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N E W S R E L E A S E

CONTACT: Katherine Blodgett

Vice President of Public Relations

phone: 215.893.1939

e-mail: kblodgett@philorch.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE DATE: February 19, 2014

YANNICK NÉZET-SÉGUIN

AND THE PHILADELPHIA

ORCHESTRA ANNOUNCE 2014-2015 SEASON

The 40/40 Project: 40 Works Not Performed on Subscription by

The Philadelphia Orchestra in 40 Years

to Honor Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th Birthday

Multi-Season Requiem Focus Reaches Its Pinnacle

with Bernstein’s Epic

MASS

Month-Long Art of the Pipe Organ Celebrates the

Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ

Season Highlights also include Rachmaninoff’s Complete Symphonies,

a Three-Week St. Petersburg Festival,

and “Theater of a Concert” Collaborations

(Philadelphia, February 19, 2014)—Philadelphia Orchestra Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin and President and CEO Allison Vulgamore today announce The Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2014-15 season, the third for Nézet-Séguin, whose leadership of the venerable and innovative ensemble has garnered acclaim from critics and audiences alike since he took the helm in 2012.

A hallmark of the 2014-15 season is the 40/40 Project, a broadening of the Orchestra’s repertoire by presenting 40 works not performed on a Philadelphia Orchestra subscription concert in the last 40 years, in honor of Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th birthday and in recognition of requests from the Orchestra’s audiences. Other highlights include a month-long “Art of the Pipe Organ” celebration; the culmination of a

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multi-year requiem exploration with Bernstein’s epic MASS; Rachmaninoff’s complete symphonies; performances that push the boundaries of the concert experience, including a collaboration with the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre; guest appearances from the world’s most revered and critically acclaimed conductors and soloists; and educational Family Concerts and special events. The season’s repertoire spans over 300 years, from Buxtehude to a world premiere commission from Nico Muhly and the North American premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s Piano Concerto. The 2014-15 season also includes the Philadelphians’ annual subscription series at Carnegie Hall, an appearance at New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC), the presentation of China’s National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA) Orchestra, and a 2015 Tour of Europe.

“My first two seasons as music director of The Philadelphia Orchestra were a time of learning, of getting to know the exceptional musicians of the Orchestra and the audience,” says Yannick Nézet-Séguin. “And both were eager to help this process of discovery and to share their expectations and desires for our collaboration. Now, in my third season, we are ready to embark on a journey of musical exploration into some new territory with a variety of repertoire. I am very proud of this third season of mine because it is the most diverse in terms of repertoire. As a whole it makes a journey through the great treasure of music that we want to bring you, week after week, an experience that is a special event.”

“Yannick has once again curated an illuminating season, which introduces a special sound partnership with the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ, continues our in-depth musical explorations with further Theater of a Concert presentations, and broadens our repertoire,” says Philadelphia Orchestra President and CEO Allison Vulgamore. “In this season we again add to the ranks of Philadelphia artistic partners with whom we’re collaborating on exciting and thought-provoking inter-disciplinary projects. Our audiences have multiplied dramatically as we welcome a mix of newcomers and long-time patrons to our concerts—music lovers all. We are exploring something meaningful and powerful together in our music-making, thereby bringing a fresh and exciting musical vibrancy to our home in Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center. Thank you for being a part of this journey together.”

2014-15 Season Highlights Overview

 40/40 Project: Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s 40th birthday provides the context for the 40/40 Project, which will present 40 works not performed on a Philadelphia Orchestra subscription concert in the last 40 years. In response to audience feedback the 40/40 Project will introduce works new to the

Orchestra’s repertoire, although often by composers familiar to Philadelphia subscription audiences, as well as works of composers of our time, including Jennifer Higdon and Michael Daugherty, among others. The Project also includes the world premiere of a work by Nico Muhly commissioned by The Philadelphia Orchestra and the North American premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s jazzy and rhythmic Piano Concerto.

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 Verizon Hall’s Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ—the largest mechanical-action concert hall organ in the U.S.—resounds for Art of the Pipe Organ, a month-long celebration featuring three organ virtuosos, three organ concertos, and great organ repertoire including Strauss’s Also sprach Zarathustra,

Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 (“Resurrection”), Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass, and a new Halloween organ concert that features a virtual performance by the legendary Leopold Stokowski at the keys.

 A three-week St. Petersburg Festival in January focuses on the works of Russian masters Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, and Shostakovich, showcasing the legendary Philadelphia Sound.

 Nézet-Séguin leads the Philadelphians in the complete Rachmaninoff symphonies, emphasizing the ensemble’s storied relationship with the composer.

 The Orchestra’s multi-season focus on requiems reaches a pinnacle with the rarely performed Bernstein MASS.

 The Orchestra partners with the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre for a special Valentine’s Day performance featuring works inspired by the Bard.

 The Orchestra continues to expand the boundaries of the concert experience with its “Theater of a Concert” presentations, adding theatrical elements to performances such as a staged version of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf with film, and Bernstein MASS.

 Strauss 150: To commemorate the 150th anniversary of this iconic composer’s birth, the Orchestra concludes a two-year exploration of his works.

 A two-year cycle of Beethoven symphonies reaches its culmination.

