment and when it is administered in the program.

Name of Assessment Type or

Form of Assessment

When the Assessment Is Administered

1 [Assessment of content knowledge] GPA

Undergrad (entering) GPA, Core GPA, HPR GPA, first 9 hrs GPA, Overall GPA

Undergrad GPA at admission

First 9 hours, Core, HPER and Overall GPA upon completion of each

2 [Assessment of content knowledge in physical education]

Comprehensive Exam Last term of enrollment in Program

3 [Planning assessment] Curriculum project in PER 684 Required course

When students take PER 684 4 [Assessment of effective practice] Clinical Practice Project in PER 611 Required course

When students take PER 611 5 [Assessment of effect on student

learning]

Program completer’s survey and Administrator’s survey

1 yr. after completion of program

6 [Additional assessment that addresses AAHPERD/NASPE standards

(required) ]

Project

Technology Competency Assessment Required course When students take ELR 605, PER 611 or 684

7 [Additional assessment that addresses AAHPERD/NASPE standards

(optional) ]

Dispositions Assessment Required course

When students take ELR 605 and PER 611

8 [Additional assessment that addresses AAHPERD/NASPE standards

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SECTION III—RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESSMENT TO STANDARDS

For each AAHPERD/NASPE standard on the chart below, identify the assessment(s) in Section II that address the standard. One assessment may apply to multiple AAHPERD/NASPE standards.

AAHPERD/NASPE STANDARD

APPLICABLE ASSESSMENTS FROM SECTION II 1. Content Knowledge. Accomplished physical education candidates have a command

of the subject matter of physical education that reflects both breadth and depth. They establish and promote lifetime physical activity habits of all students. As well, they can articulate the relevance of the underlying sub-disciplines of physical education,

integrating appropriate concepts into the physical education program that encourages lifetime physical activity.

●#1 ●#2 □#3 ●#4

●#5 □#6 □#7 □#8

2. Curricular Knowledge. Accomplished physical education candidates consistently

articulate a value system base for selecting, planning and evaluating their curriculum to meet student needs and promote student learning.

●#1 ●#2 ●#3 □#4 ●#5 □#6 □#7 □#8

3. Equity/Fairness/Diversity. Accomplished physical education candidates model and

promote behavior appropriate in a diverse society by showing respect for and valuing all members of their communities and by having high expectations that their students will treat one another fairly and with dignity.

□#1 □#2 ●#3 ●#4

□#5 □#6 ●#7 □#8

4. Sound Teaching Practices. Accomplished physical education candidates thoroughly

comprehend the fundamental goals of physical education. They carefully orchestrate the blending of relevant principles of pedagogical practice with the complex nature of the physical education content. This gives their teaching actions purpose and allows them to implement a flexible yet effective instructional program responsive to students’

interests, needs, and developmental levels.

□#1 □#2 ●#3 ●#4

●#5 □#6 □#7 □#8

5. Assessment. Accomplished physical education candidates consistently use a variety

of authentic assessments aligned with national, state standards, state and local program goals, and student outcomes goals to provide feedback to students, report student progress, shape instruction, and evaluate curriculum and program goals.

●#1 ●#2 ●#3 □#4

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AAHPERD/NASPE STANDARD

APPLICABLE ASSESSMENTS FROM SECTION II 6. High Expectations for a Physically Active Lifestyle. Accomplished physical

education candidates maintain a stimulating, productive learning environment that holds all students to the highest expectations for adopting a physically active lifestyle.

□#1 □#2 □#3 ●#4

●#5 □#6 □#7 □#8

7. Methods of Inquiry. Accomplished physical education candidates know,

understand, interpret, critique, and consistently use research to improve practice.

●#1 ●#2 □#3 □#4

□#5 ●#6 □#7 □#8

8. Collaboration, Reflection, Leadership, and Professionalism. Accomplished

physical education candidates are lifelong learners who collaborate as members of a larger learning community to improve school physical education for all students and enhance the professional culture of their field.

□#1 □#2 □#3 ●#4

●#5 □#6 ●#7 □#8

9. Mentoring. Accomplished physical education candidates contribute to the

professional development and support of other current and/or future educators.

□#1 □#2 □#3 □#4

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Assessment # 1

GPA: Undergraduate (entering) GPA, Core GPA, HPR GPA, first 9 hrs GPA. And Comprehensive examinations.

Overall GPA

1. The chart for Assessment # 1 is a compilation of academic achievement of all students who entered the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER for the past three academic years. These records are part of the criteria for admission to the program, retention in the program and satisfactory completion of the program. Additionally, they are an indication of the content knowledge of each of the students based on entering GPA, grades achieved in each required educational core class, HPER required classes as well as elective classes and classes that had to be repeated by students in the program. Finally, the chart indicates the number of program completers, how they scored on the comprehensive exams and an indication of those students who were academically dismissed from the program.

