Florida Atlantic University Wilkes Honors College

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Florida Atlantic University

Wilkes Honors College

FBOG ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW

Dr. Jeffrey Buller, Dean June 30, 2012

WILKES HONORS COLLEGE

OVERVIEW

1. MISSION AND PURPOSE OF THE PROGRAM

The purpose of the Honors College is to offer students a liberal arts education of the highest intellectual and scholarly standard. As a public institution, we open our doors to those seeking a challenging, yet affordable, learning experience equal to that of the most selective colleges and universities. Small class size, rigorous requirements, and an emphasis on interdisciplinary study anchor a community of dedicated faculty and a talented, diverse student body. We value our special responsibility of public service, and recognize that this responsibility extends not only to the people of Florida but also to the nation, the global community, and the natural environment. (Published at http://www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/about_mission_guiding.htm.)

Guiding Principles:

 To offer a liberal arts education of the highest quality

 To attract outstanding students from a wide array of backgrounds

 To build a dedicated and diverse faculty recognized for its excellence in teaching and research  To link teaching, research, and service in order to convey, expand, and apply knowledge

 To promote breadth of knowledge, encourage depth of understanding, and bridge disciplinary divides  To respect differences and recognize their educational value

 To cultivate critical thinking in the classroom and beyond

 To introduce students to the challenge of original research and discovery

 To produce global citizens through international, area, and environmental studies (Published at http://www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/about_mission_guiding.htm.) Expanded statement:

The Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College of Florida Atlantic University opened in the Fall of 1999 and is the first public honors institution in the nation to be built from the ground up. Its pioneering interdisciplinary

curriculum, with a strong emphasis on international and environmental studies, and on preparing students for the completion of a senior honors thesis, is positioning FAU’s Wilkes Honors College as Florida’s premier selective public institution for the 21st century. Its intellectual foundation is a belief that a liberal arts education is the best preparation for a full and productive life.

The Wilkes Honors College is dedicated exclusively to undergraduate education, and offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences (our original CIP 24.0104 was changed to CIP 24.0199 in the summer of 2003). The B.A. program is designed to develop the qualities of a free and responsible citizen, one who can reason clearly, read critically and analytically, argue persuasively in speech and writing, and contribute to society in fundamental and innovative ways. Students choose areas of concentration from the humanities, the

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social sciences, and the natural sciences, or design their own concentration with faculty supervision. By providing broad intellectual training in the arts and sciences and specialized study in an area of concentration, the Wilkes Honors College prepares its students for graduate and professional schools such as education, law, and medicine, as well as for careers in business, science, and government.

The Wilkes Honors College provides an atmosphere conducive to the highest quality of liberal arts education. Freshmen and sophomores are required to live on campus to facilitate a living-learning community. One-on-one learning that culminates in the student producing an honors thesis combines with small class size and affordable state tuition to make the experience of the Wilkes Honors College student unlike the typical experience of the undergraduate at other state universities. Unlike honors programs in which a minority of courses taken by students are honors courses, and in which faculty are assigned primarily to a department outside of the honors program and teach a minority of courses as honors courses, at the Wilkes Honors College at least 85% of a student’s courses are honors courses, and faculty have their primary assignment and are tenured in the Honors College. This unique structure allows an ongoing relation between student and faculty that culminates in the writing of the honors thesis, which is the focal point of the College’s Academic Learning Compact.

The integration of the John D. MacArthur campus into the Abacoa community offers an ideal setting for both informal and formal education, an educational opportunity usually found only in small private colleges. The presence of Scripps Research-Florida and the Max-Planck Institute on the MacArthur campus provides

extraordinary opportunities for Honors College students in the sciences in particular and already over 60 Honors College students have done internships at these institutions.

The Wilkes Honors College does not have departments. There are two chairs to supervise faculty and programs, with one chair covering the arts, humanities, and social sciences; and the other chair covering the natural sciences and mathematics.

2. LAST PROGRAM REVIEW AND RESPONSES

This is the second program review for the Wilkes Honors College, which opened in the Fall of 1999. The first program review was conducted in 2005.

The 2005 Program review identified some concerns. One concern was student retention: the report noted that in 2001, the Honors College retained 76% of its freshman FTIC students to the sophomore year, which was higher than the 71% retention figure for FAU at large but lower than we would like. As a result of that report, a great deal of effort was placed into student retention, including a better explanation of the Wilkes Honors College experience to potential students, an increased level of student service, and quicker response to student needs and interest. Those efforts have been quite successful. In 2007, persistence from freshman to sophomore year for Honors College FTICs was 91% and in 2008 (the last date for which numbers are available through the IEA retention tool), the figure was 86%.

The 2005 program review also identified faculty retention as a concern: from 2002-2005 the Honors College lost 8 faculty members. From 2005-2011 the Honors College lost 7 faculty members with one other transferring to the Boca campus. Because of budget challenges facing the SUS and FAU in particular, we have not been able to address ongoing salary concerns, but we have taken measures such as lightening the service load of non-tenured faculty and making counter-offers to faculty members who have received written offers from other institutions.

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A further concern noted in the 2005 program review was that the average value of scholarships offered to students has decreased since the College’s creation while the cost of tuition and room/board has increased. Unfortunately this remains a concern, as will be discussed below.

Finally, the 2005 program review noted the ongoing difficulty of recruiting students and providing housing. In response, the Honors College has significantly changed its method of recruiting. The Director of Admissions for FAU now oversees Honors College admission, and the entire recruiting staff for FAU recruits for the Honors College, rather than in past years when we had our own director and recruiting staff. We retain a necessary presence on the Jupiter campus, but the hope is that this new approach will expose more students to the Honors College. We also revised our housing policy to make it less of an economic deterrent to prospective students. In the past all students were required to live on campus freshman through senior year unless they had a medical exemption or exemption based on age or marriage. Our new policy, implemented in 2010, now requires students to live on campus only for their freshman and sophomore years.

Other significant changes since the previous program review include additions to our curricular offerings. The Honors College now offers concentrations in Business, Interdisciplinary Critical Theory, Transdisciplinary Visual Arts, and Minors in Ethics, and Interdisciplinary Theory of Knowledge. With the opening of a Medical School at FAU the Honors College and the College of Medicine developed the Wilkes Medical Scholars Program, which allows high school seniors to be admitted to the Honors College and complete their B.A. and medical degree in 7 years. The Honors College expanded its Pathways programs, which now include pathways in nursing, education, business, and engineering.