 Many of the world’s most-acclaimed conductors and soloists return as guests including former Music Director Christoph Eschenbach, Valery Gergiev, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Alan Gilbert, Vladimir Jurowski and multi-week visits by Stéphane Dèneve, Gianandrea Noseda, and Bramwell Tovey. Jakub Hrůša and Susanna Mälkki make their Philadelphia Orchestra debuts and Bramwell Tovey and Paul Goodwin make their subscription debuts.

 Many notable soloists make their returns such as Lang Lang, Sarah Chang, André Watts, Gil Shaham, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Emanuel Ax, Lisa Batiashvili, and Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg. A number of musicians, including violinist Alina Ibragimova, mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly, cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras, pianist Jorge Federico Osorio, and soprano Carolyn Sampson make their debuts, while such artists as organist Peter Richard Conte, trumpeter Alison Balsom, violinist Benjamin Beilman, and baritone Shuler Hensley make subscription debuts. Five musicians of The

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Philadelphia Orchestra appear—Principal Clarinet Ricardo Morales, Principal Horn Jennifer Montone, Concertmaster David Kim (leading a program from his chair), Principal Tuba Carol Jantsch

(subscription debut), and Principal Viola Choong-Jin Chang.

 Season highlights also include the Orchestra’s annual subscription series at Carnegie Hall; an appearance at NJPAC; the presentation of China’s National Centre for the Performing Arts

Orchestra; a 2015 tour of Europe; plus holiday programs, education and Family Concerts, and other special events.

The 40/40 Project

Yannick Nézet-Séguin marks his 40th birthday in the 2014-15 season (on March 6, 2015) and to honor this milestone The Philadelphia Orchestra presents 40 works not performed on subscription in 40 years.

“In my first two years as music director in Philadelphia, I got the chance to listen to what were the

expectations and the desires of our audiences,” says Nézet-Séguin. “One thing that I heard frequently was the wish to hear more new pieces, as well as works that we don’t get to hear often, sometimes even by well-known composers. The 40/40 Project came as a result of us thinking creatively about how we can apply ourselves to expanding and diversifying the Orchestra’s repertoire.”

40/40 Project works are presented throughout the season and range from Bernstein’s MASS, grand organ repertoire, and more familiar works such as the First and Second suites from The Nutcracker and

Peter and the Wolf, to works by living composers and new pieces by Nico Muhly and Mark-Anthony Turnage. The artistic endeavor begins with the first subscription concerts (September 26-28) when the Orchestra performs works selected by the audience, and different on each night. Other 40/40

performances include:

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Glazunov’s “Autumn,” from The Seasons (40/40)and Khachaturian’s Piano Concerto (40/40) performed by Jean-Yves Thibaudet in a program that also includes Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 1 conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin. (October 8-11)

 Seven 40/40 works will be highlighted during the Orchestra’s multi-week Art of the Pipe Organ Celebration: Alan Gilbert leads the first Philadelphia Orchestra subscription performances of Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass (40/40)and the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Sibelius’s

Night Ride and Sunrise (40/40)(October 16-18); Vladimir Jurowski conducts the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Julian Anderson’s The Stations of the Sun (40/40)(October 23-25); and Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads a spectacular all-organ weekend featuring Buxtehude’s Chaconne in E minor in an orchestration by Carlos Chávez (40/40), Jongen’s Symphonie concertante (40/40), and

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the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Guilmant’s Symphony No. 1 for Organ and Orchestra (40/40) and Stephen Paulus’s Grand Concerto for Organ and Orchestra (40/40). (November 6-8)

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Janáček’s Jealousy (40/40) conducted by Jakub Hrůša in his Philadelphia Orchestra debut. The program also features André Watts performing Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8. (November 13-15)

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Rossini’s Variations for Clarinet and Orchestra (40/40) and the first subscription performances of Debussy’s Rhapsody No. 1, for clarinet and orchestra (40/40), performed by Principal Clarinet Ricardo Morales. Juanjo Mena conducts the program, which also includes Rimsky-Korsakov’s Capriccio espagnol (40/40) and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4. (November 28-30).

 Bramwell Tovey makes his subscription debut conducting his own Songs of the Paradise Saloon, for trumpet and orchestra (40/40),in its first Philadelphia Orchestra performances (40/40). Trumpeter Alison Balsom makes her Philadelphia Orchestra subscription debut. The program of theatrical music also includes the first Philadelphia Orchestra subscription performances of Gershwin’s Catfish Row:

Suite from Porgy and Bess (40/40)as well as Britten’s Passacaglia from Peter Grimes and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story. (December 11-13)

 Six 40/40 works will be highlighted during a three-week St. Petersburg Festival conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin including Glazunov’s “Winter” from The Seasons and Suites Nos. 1 and 2 from Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker (January 15-17) and selections from Shostakovich’s The Gadfly

(January 28-31). In addition the North American premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s Piano Concerto, written for and performed by Marc-André Hamelin and conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, who gave the piece its world premiere will appear on a program that also includes the Orchestra’s first subscription performances of Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in C-sharp minor orchestrated by Stokowski. (January 22 & 23)

