• No results found

Interagency National Security Knowledge and Skills in the Department of Defense

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2021

Share "Interagency National Security Knowledge and Skills in the Department of Defense"

Copied!
20
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

(1)

INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882

Interagency National Security Knowledge and Skills in the Department of Defense

Joseph F. Adams Amy A. Alrich Colin M. Doyle P. M. Picucci Robert B. Polk Steven B. Walser I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-5204 Log: H 14-000650 June 2014 Copy

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

(2)

About This Publication

The views, opinions, and findings should not be construed as representing the official position of either the Department of Defense or the sponsoring organization.

Copyright Notice

© 2014 Institute for Defense Analyses

4850 Mark Center Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882 • (703) 845-2000. This material may be reproduced by or for the U.S. Government pursuant to the copyright license under the clause at DFARS 252.227-7013 (a)(16) [Sep 2011].

(3)

I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S

IDA Document D-5204

Interagency National Security Knowledge and Skills in the Department of Defense

Joseph F. Adams Amy A. Alrich Colin M. Doyle P. M. Picucci Robert B. Polk Steven B. Walser

(4)
(5)

Interagency National Security

Knowledge and Skills in Department

of Defense

Joseph F. Adams, Amy A. Alrich, Colin M.

Doyle, P. M. Picucci, Robert B. Polk,

Steven B. Walser

Institute for Defense Analyses

June 2014

(6)

2011 National Defense Authorization Act

• “Assess the current state of interagency national security

knowledge and skills in Department of Defense civilian

and military personnel, and make recommendations for

strengthening such knowledge and skills.” Legislation

requires assessments and recommendations regarding:

─ Interagency national security training, education, and rotational assignment opportunities available

─ Integration of interagency national security education into the professional military education system

─ Levels of interagency national security knowledge and skills possessed by personnel

─ Incentives and disincentives for personnel undertaking interagency assignments, education, and training opportunities

─ Plans or current efforts to improve interagency national security knowledge and skills of civilian and military personnel

(7)

Fact Finding – As Executed

• IDA executed a practicable approach to fact finding

─ Examining

o Rosters of Department of Defense (DOD) positions in other Departments

o Educational opportunities and quotas for executives

o Precepts to promotion boards and analysis of official biographies

─ Conducting

o Meetings with General Officer Management Office (GOMO) and Senior Executive Management Office (SEMO) offices

o A limited number of interviews with senior executives from the Military Departments and Washington Headquarters Services o Research results provided insights, but external time and funding

constraints would not permit statistically significant sampling without the use of questionnaires

(8)

Training and Education Findings

• DOD’s definition of ‘interagency’ is limited

– Does not consider state, local, non-governmental organizations, or industry

• GS13-15/O-4-O-6 level

– Robust inclusion of interagency topics in curriculum

– Interagency students featured prominently in educational programs

• General Officer/Flag Officer/Senior Executive Level

opportunities are limited

– Coordination and timing issues pose scheduling difficulties for Senior Executives

– Tendency among senior leaders is to promote existing opportunities as valuable for subordinates

Addresses statutory requirements

(9)

Professional Experience and Rotational Assignment

Opportunities

• Opportunities exist below the executive level; few at the

executive level

• They are viewed as career ‘broadening’ experiences

• For uniformed flag officers, they were comprised of ‘Joint’ billets

at the State Department, in the intelligence community, National Security Staff and sometimes at Department of Energy and

White House

• For civilian senior executives they may involve positions with

supervisory authority depending on the memorandums of

understanding between DOD and other Departments regarding scope of responsibilities, authorities, and rating schemes

• SEMO comments suggest efficiency drills limit participation in

such rotations

(10)

Incentives and Disincentives

• Executives do not always know whether they should agree to

educational or professional experience opportunities, nor do they know how doing so might assist their career

• Incentives

─ GOMO precepts suggest consideration of other skill sets such as language competency and multi-national and interagency experience

─ Numerous opportunities exist below the executive level for training, education, and professional experiences.