Some of these revisions have been made to help situate the College to be in a stronger position to recruit

students without requiring significant expansion of resources that are unlikely to be available in the near future. For example, a study of the tentative major of high school students who made contact with the Honors College since its inception (1999-2011) indicated that the top 7 most popular tentative majors were:

Premed 5628 Biology 2709 Business 2653 Psychology 2082 Engineering 2061 Undecided 2053 Law 1721

In the past we have had to tell prospective students interested in Business or Engineering that they cannot undertake their studies at the Honors College and must go to the Boca campus of FAU. We suspect that many of these high ability students ended up at another university. With the adoption of a Business concentration that has students take 5 to 6 courses in the College of Business and the rest of their coursework at the Honors College, we hope to attract a good number of these students to FAU. Similarly, with a new pathway with the College of Engineering, students can receive an AA degree from the Honors College and seamlessly transfer to the College of Engineering, with their math and physics honors coursework counting towards their engineering degree.

Another significant development in expanding honors options at FAU overall is that the Honors College has recently opened sections of its courses to non-honors students and has made efforts to cross list several of its courses with cognate departments at the Boca campus, to increase the opportunity for non-Honors College students to take our courses. With support from the university’s president and provost, as well as endorsement

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by an institution-wide taskforce during the summer of 2011, this type of permeability is likely to expand in the future.

3. INSTRUCTION

The College is known for excellent instruction and for strong student advising. Tenured or tenure-line faculty provide instruction for over 80% of lecture/seminar courses in the College (Appendix F). Average class size is approximately 16. In 2010-11 there were 28 tenure-line faculty members present, and with visiting faculty and instructors, the number of non-adjunct faculty present was 32.

ENROLLMENT TRENDS

By the standards of the National Collegiate Honors Council, the numbers of students enrolled would rank the FAU Wilkes Honors College as “mid-sized.” Headcount in Fall 2011 was 322. Peak headcount was achieved in Fall 2006, at 387. Since that time enrollment decreased to a low of 297 in Fall 2010 and 276 in Spring 2011, but the incoming class in Fall 2011 of 146 was one of our largest. Since its opening, over 565 Honors College students have graduated with Bachelor of Arts degrees from the College.

STUDENT DIVERSITY

The College has a strong record of enrolling a diverse group of students. Of the 304 students in our annual headcount for 2010-2011, 22% report themselves as a minority.

STUDENT SATISFACTION

Performance in instruction remains strong. The rating of overall quality of instruction continues to be better than the university mean: for undergraduates, it is 1.7, compared to 1.9 at the University, with a lower number reflecting a higher rating on a 1-5 scale. Student satisfaction with instruction and advising also remains higher than the university means and increased slightly over prior years: on a 1-4 scale where a higher number reflects a higher rating, students rate quality of instruction at 3.6 compared to a university mean of 3.0, and rate the quality of advising by faculty at 3.4, which compares favorably to past years and to the university total of 2.9. In 2010-11 the faculty offered 108 sections of thesis research or directed independent study sections

accommodating a headcount of 234, evidence of the extent to which the College fostered undergraduate research.

ASSESSMENT AND ACADEMIC LEARNING COMPACT

The Wilkes Honors College Assessment Plan for the Bachelor of Arts in the Liberal Arts and Sciences for 2010-2011 identifies expected learning outcomes in the areas of content knowledge and skills, communication skills, and critical thinking skills through its Academic Learning Compact (ALC) (see Appendix D). These outcomes are tied in part to honors theses, which each Wilkes Honors College student produces as a

requirement for graduation. The honors thesis is the culmination of the students’ four years of education, and the curriculum at the College is designed to prepare students for the thesis. Preparation for the thesis involves extensive mentoring of students by faculty with whom they have worked on an ongoing basis. The other component of Assessment is an evaluation of a student’s writing portfolio after their sophomore year by a faculty committee.

The College has identified additional strategic goals and objectives, as outlined in the most recent update of its strategic plan (publicly available at

http://www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/HC%20Strategic%20Plan%20Rev%202011.pdf):  Enroll an incoming class of at least 160 students per year, beginning in fall 2012.

 Maintain the diversity of the incoming class relative to peer honors colleges and programs.  Continue to increase faculty diversity.

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 Assist the Dean of Undergraduate Studies in building the University Honors Program until it maintains an incoming class of at least 100 students per year.

 Monitor to ensure that the number of Wilkes Honors College graduates who are accepted into professional and postgraduate programs remains high and that graduates who do not immediately continue their educations receive employment that enables them to contribute to a rich and vibrant community life.

 As a model paradigm for honors colleges across the nation, provide an outstanding learning environment for students that fosters close faculty-student mentoring, culminating in the writing of an honors thesis.  Retain faculty members with excellent records of instruction and high levels of research productivity.  Increase the breadth of academic opportunities for honors students by taking full advantage of the

Wilkes Honors College’s position as a college within a large university with vast resources, a factor that distinguishes it both from other small liberal arts colleges and from other honors opportunities.

 Increase partnerships with Scripps Research Florida, the Max Planck Institute, FAU’s medical school, and other educational/research enterprises with connections to the Jupiter/North Palm Beach area.

 To meet the Wilkes Honors College’s institutional responsibility of increasing the number of high ability students admitted to FAU, increase recruitment of out-of-state students while continuing to provide an honors education in the liberal arts and sciences to talented students from the state of Florida.

 Sponsor or co-sponsor additional programs that enrich the intellectual life of the community or help to address community need.

 Expand the variety of internships that contributes to the community and motivates students to continue serving their community.

The latest complete report of Assessment, for 2010-11, is included as Appendix E.

Partial results for the 2011-12 assessment are available for the thesis component of the ALC. (Evaluation of writing portfolios does not take place until late summer.) In the area of Written communication, 17 of 55 thesis received distinction and 38 honors, with none receiving an unacceptable score. In Content, there were 16 distinctions, 39 honors, and no unacceptable. In Critical thinking there were 16 distinctions, 38 honors, and 1 unacceptable; and in collaborative skills there were 21 distinctions, 33 honors, and 1 unacceptable. Pass rates thus are between 98-100% for each category.

4. RESEARCH

FUNDED RESEARCH

The Wilkes Honors College expects to contribute toward the University’s targets in funded research. In 2010-11 the College received $38,495 for organized research and $142,648 for sponsored instruction.

CREATIVE AND SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

Faculty produced 5 books and the rate of publication of peer reviewed articles per faculty remained the same as in 09-10; the rate of publication of books is consistent with the rate for the University overall and the rate for other peer-reviewed publications is slightly below the university rate (1.4 vs 1.8). The number of submissions of grant proposals decreased but the dollar value per faculty nearly doubled. Nevertheless, this figure is well below the university average. In evaluating the significance of this discrepancy it is important to note that a sizable portion of faculty at the Honors College work in areas within Humanities and Arts that do not

traditionally have significant access to large extramural grants and the College does not designate any faculty as research faculty with reduced teaching loads; in addition, few faculty in the College have access to graduate research assistants.

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6 5. SERVICE

The College service load increased minutely on a per faculty basis from the previous year (3.3 committees per faculty, compared with 3.2 in 2009-10 but compared with 2.4 in 2006-07). There was a substantial increase in faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications (.7 per faculty compared to .4 in the two prior years). The performance of faculty in providing service has been solid and has extended to helping to recruit students, taking students to conferences and helping students present their undergraduate research.