 The Orchestra collaborates with The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre for a first-time Philadelphia Orchestra performance of the Prelude from Walton’s Selections from As You Like It, among other selections (40/40). The Valentine’s Day performance features a program of music all inspired by the Bard with Cristian Măcelaru conducting and with actors from the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre enhancing works including Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, selections from Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Berlioz’s Overture to Beatrice and Benedict. (February 14)

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Jennifer Higdon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Violin Concerto (40/40), performed by Curtis-trained Benjamin Beilman in his subscription debut. The program, conducted by Robert Spano, also includes Higdon’s blue cathedral as well as Debussy’s

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Iberia and Stokowski’s orchestration of “The Sunken Cathedral” from Preludes(40/40). (February 26-28)

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Vaughan Williams’s Symphony No. 4 (40/40). Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts the program, which also features Haydn’s Symphony No. 92 (“Oxford”) and Emanuel Ax performing Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3. (March 5-7)

 Close artistic partner Gianandrea Noseda returns for a two-week residency and leads programs featuring two 40/40 works: Respighi’s Ancient Airs and Dances for the Lute, Suite No. 2, and the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Michael Daugherty’s Reflections on the Mississippi. The Respighi is paired with Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto performed by Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg and Holst’s The Planets in a performance that also features the women of the Philadelphia Singers Chorale. (March 20-22) Principal Tuba Carol Jantsch makes her subscription debut as soloist in Daugherty’s Reflections on the Mississippi, for tuba and orchestra. Mahler’s Symphony No. 5 completes the program. (March 26-28)

 The first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Mozart’s Symphony in D major, K. 320, after the Serenade in D major (“Posthorn”), and Carl Stamitz’s Viola Concerto in D major featuring Principal Viola Choong-Jin Chang. Paul Goodwin makes his subscription debut conducting the program, which also includes Beethoven’s Consecration of the House Overture and Symphony No. 4. (April 10 & 11)

 A Philadelphia favorite, Stéphane Denève returns for a two-week residency, leading programs the feature five 40/40 works. The first (April 16-18) includes the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of selections from Poulenc’s Les Animaux modèles (40/40),Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf (with film) (40/40), Saint-Saëns Carnival of the Animals featuring twins Christina and Michelle Naughton on piano (40/40), as well as Roussel’s The Spider’s Feast. The second (April 23-25) features the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Magnus Lindberg’s Graffiti and the first subscription performances of John Williams’s Excerpts from Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Excerpts from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet complete the program, which also features the Philadelphia Singers Chorale.

 Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads the first complete Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Bernstein’s MASS (40/40), bringing together significant musical forces for this sacred work written to honor President John F. Kennedy. (April 30-May 3)

 Associate Conductor Cristian Măcelaru leads the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Ligeti’s Romanian Concerto (40/40) in a program that also includes Enescu’s Romanian Rhapsody

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No. 1 (40/40), Sarah Chang performing Dvořák’s Violin Concerto, and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1 in this penultimate subscription series. (May 7-9)

 The world premiere of an orchestral work by Nico Muhly commissioned by The Philadelphia

Orchestra closes the season with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting the final subscription series in a program that also includes Rachmaninoff’s Third Symphony and Lisa Batiashvili performing

Shostakovich’s Violin Concerto No. 1. (May 13-16)

The Art of the Pipe Organ

Mozart called it the “King of Instruments” and the organ figures prominently in the Orchestra’s 2014-15 season with four weeks of heart-pounding programming showcasing masterful organists, monumental organ repertoire, and the nearly-7,000-pipe Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ, the largest mechanical-action concert hall organ in the U.S., resounding through Verizon Hall.

“We are blessed in Philadelphia to have this magnificent instrument, the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ,” says Nézet-Séguin. “The organ is a symphonic instrument. It is the only instrument that can actually rival a full symphony orchestra and this is why the combination of a great organ and an orchestra is one of the richest that can exist in our repertoire. The colors of this organ will combine with the glorious Philadelphia Sound to create a powerful universe of music.”

The Art of the Pipe Organ begins with guest conductor and New York Philharmonic Music Director Alan Gilbert leading the first Philadelphia Orchestra subscription performances of Janáček’s rarely heard 1926 masterpiece, the powerful Glagolitic Mass, which includes a prominent role for the organ.(October 16-18) The program also features Dvořák’s The Golden Spinning Wheel and the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of Sibelius’s tone poem Night Ride and Sunrise.

The Orchestra’s good friend and frequent collaborator Vladimir Jurowski returns to lead the second week (October 23-25), introducing the music of Julian Anderson with the first Philadelphia Orchestra

performances of The Stations of the Sun. The Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ will be showcased in Richard Strauss’s iconic work for orchestra and organ, Also sprach Zarathustra, and the young Russian violinist Alina Ibragimova will make her Philadelphia Orchestra debut with Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 4.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts the third and fourth weeks of the celebration. The music director’s love of choral works and organ will be on full display with Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 (“Resurrection”) in a performance featuring Philadelphia’s Academy of Vocal Arts alumna soprano Angela Meade, British mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly in her Philadelphia Orchestra debut, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir under the direction of Joe Miller. (October 30-November 2)