2. This assessment aligns with standards 1, 2, 5, and 7.

Standard 1: Students entering the M.Ed. program in HPER are required to achieve an undergraduate GPA of 2.5 or higher with a major in HPER or related field. This indicates a basic command of a broad range of pre-requisite content knowledge that should prepare students to successfully complete a graduate degree program.

Requiring students to achieve a 3.0 GPA in the core education courses, Foundations of Ed. Thought, Psychology of Learning and Methods of Research and Statistics provides student with a broad background into the history and principles of education, the learning process and methods of inquiry that they can integrate with the core required courses in the major field of HPER. The required course work in the major field gives students the content knowledge that they will use as they plan curricular projects in specific courses as well as the ability to utilize the State mandated curriculum in their teaching roles. This same content knowledge provides a basis for the students to choose, model and implement the appropriate physical activities into their professional careers whether that be teaching or working in physical activity settings outside K-12 physical education. Specifically, students are required, in Methods in Curriculum and Programs in Physical Education to plan a K-12 curriculum based on the 6 NASPE

Standards for K-12 and the State of Mississippi mandated curriculum which is also bases on the NASPE standards. This curriculum project will be explained further, later, but it includes teaching strategies and learning experiences in all three of the domains of learning.

Standard 2: This assessment aligns with standard 2 because it indicates successful completion of courses requiring the mastery of content related to curriculum development that is based on the NASPE National Standards for K-12 students. The curriculum project also includes a study of various curricular models, knowledge and application of learner characteristics ands teaching and assessment strategies.

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psychomotor domain of physical activity as well as in the areas of student learning and program development.

Standard 7: The above mentioned courses in measurement and evaluation, exercise physiology and research methods require students to examine and apply research through projects and assignments that are prepared and often presented to classes in formal presentations that require the use of various technologies.

3. As indicated in # 5 of Section I, Context, Students entering the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER must provide evidence of an undergraduate degree in HPER or related field or meet the pre-requisite course requirements. Once enrolled, they must earn a grade of “B” or better in their first nine hours. These hours must be required hours and

approved by the Division of HPER. Students who do not earn at least a grade of “B” in any of the first nine hours may repeat that/those classes one time. All students are provisionally admitted to the program and no other course work will be accepted toward the completion of their program until this “first 9 hour” requirement is met. Additionally, as part of the program, they must earn a 3.0 GPA in the three educational core classes, a 3.0 GPA in the physical education core classes and an overall 3.0 GPA in order to complete their program. The exit exam for the program is a comprehensive examination covering the five required core classes in HPER.

Even though the mean GPA of students entering the program increased each year, so did the number of students entering the program. The increased numbers dilutes the lower entering GPA’s. For instance, in 2003-04 15% of entering students had an entering GPA above 3.3. But, since the number of entering students was small, relatively small number of higher GPA’s didn’t raise the mean. Succeeding years showed a smaller range of entering GPA’s but the increased number of enrolling students with higher GPA’s raised the mean. If the X Ed. .Core GPA’s, and the X P.E. core GPA’s are compared for the three years, they are lower than the entering GPA would predict. The number of students repeating any of the first nine hours, repeating the comprehensive exams and the number of academic dismissals increased in ‘04-05 and’05-06 but so did the number of entering students.

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Attachment A

Description of the Assessment Tool for Assessment #1

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Attachment B Scoring Guide

Delta State University uses a grading scale of 4.0 with the following quality points being applied to grades.

For every 1 hour of academic credit earned students receive these quality points:

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Attachment C

Candidate Data Derived from the Assessment

Undergraduate (entering) GPA, Core Education GPA, HPER GPA. First 9 hours GPA, Overall GPA

year num. entering mean mean mean over-all first #

repeating comps repeat academic completed currently didn't entered students GPA entering Ed. core P.E. core GPA 9 hours courses comps dismissal program enrolled complete

entered range GPA GPA GPA GPA in first 9 program

2003-04 11 2.5-3.8 2.841 3.152 3.249 3.125 3.189 2 3(5),3(4),3(3) 3 1 9 1

2004-05 21 2.5-3.69 2.996 2.95 3.027 3.345 3.213 4 7(5),2(4),4(3) 4 2 12 3 4

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Assessment # 2 Comprehensive examinations.

1. This assessment is given during the final term of enrollment in the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER. It examines each of the five areas that are required in core HPER course work. The faculty member who teaches the respective course prepares and scores the exam for their particular area of study. Students must pass these exams in order to complete the program. This assessment is considered the capstone examination in the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER. Initial testing is a written exam with any follow up being an oral examination.

2. This assessment aligns with standards 1, 2, 5, and 7

The core course requirements in HPER include: Administration and Supervision in Physical Education, Current Literature and Trends in Physical Education, Advanced Tests and Measurement in Physical Education, Methods in Curriculum and Programs in Physical Education and Advanced Exercise Physiology. Successful completion of the comprehensive examinations indicate an acceptable level of content knowledge in each of the courses.