6. OTHER PROGRAM GOALS

 Secure fully endowed faculty positions in order to diversify the academic expertise of the faculty while simultaneously reducing E+G cost per student credit hour generated.

 Develop additional external support for scholarships, student and faculty research/travel, and program enhancement.

 Use naming rights for buildings to expand the College’s endowment.

 Use the College’s annual affinity trip (i.e., fundraising trips for donors and supporters) to develop lasting relations with new potential donors.

 Conduct at least one community event per month to bring new members of the public to Honors College and FAU events.

 Diversify membership on the Honors College Advisory Board.  Find additional sources for Honors College internship placements.

7. STRENGTHS AND OPPORTUNITIES

STRENGTHS:

The greatest strength of the Wilkes Honors College is its uniqueness. It distinguishes itself from virtually all other honors programs and colleges in the nation by providing its own faculty housed in the College, and by offering students the ability to take all 120 credits in their degree program within the Honors College while they reside on campus. It is one of only four true 4-year Honors Colleges in the nation, the others being the

University of Minnesota at Morris (www.morris.umn.edu), St. Mary's College of Maryland (www.smcm.edu), and New College of Florida (www.ncf.edu), all of which are selective public liberal arts colleges with fewer than 2,000 students and which, because of their similar characteristics, constitute our peer institution

comparative set when evaluating student retention. A comparison of the characteristics of honors programs and honors colleges in the state of Florida reveals that only the Wilkes Honors College and New College of Florida offer complete honors coursework over four years taught by faculty whose teaching assignment is dedicated entirely to honors students. This distinction places the Wilkes Honors College at the cutting edge of honors education, where it stands as a model to which honors programs around the nation aspire. The College itself aspires to be among the most distinguished small liberal arts colleges in the nation.

Specific related strengths are:

 Innovative curriculum that combines a distinctive liberal arts core with concentrations that allow focused study in specific area in the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, or mathematics, and that includes an internship or study abroad requirement, honors thesis, and interdisciplinary team-taught courses. The Honors College also emphasizes environmental and international studies both by requiring students to take at least one elective in each area, and by offering interdisciplinary concentrations in each area.

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7  Close student-faculty interaction and mentoring:

o student: tenure-earning faculty ratio in 2010-11 is 11:1. o standard class size averages 16 (but see the note below)

o 225 one-on-one tutorials (directed independent studies or thesis supervision) offered in Fall and Spring of 2010-2011.

While the average class size is relatively small at the Honors College, it is important to note that the average class size for pre-med students is significantly larger. In 2003-04 it was about 40 students per class. In response, the College began to offer multiple section of some large intro classes, which reduced the average class size in 2005-06 to about 24, though it rose to 30 in 2006-07. In 2010-11, the average class size that a pre-med student experiences was about 24 (See Appendix G).

 Nearly 80% of all courses are taught by tenure-earning faculty

 Quality of the full-time faculty: of the 28 tenure-earning faculty present in 2010-11, 28 have terminal degrees (Ph.D., M.F.A.). Their graduate institutions are Vanderbilt, U Illinois-Urbana-Champagne (2), U British Columbia, Georgia Tech, Brown, Penn, UC Berkeley (4), Kent State, UC Irvine, George Mason, Emory, Penn State, U South Carolina, U Florida, U Texas-Austin, Yale, Virginia Tech (2), U Nebraska-Lincoln, Johns Hopkins, U Wisconsin-Milwaukee, UNC-Chapel Hill, Indiana, U

Washington.

 Student accomplishments:

o Honors College graduates have been accepted to or attend law school, medical school, and graduate programs in areas such as Chemistry, Rhetoric, Comparative Literature, English, Psychology, Mathematics, Neuropsychology, and Political Science at places including Cal Tech, Case Western, FAU, FSU, Georgetown, Georgia Tech, M.I.T., Tulane, University of Florida, Johns Hopkins, University of Chicago, University of Durham (England), University of Miami, University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, University of Nebraska, and

University of Wisconsin among others. Other students went directly to work, be it for businesses such as banks and investment firms, the healthcare industry, nonprofits, or for government.

o 32 publications co-authored by students and Honors College faculty in peer-reviewed scholarly or scientific journals (see http://www.fau.edu/divdept/honcol/about_student_faculty_pub.htm)

WEAKNESSES:

 Student retention and graduation rates

Through 6 years, the graduation rate of Honors College FTIC students has reached 61% for the incoming class of 2004, with 7% persisting and 15% transferring or graduating from another SUS Institution. (6-year outcome data is available only for the first 4 classes at the Honors College). 6-year graduation rates for transfers from a Florida college has ranged from 50 to 80% for the classes entering 2000-2004; and ranges from 33.3 to 78% for students who transferred from other undergraduate

institutions. The largest group of these students entered in 2004 and has the highest graduate rate, 78%.1

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The 6-year graduation rates for the comparative cohort of selective public liberal arts colleges with fewer than 2000 students is higher, ranging from 51-75%.2 One peer institution, New College, reports a 6-year graduation rate in 2003 of 74%; however its figures for earlier years are lower. Its 6-year graduation rate for the 1991-1992 cohort is 56%. The graduation rate for the Honors College’s initial cohort is not far from what one might expect for an institution in its first years. Nevertheless, we do aspire to raise this graduation rate.

It is worth noting that since it opened in 1999 through the entering class of 2011, the Honors College has matriculated over 1550 students. Of this group, close to 300 who left the Honors College

transferred to another college within FAU.

 Faculty retention

Between 2002-2005 the Honors College lost 8 faculty members. From 2005 to 2011 another 7 have left. There are a number of reasons faculty decided to leaves the Wilkes Honors College. In some cases, there were personal reasons, such as a desire to be closer to family members. In others, faculty members received more lucrative salary offers elsewhere. Some left to take administrative positions. And some faculty members realized that they were unlikely to be successful in the tenure process here. The Honors College attracts very talented faculty who often receive multiple job offers and can readily find positions elsewhere.

OPPORTUNITIES:

 Collaborations with Scripps Research-Florida and the Max Planck Institute

A compelling opportunity for the Honors College is interaction with Scripps-Florida and the Max Planck Institute, which are located on the Jupiter campus. We have already placed over 50 undergraduates concentrating in the sciences in internships there. At the same time, the Honors College wants to continue to balance the offerings and resources in the sciences with those in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, to fulfill our mission of providing an outstanding liberal arts and sciences education and of developing the qualities of a free and responsible citizen.