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The Art of the Pipe Organ culminates with Nézet-Séguin leading a spectacular All-Organ weekend featuring different soloists and repertoire on each performance. The first night (November 6) features Jongen’s remarkable Symphonie concertante for organ and orchestra (40/40), commissioned in 1926 for The Philadelphia Orchestra and the world-renowned Wanamaker Organ. Peter Richard Conte, Grand Court Organist of the Wanamaker Organ, makes his subscription debut. Highlighting the second performance (November 7) is the first Philadelphia Orchestra performance of Guilmant’s astonishing Symphony No. 1 for Organ and Orchestra with Grammy Award-winning Paul Jacobs at the keys. The final performance (November 8) centers on the first Philadelphia Orchestra performance of Stephen Paulus’s lyrical Grand Concerto for Organ and Orchestra, performed by Canadian Ken Cowan. All three

performances also include Elgar’s organ-rich “Enigma” Variations and Buxtehude’s Chaconne in E minor, originally for organ, but heard here in the orchestrated version by Carlos Chávez, another 40/40

presentation.

Also during Art of the Pipe Organ: a Halloween Organ Extravaganza featuring all three organists from the All-Organ Weekend performing Halloween staples (Musorgsky’s A Night on Bald Mountain, Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor), in addition to many special surprises, plus a summoning of the

Orchestra’s past music director, Leopold Stokowski, with his organ roll recording of Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. (This concert does not feature The Philadelphia Orchestra.) (October 31 at 9:30 PM)

Rachmaninoff and the St. Petersburg Festival

Rachmaninoff loved The Philadelphia Orchestra, and often composed with the sound of the Philadelphians in his head. In the 2014-15 season, Nézet-Séguin conducts all three of the great composer’s glorious symphonies. Performances of Rachmaninoff’s complete symphonies begin with Symphony No. 1 in the second week of subscription concerts. (October 8-11) Rachmaninoff’s First Symphony was a colossal failure when it premiered in 1897 (conductor Alexander Glazunov, whose work “Autumn” from The Seasons also appears on the program, was reportedly inebriated) and wasn’t heard again for nearly 50 years. Eugene Ormandy and the Philadelphians gave the piece its successful American premiere in 1948. Symphony No. 2 appears on the program during the St. Petersburg Festival. (January 22-23)

Rachmaninoff himself led the Philadelphians in the work at a performance at the Academy of Music in 1909—his first in the United States. The Symphony No. 3 was written specifically for The Philadelphia Orchestra. It had its world premiere in 1936 with Leopold Stokowski on the podium and three years later was recorded with Rachmaninoff conducting. The Philadelphians end their 2014-15 season with Nézet-Séguin leading the expressive and beloved work. (May 13-16)

The resplendent and famous Philadelphia strings also take center stage when the Orchestra travels, figuratively, to St. Petersburg for three weeks in January for a further celebration of the Russian masters. Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts the entire St. Petersburg Festival, beginning with a program of

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Tchaikovsky and Glazunov. (January 15-17) 40/40 works include Glazunov’s “Winter” from The Seasons

and, perhaps surprisingly, the Suites Nos. 1 and 2 from The Nutcracker (the Second Suite in its first complete Philadelphia Orchestra performances).Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 completes the program. Week two (January 22-23), highlighted by Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2, opens with the first

subscription performances of the composer’s famous Prelude in C-sharp minor, orchestrated by Leopold Stokowski. The Philadelphia Orchestra gave the world premieres of six of Rachmaninoff’s works, and in that spirit of history-making concerts, this program also features the North American premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s Piano Concerto, written for and performed by Marc-André Hamelin. Hamelin and Nézet-Séguin gave the piece its world premiere with the Rotterdam Philharmonic in 2013. The final week (January 28-31) features two works by Shostakovich: the Piano Concerto No. 2, with Russian-born Kirill Gerstein; and selections from the Suite from The Gadfly, in the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5 opens this program.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin Leads Bernstein’s Epic MASS

A multi-season exploration of great requiems including performances by those of Mozart, Brahms, Verdi, and Fauré reaches what Yannick Nézet-Séguin calls “the pinnacle” of the journey with the first complete Philadelphia Orchestra performances of the epic and rarely-performed Bernstein MASS. (April 30-May 3) The legendary composer and conductor’s sacred work, conceived as a requiem mass for John F. Kennedy in conjunction with the dedication of the Kennedy Center in 1971, draws on Broadway, religious, and popular influences and deploys a battalion of forces including two orchestras, rock and marching bands, vocalists, and multiple choirs. The spiritual heart of the work is represented by the Celebrant, performed by baritone Shuler Hensley in his subscription debut. Disillusioned by doubt, the Celebrant suffers a crisis of faith en route to eventual reconciliation and peace. A Catholic Mass seen through the eyes of a Jewish composer, Bernstein’s MASS explores themes still relevant today: religious community vs. individual identity, challenging authority vs. conforming to communal belief, war vs. coming together. Theatrical elements and stage direction by Kevin Newbury as well as collaborations with the Westminster

Symphonic Choir and other community partners assist in bringing Bernstein’s stunning vision to life in this destination event.

“Theater of a Concert”: Philadelphia Orchestra Collaborations

The Philadelphia Orchestra is committed to transforming the way its audiences connect to the music, through artistic initiatives that range from expanding the repertoire or experimenting with lighting, to multi-media presentations and full-scale collaborations with other major arts organizations that push the limits of the concert experience.