Standard 1: Acceptable or passing scores on the comprehensive examinations indicate both an acceptable breadth and depth of content knowledge in each of the examined courses. These courses cover a variety of concepts from disciplinary knowledge to skills that allow students to analyze and provide appropriate cues for students. Content knowledge demonstrated here

indicates that program completers have the basis to prepare those with whom they work to lead a healthy and active lifestyle.

Standard 2: Comprehensive examinations require students to demonstrate an acceptable (passing score) knowledge in the areas of curriculum and planning of programs based on the NASPE Standards for K-12 students (Methods in Curriculum and Programs in Physical

Education). Class preparation for the major curriculum project in this course requires students to examine various curricula models, characteristics of student learners, domains of learning, teaching strategies and assessments of learning. An acceptable (passing) score in the curriculum area of the comprehensive exams indicates that program completers are competent in their curricular knowledge and abilities to use this knowledge whether in the K-12 setting or in other physical activity settings.

Standard 5: Acceptable (passing) scores on the comprehensive exams in Advanced Tests and Measurement in Physical Education as well as Advanced Physiology of Exercise indicate that the program completers have the ability to assess students abilities in the three domains of learning as well as their educational programs and interpret the results of these assessments to plan programs and make program revisions.

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3. Analysis of data related to comprehensive examinations for the past three years.

Acceptable (passing) scores on the comprehensive examinations are achieved in the following ways:

a. Initial assessment requires students to pass all five areas with 50% accuracy .

b. Having accomplished a students are then required to pass 4 of the 5 areas with 80% accuracy. 5/5 is target but 4/5 is acceptable.

c. If students fail to complete 4 of the 5 areas with 80% accuracy, they are given a one week study time and are then required to pass all of the areas that they failed in the oral examination follow up testing giving them a final score of 5/5.

d. If a students fails to successfully complete c, they may retake the comprehensive examinations the during the next regular term. At that time, they must approach the exams as if it were their initial testing.

A brief descriptive analysis of the data on comprehensive exams for the past three years indicates that in ’03-04, 33% of the program completers passed all areas on the initial testing. This increased to 54% in ’04-05 but dropped to 40 % in ’05-06. In ’03-04, 33% of the program completers passed at the acceptable level of 4 of 5 areas (4/5). This percentage dropped to 18% in ’04-05 but increased to 40% in ’05-06. In ’03-04, 33% of the program completers failed the initial written testing but all successfully passed the failed parts on the follow up oral

examinations. Two or more parts of the exams had to be repeated by 36% of the program completers in ’04-05 and 20% in ’05-06. All but one successfully completed all failed parts on the oral testing. One student in ’04-05 failed both the written and oral exams. That student returned during the next regular term and successfully completed all 5 parts of the

comprehensive exams. That accounts for the 1 number discrepancy in the totals for ’04-05 in the chart which is attachment C for this assessment.

4. These data indicate that program completers are able to retain and apply the knowledge gained in the physical education required courses at an acceptable level as indicated by the pass fail rate on the comprehensive exams. These examinations, devised and evaluated by the Division

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Attachment (a) Assessment Tool

The Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination is considered the capstone evaluation of students during their final term of enrollment in the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER. The examination consists of five separate parts which corresponds to each of the five required courses in the HPER core (required classes in the major). Each of these examinations are prepared and

evaluated by the instructor who taught each class. Students have four hours to complete the five separate parts. Many professors will give the students study guides for the exams, usually as part of the syllabus for that course.

A date for the examinations are set by the graduate coordinator in the Division and he monitors the procedure, distributes the completed exams to the respective professors for evaluation and maintains a tally of the grades of each student. Students are notified, usually within 48 hours, of their success or failure on the examinations. The graduate coordinator makes arrangements with professors and students who are unsuccessful based on the scoring guide presented in attachment (b) of this file for the follow up oral phase of the examinations. If further testing is necessary, the graduate coordinator will inform the student that they will need to repeat the comprehensive examinations at the next regularly scheduled date for the examinations, which is the next academic term.

As indicated in the scoring guide, attachment (b) of this file, students must successfully complete 4 of the 5 parts of the examination. We assumed that students would write all 5 areas for evaluation. During the examinations for the years of ’03-04, and the summer and fall of academic year ’04-05, a few students began to take a chance that they would pass all the parts that they were attempting and would only write 4 parts. This gave them a decided advantage over the students who attempted all 5 parts. Additionally, we found that students were not attempting the part of the comprehensive examination in which they had a poor grade. To address this problem, the graduate faculty instituted the pre-requisite requirement of a score of 50% on all 5 parts of the examination (part a of the scoring guide). Once that 50% was achieved, the students were assessed as they had been in the past in that in order to successfully complete the

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Attachment (b)

Scoring Guide for the Comprehensive Examination

The examination consists of five separate parts which corresponds to each of the five required courses in the HPER core (required classes in the major). Each part of this examination is prepared and evaluated by the instructor who taught each class. Scoring of the five parts of the examination is as follows:

a. Initial assessment requires students to pass all five areas with 50% accuracy .

b. Having accomplished (a), students are then required to pass 4 of the 5 areas with 80% accuracy. 5/5 is target but 4/5 is acceptable.

c. If students fail to complete 4 of the 5 areas with 80% accuracy, they are given a one week study time and are then required to pass all of the areas that they failed in the oral examination follow up testing giving them a final score of 5/5.