 Collaborations with other units of FAU

One feature that sets the Honors College apart from other selective liberal arts colleges is that it is part of a large state university. This enables students, faculty and staff to benefit from the expertise of over a thousand faculty members. While the distance between the Honors College and the main campus at FAU is a barrier to day-to-day interactions, overcoming this barrier can create opportunities both for students and faculty. Honors College faculty have taught graduate courses in mathematics on the Boca campus and Honors College faculty have served on dissertation committees for FAU graduate

students; Honors College faculty participate with other FAU faculty in academic programs such as the Latin American Studies and the Women’s Studies certificates, and on university committees; and Honors College students participate in programs with other students at FAU such as the Spanish Honors Society, Study Abroad programs, and student government activities. Recently we have opened several Honors College courses to non-honors college students.

2 St. Mary’s College of Maryland: 75.1%; University of Minnesota-Morris: 51.2% (from Education Trust “College Results online”,

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9 8. WEAKNESSES AND THREATS

 Attracting top students in difficult economic times

The success of the Honors College in attracting top-flight students depends on our offering attractive scholarships. From its inception to the Spring semester of 2012, the Honors College has provided $11,968,966 in academic scholarships to its students. The average award provided to students in 1999-2000 was $4,045; this figure has decreased to $3,178 in 2011-12, while costs for room and board have steadily increased and the amount of tuition that Florida Bright Futures covers has decreased. The net cost of a year at the Honors College for a student with the highest level of Bright Futures coverage in 1999-2000 was $5,098; in 2010-11 that figure grew to $8,387 and it is projected to be $11, 032 for 2012-13. (See Appendix H).

 The College’s unique nature

Being unique is both a blessing and a curse. It helps distinguish the College in the marketplace. At the same time it requires the Admissions staff to explain the College to students unfamiliar with its model. Particularly in Florida, where there are relatively few private liberal arts colleges, the benefit of the College’s intimate learning environment is often not immediately understood. As the College’s increasing retention rates demonstrate, once students get to the Honors College, they overwhelmingly like the experience. The challenge is to get them to the College in the first place, and the recent changes in Admissions structure and strategy have been made with that goal in mind.

9. RESOURCE ANALYSIS

Like all other colleges at Florida Atlantic University (and perhaps most across the United States), the Wilkes Honors College has been hurt by the budget cuts that occurred from 2007 onward. As will be noted in the next section of this review, these cuts have meant that full-time faculty members in the Honors College were reduced from 36 in 2006-0207 to 28 in 2010-2011. As a result fewer sections of standard courses (i.e., not independent study, internship, or other special formats) were offered: 168 in 2010-2011 compared with 220 in 2007-2008. The result is less than ideal, but it also is not an

insurmountable obstacle to the College’s ability to fulfill its mission. Indeed, the College has been forced to become more entrepreneurial, aggressively increasing its funding from donations and endowments, plus planning for endowed professorships and programs for the future. With the Jupiter Science Initiative, shared positions with the Schmidt College of Science (and potentially the local research institutes) will insure expanding offerings to the sizable portion of Honors College students interested in the natural sciences. The challenge will be to find innovative ways to provide equally rich academic choices in the fine arts, humanities, and social sciences so that all Wilkes Honors College students have access to a balanced curriculum.

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Florida Atlantic University

Wilkes Honors College

COLLEGE PERFORMANCE REVIEW

Dr. Jeffrey Buller, Dean

May, 2012

This College Performance Review of the Wilkes Honors College, required by the Florida Atlantic University (FAU) Board of Trustees (BOT), is compliant with the guidelines and procedures of the BO (Appendixes A,B).

According to BOT guidelines, the FAU Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analysis (IEA) is to prepare annually a report of College Dashboard Indicators (CDIs) that provide program performance data for the past three years. CDIs for the Wilkes Honors College for 2010-2011 are included here as Appendix C. The accompanying Program Assessment Plan appears in Appendix D.

BOT guidelines also require that the Dean of the College review the CDIs and Program Assessment Reports and submit to the Provost an overall assessment of the College’s performance. These performance assessments are provided herein.

WILKES HONORS COLLEGE

PERFORMANCE REVIEW 2010-2011

Dean's evaluation of department's performance in instruction.

In 2010-11 the Honors College reduced its faculty headcount (from 36 in 06-07 to 30 in 09-10 to 28 in 10-11). Fewer sections in standard courses were offered (168, compared to 181 in 09-10 and 220 in 07-08) but average class size decreased because of the reduced student count from 332 to 304. FTE per instruction person increased slightly from 10 in 09-10 to 10.9 in 10-11. Performance in instruction remains strong. The rating of overall quality of instruction continues to be better than the university mean: for undergraduates, it is 1.7, compared to 1.9 at the University, with a lower number reflecting a higher rating on a 1-5 scale. Student satisfaction with instruction and advising also remains higher than the university means and increased slightly over prior years: on a 1-4 scale where a higher number reflects a higher rating, students rate quality of instruction at 3.6

compared to a university mean of 3.0, and rate the quality of advising by faculty at 3.4, which compares favorably to past years and to the university total of 2.9.

In 2010-11 the faculty offered 108 sections of thesis research or directed independent study sections accommodating a headcount of 234, evidence of the extent to which the College fostered undergraduate research.

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11 Rating (optional)

S+ S S- U

Part II Research, Creative, and Scholarly Activities Related Departmental Dashboard Indicator (DDI) data Funded research: B1 C7-9 D7-9 (efficiency) Creative and scholarly productivity: C1-6 D1-6 (efficiency) Dean's evaluation of department's performance in research, creative and scholarly activity:

Faculty produced 5 books and the rate of publication of peer reviewed articles per faculty remained the same as in 09-10; the rate of publication of books is consistent with the rate for the University overall and the rate for other peer-reviewed publications is slightly below the university rate (1.4 vs 1.8). The number of submissions of grant proposals decreased but the dollar value per faculty nearly doubled though this figure is well below the university average. In evaluating the significance of this discrepancy it is important to note that a sizable

fraction of faculty at the Honors College work in areas within Humanities and Arts that do not traditionally have significant access to major extramural grants and the College does not designate any faculty as research faculty with reduced teaching loads; in addition, few faculty in the College have access to graduate research assistants. Rating (optional)

S+ S S- U

Part III Service Related Departmental Dashboard Indicator (DDI) data Service productivity: B1-3 C1-3 (efficiency) Dean's evaluation of department's performance in providing service. The College service load increased minutely on a per faculty basis from the previous year (3.3 committees per faculty, compared with 3.2 in 2009-10 but compared with 2.4 in 2006-07). There was a substantial increase in faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications (.7 per faculty compared to .4 in the two prior years). The performance of faculty in providing service has been solid and has extended to helping to recruit students, taking students to conferences and helping students present their undergraduate research.

Rating (optional)

S+ S S- U

Summary and Future Plans Summary comments / Areas for improvement Honors College students have had great success in getting internships, presenting their work at conferences, publishing their work in peer-reviewed journals, and this has translated into a high success rate in getting into graduate and professional schools including FAU graduate programs.