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 A collaboration with the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre in the company’s Philadelphia Orchestra subscription debut. The Orchestra’s associate conductor, Cristian Măcelaru, leads a special

Valentine’s Concert featuring the first-time Philadelphia Orchestra performance of the Prelude from Walton’s Selections from As You Like It (among other selections), as well as Berlioz’s Overture to

Beatrice and Benedict, Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet, and excerpts from Mendelssohn’s Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream. (February 14)

 Back by popular demand, reprise performances of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, which sold out when the Orchestra presented the work for the first time in 30 years in the 2012-13 season. A Symphony V.0 production with brilliant minimalist staging by renowned stage director James Alexander and lighting design by Jon H. Weir, the 2014-15 performances feature return engagements by mezzo-soprano Karen Cargill, bass-baritone Andrew Foster-Williams, and tenor Andrew Staples as the Evangelist. Joining the ensemble are the Westminster Symphonic Choir, soprano Carolyn Sampson in her Philadelphia Orchestra debut, and Philippe Sly as Jesus; Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts. (April 1 & 4)

 An evening of Modern Fairy Tales focusing on Peter and the Wolf in a decidedly adult version encompassing both Prokofiev’s composition accompanied by the 2008 Oscar®-winning animated short film Peter and the Wolf LIVE. Stéphane Denève conducts this edgy, dramatic series, which also features the first Philadelphia Orchestra performances of selections from Poulenc’s Les Animaux modèles, a 40/40 presentation of Saint-Saëns Carnival of the Animals featuring the dazzling twins Christina and Michelle Naughton on piano, and Roussel’s The Spider’s Feast. (April 16-18)

Continued Explorations

In addition to the focus on requiems and choral music, The Philadelphia Orchestra is in the midst of several other multi-season musical explorations including:

 Strauss at 150 To commemorate the 150th anniversary of this iconic composer’s birth, the Orchestra began a two-year exploration of his works in the 2013-14 season. That journey continues in 2014-15 with a number of notable performances. Former Music Director Christoph Eschenbach returns to conduct Strauss’s Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks and Horn Concerto No. 1 featuring Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Horn Jennifer Montone in a program that also includes Schumann’s Symphony No. 2. (January 8-10) Other works by Strauss include An Alpine Symphony (September 26-28) and Also sprach Zarathustra (October 23-25).

 Beethoven’s Complete Symphonies A two-year cycle begun in 2013-14 continues with

performances of the composer’s First (May 7-9), Fourth (April 10-11), Fifth (January 28-31), and Sixth (March 12-14) symphonies.

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Additional Subscription Highlights

 Yannick Nézet-Séguin begins his third season as The Philadelphia Orchestra’s eighth music director in a weekend of performances featuring Lang Lang performing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 17,

Strauss’s An Alpine Symphony, plus 40/40 works chosen by the audience, which will be different each night. (September 26-28)

 A French-themed Opening Night Gala with Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting and performing on piano with guest pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet. (October 10)

 Leila Josefowicz performs Stravinsky’s Violin Concerto on a program with Respighi’s Botticelli Triptych and Brahms’s Symphony No. 4 conducted by Susanna Mälkki in her Philadelphia Orchestra debut. (November 21-22)

 Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts Brahms’s Symphony No. 3, Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C major, and Strauss’s Suite from Der Rosenkavalier. Cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras makes his Philadelphia

Orchestra debut. (December 4-6)

 Concertmaster David Kim and pianist Imogen Cooper lead the Orchestra in a program including Grieg’s “Holberg” Suite, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2, and Mozart’s Symphony No. 38 (“Prague”). (February 5-7)

 Valery Gergiev returns to conduct Stravinsky’s Symphony in C, Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9, and Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5. (February 12-13)

 Guest conductor Robin Ticciati leads the Orchestra and Gil Shaham in Berg’s Violin Concerto. The program also includes Wagner’s Prelude to Act I of Lohengrin, Ligeti’s Atmosphères, and Debussy’s

La Mer. (February 20-22)

 Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos returns to conduct Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 and Falla’s Nights in the Gardens of Spain and Suite No. 2 from The Three-Cornered Hat. Pianist Jorge Federico Osorio makes his Philadelphia Orchestra debut. (March 12-14)

Guest Conductors and Conductor Residencies

Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts 11 weeks of subscription programming in the 2014-15 season as well as a number of special concerts and events. He shares the podium with a number of other distinguished conductors who have enjoyed long, collaborative relationships with the Philadelphians. Two close musical friends return for extended, two-week residencies in the spring of 2015: Gianandrea Noseda conducts

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two subscription series in March (March 20-22 and March 26-28); and in April, Stéphane Denève

conducts two subscription series (April 16-18 and April 23-25) and leads a Family Concert (April 18). The Orchestra also welcomes back esteemed conductors Alan Gilbert (October 16-18); Vladimir Jurowski (October 23-25); Juanjo Mena (November 28-30); Christoph Eschenbach (January 8-10); Valery Gergiev (February 12-13); Robin Ticciati (February 20-22); Robert Spano (February 26-28); Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos (March 12-14); and Associate Conductor Christian Măcelaru, who conducts a subscription series (May 7-9) as well as special performances by Cirque de la Symphonie (January 3-4) and on Valentine’s Day (February 14).

