Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous & Explosive Chemicals. Application, Exclusions & Definitions

Full text

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Process Safety Management

of Highly Hazardous &

Explosive Chemicals

Process Safety Management

of Highly Hazardous &

Explosive Chemicals

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Application

Application

1910.119(a)(i)

A process which involves a chemical at or above the specified threshold quantities listed in Appendix A

to this section

1910.119(a)(i)

A process which involves a chemical at or above the specified threshold quantities listed in Appendix A

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Application

Application

1910.119(a)(ii)

A process which involves a flammable liquid or gas (as defined in 1910.1200(c) of this part) on site

in one location, in a quantity of 10,000 pounds (4535.9 kg)

1910.119(a)(ii)

A process which involves a flammable liquid or gas (as defined in 1910.1200(c) of this part) on site

in one location, in a quantity of 10,000 pounds (4535.9 kg)

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What Facilities are Covered

What Facilities are Covered

 Those Who Use Chemicals in Appendix A: A List of highly

hazardous chemicals, toxics and reactive (Mandatory). Contains a listing of 137 toxic and reactive highly hazardous chemicals which present a potential for a catastrophic event at or above the

threshold quantity

 Examples

Chemical Threshold Quantity (TQ)  Anhydrous Ammonia 10,000 lbs

 Chlorine 1,500 lbs

 Hydrogen Sulfide 1,500 lbs

 Phosgene 100 lbs

 Sarin 100 lbs

 Those Who Use Chemicals in Appendix A: A List of highly

hazardous chemicals, toxics and reactive (Mandatory). Contains a listing of 137 toxic and reactive highly hazardous chemicals which present a potential for a catastrophic event at or above the

threshold quantity

 Examples

Chemical Threshold Quantity (TQ)

 Anhydrous Ammonia 10,000 lbs  Chlorine 1,500 lbs  Hydrogen Sulfide 1,500 lbs  Phosgene 100 lbs

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 Important Interpretation: 2007 - 06/11/2007 - OSHA defines "on-site in one location" for Process Safety Management of Highly

Hazardous Chemicals standard

OSHA interprets "on-site in one location" to mean that the standard applies when a threshold quantity of a highly hazardous chemical (HHC) exists within an area under the control of an employer or

group of affiliated employers. It also applies to any group of vessels that are interconnected, or in separate vessels that are close

enough in proximity that the HHC could be involved in a potential catastrophic release.

 Important Interpretation: 2007 - 06/11/2007 - OSHA defines "on-site in one location" for Process Safety Management of Highly

Hazardous Chemicals standard

OSHA interprets "on-site in one location" to mean that the standard applies when a threshold quantity of a highly hazardous chemical (HHC) exists within an area under the control of an employer or

group of affiliated employers. It also applies to any group of vessels that are interconnected, or in separate vessels that are close

enough in proximity that the HHC could be involved in a potential catastrophic release.

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 Important Interpretation: 02/01/2002 - PSM applicability to warehousing flammable

liquids and other HHCs

 A company has a warehouse for the storage and distribution of

laboratory grade chemicals such as flammable liquids and formaldehyde. The company storage and distribution operation does not include any processing, dispensing, mixing, stirring, agitation, blending, filtering, evaporating, or drying.

PSM-covered highly hazardous chemical(s) (HHC) exists in your

warehouse/process. You listed two HHCs that are covered by PSM: formaldehyde and flammable liquids. If other HHCs exist in the

warehouse/process, they too would be a basis for establishing a PSM-covered process

 However, when an HHC is stored in one or more cans, packages,

containers, tanks, vessels, etc., the amount is aggregated if a single event such as a fire, explosion, incompatible chemical reaction, etc.

could result in a release of HHC. For example, if a fire could consume an entire warehouse all the HHCs would be aggregated as either flammable liquids, flammable gasses, or by specific Appendix A chemical listing, where applicable.