Student headcount decreased and an area for improvement is to attract more high ability students to the College. The incoming class in 10-11 was one of the smallest in some time (86), whereas the incoming class in 11-12 was one of the highest (146). It is our expectation that the count of 86 new incoming students was a blip due to economic conditions and our inability to offer every student a scholarship that year.

Providing support for junior faculty and retaining existing faculty at a time when new hires are a difficulty is another goal.

As always, it would be highly desirable for faculty to increase grant support.

Attracting students to the Jupiter campus overall is a challenge that is important to address. We have lost students whose family did not think they could afford room and board, an expense we require for all freshmen and sophomores. If there was a larger general student base at the Jupiter campus that could fill the residence halls, we would not have the pressure to say no to those who never matriculate because they believe they can't afford to live in campus housing.

We need to address the ability to offer courses in physics.

Planned new initiatives We continue to plan to expand honors opportunities throughout all of FAU and hope to open doors to qualified Honors College students to take our courses and co-list honors courses with non-honors versions.

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Among our objectives is to provide pathways for students interested in Business and even Engineering. We are pursuing an initiative with Palm Beach State College to guarantee admission to the HC for students in their honors program who meet minimum standards.

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13 Appendix A.

Florida Atlantic University Departmental Performance Review - Guidelines and Procedures PURPOSE

Under policies adopted by the FAU Board of Trustees, each academic department within the university shall participate in an ongoing performance review process. The purpose of this process is to ascertain that the department’s programs of teaching, research, and service are performing at a satisfactory level, and through the process of self-examination, to assist the department in continuing improvement. The process is intended to avoid requiring extensive preparation of material by the department, being based instead on the department’s assessment goals and outcomes and quantitative data that are readily available in the university’s data systems. PROCESS

Annually, a report containing Departmental Dashboard Indicators and Goal Assessments and Outcomes shall be prepared by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Analysis (IEA) providing, for each department, the data shown in Attachment 1a for the past three years. The dean of the college shall review this report with the department and submit to the provost an overall assessment of the department’s performance, including an evaluation of whether the department has performed at an acceptable level in instruction, research (which includes creative and scholarly activities as appropriate to each department), and service.

If the provost determines that a department’s performance falls below an acceptable level in any of the three areas, the dean shall be required to recommend immediate steps for improvement to the department and to the provost. If a department’s performance falls below an acceptable level for two years out of any three-year period, the department shall be required to develop an action plan for improvement during the following year and submit it for approval by the dean and provost.

The action plan shall identify the shortcomings to be addressed and propose concrete measures to be taken over the next three years to remedy them. In preparing the action plan, the department may be required by the provost to involve external consultants if necessary and appropriate. The action plan shall take account of the department’s strengths and weaknesses, the university’s long-range plan, the current national status of the discipline, enrollment trends in the discipline, and the budgetary constraints faced by the college and university. The Florida Board of Governors has issued an Academic Program Review Policy Guideline (#PG 04.08.11) , requiring cyclic review of all academic programs in state universities at least every seven years. Each Spring, the department designated for Program Review, will present their report to the FAU Board of Trustees prior to submission to the Florida Board of Governors.

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14 Appendix B.

Departmental Performance Review Report Data

(Note: Data may be modified or refined, depending on developments in university data systems) I. Instruction

A. Assessment goals and outcomes for each degree program B. Input data

1. Faculty headcount, person years and FTE devoted to instruction a. Tenured and tenure-earning faculty

b. Non-tenure earning faculty

c. Research faculty

d. Adjuncts

e. Graduate assistants

2. Instructional faculty and adjuncts by gender and ethnicity

3. Average course section size and percent of sections taught by faculty 4. Number of majors in each degree program enrolled by:

a. level

b. gender and ethnicity

C. Productivity data

1. Annualized FTE produced by level

2. FTE produced by majors within department and by majors outside of department or college

3. Degrees awarded by each degree program D. Efficiency data

1. FTE produced at each level, per instructional person-year

2. Degrees awarded at each level, per faculty instructional person-year E. Effectiveness data

1. Overall rating of instructor by students on Student Perception of Teaching (SPOT) overall effectiveness question (Item 8)

2. Mean rating of satisfaction with instruction and advising in program, from Student Satisfaction Survey

II. Research, Creative and Scholarly Activities

A. Assessment goals and outcomes for research B. Input data

1. Faculty person years and FTE devoted to research, creative and scholarly activities C. Productivity data

1. Books

2. Other peer-reviewed publications 3. All other publications

4. Presentations at professional meetings or conferences 5. Productions/Performances/Exhibitions

6. Grant proposals submitted

7. Externally-funded research expenditures D. Efficiency data

1. Books per faculty member

2. Other peer-reviewed publications per faculty member 3. All other publications per faculty member

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15

5. Productions/Performances/Exhibitions per faculty member 6. Grant proposals submitted per faculty member

7. Externally-funded research expenditures per faculty member III. Service

A. Assessment goals and outcomes for service B. Productivity data

1. Faculty memberships on department, college and university committees 2. Faculty memberships on community and professional committees 3. Faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications C. Efficiency data

1. Faculty memberships on department, college and university committees per faculty member

2. Faculty memberships on community and professional committees per faculty member

3. Faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications per faculty member

Approved by the Committee on Academic and Student Affairs, 7/24/02 Approved by the FAU Board of Trustees, 10/16/02

Revised to reflect Florida Board of Governors Academic Program Review Policy Guideline (August 2004) and FAU data refinements and modifications, 2/2005

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16

Appendix C: Honors College Department Dashboard Indicators 2010-11

2010-2011 Program Review Honors College

I Instruction

A Assessment goals and outcomes for each degree program (reported separately) B Input Data

B 1 Headcount, Person Years and FTE -- Overall and Devoted To Instruction Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Tenured & tenure-earning

faculty

Professor, Assoc Professor, Asst Professor Total Headcount 30 30 28 28 660 Total Person-Years 25.4 24.4 23.4 23.4 587.8 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 14.6 16.1 13.9 13.9 325.1 Total FTE 33.9 32.5 31.2 31.2 783.7 FTE Devoted to Instruction 19.4 21.5 18.5 18.5 433.5 Non-tenure-earning faculty Instructors, Lecturers, Visiting Faculty Total Headcount 4 5 4 4 239 Total Person-Years 2.7 3.8 3.0 3.0 204.2 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 2.6 3.6 2.6 2.6 166.9 Total FTE 3.6 5.0 4.0 4.0 272.3 FTE Devoted to Instruction 3.4 4.8 3.5 3.5 222.6

Other personnel paid on faculty pay plan

Scholar/ Scientist/ Engineer, Research Assoc, Assoc In, Asst In, Postdoc Assoc

Total Headcount 101 Total Person-Years 80.8 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 12.2 Total FTE 107.7 FTE Devoted to Instruction 16.2