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Attachment (c)

Candidate data derived from the assessment

As can be noted in the chart below, 9 of the students who enrolled in ’03-04 successfully completed the comprehensive examinations. Three of these students were required to repeat at least 2 parts of the examination but did so successfully. One of the eleven was dismissed from the program for academic reasons and one is still enrolled in the program

Of the 21 students who enrolled in the program in academic year ’04-05, 13 successfully completed the comprehensive examination, four of whom were required to repeat at least 2 parts of the examination. One of the students who had to repeat parts of the written comprehensive examination, was not successful in the follow-up oral examination covering the parts that he failed but did return in the fall of ’05 and successfully complete all 5 areas of the examination. That student will account for the discrepancy in the numbers for academic year ’04-05.

Additionally, 2 students were dismissed from the program for academic reasons, 4 didn’t complete the program and 3 are currently enrolled.

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Undergraduate (entering) GPA, Core Education GPA, HPER GPA. First 9 hours GPA, Overall GPA

year num. entering mean mean mean

over-all first #

repeating comprehensive repeat academic completed currently didn't

entered students GPA entering Ed. core P.E. core GPA 9 hours courses examination comps dismissal program enrolled complete

entered range GPA GPA GPA GPA in first 9 program

2003-04 11 2.5-3.8 2.841 3.152 3.249 3.125 3.189 2 3(5),3(4),3(3) 3 1 9 1

2004-05 21 2.5-3.69 2.996 2.95 3.027 3.345 3.213 4 7(5),2(4),4(3) 4 2 12 3 4

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Assessment # 3Curriculum project in PER 684, Methods in Curriculum and Programs in Physical Education

Methods in Curriculum and Programs in Physical Education is one of the 5 required courses in the physical education core.

1. This course is designed to prepare the student to prepare a comprehensive curriculum based on the six National Association for Sport and Physical Education Standards for K-12 physical education. Students are required to identify their personal philosophy of physical education, and use it as a beginning basis for designing a K-12 curriculum. Curricular models are studied prior to beginning the curriculum project. The curriculum requires the students to gain knowledge regarding establishing objectives to accomplish national NASPE standards, identify teaching strategies to accomplish these objectives, design activities to allow K-12 students to accomplish the stated objectives and finally, include assessments that would both determine student

achievement and whether or not the objectives of the program were met.

2. The curriculum project aligns with standards2, 4 and 5.

Standard 2: In order to accomplish this project students are required to identify their personal philosophy of physical education, and use it as a beginning basis for designing a K-12

curriculum. Students review the purposes of education, various curricular models, characteristics of learners in the three domains of learning and NASPE standards for K-12 physical education. The successful planning and writing of the curriculum requires students to identify needs of students based on student characteristics and the demographics of the community. They review how to and write measurable learning outcomes and teaching strategies to accomplish these outcomes. The activities that are identified for inclusion in the curriculum are separated into seven different activity areas each of which provide opportunities for the program completers to produce a curriculum that includes discipline practices that are sequenced in a manner that is determined by current best practices and pedagogical knowledge. Assessments that would both provide evidence of student achievement and a determination of whether or not the objectives of the program were met are included in the curriculum project. The assessment section would provide ready data to be used for justification for curricular revisions.

Standard 4: Part of the curricular preparation required students to study various teaching practices, strategies, and assessment procedures. Investigation of various activity areas that would allow students to accomplish the objectives of the curriculum leading to a varied and active lifestyle are an integral part of the curriculum project preparation. The planning phase of this curriculum project also requires the students to study the demographics of community populations and the influence they have on the structure of the curriculum for the school in society.

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from the various assessments should enable the students who are writing the curriculum to make recommendations for revisions in the curriculum as they use it.

3. Data table is attachment (c) of this assessment

Spring ’06. Of the 4 students who scored marginally acceptable on the curriculum project, one was a first term graduate student with no work experience and the other three had low program entering GPA’s as well as marginal GPA’s for the program. One of the students who scored a 3 is currently teaching K-12 and the other will begin began teaching fall ’06.. The six students who scored at the 4 or target level are all teaching in K-12 or working in the profession in a non teaching capacity.

Summer ’06 Of the six students who scored a three or acceptable on the curriculum project, four have never taught and were first term graduate students and two were teaching in K-12. The five students who scored a 4 or target on the project included 3 students who are teaching in K-12 and two others who had an program entering GPA of over 3.5 and have earned a 4.0 graduate GPA.

Analysis of the data derived from the scoring rubric for this project for the spring term and the summer term of 2006 produced predictable results. This graduate class had a mixed student population made up of graduate students with no teaching experience and those who were

employed either in K-12 education or other related professional situations. Students who entered the graduate program with no break from their undergraduate program were able to write and align objectives with national standards and were fairly knowledgeable about various assessment techniques. These students needed additional work with writing teaching strategies and aligning them with the curricular objectives and national standards. They also were able to identify student characteristics in the three domains of learning but struggled with how these characteristics aligned with teaching strategies and activities.

