EGRHS AP Physics C

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AP

P

HYSICS

C

S

YLLABUS

O

VERVIEW OF

AP

P

HY SICS

AP Physics C is a college level course that covers Newtonian physics including rotation, gravitation and oscillation in preparation for the AP Physics C (M echanics) exam. Additional topics include modern physics, electricity and electric circuits, special relativity and astronomy applications as time allows. Some calculus is used, but students are not required to be proficient in calculus before they take this course.

T

EXT

B

OOK AND

M

ATERIALS

The textbook used in this course is: Halliday, David, Robert Resnick, and Jearl Walker. Fundamentals of Physics. 10th ed. Chichester: Wiley, 2014.

In addition, students will need a graphing calculator (TI-83 or TI-84) and a three ring binder. Binders and calculators are available for students who can not obtain one of their own.

C

OURSE

D

ESIGN

,

O

BJECTIVES AND

S

TRATEGIES

The goal of our AP Physics course is to provide an outstanding first-year college-level calculus-based physics education.

Students coming out of the courses will have a strong understanding of the facts and concepts of physics coupled with:

• Knowledge of the methods and techniques that characterize physics and science in general. • Fluency of scientific terminology and discourse.

• Experimental and investigative scientific skills.

• Experience analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing scientific information. • The ability to present scientific information effectively

C

LASS

F

ORMAT CLASS WORK

A typical non-laboratory class day consists of two parts: Introduction of material by brief lecture or

demonstration followed by guided and independent in-class activity or exercises. Many demonstrations

will be conducted live, some will be shown by video or include animated demonstrations. As much class

time as possible will be devoted to in-class activities or exercises, so students can have as much

supervised practice as possible.

Students are encouraged to ask questions at any time on the current assignment, previous assignments and

other physics topics.

The “modeling” approach will be used when possible for students to discover for themselves what

relationship exists for the situation at hand. Guidance from the instructor will be provided when

necessary.

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AB

W

ORK

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mixture of modern tech based equipment and “old school” lab techniques. This allows the students to have experience with the latest laboratory approaches and equipment. It also requires them to spend time with the basic and fundamental skills of graphing, calculating and organizing.

Each laboratory assignment will require students to perform most of the following tasks:

Identifying a problem or stating a hypothesis;

Defining experimental variables;

Designing an experiment to test hypothesis;

Collection of data and observations

Perform relevant calculations;

Apply statistical methods to data; Conduct an error analysis; and Draw conclusions from results.

Each student will be required to keep a laboratory notebook in which lab assignments will be graded

from. A bound “composition” book or separate lab section in their physics binder is an acceptable

laboratory notebook .

Students will conduct at least 20 of the experiments listed below:

Indirect Measurement of heights and

distances

Densities, areas, volumes and

measurement of small things (vernier

calipers)

Motion with Uniform Acceleration

Measuring Acceleration of Gravity, g

Hooke’s Law

Projectile Motion (Video Point)

Projectile Challenge

Newton’s Second Law

Mechanical / Rotational Equilibrium

Atwood’s Machine

Rotational Dynamics

Coefficient of Friction

Centripetal Force/Uniform Circular

Motion

Spring-Mass Oscillator

Conservation of Momentum (explosions)

Conservation of Momentum (collisions)

Conservation of Angular Momentum

Conservation of Momentum (Bike

Wheel)

Rotating Accelerometer

Conservation of Energy

Planetary Orbit Simulation (Interactive

Physics)

Simple Pendulum

Physical Pendulum

Center of Mass

Electrostatics (van de graaff generator)

Coulomb’s Law

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Electric cells

RC Circuits

Atomic spectra

Parallax

Measurement of speed of light

Photoelectric effect

Telescopes / Optics

Practical Astronomy (measurement of

latitude).

Some of the laboratory activities will appear on the final examination for the course instead of during the

academic year.

Unit Topics Time

Unit 1 Measurement

SI Units, Dimensional Analysis, Vectors

M easurement, indirect measurements, measurement instruments Introduction to Lab Techniques

Vector components, vector addition, graphical analysis of vectors Significant figures and precision

1 week

Unit 2 Motion Linear Motion

Kinematics with constant acceleration Freely Falling Objects

Introduction to Problem Solving

2 weeks

Unit 3 Calculus of Physics

Derivatives, Integrals and Applications

Review of /Introduction to derivatives and applications Variable acceleration

3 weeks

Unit 4 Vectors

TwoDimensional Motion

Two Dimensional Motion

Vectors, unit vectors, vector components Two dimensional motion

Projectiles

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Unit 5

Newton’s Laws

Introduction to Newton’s Laws

Free body diagrams

Some particular forces: M ass, weight, normal force, friction

2 weeks

Applications of Newton’s Laws

Uniform circular motion Non-uniform circular motion Velocity dependent forces, drag

3 weeks

Unit 6 Energy

Work and Energy

Work done by constant force; Work done by varying force Scalar product of vectors

Kinetic energy Work energy principle

2 weeks

Conservation of Energy

Forces and potential energy

Dissipative forces, work done by conservative and non-conservative forces

Power

1 week

Unit 7 Momentum

Impulse, Momentum, and Collisions

Impulse momentum theorem Conservation of M omentum Elastic and inelastic collisions Collisions in two dimensions Center of M ass

3 days

Unit 8

Rotational Motion

Rotational Kinematics

Rotational variables

Kinematics with constant angular acceleration Introduction to torque and moment of inertia Kinematics with time-varying angular acceleration Relationships between linear and angular variables

1 Week

Rotational Dynamics

Angular momentum Newton’s laws and rotation M ore Torque

Conservation of angular momentum

Conservation of mechanical energy for translational and rotational motion

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Translational and Rotational Equilibrium 3 days

Gravitation

Orbits of planets and satellites

Geophysical applications, weightlessness Kepler’s laws

Black holes

1 Week

Unit 9

Oscillations and Waves

Simple Harmonic Oscillations

M ass on Spring Simple Pendulum Energy in Oscillators

Damped harmonic oscillations

1 week

Waves

Transverse waves / Standing waves Waves on a string

Interference of waves Properties of Waves

3 days

Waves II

Speed of sound Interference

Intensity and sound level Doppler Effect

3 days

Unit 10

Thermal Physics

Temperature and Heat

M echanical Equivalent of heat Heat transfer and thermal expansion Temperature scales

First Law of Thermodynamics

3 days

Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

Ideal gases and Ideal Gas Law Translational kinetic theory M ean free path

Distribution of molecular speeds

Degrees of freedom and molar specific heats Second Law (including heat engines)

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Unit 11 Nuclear and Quantum Mechanics

Nuclear Physics and Quantum Mechanics

Unit 11 /

Alternate Astrophysics

Astrophysics

Stellar quantities

Stellar characteristics and stellar evolution Cosmology

2 weeks

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