 Important Interpretation: 02/01/2002 - PSM applicability to warehousing flammable

liquids and other HHCs

 A company has a warehouse for the storage and distribution of

laboratory grade chemicals such as flammable liquids and formaldehyde. The company storage and distribution operation does not include any processing, dispensing, mixing, stirring, agitation, blending, filtering, evaporating, or drying.

PSM-covered highly hazardous chemical(s) (HHC) exists in your

warehouse/process. You listed two HHCs that are covered by PSM: formaldehyde and flammable liquids. If other HHCs exist in the

warehouse/process, they too would be a basis for establishing a PSM-covered process

 However, when an HHC is stored in one or more cans, packages,

containers, tanks, vessels, etc., the amount is aggregated if a single event such as a fire, explosion, incompatible chemical reaction, etc.

could result in a release of HHC. For example, if a fire could consume an entire warehouse all the HHCs would be aggregated as either flammable liquids, flammable gasses, or by specific Appendix A chemical listing, where applicable.

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What Types of Industries?

What Types of Industries?

 Industries that Process Chemicals Such As:

 Industrial Organics & Inorganics  Paints

 Pharmaceuticals  Adhesives

 Sealants and Fibers  Petrochemical facilities

 Paper Mills (typically four covered processes)

 Food Processing with Anhydrous Ammonia over the TQ (10,000 lbs)

 Industries that Process Chemicals Such As:

 Industrial Organics & Inorganics  Paints

 Pharmaceuticals  Adhesives

 Sealants and Fibers  Petrochemical facilities

 Paper Mills (typically four covered processes)

 Food Processing with Anhydrous Ammonia over the

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Exclusions

Exclusions

1910.119(a)(1)(ii)(A)

Hydrocarbon fuels used solely for workplace consumption as a fuel (e.g., propane used for comfort heating, gasoline for

vehicle refueling), if such fuels are not a part of a process containing another highly hazardous chemical covered by

this standard

1910.119(a)(1)(ii)(A)

Hydrocarbon fuels used solely for workplace consumption as a fuel (e.g., propane used for comfort heating, gasoline for

vehicle refueling), if such fuels are not a part of a process containing another highly hazardous chemical covered by

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 Retail facilities;

 Oil or gas well drilling or

servicing operations; or,

 Normally unoccupied

remote facilities

 Retail facilities;

 Oil or gas well drilling or

servicing operations; or,

 Normally unoccupied remote facilities

Exclusions

1910.119(a)(2)(ii)

Exclusions

1910.119(a)(2)(ii)

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Affect of the “Meer” Decision:

MEER ruling and the MEER Memorandum addressed in the Secretary's letter, OSHA's enforcement policy that the Agency would not cite employers for violations of 1910.119 where stored flammable liquids in atmospheric tanks were connected to a

process, unless the process outside of the amount in storage contained more than 10,000 pounds of the substance

Affect of the

Affect of the

Meer

Meer

Decision:

Decision:

MEER

MEER ruling and theruling and the MEERMEER Memorandum addressed in the Memorandum addressed in the Secretary's letter,

Secretary's letter, OSHA's OSHA's enforcement policy that the Agency enforcement policy that the Agency would not cite employers for

would not cite employers for violations of 1910.119 where stored violations of 1910.119 where stored flammable liquids in atmospheric tanks were connected to a

flammable liquids in atmospheric tanks were connected to a

process, unless the process outside of

process, unless the process outside of the amount in storage the amount in storage contained more than 10,000 pounds of the substance

contained more than 10,000 pounds of the substance

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Definitions

Definitions

1910.119(b)

1910.119(b)

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Definitions

Definitions

 Atmospheric tank means a storage tank which has been

designed to operate at pressures from atmospheric

through 0.5 p.s.i.g. (pounds per square inch gauge, 3.45 Kpa).

 Boiling point means the boiling point of a liquid at a

pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute (p.s.i.a.) (760 mm.).