Students in the class who were either teaching or working in related professions had a much easier time aligning teaching strategies and activities with the larger curricular objectives and national standards for physical education. Additionally, they had a better understanding of which assessments would work with various teaching strategies. They struggled with writing curricular objectives that clearly defined what the national standards for physical education required to be included in the curriculum and what the student were to learn based on the national standards.

The differences in background of the students made for an excellent interchange of ideas, where deficiencies and strengths of class members required the class to study all aspects of the curricular process as the project was completed.

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Attachments of assessment documentation for Assessment # 3 Attachment (a)

Description of the Assignment

The information below indicates what is covered in this course. An explanation of the curriculum project is presented on the next page.

PER 684 Methods in Curricula and Programs in Physical Education

OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course students will be expected to be able to:

A. Develop a guiding philosophy for the development of the physical education curriculum.

B. Define a conceptual framework for a physical education curriculum.

C. Identify the physical abilities, characteristics and developmental levels of students D. Identify physical abilities and characteristics of students in the three domains of learning. Cognitive, Affective and Psychomotor.

E. Identify factors affecting curriculum decisions

F. Determine content standards and student objectives of physical education programs.

G. Select instructional activities for physical education programs.

H. Organize selected activities into instructional units and develop long-term plans I. Select appropriate assessments for the teaching strategies and student learning activities

I. Evaluate and modify the physical education curriculum based on the evaluative process.

Topics to be covered prior to or during the curriculum project:

1. COE Conceptual Framework as a basis for curricular development and planning within the Division of HPER and the State Of Mississippi. Additionally, the purposes of education and professional dispositions will be discussed.

2. Curricular Models: Motor Development, Kinesiology, and Movement Education Models.

3. Bloom's taxonomy of learning

4. Domains of learning: cognitive, affective and psychomotor 5. Characteristics of students. K-6, 7-9, 10-12

6. Curricular standards. State and national

7. Curriculum guides. Miss. as well as other states

8. Curriculum components. Fitness, dance and rhythmical movements, dual and individual sports, team sports, gymnastics, aquatics, motor development and movement activities.

9. Physical Education National Board standards and requirements

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The curriculum project is the major project for this class.

Curriculum Project

Students will participate as part of one of three/four curriculum committees to plan the physical education curriculum for their age group.

In order to complete the project, students will be expected to:

1 .Compile the abilities and characteristics of students in the age group that they are assigned to work with, in the three domains of learning

2. Determine activities that correspond to the abilities and characteristics of students in their assigned age group

3. Examine national standards that need to be included in their curricular plan. 1. NASPE Standards

2. National Educational Standards 3. Risk behaviors from CDC

4. CDC standards for Physical Education

5. State of Mississippi State P.E. Curriculum Guide

4. Using the National NASPE Standards for K-12 physical education, write appropriate objectives that indicate what students are to learn.

5. Write appropriate teaching strategies that indicate how the teacher will structure the class in order for the students to accomplish the objectives of the curriculum.

6. Describe suggested learning activities that will allow students to accomplish the objectives of the curriculum. These activities must be justified by abilities and characteristics of the learner as compiled in # 2 above.

7. Align a minimum of 20 teaching strategies with the student learning activities that will provide a basis for assessing whether the students accomplished the objectives of the curriculum.

8. Students will occasionally meet during class to function as a curriculum development team to share information as they plan the curriculum

9. Each curricular team will formally present the curriculum to the class

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Attachment (b)

Scoring Rubric for the Curriculum Project

1 unacceptable 2 marginally acceptable

3 acceptable 4 target

Many of the required aspects of the

curriculum project are completed and submitted on time using Task Stream but others are omitted. The

curriculum project is poorly written with incorrect English and organized poorly. Some of the required parts of the

curriculum are correctly aligned showing a direct link between, philosophy of physical education, NASPE standards, objectives, teaching strategies, activities and assessments of learning. Others are not aligned correctly or omitted.

Most of the required aspects of the

curriculum project are completed and submitted on time using Task Stream. The curriculum project fairly well written with only a few incorrect English usages and organized fairly well. Most of the required parts of the curriculum are correctly aligned showing a direct link between, philosophy of physical education, NASPE standards, objectives, teaching strategies, activities and assessments of learning. Some are not or are omitted

All required aspects of the curriculum project are

completed and submitted using Task Stream. Some parts submitted late. The curriculum project is well written with a few incorrect English usages and

organized properly. Most of the

required parts of the curriculum are correctly aligned showing a direct link between, philosophy of physical education, NASPE standards, objectives, teaching strategies, activities and assessments of learning

All required aspects of the curriculum project are

completed and submitted on time using Task Stream. The curriculum project is well written with correct English and

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Attachment (c)

Candidate data for the Curriculum Project

Spring ’06. Of the 4 students who scored marginally acceptable on the curriculum project, one was a first term graduate student with no work experience and the other three had low program entering GPA’s as well as marginal GPA’s for the program. One of the students who scored a 3 is currently teaching K-12 and the other will begin began teaching fall ’06.. The six students who scored at the 4 or target level are all teaching in K-12 or working in the profession in a non teaching capacity.