─ Office of the Secretary of Defense for Policy is currently designing a model for a rotational and professional development program (plan)

• Disincentives

─ Risk of being out of sight and out of mind when serving in non-Service billets ─ No formalized or systematic reintegration process

─ Challenging to attend educational or training opportunities when confronted with daily executive responsibilities

─ Uniformed or civilian executive management processes do not appear to directly reward career broadening experiences

6

Addresses statutory

(11)

Analysis of Official Service Biographies

Service Flag Officer and Senior Executive Biographiesж

Interagency Keywords

Combatant Command* Foreign Policy National Security Council*

Congressional* Intelligence* Special Operations

Corps of Engineers Interagency State Department

Council on Foreign Relations Joint Forces Staff College Strategic Planner*

Engagement Joint Task Force White House

Federal Executive Institute Liaison

Fellow National Defense University*

* Categories representing a group of IA keywords

* Combatant Command also contains references to COCOM and CCMD * Congressional also contains references to Legislative

* Intelligence also contains references to National Security Agency or NSA

* National Defense University also contains references to Industrial College of the Armed Forces and National War College

* National Security Council also contains references to National Security Council Staff * Strategic Planner also contains references to Strategic Plans

ж SES Biographies were obtained from the Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service Defense

(12)

Sample Size

Entire Bio Assignments/ Education Air Force GO 252 252

Air Force SES 192 192

Army GO 358 358

Army SES 273 273

National Guard GO 305 305

Marine Corps GO 107 n/a

Navy/Marine Corps SES 272 272

Navy GO 312 n/a

Other SES 343 343

All GOs 1,334 915

(13)

Percent GO Biographies Containing Interagency

Keywords

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%

Entire Bio: All Services (n = 1334)

Assignments: Air Force, Army, National Guard (n = 915) Education: Air Force, Army, National Guard (n = 915)

(14)

Percent SES Biographies (DTMS) Containing

Interagency Keywords

0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18%

Entire Bio (n = 1080) Assignments (n = 1080) Education (n = 1080)

*Categories representing a group of Interagency keywords

Addresses statutory requirement 3

(15)

Average Number of Interagency Keywords per

Biography

0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Unique References Per Biography

Total References Per Biography

(16)

Histograms of Unique Keyword References

Addresses statutory requirement 3

(17)

Observations and Inferences from Biographies

• Interagency experiences take place in a great variety of

assignment domains

─ Some of the domains with the greatest participation include

o Intelligence

o Joint Task Force

o Liaison

o Special Operations

o National Defense University

─ Interview sessions revealed some individuals with tremendous levels of interagency experience

• There appears to be a large number of executives who have

limited interagency experience and education

─ More than 300 flag officers and over 500 SES had none of the keywords associated with their resumes

(18)

Recommendations

• The DOD should thoroughly consider the value proposition of interagency training, education, and professional experiences

─ Currently, this proposition is articulated more clearly in terms of ‘joint’ or enterprise training, education, and professional

experiences in publications, processes, and regulations

─ “Interagency” is not clearly defined throughout the Department o Definition: Of or pertaining to United States Government

agencies and departments, including the Department of Defense (Joint Pub 1-02)

─ Personnel systems need to more clearly capture interagency training, education, and professional experiences

o For this assessment, inferences had to be made based on biographies

Addresses statutory requirement 5

(19)

R E P O R T D O C U M E N TAT I O N PA G E Form Approved

OMB No. 0704-0188

Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS.

1 . R E P O R T D AT E ( D D - M M - Y Y ) 2 . R E P O R T T Y P E 3 . D AT E S C O V E R E D ( F r o m – To )

June 2014 Final

4 . T I T L E A N D S U B T I T L E 5 a . C O N T R A C T N O .

Interagency National Security Knowledge and Skills in the Department of Defense DASW01 04 C 0003

5 b . G R A N T N O .

5 c . P R O G R A M E L E M E N T N O ( S ) . 6 . A U T H O R ( S ) 5 d . P R O J E C T N O .

Joseph F. Adams, Amy A. Alrich, Colin M. Doyle, P. M. Picucci, Robert B. Polk, Steven B. Walser

5 e . TA S K N O .