Nézet-Séguin has invited several conductors to make their Philadelphia Orchestra debuts this season including Jakub Hrůša (November 13-15) and Susanna Mälkki (November 21-22). Making their subscription debuts are Bramwell Tovey (December 11-13), who also conducts the Glorious Sound of Christmas concerts (December 18-20), and Paul Goodwin (April 10-11).

Guest Artists and Collaborators

The Philadelphia Orchestra has longstanding relationships with many of the world’s greatest and most celebrated artists. Returning soloists in the 2014-15 season include nine pianists: Lang Lang (September 26-28); Jean-Yves Thibaudet (October 8-11, including Opening Night); André Watts (November 13-15); Marc-André Hamelin (January 22-23); Kirill Gerstein (January 28-30); Imogen Cooper, also leading the Orchestra (February 5-7); Emanuel Ax (March 5-7); and twins Christina and Michelle Naughton (April 16-18). Returning violinists include Leila Josefowicz (November 21-22); Gil Shaham (February 20-22); Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg (March 20-22); Sarah Chang (May 7-9); and Lisa Batiashvili (May 13-16). Also returning are organists Paul Jacobs (November 7) and Ken Cowan (November 8) and soprano Angela Meade (October 30-November 2).

Guest artists making their debuts with The Philadelphia Orchestra in 2014-15 include violinist Alina Ibragimova (October 23-25); cellist Jean-Guihen Queyras (December 4-6); pianist Jorge Federico Osorio (March 12-14); and mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly (October 30-November 2). Making their subscription debuts are organist Peter Richard Conte (November 6); trumpeter Alison Balsom

(December 11-13); violinist Benjamin Beilman (February 26-28); and baritone Shuler Hensley (April 30-May 3). The Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre also makes its subscription debut in a special Valentine’s Day collaboration.

Five of the Orchestra’s principal players return as featured soloists this season including Principal Clarinet Ricardo Morales (November 28-30); Principal Horn Jennifer Montone (January 8-10); and Principal Viola Choong-Jin Chang (April 10-11). Concertmaster David Kim returns to lead the Orchestra (February 5-7). And Principal Tuba Carol Jantsch makes her subscription debut (March 26-28).

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In addition, The Philadelphia Orchestra welcomes back choirs with which it has longstanding relationships, including the Westminster Symphonic Choir directed by Joe Miller for Mahler’s “Resurrection”

Symphony (October 30-November 2) and Bach’s St. Matthew Passion (April 1 & 4); the Philadelphia Singers Chorale directed by David Hayes for Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass (October 16-18), Handel’s

Messiah (December 21), Holt’s The Planets (March 20-22), and Magnus Lindberg’s Graffiti (April 23-25); and the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia directed by Alan Harler for the Glorious Sound of Christmas (Dec. 18-20).

The Philadelphia Orchestra at Carnegie Hall

The Philadelphia Orchestra has a long and celebrated history performing at Carnegie Hall, having given its first performance there more than 100 years ago, in 1902. Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Orchestra begin their 2014-15 Carnegie Hall series with Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 (“Resurrection”) featuring soprano Angela Meade, mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly, and the Westminster Symphonic Choir with conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin (October 31). Their annual residency continues with Brahms’s

Symphony No. 3, Strauss’s Suite from Der Rosenkavalier, and Haydn’s Cello Concerto in C major with guest soloist Jean-Guihen Queyras and Nézet-Séguin (December 5); and, with guest soloist Emanuel Ax, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 3, Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 3, and the New York premiere of a new work by Nico Muhly commissioned by The Philadelphia Orchestra, again with Nézet-Séguin. (May 14) The Orchestra is a partner in Carnegie Hall’s season-long Perspectives series with celebrated mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato in March. Ms. DiDonato will sing both beloved and rare bel canto arias and ensembles with close colleagues soprano Nicole Cabell and tenor Lawrence Brownlee. The Orchestra will be led by conductor Maurizio Benini. (March 18)

Special Concerts and Programs

In addition to 29 weeks of subscription programming, The Philadelphia Orchestra presents a number of special concerts and events in the 2014-15 season. Marking the 35th anniversary of official relations between the U.S. and China, the Orchestra presents Beijing’s National Centre for the Performing Arts Orchestra (November 7), making its first North American tour. The performance features conductor Lü Jia and pianist Yuja Wang in a program of works by Ravel, Tchaikovsky, and Qigang Chen. The Philadelphia Orchestra—the first American orchestra to perform in the People’s Republic of China during its historic visit in 1973—is the National Centre’s long-term strategic partner in China.

Other events include a Halloween Organ Extravaganza featuring the Fred J. Cooper Memorial Organ and three master organists pulling out all the stops (October 31) and the Orchestra’s beloved annual holiday offerings: Bramwell Tovey returns to conduct The Glorious Sound of Christmas concerts featuring the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia (December 18-20); the Philadelphia Singers Chorale joins the

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Orchestra for Handel’s Messiah (December 21); and Yannick Nézet-Séguin rings in the New Year in style with a special New Year’s Eve Concert (December 31).