Summer ’06 Of the six students who scored a three or acceptable on the curriculum project, four have never taught and were first term graduate students and two were teaching in K-12. The five students who scored a 4 or target on the project included 3 students who are teaching in K-12 and two others who had an program entering GPA of over 3.5 and have earned a 4.0 graduate GPA.

1 Unacceptable 2 Marginally Acceptable

3 Acceptable 4 Target

# of % of # of % of # of % of # of % of

students total students total students total students total Spring ’06

(12) Students

0 0 4 33% 2 17% 6 50%

Summer ’06 (11) Students

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Assessment # 4; Evaluation of Clinical Practice

1. Clinical practice is a necessary part of a professional preparation program, whether the program is preparing completers for K-12 teaching or for other related professional fields. Clinical practice provides the student the opportunity to apply their knowledge, skills, and dispositions in many different settings outside the graduate program classroom. An integral part of clinical practice is that as the students are completing the practical experience, they have the advantage of the instructor as a guiding mentor to assist with the practice. Several years ago, the graduate faculty saw this lack of a clinical experience at the graduate level as a weakness of the program. The faculty chose to expand a fund raising event where undergraduate and graduate students merely assisted to a clinical practice project where the graduate students were the entire planning, implementation, and assessment committees with the graduate faculty instructor as the mentor.

This clinical practice is required in PER 611Current Literature and Trends in Physical Education. It is designed to provide students with an experience that will allow them to plan, implement and assess a sports tournament. Since this tournament is open to the public and uses city sports facilities, the students must deal with diverse groups of participants as well as city officials as they partner with community leaders, area businesses, and sports officials to plan and conduct this tournament. The participants will vary in age, ability, sex, socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. Sponsors will range from individual businesses to corporate sponsors. Many of the participants will be experienced players while others will be novice players.

2. The clinical practice project aligns with standards1,3,4,6 and 8.

Standard 1: Clinical practice provides an opportunity for students to use content knowledge as they practice and improve skills that involve planning experiences for a variety of populations and skills that involve collaboration and cooperative efforts with diverse groups of people both in the education setting and in the community.

This experience required students to use their content knowledge regarding the particular sport that was the focus of the tournament. Additionally, they were expected to plan and

implement a program that was open to the general public. It would model current practice for tournaments in that sport, fairness and sportsmanship in the planning and conducting of the tournament, and encourage a variety of participants to be physically activity in an enjoyable atmosphere.

Standard 3: The project required students to devise a tournament that would be based on the accepted rules of the sport, hire officials that would fairly conduct the tournament, and devise an appropriate list of local rules for the tournament that demonstrated fairness and encouraged ethical conduct both by the students conducting the tournament as well as the participants. A tournament rules committee was responsible for setting and enforcing local rules where they differed from accepted rules of the sport. The rules committee was also required to handle any protests, breach of tournament rules and misconduct of participants or fans.

Standard 4: The clinical practice provided an opportunity for students to experience first hand the results of making decisions that were not considered to be fair and ethical to all participants. Since the tournament was a team tournament, families were present, fans with a great deal of knowledge and some with very little knowledge were present and everyone wanted an opportunity to compete on a level playing field.

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Standard 6: This clinical practice provided an opportunity for students to plan and conduct a sports event that was open to the general public. The planning and implementation required tremendous cooperation between the individual class members as they planned, publicized, and solicited sponsors and participants for the event. The city recreational leaders, officials,

tournament sponsors and team representatives were a diverse group who were vitally interested in promoting physical activity, except the sponsors who were interested in promoting their business.

Standard 8: The tournament required students to collaborate with a diverse group of persons. Facilities required dealing with city recreational leaders, publicity required dealing with the university public relations department, local media outlets, and surrounding recreation facilities, solicitation of sponsors required dealing with area businesses, concessions required dealing with local merchants, and finally, the participating teams required dealing with a diverse group of persons.

Since this clinical practice was advertised as being sponsored by the graduate students at DSU, students were made aware of the importance of conducting themselves appropriately and projecting a professional image during all phases of planning and implementing the tournament.

Having applied the skills needed to conduct this practice, all the students reflected that the next tournament would be easier to conduct and that they felt that they could do a better job and would alter some of the procedures so they would apply to specific populations. All students participating in the clinical practice had participated in sports tournaments previously, but only one had been actively involved in planning and conducting one. Reflections of the students indicated a very positive experience that, to a person, provided the practical experience that was the purpose of the clinical practice.

3. A brief analysis of the data indicated that the majority of the students completed the practice at the acceptable or target level. During the spring ’06 term 20 percent of the students functioned at the marginally acceptable level. These students either did not shoulder their part of the project or were ineffective in parts of the project. This percentage increased to 30 percent during the summer term of ’06 for essentially the same reasons.