Adjuncts -- Total Headcount 17 18 22 22 656

Total Person-Years 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 124.1 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 119.8 Total FTE 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 165.5 FTE Devoted to Instruction 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.5 159.7

Graduate Assistants -- Total Headcount 1 1 1,228

Total Person-Years 0.1 0.1 361.9 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 0.0 0.0 226.3 Total FTE 0.2 0.2 482.6 FTE Devoted to Instruction 0.0 0.0 301.8

Other -- Total Headcount 3 3 4 4 277

Total Person-Years 0.3 0.7 0.5 0.5 50.5 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.5 15.9 Total FTE 0.4 0.9 0.6 0.6 67.4 FTE Devoted to Instruction 0.4 0.7 0.6 0.6 21.2

Total Total Headcount 54 56 59 59 3,161

Total Person-Years 30.1 30.6 28.9 28.9 1,409.3 Person-Years Devoted To Instruction 19.2 22.1 18.8 18.8 866.2 Total FTE 40.2 40.8 38.5 38.5 1,879.1 FTE Devoted to Instruction 25.6 29.4 25.1 25.1 1,154.9

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17

Source: Instruction and Research File

Report includes summer, fall and spring semester data

Faculty headcounts are unduplicated within year; faculty with appointments in multiple departments are counted in the department where they devoted most effort.

Adjuncts and Grad Assistants are counted in each department where they had an appointment. Person-year= 1 person working full time for one year

1.00 FTE = .75 person-years

B 2 Instructional Faculty and Adjuncts By Gender and Ethnicity Honors College

Instructional Faculty (Tenured, tenure-earning, &

non-tenure-earning) Honors College

College Total

University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011

American Indian/Alaskan Native Male 1

Total 1

Asian or Pacific Islander 0 0 0

Female 1 1 1 1 28

Male 1 1 79

Total 1 1 2 2 107

Black (Not of Hispanic Origin) 0

Female 2 2 2 2 35 Male 18 Total 2 2 2 2 53 Hispanic 0 0 0 Female 1 1 1 35 Male 1 1 1 1 26 Total 1 2 2 2 61

White (Not of Hispanic Origin) 0 0 4

Female 11 11 10 10 302

Male 18 17 16 16 396

Total 29 28 26 26 702

Non-Resident Alien Male 1 1

Total 1 1 Not Reported 0 Total 0 Total 0 0 0 4 Female 14 15 14 14 400 Male 20 19 18 18 520 Total 34 34 32 32 924

Source: Instruction and Research File

Instructional Faculty includes tenured, tenure-earning and non-tenure-earning faculty members who taught a course during the year.

B 2 Instructional Faculty and Adjuncts By Gender and Ethnicity Honors College

Adjuncts Honors College

College Total

University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011

Asian or Pacific Islander Female 1 1 9

Male 11

Total 1 1 20

Black (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 27

Male 14

Total 41

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Adjuncts Honors College

College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Male 1 14 Total 1 2 1 1 45

White (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 10 8 13 13 280

Male 6 8 7 7 269

Total 16 16 20 20 549

Non-Resident Alien Female 1

Total 1

Total Female 11 9 15 15 348

Male 6 9 7 7 308

Total 17 18 22 22 656

Source: Instruction and Research File

B 3 Average Course Section Size and Percent of Sections Taught By Faculty Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Course Level Type

185 181 168 168 5,265 Undergraduate Lecture/Seminar Sections Offered #

# Enrolled 2,707 2,717 2,444 2,444 179,212 Avg Section Enrollment 14.6 15.0 14.5 14.5 34.0

Sections Faculty-Taught # 160 159 148 148 3,272 % 86.5 87.8 88.1 88.1 62.1

Lab Sections Offered # 24 28 26 26 918

# Enrolled 334 362 350 350 18,484 Avg Section Enrollment 13.9 12.9 13.5 13.5 20.1

Sections Faculty-Taught # 10 15 8 8 420

% 41.7 53.6 30.8 30.8 45.8

Discussion Sections Offered # 182

# Enrolled 5,733

Avg Section Enrollment 31.5

Sections Faculty-Taught # 22

% 12.1

Other Course Types Sections Offered # 166 157 160 160 1,333

# Enrolled 352 353 330 330 9,458

Avg Section Enrollment 2.1 2.2 2.1 2.1 7.1

Sections Faculty-Taught # 149 153 138 138 942 % 89.8 97.5 86.3 86.3 70.7

Graduate Lecture/Seminar Sections Offered # 1,730

# Enrolled 22,742

Avg Section Enrollment 13.1

Sections Faculty-Taught # 1,441

% 83.3

Lab Sections Offered # 29

# Enrolled 238

Avg Section Enrollment 8.2

Sections Faculty-Taught # 20

% 69.0

Other Course Types Sections Offered # 1,985

# Enrolled 4,022

Avg Section Enrollment 2.0

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Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 % 94.4

Source: Instruction and Research File and Student Data Course File

'Other Course Types' includes DIS, Thesis/Dissertation Research, Individual Performance Instruction, Internships, etc. Sections taught by tenured, tenure-earning and non-tenure-earning faculty are counted as 'faculty-taught'

B 4 a Majors Enrolled By Level (Annual Headcount) Honors College (Program CIP: 240199)

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Bachelors 332 332 304 304 26,663 Masters/Specialist 4,486 Doctoral 905 Unclassified 4,192 Total 332 332 304 304 36,246

Source: Student Data Course File

Note: For Annual Headcounts, each student is counted once whether enrolled in summer, fall or spring. Students enrolled in more than one term during the year are included in the level of their latest term.

B 4 b Majors Enrolled (Annual Headcount) By Gender and Ethnicity Honors College (Program CIP: 240199)

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Undergraduate American Indian/Alaskan Native Female 2 2 1 1 66

Male 46

Total 2 2 1 1 112

Asian or Pacific Islander Female 10 9 10 10 707

Male 6 6 5 5 606

Total 16 15 15 15 1,313

Black (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 9 7 10 10 3,228

Male 4 2 5 5 1,911

Total 13 9 15 15 5,139

Hispanic Female 22 24 22 22 3,386

Male 15 22 20 20 2,436

Total 37 46 42 42 5,822

White (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 129 136 120 120 7,575

Male 118 109 98 98 5,971

Total 247 245 218 218 13,546

Non-Resident Alien Female 5 6 7 7 298

Male 10 6 4 4 311

Total 15 12 11 11 609

Not Reported Female 2 1 1 70

Male 2 1 1 1 52

Total 2 3 2 2 122

Total Female 177 186 171 171 15,330

Male 155 146 133 133 11,333

Total 332 332 304 304 26,663

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Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Male 9 Total 17

Asian or Pacific Islander Female 151

Male 105

Total 256

Black (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 481

Male 177

Total 658

Hispanic Female 421

Male 283

Total 704

White (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 2,031

Male 1,220

Total 3,251

Non-Resident Alien Female 178

Male 221

Total 399

Not Reported Female 63

Male 43

Total 106

Total Female 3,333

Male 2,058

Total 5,391

Unclassified American Indian/Alaskan Native Female 8

Male 5

Total 13

Asian or Pacific Islander Female 143

Male 108

Total 251

Black (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 555

Male 207

Total 762

Hispanic Female 400

Male 247

Total 647

White (Not of Hispanic Origin) Female 1,381

Male 897

Total 2,278

Non-Resident Alien Female 94

Male 75

Total 169

Not Reported Female 39

Male 33

Total 72

Total Female 2,620

Male 1,572

Total 4,192

Source: Student Data Course File

Note: For Annual Headcounts, each student is counted once whether enrolled in summer, fall or spring. Students enrolled in more than one term during the year are included in the level of their latest term.