Fresh from their Kimmel Center debut in 2014, Cirque de la Symphonie returns for two performances conducted by Cristian Măcelaru (January 3-4). Later in January Nézet-Séguin leads the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute Concert (January 19) and the Academy of Music 158th Anniversary Concert and Ball (January 24). Back by popular demand, Nézet-Séguin conducts the Orchestra in reprise performances of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion on Easter weekend (April 1 & 4); performances sold out when the Orchestra performed the work in 2013 for the first time in 30 years.

Family Concerts with Cristian Măcelaru and Stéphane Denève

The Philadelphia Orchestra is committed to instilling a love and appreciation for classical music in the youngest of listeners and will present five Saturday morning Family Concerts, geared toward children ages 6-12 and their families, in the 2014-15 season. Philadelphia Orchestra Associate Conductor Cristian Măcelaru leads two performances: Christmas Kids Spectacular! (December 13) featuring narrators Michael Boudewyns and Sara Valentine and the Rock School for Dance Education; and Oh, the Music You’ll Hear! (February 7), focusing on music with a little help from Dr. Seuss. Guest conductor Stéphane Denève, who leads the Orchestra for a two-week residency in the spring of 2015, takes the podium for Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf (April 18), a perfect introduction to the instruments of the orchestra. Rounding out the series are Halloween Fantastique (October 25), starring The Philadelphia Orchestra and the incredible acrobats of Cirque de la Symphonie; and Make Your Own Musical Adventure (March 28), an interactive program hosted by Charlotte Blake Alston. All concerts begin at 11:30 AM, and are preceded by Pre-Concert Adventures in Perelman Theater, an interactive exploration of each concert’s featured works, composers, and instruments.

2014-15 Season Subscriptions

Subscriptions for the 2014-15 season are now on sale. New and renewing subscribers may purchase subscriptions through Ticket Philadelphia by calling 215.893.1955 or visiting

www.philorch.org/subscribe. Renewing subscribers will receive a special mailing of renewal information immediately and can renew now.

Subscribers will continue to have the benefit of free exchanges on all subscription tickets for the 2014-15 season. A monthly payment plan is available for subscribers, which allows them to split their subscription payment into monthly installments, and an option to pay half now and half later. Other subscriber benefits include free ticket replacement, priority seating, and special promotional offers. Subscribers also have the option of purchasing additional individual tickets to any of the season’s subscription concerts or special concerts now with their series purchase prior to individual concert tickets going on sale to the general public. Discount parking is also available to subscribers.

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Orchestra subscribers may renew their subscriptions through the end of May. Single tickets traditionally go on sale after Labor Day at the beginning of September. The Orchestra offers subscription packages of six concerts for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings as well as Sunday matinees. Packages of nine concerts are offered for Friday afternoons and Saturday evenings. Also available at this time is the popular Create-Your-Own 6-concert series, designed for audiences who like the flexibility of choosing their own concerts as well as the Family Concert series.

Subscription packages range from as little as $36 for Family Concert series seats in the 3rd Tier, to $1,181 for a Saturday evening, 9-concert series, with premium box seats located in Tier 1. A Ticket Philadelphia processing fee of $19 is added to each subscription order.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Yannick Nézet-Séguin continues his inspired leadership as the eighth music director of The Philadelphia Orchestra, which began in the fall of 2012. His highly collaborative style, deeply-rooted musical curiosity, and boundless enthusiasm, paired with a fresh approach to orchestral programming, have been heralded by critics and audiences alike, from the Orchestra’s home in Verizon Hall to the Carnegie Hall stage. The

New York Times has called Yannick “phenomenal,” adding that under his baton, “the ensemble, famous for its glowing strings and homogenous richness, has never sounded better.”

Yannick’s second season as music director builds on the momentum of his first, with fresh artistic initiatives. Highlights in 2013-14 included a Philadelphia Commissions Micro-Festival, for which three leading international composers were commissioned to write solo works for three of the Orchestra’s principal players, all presented over one weekend. The season ends with a unique, theatrically-staged presentation of Richard Strauss’s revolutionary opera Salome, the Orchestra’s first-ever co-production with Opera Philadelphia and Yannick’s first operatic appearances with the Philadelphians.

Yannick has taken the Orchestra to new musical heights in concerts at home in Verizon Hall and at the Academy of Music. He is embraced by the musicians of the Orchestra, audiences in the concert hall, and the community itself, and in return he takes great joy in getting to know his new city, noting how welcomed he felt from his very first moments in Philadelphia. His concerts of diverse repertoire attract sold-out houses, and he has established a regular forum for connecting with concert-goers through Post-Concert Conversations following his subscription concerts. Outside the Kimmel Center he has led the Orchestra in a powerful performance at the ensemble’s annual Martin Luther King Tribute Concert and worked with young musicians from the School District of Philadelphia’s All City Orchestra and with students at the Curtis Institute of Music. He continues to make connections within Philadelphia’s diverse music community.

Under Yannick’s leadership the Orchestra returns to recording with a newly-released CD on the prestigious Deutsche Grammophon label of Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring and Leopold Stokowski transcriptions of three of Bach’s most famous organ works—his Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, Fugue in G minor (“Little”), and Toccata and Fugue in D minor—as well as his transcription of Stravinsky’s “Pastorale.” In Yannick’s inaugural season the Orchestra has also returned to the radio airwaves, with weekly Sunday afternoon broadcasts on WRTI-FM.