 Catastrophic release means a major uncontrolled

emission, fire, or explosion, involving one or more highly hazardous chemicals, that presents serious danger to employees in the workplace.

 Atmospheric tank means a storage tank which has been

designed to operate at pressures from atmospheric

through 0.5 p.s.i.g. (pounds per square inch gauge, 3.45 Kpa).

 Boiling point means the boiling point of a liquid at a

pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch absolute (p.s.i.a.) (760 mm.).

 Catastrophic release means a major uncontrolled

emission, fire, or explosion, involving one or more highly hazardous chemicals, that presents serious danger to employees in the workplace.

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Definitions

Definitions

 Facility means the buildings, containers or equipment

which contain a process.

 Highly hazardous chemical means a substance

possessing toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive properties and specified by paragraph (a)(1) of this section.

 Hot work means work involving electric or gas

welding, cutting, brazing, or similar flame or spark-producing operations.

 Normally unoccupied remote facility means a facility

which is operated, maintained or serviced by

employees who visit the facility only periodically to check its operation and to perform necessary

operating or maintenance tasks. No employees are permanently stationed at the facility.

 Facility means the buildings, containers or equipment

which contain a process.

 Highly hazardous chemical means a substance

possessing toxic, reactive, flammable, or explosive properties and specified by paragraph (a)(1) of this section.

 Hot work means work involving electric or gas

welding, cutting, brazing, or similar flame or spark-producing operations.

 Normally unoccupied remote facility means a facility

which is operated, maintained or serviced by

employees who visit the facility only periodically to check its operation and to perform necessary

operating or maintenance tasks. No employees are permanently stationed at the facility.

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Definitions

Definitions

 Process means any activity involving a highly

hazardous chemical including any use, storage,

manufacturing, handling, or the on-site movement of such chemicals, or combination of these activities. For purposes of this definition, any group of vessels which are interconnected and separate vessels which are located such that a highly hazardous chemical

could be involved in a potential release shall be considered a single process.

 Replacement in kind" means a replacement which

satisfies the design specification.

 "Trade secret" means any confidential formula,

pattern, process, device, information or compilation of information that is used in an employer's business

 Process means any activity involving a highly

hazardous chemical including any use, storage,

manufacturing, handling, or the on-site movement of such chemicals, or combination of these activities. For purposes of this definition, any group of vessels which are interconnected and separate vessels which are located such that a highly hazardous chemical

could be involved in a potential release shall be considered a single process.

 Replacement in kind" means a replacement which

satisfies the design specification.

 "Trade secret" means any confidential formula,

pattern, process, device, information or compilation of information that is used in an employer's business

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Determining Application

Determining Application

Determine:

Chemicals in Your Process

Process Chemistry

Quantity of Chemicals in lbs

Compare to Appendix A List with

Threshold Quantities (TQ’s)

Determine:

Chemicals in Your Process

Process Chemistry

Quantity of Chemicals in lbs

Compare to Appendix A List with

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Determining Application

Determining Application

How to Calculate from Gallons to lbs?

Multiply the gallons of Liquid

x 8.33 (How much a gallon of water weighs) x

Specific Gravity of Liquid = lbs of Liquid

Example: Wt of 10,000 gallons of gasoline

10,000 x 8.33 x 0.739 = 61,559 lbs

How to Calculate from Gallons to lbs?

Multiply the gallons of Liquid

x 8.33 (How much a gallon of water weighs) x

Specific Gravity of Liquid = lbs of Liquid

Example: Wt of 10,000 gallons of gasoline

10,000 x 8.33 x 0.739 = 61,559 lbs

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NASA High Pressure Gas

Plant - Hydrogen Plant

NASA High Pressure Gas

Plant - Hydrogen Plant

Application & Exclusions

Case Study

Team Exercise

Application & Exclusions

Case Study

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Hydrogen Facts

Hydrogen Facts

 A colorless, highly flammable gaseous element, the lightest of all gases and the most abundant element in the