Productivity Data

C 1 Annualized State-Fundable FTE Produced By Level Honors College

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01:17 Tuesday, October 02, 2012 21 Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Undergraduate Total 217.9 221.0 204.2 204.2 14,266.9 Graduate Total 2,280.3 Grad I 1,878.6 Grad II 401.8 Classroom 2,114.5 Thesis-Dissertation 165.8 Grand Total 217.9 221.0 204.2 204.2 16,547.2

Source: Student Data Course File Based On State-Fundable Credit Hours

Note: Grad I and Grad II groups will sum to Graduate Total; Classroom and Thesis-Dissertation will sum to Graduate Total.

C 2 Annualized State-Fundable FTE Produced In/Out Of Department or College Honors College

Courses offered by:

Honors College College of Honors College University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Course Level FTE produced by students who are:

104.4 105.9 94.0 94.0 635.3 Lower Division Undergraduate Majors within the department

Majors outside the department, but within the college 1,507.6 Majors outside the college 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.4 3,567.8

Total 111.0 112.5 100.4 100.4 5,710.7

Upper Division Undergraduate FTE produced by students who are:

102.2 106.5 100.5 100.5 4,839.6 Majors within the department

Majors outside the department, but within the college 2,361.8 Majors outside the college 4.7 2.1 3.4 3.4 1,354.7

Total 106.9 108.6 103.8 103.8 8,556.1

Graduate FTE produced by students who are:

1,700.0 Majors within the department

Majors outside the department, but within the college 368.8

Majors outside the college 211.6

Total 2,280.3

Total FTE produced by students who are:

206.6 212.4 194.4 194.4 7,174.9 Majors within the department

Majors outside the department, but within the college 4,238.2 Majors outside the college 11.3 8.7 9.8 9.8 5,134.1

Total 217.9 221.1 204.2 204.2 16,547.2

Source: Student Data Course File Based On State-Fundable Credit Hours

C 3 Degrees Awarded

Honors College (Program CIP: 240199)

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Degrees awarded with a:

220.0 Associates Single major

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01:17 Tuesday, October 02, 2012 22 Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 All 220.0

Bachelors Degrees awarded with a:

55.0 73.0 69.0 69.0 4,225.0 Single major

Double or triple major 367.5

All 55.0 73.0 69.0 69.0 4,592.5

Masters Degrees awarded with a:

1,347.0 Single major

Double or triple major 1.0

All 1,348.0

Specialist Degrees awarded with a:

27.0 Single major

All 27.0

Doctorate Degrees awarded with a:

88.0 Single major

All 88.0

Total Degrees awarded with a:

55.0 73.0 69.0 69.0 5,907.0

Single major

Double or triple major 368.5

All 55.0 73.0 69.0 69.0 6,275.5

Source: Student Data Course File

Note: Degrees awarded with multiple majors may result in fractional degree totals for some groups.

A degree awarded with a single major contributes 1 degree, a double major contributes 1/2 degree in each major, and a triple major contributes 1/3 degree in each major to the degree totals.

Efficiency Data

D 1 Annualized FTE Produced Per Instructional Person-Year Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Undergraduate 11.4 10.0 10.9 10.9 16.4 Graduate 2.6 Total 11.4 10.0 10.9 10.9 19.1

Source: Instruction and Research File and Student Data Course File Includes Instructional Person-Years from all personnel categories.

Annualized FTE (C 1) produced for each person-year devoted to instruction (B 1 department total).

D 2 Degrees Awarded Per FACULTY Instructional Person Year Honors College (Program CIP: 240199)

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Associates 0 0 0 0 0.4 Bachelors 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.2 9.3 Masters 0 0 0 0 2.7 Specialist 0 0 0 0 0.1 Doctorate 0 0 0 0 0.2 Total 3.2 3.7 4.2 4.2 12.8

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Source: Instruction and Research File and Student Data Course File

Includes Instructional Person-Years from Tenured, Tenure-earning and Non-tenure-earning faculty only

Number of Degrees (C 3) produced for each Faculty person-year devoted to instruction (B 1 tenured, tenure-earning and non-tenure-earning faculty).

Effectiveness Data

E 1 Rating of Quality of Instruction (item 20) and Instructor (item 21) from Student Perception of Teaching (SPOT) Honors College

Scale 1=Excellent 5=Poor

20. Rate the quality of instruction as it contributed to your learning in the course.

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Undergraduate # Sections 200 204 196 196 5,842 Mean Rating 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.9 Graduate # Sections 1,179 Mean Rating 1.7 Total # Sections 200 204 196 196 7,021 Mean Rating 1.7 1.8 1.7 1.7 1.8

Source: Student Perception of Teaching Results

Effectiveness Data

E 1 Rating of Quality of Instruction (item 20) and Instructor (item 21) from Student Perception of Teaching (SPOT) Honors College

Scale: 1=One of Most Effective 5=One of Least Effective

21. What is your rating of this instructor compared to other instructors you have had?

Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Undergraduate # Sections 200 204 196 196 5,842 Mean Rating 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Graduate # Sections 1,179 Mean Rating 1.9 Total # Sections 200 204 196 196 7,021 Mean Rating 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0

Source: Student Perception of Teaching Results

E 2 Mean Rating of Satisfaction With Instruction & Advising In Program Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2006-2007 2008-2009 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Student Level 149 136 183 183 2,177 Undergraduate Quality of courses in degree program # Responses

Mean 3.4 3.4 3.5 3.5 3.0

Quality of instructors in degree program # Responses 151 136 183 183 2,106

Mean 3.5 3.5 3.6 3.6 3.0

Quality of advising in college advising office # Responses 109 99 139 139 1,928

Mean 3.0 3.0 3.1 3.1 2.7

Quality of advising by faculty # Responses 146 124 175 175 1,779

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Honors College College Total University Total 2006-2007 2008-2009 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Graduate Quality of courses in degree program # Responses 592