4. Considering how well the clinical practice aligned with the designated standards, student performance at the acceptable and target levels indicated very positive evidence of appropriate performance on the clinical practice. While data obtained from the reflections of the clinical practice are not reported in this document, they indicated a very positive experience even from those students who performed at the marginally acceptable level. This practice was/is

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Attachments of assessment documentation for Assessment # 4 Attachment (a)

Description of the assignment

This description is included in the course syllabus for PER 611 Current Literature and Tends in Physical education.

Clinical Practice:

In the clinical practice project, students will plan, implement and evaluate a sports tournament sponsored by the graduate HPER majors.

Students will function as a class to determine project leadership, committee assignments, tournament guidelines and local rules.

Leadership will include tournament co-directors and committee chairpersons

All students will participate on the planning, the publicity, and the sponsor committee. All students will participate on at least one of the following committees; concessions, trophies and awards, game management, protest, tournament organization (brackets), tournament signs, and tournament and sponsor follow-up.

During the spring term, the tournament will typically be a 16 team slow pitch double elimination softball tournament. Due to time limitations, the tournament for the summer term will be a parent/child golf tournament.

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Attachments of assessment documentation for Assessment # 4 Attachment (b)

Scoring rubric

name 1 Unacceptable 2 Marginally Acceptable

3 Acceptable 4 Target

Student failed to participate in many expected parts of the clinical practice. Most assignments were carried out but some were late or not completed in a positive manner. Results of some of the student’s actions were not positive to the practice, the participants and to peers. Student was weak in some areas as they applied the knowledge and skills in this practical experience and did not respond well to feedback regarding their performance.

Student

participated in most expected parts of the clinical practice. Most assignments were carried out but some were late or not completed in a positive

manner. Results of the student’s actions were mostly positive to the practice, the participants and to peers. Student was weak in some areas as they applied the knowledge and skills in this practical experience but responded to mentoring

Student

participated in all expected parts of the clinical practice. Most assignments were carried out on time and in a positive manner. Results of the student’s actions were mostly positive to the practice, the participants and to peers. Student was weak in some areas as they applied the knowledge and skills in this practical experience but responded to mentoring

Student actively participated in all expected parts of the clinical practice.

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Attachments of assessment documentation for Assessment # 4 Attachment (c)

Candidate data derived from the assessment

1 Unacceptable 2 Marginally Acceptable

3 Acceptable 4 Target

# of % of # of % of # of % of # of % of

students total students total students total students total Spring ’06

(15) Students

0 0 3 20% 3 20% 9 60%

Summer ’06 (10) Students

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Assessment # 5: Program Completer’s Survey and Administrators Survey

1. The physical educator’s surveys were completed by program completers who have been out of the M.Ed. program with a major in HPER for a minimum of one year. The administrator’s surveys were completed by the administrator who has direct responsibility for the teaching effectiveness of the physical educator who completed the first survey. These surveys give the Division feedback on how well we are preparing teachers to teach in K-12 in Mississippi based on the physical educator’s opinion as well as their administrators. Additionally, these surveys give the Division some indication of strengths and weaknesses in the program. Certainly, we wanted feedback from both groups since both see an entirely different situation regarding the effectiveness of the program completer and their professional preparation provided by our

Division. While this provides excellent feedback regarding our program, we do realize that many of our M.Ed. program completers did not complete their undergraduate professional preparation programs with us.

2. These survey’s align with standards 1,2,4, 5, 6, 8 & 9

Standard 1: Both of these surveys align with whether or not the physical educator has the content knowledge to provide a broad and comprehensive physical education program that provides K-12 students with the knowledge and ability to lead healthy and active lifestyles. Items on the surveys also addressed the expertise of the instructor in providing a wide variety of physical activity areas.

Standard 2: These surveys provided feedback on whether our program completers were able to use the State of Mississippi mandated K-12 curriculum. This curriculum is based on the NASPE standards for K-12 physical education programs. Items on these surveys address the objectives and activities utilized in the K-12 program, lesson planning and assessment strategies used in the K-12 program.

Standard 4: Items included on these surveys include feedback related to the level at which physical educators are providing programs that are appropriate and challenging for students of all levels and contain a variety of activities that provide an opportunity for students of different learning styles to succeed in the program.

Standard 5: Specific items on the assessments address the ability of the physical educators to appropriately assess student learning including students with different learning styles. The survey also seeks feedback on the physical educator’s ability to communicate the results of assessments to students, parents, guardians and colleagues.

Standard 6: Items included in the surveys address the level at which physical educator’s include a variety of activities in their program which encourages their students to be prepared to pursue an active lifestyle. These items include assessment of the level at which the teacher address the needs of all students regardless of their ability or age level.

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Standard 9: Items in these surveys relate directly to the outcome given for Standard 9. Physical educators are asked to provide feedback as to the level at which they respond to the needs of colleagues, contribute positively to the needs of the workplace, and communicate student progress to …colleagues.