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Yannick Nézet-Séguin has established himself as a musical leader of the highest caliber and one of the most exciting talents of his generation over the past decade. Since 2008 he has been music director of the Rotterdam Philharmonic and principal guest conductor of the London Philharmonic, and since 2000 artistic director and principal conductor of Montreal’s Orchestre Métropolitain. In addition he became the first ever mentor conductor of the Curtis Institute of Music’s conducting fellows program in the fall of 2013. He has made wildly successful appearances with the world’s most revered ensembles—the Vienna Philharmonic, the Berlin Philharmonic, the Boston Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Dresden Staatskapelle, the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, the Bavarian Radio Symphony, the Berlin Staatskapelle, and all the major Canadian orchestras, among many others. Throughout Europe and North America, Yannick’s appearances have left indelible marks on the

international classical music scene, making him one of the most sought-after conductors in the world.

Widely recognized for his musicianship, dedication, and charisma, Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s talents extend beyond symphonic music into the world of opera and choral music. His critically acclaimed performances at New York’s Metropolitan Opera (where he appears annually), Milan’s La Scala, London’s Royal Opera House, the Festspielhaus Baden-Baden, and the historic Salzburg Festival demonstrate that he is an artist of remarkable versatility and depth.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin and Deutsche Grammophon (DG) announced a major long-term collaboration in July 2012. Among his projects will be live recordings of Mozart’s seven mature operas from the Baden-Baden Summer Festival. The first, Don Giovanni, with the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, was released in 2012 to outstanding reviews and was followed in July 2013 by the release of Così fan tutte, recorded with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Yannick’s discography with the Rotterdam Philharmonic includes a disc of works by Tchaikovsky with Lisa Batiashvili, on DG; recordings of Strauss and Berlioz for BIS Records; and three EMI/Virgin releases, including an Edison Award-winning album of Ravel’s orchestral works. He also continues to enjoy a fruitful recording relationship with the London Philharmonic and Choir for the LPO label and with the Orchestre Métropolitain for ATMA Classique.

Yannick’s appearances with other ensembles in the 2013-14 season include concert performances of Wagner’s The Flying Dutchman with the Rotterdam Philharmonic in Rotterdam, Paris, and Dortmund, the latter inaugurating the start of his term as artist-in-residence at the Konzerthaus Dortmund. In addition to his regular orchestral commitments, he returns to the Berlin Philharmonic and the Vienna Philharmonic.

A native of Montreal, Yannick Nézet-Séguin studied piano, conducting, composition, and chamber music at Montreal’s Conservatory of Music and continued his studies with renowned conductor Carlo Maria Giulini; he also studied choral conducting with Joseph Flummerfelt at Westminster Choir College.

Yannick was appointed a Companion of the Order of Canada in 2012, one of the country’s highest civilian honors. His other honors include a Royal Philharmonic Society Award; Canada’s National Arts Centre Award; the Prix Denise-Pelletier, the highest distinction for the arts in Quebec, awarded by the Quebec government; and an honorary doctorate by the University of Quebec in Montreal.

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The Philadelphia Orchestra

Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin has been heralded by critics and audiences alike for his highly collaborative style, deeply-rooted musical curiosity, and boundless enthusiasm, paired with a fresh approach to orchestral programming. He is embraced by the musicians of the Orchestra, audiences, and the community. His concerts of diverse repertoire attract sold-out houses and he has established a regular forum for connecting with concert-goers through Post-Concert Conversations, as well as returning the Orchestra both to recording and to regular radio broadcasts. He is increasingly engaged with musicians in the Philadelphia community having conducted a Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute Concert, a Neighborhood Concert, and a free Pop-Up Concert, in addition to leading the All-City Orchestra and Choir and the Curtis Symphony Orchestra. The New York Times has called Nézet-Séguin “phenomenal,” adding that under his baton, “the ensemble … has never sounded better.”

The Philadelphia Orchestra maintains a strong commitment to collaborations with cultural and community organizations on a regional and national level. Since Orchestra President and CEO Allison Vulgamore’s arrival in 2010 the Orchestra has reinvigorated and launched new partnerships with Opera Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Ballet, Philadelphia Live Arts (Fringe Festival), Philadanco, the Curtis Institute of Music, the Ridge Theater Company, and stage director James Alexander, among others.

The Philadelphia Orchestra has a decades-long tradition of presenting learning and community

engagement opportunities for listeners of all ages across the Delaware Valley. Among the ways in which the Orchestra introduces orchestral music to a new generation of listeners are concerts for families and schoolchildren and eZseatU, which allows full-time college students to attend an unlimited number of Orchestra concerts for a $25 annual membership fee. Community concerts include free Pop-Ups, an annual Martin Luther King Jr. Tribute Concert, and Neighborhood Concerts. PreConcert and Post-Concert Conversations bring concert-goers closer to the music, musicians, and conductors. Musician-led initiatives such as the Play-Ins shine a spotlight on the Orchestra’s musicians, as they spread out from the stage into the community, and serve a key role in growing musician talent and a love of classical music in their own dedicated roles as teachers, coaches, and mentors.

For more information on The Philadelphia Orchestra, please visit www.philorch.org.

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