Mean 3.1

Quality of instructors in degree program # Responses 575

Mean 3.1

Quality of advising in college advising office # Responses 441

Mean 2.9

Quality of advising by faculty # Responses 474

Mean 3.0

Scale 1=Poor 4=Excellent

Source: Student Satisfaction Survey

II. Research, Creative & Scholarly Activities

A Assessment Goals and Outcomes for Research (reported separately) B 1 Faculty Person Years and FTE Devoted to Research

Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 Departmental Research

Tenured & tenure-earning faculty Professor, Assoc Professor, Asst Professor

Person-Years 5.5 3.9 4.7 4.7 109.8

FTE 7.3 5.2 6.3 6.3 146.3

Non-tenure-earning faculty Instructors, Lecturers, Visiting Faculty

Person-Years 0.1 0.1 6.2

FTE 0.2 0.2 8.3

Other personnel paid on faculty pay plan -- Person-Years 12.8 FTE 17.0 Total Person-Years 5.5 3.9 4.8 4.8 128.7 FTE 7.3 5.2 6.5 6.5 171.6 Sponsored Research

Tenured & tenure-earning faculty Professor, Assoc Professor, Asst Professor

Person-Years 0.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 28.3

FTE 0.6 0.4 0.0 0.0 37.8

Non-tenure-earning faculty Instructors, Lecturers, Visiting Faculty

Person-Years 4.7

FTE 6.3

Other personnel paid on faculty pay plan

-- Person-Years 36.8

FTE 49.1

Total Person-Years 0.5 0.3 0.0 0.0 69.9

FTE 0.6 0.4 0.0 0.0 93.2

Source: Instruction and Research File

'Other personnel paid on faculty pay plan' includes Scholar/Scientist/Engineer (all ranks), Research Assoc, Assoc In, Asst In, Postdoctoral Assoc

Includes summer, fall and spring semester data Person-year= 1 person working full time for one year 1.00 FTE = .75 person-years

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01:17 Tuesday, October 02, 2012 25

C 1-9 Research/Scholarly Productivity Honors College

Honors College College Total

University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 1. Books (including monographs & compositions) # 5 4 5 5 133 2. Other peer-reviewed publications # 40 41 39 39 1,202

3. All other publications # 16 23 28 28 544

4. Presentations at professional meetings or conferences # 45 49 52 52 1,433 5. Productions/Performances/Exhibitions # 6 9 0 0 437

6. Grant Proposals Submitted # 6 7 4 4 333

Sponsored Research & Program Expenditures

7. Organized Research # $82,007 $22,563 $38,495 $38,495 $15,342,822 8. Sponsored Instruction # $105,496 $127,041 $142,648 $142,648 $5,760,158 9. Other Sponsored Activities # $0 $0 $0 $0 $4,562,633

Sources: College Dean's Office and Division of Research (Grant Proposals Submitted & Sponsored Research & Program Expenditures) Note: Grant Proposals Submitted includes proposals administered by the Division of Research only. This number does not include funding proposals administered by the FAU Foundation.

University Total Grant Proposals Submitted excludes proposals submitted by units outside the University's Colleges (e.g., IRM, Library). Sponsored Research and Program Expenditures excludes expenditures by units outside the University's Colleges (e.g., Library, Henderson School).

Organized Research: All research and development activities of an institution that are separately budgeted and accounted for. Sponsored Instruction: Instructional or training activity established by grant, contract, or cooperative agreement.

Other Sponsored Activities: Programs and projects financed by Federal and non Federal agencies and organizations which involve the performance of work other than instruction and organized research (e.g., health or community service projects).

D 1-9 Efficiency Data Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 1. Books (including monographs & compositions) per faculty member 0.2 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 2. Other peer-review publications per faculty member 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.4 1.8 3. All other publications per faculty member 0.5 0.8 1.0 1.0 0.8 4. Presentations at professional meetings or conferences per faculty member 1.5 1.6 1.9 1.9 2.2 5. Productions/Performances/Exhibitions per faculty member 0.2 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.7 6. Grant proposals submitted per faculty member 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.5 Sponsored Research & Program Expenditures

7. Organized research expenditures per faculty member $2,734 $752 $1,375 $1,375 $23,247 8. Sponsored instruction expenditures per faculty member $3,517 $4,235 $5,095 $5,095 $8,728 9. Other sponsored activity expenditures per faculty member $0 $0 $0 $0 $6,913

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III. Service

A Assessment Goals and Outcomes for Service (reported separately) B 1-3 Service Productivity Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 1. Faculty memberships on department, college or university committees # 110 96 93 93 2,822 2. Faculty memberships on community or professional committees # 15 17 5 5 1,255 3. Faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications # 13 13 19 19 1,284

Source: College Dean's Offices

C 1-3 Efficiency Data Honors College Honors College College Total University Total 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2010-2011 2010-2011 1. Faculty memberships on department, college or university committees per faculty member 3.7 3.2 3.3 3.3 4.3 2. Faculty memberships on community or professional committees per faculty member 0.5 0.6 0.2 0.2 1.9 3. Faculty serving as editors or referees for professional publications per faculty member 0.4 0.4 0.7 0.7 1.9

Faculty committee memberships and faculty serving as editors or referees (Section III B 1-3) per tenured and tenure earning faculty member (Section I B 1)

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27

Appendix D: Wilkes Honors College 2010-2011 Assessment Plan & Academic Learning Compact Form

 

CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (Declarative Knowledge, Research Skills, Technical Skills):

Through the writing of an honors thesis, students will demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the fundamental concepts and methods in the student’s area of study as well as the ability to draw on ideas and methods from related disciplines where appropriate. (Outcome 3)

In addition, content knowledge will be assessed by the evaluation of a Sophomore Writing Portfolio (SPW) that includes a scholarly paper and a Forum paper written in response to several presentations by experts in different disciplines. (Outcome 4)

COMMUNICATION (Written Communication):

Through the writing of an honors thesis, students will demonstrate proper use of

grammar, syntax, structure and style in the creation of a persuasive argument, and/or will meet criteria of competent communication appropriate to the concentration for which the thesis is written. (Outcome 2)

In addition, written communication skills will be assessed by the evaluation of the Sophomore Writing Portfolio (Outcome 5).

COMMUNICATION (Collaborative Skills):

Through the process of conducting research and formulating the thesis in collaboration with the thesis advisors, students will demonstrate the ability to interact with faculty by

communicating ideas in the process of researching and writing the thesis, responding to criticisms from faculty advisors, taking the initiative, and meeting deadlines. (Outcome 2)

CRITICAL THINKING (Analytical Skills; Creative Skills):

Through the writing of an honors thesis, students will demonstrate the ability to raise appropriate questions and use in-depth analysis in order to make an original contribution to existing scholarship, and/or demonstrate the application of critical thinking skills to the completion of a creative project. (Outcome 1)

In addition, critical thinking skills will be assessed by the evaluation of the Sophomore Writing Portfolio (Outcome 6).

Details on assessment:

HARRIET L. WILKES HONORS COLLEGE

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

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