3. Surveys were mailed to physical educators who had completed the M.Ed. program with a major HPER and one to the administrator most directly responsible for their academic

performance. In all but 2 cases, that person was their principal. There was a 95% return rate on the physical educator’s survey and a 90% return rate on the administrator’s survey. There were no comments on the physical educator’s survey and only two positive comments on the

administrator’s survey.

A brief analysis of the data obtain from both the physical educator’s survey and the administrator’s survey revealed interesting feedback that has been valuable to the Division as we continue to assess the strengths and weaknesses of our program. On the physical educator’s survey, no responder rated themselves as not meeting expectations on any of the assessment items. Only one of the administrators rated a physical educator a one and that was in the area of the variety of the program. One physical educator rated themselves a 2 on professional

improvement, one rated themselves a 2 on appropriate objectives being used for their intended grade level, and three rated themselves a 2 on maintaining records and communicating

effectively with parents and guardians. Two of the three who rated themselves a 2 on student records and communicating with parents were also rated a 2 by their administrators on the same item.

The mean rating X was consistently at or above the level three indicating that the

physical educator and their administrator believed that the physical educator was, almost always, meeting the expectations of their employer on all items on the survey.

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Attachments of assessment documentation for Assessment # 5 Attachment (a)

Physical Educator’s Survey Administrator’s Survey

These surveys contain the information required for attachments (a), (b) and (c) which is the assessment, the scoring guide for the assessments and also the data collected from the

returned surveys. It seemed more sensible to include this assessment, scoring guide and data combined in each of the survey’s rather than in three different attachments.

Delta State University

Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation

Physical Educator’s Survey

Spring

2006

Appraisal Scale:

1 – Does not meet expectations

2 – Meets a few expectations but not sufficient 3 – Meets expectations

4 – Exceeds expectations

N/O – No opportunity to observe

Rating Teaching characteristics

1 2 3 4 X

comments

Did the DSU teacher education program adequately prepare you for your teaching responsibilities in physical education?

58% 42% 3.41

Do you demonstrate a genuine commitment toward professional improvement by routinely attending professional development workshops, conferences and/or seeking advanced degrees in the area of endorsement without being prompted?

25% 58% 17% 2.75

Do you use acceptable written, oral, and nonverbal communication with students, faculty and administration?

66.6% 33.3% 3.3

Do you respond promptly and

effectively to unexpected occurrences in the classroom and to the needs of colleagues and administration?

59% 41% 3.41

Do you adapt willingly to change and contribute positively to the needs of the workplace?

33.3% 66.6% 3.66

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meetings, and training that are required? Do you demonstrate expertise in multiple forms of physical activity including but not limited to fitness activities, games, sports, dance, adventure activities, and gymnastic activities? This demonstration of expertise should be indicated not only by your personal skills but by the inclusion of a variety of these activities in your physical education program.

8.3% 41.7% 50% 3.42

Are the objectives and activities utilized in your classes appropriate for the intended grade level?

33.3% 66.6% 3.66

Do your class/program objectives provide a clear sense of what students will know and be able to do as a result of attending your class? All objectives are clearly stated and closely related to State standards.

66.6% 33.3% 3.33

Do your class activities provide a logical path to meeting your

class/program objectives? No activities are extraneous or irrelevant. Students of many learning styles and strengths can benefit from activities.

66.6% 33.3% 3.33

Do your lesson plans clearly offer appropriate, creative, and

well-integrated challenges for students of all levels, including gifted and special needs students

66.6% 33.3% 3.33

Do you apply human relations and interpersonal skills to foster a climate of continuous learning and

improvement?

33.3% 66.6% 3.66

Are your class/program assessments inclusive and directly related to objectives and standards of the State mandated curriculum framework? Assessments provide opportunities for students with varying learning styles and strengths to excel.

58.3% 41.66% 3.42

Do you maintain records of student work and performance and

communicate student progress to students, parents, guardians, and colleagues?

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Delta State University

Division of Health, Physical Education and Recreation

Administrator’s Survey

Spring 2006

Appraisal Scale:

1 – Does not meet expectations

2 – Meets a few expectations but not sufficient 3 – Meets expectations

4 – Exceeds expectations

N/O – No opportunity to observe

Rating Teaching characteristics

1 2 3 4 X

comments

Did the DSU teacher education program adequately prepare the faculty member to conduct their teaching responsibilities?

30% 70% 3.7

Does the faculty member demonstrate a genuine commitment toward

professional improvement by routinely attending

professional development workshops, conferences and/or seeking advanced degrees in the area of endorsement without being prompted to do so?

20% 60% 20% 3

Does the faculty member use acceptable written, oral, and nonverbal communication with students, faculty and administration?

50% 50% 3.50

Does the faculty member respond promptly and effectively to unexpected occurrences in the classroom and to the needs of colleagues and administration?

70% 30% 3.3

Does the faculty member adapt willingly to change and contribute positively to the needs of the workplace?

10% 90% 3.9

Does the faculty member attend all expected classes, meetings, and training that are

Figure

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References

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