universe, used in the production of synthetic ammonia and methanol, in petroleum refining, in the hydrogenation of organic materials, as a reducing atmosphere, in

oxyhydrogen torches, and in rocket fuels.  Atomic number: 1

 atomic weight: 1.00794  melting point −259.14ーC  boiling point −252.8ーC

 density at 0ーC 0.08987 gram per liter  valence 1

 A colorless, highly flammable gaseous element, the lightest of all gases and the most abundant element in the

universe, used in the production of synthetic ammonia and methanol, in petroleum refining, in the hydrogenation of organic materials, as a reducing atmosphere, in

oxyhydrogen torches, and in rocket fuels.  Atomic number: 1

 atomic weight: 1.00794  melting point −259.14ーC  boiling point −252.8ーC

 density at 0ーC 0.08987 gram per liter  valence 1

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Hydrogen Facts

Hydrogen Facts

How much does a gallon of liquid

hydrogen weigh?

 1 liter of liquid hydrogen weighs only 0.07 kg. That is

a density of 70.8 kg/mウ (at 20 K) There are 3.7854 liters per gallon, so 1 gallon of liquid H2 weighs 0.268 kg. There are 2.2046 lbs per kilogram, so 1

gallon of liquid H2 weighs 0.5908 lbs. Compare that

with the weight of 1 gallon of water: 8.3454 lbs (more than 14 times heavier!)

How much does a gallon of liquid

hydrogen weigh?

 1 liter of liquid hydrogen weighs only 0.07 kg. That is a density of 70.8 kg/mウ (at 20 K) There are 3.7854 liters per gallon, so 1 gallon of liquid H2 weighs 0.268 kg. There are 2.2046 lbs per kilogram, so 1

gallon of liquid H2 weighs 0.5908 lbs. Compare that

with the weight of 1 gallon of water: 8.3454 lbs (more than 14 times heavier!)

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Team Exercise

Team Exercise

With the Information to Follow in The

NASA Case Study Video, Presentation &

Notebook

With Your Team Members, Answer the

Following Questions:

With the Information to Follow in The

NASA Case Study Video, Presentation &

Notebook

With Your Team Members, Answer the

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Case Study Facts

Case Study Facts

 The High Pressure Gas Plant Uses  Helium

 Nitrogen  Hydrogen

 The Nitrogen & Helium Plant is one Section of the Plant  The Hydrogen Plant is remotely located from the

Nitrogen & Helium Plant

 The Hydrogen is Piped from the Hydrogen Plant to the

Engine Test Stands through a valved system

 There are approximately 100 miles of pipe at the NASA

Stennis Space Center

 The High Pressure Gas Plant Uses

 Helium  Nitrogen  Hydrogen

 The Nitrogen & Helium Plant is one Section of the Plant  The Hydrogen Plant is remotely located from the

Nitrogen & Helium Plant

 The Hydrogen is Piped from the Hydrogen Plant to the

Engine Test Stands through a valved system

 There are approximately 100 miles of pipe at the NASA

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Case Study Exploration

Case Study Exploration

1.

Are the Nitrogen & Helium sections of the plant

a covered process? Yes or No & Why

2.

Is the Hydrogen Plant a covered process?

Why?

3.

How Much Hydrogen is in the Hydrogen Plant

- Find in the PSM Documentation?

4.

How is the amount of Hydrogen Calculated?

5.

Is that All the Hydrogen in the covered

process?

We will discuss the Team Findings

1.

Are the Nitrogen & Helium sections of the plant

a covered process? Yes or No & Why

2.

Is the Hydrogen Plant a covered process?

Why?

3.

How Much Hydrogen is in the Hydrogen Plant

- Find in the PSM Documentation?

4.

How is the amount of Hydrogen Calculated?

5.

Is that All the Hydrogen in the covered

process?

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What’s Next

What’s Next

Process Information &

Toxicity

Process Information &

Toxicity

Figure

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References

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