C6396

5 f . W O R K U N I T N O . 7 . P E R F O R M I N G O R G A N I Z AT I O N N A M E ( S ) A N D A D D R E S S ( E S )

Institute for Defense Analyses 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22311-1882

8 . P E R F O R M I N G O R G A N I Z AT I O N R E P O R T N O .

IDA Document D-5204

9 . S P O N S O R I N G / M O N I T O R I N G A G E N C Y N A M E ( S ) A N D A D D R E S S ( E S ) 1 0 . S P O N S O R ’ S / M O N I T O R ’ S A C R O N Y M ( S )

Institute for Defense Analyses 4850 Mark Center Drive

Alexandria, VA 22311-1882 11 . S P O N S O R ’ S / M O N I T O R ’ S R E P O R T N O ( S ) .

1 2 . D I S T R I B U T I O N / AVA I L A B I L I T Y S TAT E M E N T

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

1 3 . S U P P L E M E N TA R Y N O T E S

1 4 . A B S T R A C T

Section 1051 of the 2011 National Defense Authorization Act required the Department of Defense (DOD) to commission a study assessing the current state of interagency national security knowledge and skills of DOD civilian and military executives. IDA interviewed officials from organizations responsible for managing interagency education, training, and professional experiences, and a select number of general/flag officers (GO/FO) and members of the Senior Executive Service (SES), with varying degrees of interagency skills. IDA reviewed precepts of GO/FO promotion boards, analyzed templates of joint assignments, and examined official biographies to assess interagency education and professional experience based on keyword searches. IDA’s findings highlight the lack of a parallel entity to the Joint Staff J-7 for civilian and SES interagency education. Unlike the value proposition regarding joint or enterprise knowledge and skills, interagency has not been articulated throughout DOD therefore there is little incentive for skill acquisition. Additionally, interagency topics do not feature prominently in DOD educational programs and only 3.6 percent of the joint executive billets provide opportunities outside DOD. Ultimately, IDA found that, while not well tracked within personnel systems, some executives appear to possess significant interagency knowledge and skills while many more lack any relevant experience.

1 5 . S U B J E C T T E R M S

Interagency, training, education, professional experiences, detail assignments' incentives, disincentives, Senior Executive Service (SES), flag officer, general officer 1 6 . S E C U R I T Y C L A S S I F I C AT I O N O F : 1 7 . L I M I TAT I O N O F A B S T R A C T UU 1 8 . N O . O F PA G E S 18 1 9 a . N A M E O F R E S P O N S I B L E P E R S O N Steven B. Walser a . R E P O R T b . A B S T R A C T c . T H I S PA G E 1 9 b . T E L E P H O N E N U M B E R ( I n c l u d e A r e a C o d e ) (703) 845-6879 U U U

(20)

References

Related documents

The increased emphasis on 21st Century Skills at the global level has increased the demand for formal education to ensure, alongside knowledge related to traditional academic

The learner, who has advanced social cognitive abilities (e.g., theory of mind) might accept the teacher’s explanations and imitate their actions, words and behaviours, in order

As a result of this stagnation of total rail passenger traffic in Italy and the rise of the HSR, the share of high speed has particularly increased in the total Italian

While this report offers a glimpse into the type and scope of substance abuse prevention and recovery services available at UIHOs, enhanced data from the Uniform Data System

Optimal Uncertainty Quantifica- tion of a risk measurement from a thermal-hydraulic code using Canonical Moments... OPTIMAL UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF A RISK MEASUREMENT

Using NHANES 1999-2006 data on adults aged >20 years, we investigated the relationship between urinary BPA (N=2,534), monoethyl-phthalate (mEP, N=5,431), monobutyl-

With respect to the 2013 TILA Servicing Final Rule, certain requirements, specifically the periodic statement and ARM disclosure requirements, only apply to closed-end mortgage

This study investigates the effects of core self-evaluations, job autonomy, and intrinsic motivation on employees’ perceptions of their in-role job perfor- mance, based on