Safety and Security Awareness Guide Prepared By Townsville Airport Pty Ltd

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Safety and Security

Awareness Guide

Prepared By

Townsville Airport Pty Ltd

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Townsville Airport Safety and Security Awareness Guide

January 2015

Page 2 of 47

Contents

3

Introduction

4

The Reasons Behind Security

5

Contacts

6

Townsville Airport Aviation Policies & Procedures

8

Security Roles

10

Townsville Airport Security Zones

17

Security Screening

21

Identification And Access Cards

30

Security Access Control

33

Physical Security Measures

35

Security Reporting

42

Airside Safety Awareness

46

General Matters

47

Abbreviations

Page 1 Photo Source: Jetphotos.net

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Introduction

Every person who works in the Aviation Industry has an important role to play.

The Townsville Airport Safety and Security Awareness Guide is provided to you as an induction and on-going

reference tool for all Townsville Airport personnel. Information in the guide covers what you need to know

to help you keep Townsville Airport safe and secure and helps to provide a robust safety and security culture

at the airport.

Being located at the Townsville Airport means you and your organisation are in a safety and security

partnership with all other organisations at Townsville Airport, and working alongside Townsville Airport Pty

Ltd (TAPL) to protect the airport environment.

You should read and understand the contents so you are prepared for day to day operations and ensure you

are prepared for a security or emergency incident. It summarises your security responsibilities and provides

you with a good reference to help prepare you for your security awareness test, a requirement before

commencing work at Townsville Airport.

As part of our corporate strategy, it is important that we maintain the highest safety and security standards

in order to protect Townsville Airport passengers and staff.

Any threat or risk to Townsville Airport through terrorism or crime is a threat and risk to Australia. Therefore,

we all need to work together to keep Townsville Airport safe and secure. You play a significant role in this.

As an airport employee, you have an obligation and a duty to maintain the safety and security of Townsville

Airport. It is important that everyone maintains the highest security standards in order to protect

passengers, staff, visitors and Townsville Airport itself.

By keeping our ears and eyes open and by efficiently communicating about things, even if they appear minor

or unimportant, we may just be preventing a major incident from occurring.

The following list contains basic security principles that we can all apply in our day-to-day work:

Know your role in security and understand the role of others.

Be vigilant.

Trust your instincts.

Know your environment.

Recognise suspicious activity.

Communicate your concerns.

Keep in touch – ask questions, read bulletins and share information with others.

Communicate with others about security.

A positive security culture is an important aspect of effective security. It is very important that all airport

employees undertake security awareness training to understand basic airport security measures, their

obligations and what they are expected to do and how to report suspicious activity, crime or security

breaches.

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The Reasons Behind Security

Following recent terrorist attacks in Australia, Unites States, Europe and South-East Asia, there have been

significant changes in the global security environment under which the aviation industry now operates.

Security at Australian airports is governed by the

Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 (ATSA)

and

Aviation

Transport Security Regulations 2005 (ATSR).

The

Aviation Transport Security Act 2004

(ATSA)

and

Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005

(ATSR)

came into effect in order to strengthen Australia’s aviation transport security system, measures and

responses. This legislation sets out Aviation Industry Participants’ (AIPs) legal responsibilities and reporting

requirements to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development – Office of Transport Security

(OTS) and other relevant law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

The Regulations stipulate that AIPs such as Townsville Airport are required to have and adhere to a

Transport Security Program (TSP). A TSP outlines the security risk environment and the measures and

procedures an AIP has in place to deter and detect unlawful interference (terrorism and crime) with

aviation. This guide is a simplified version of the information contained in the Act and Regulations as well

as Townsville Airport’s TSP.

Townsville Airport relies on all airport organisations and employees to fulfil their security responsibilities.

Organisations operating at Townsville Airport are responsible for ensuring their personnel and/or

contractors under their control comply with the security obligations explained in this guide (and therefore

the Act and Regulations).

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Contacts

FOR INFORMATION OR ASSISTANCE CONTACT:

Aviation Department: TAPL

ASIC only

(07) 5589 1194

Access Cards and VICs

 (07) 4727 3254

Security Contact Officer (SCO): Operations

and Standards Manager

 (07) 4727 3202

0417 723 692 

Operations: TAPL

Manager Operations & Standards

 (07) 4727 3202

0417 723 692

 jbrix@tsvairport.com.au

Aerodrome Reporting Officer

0418 771 999

Terminal Operators

Qantas – Airport Manager

 (07) 4758 0001

Qantas – Customer Service Supervisor

 (07) 4758 0012

Jetstar – Airport Manager (Aviation

Ground Handling)

 (07) 4728 6134

Virgin Australia – Airport Manager (Aerocare)

 (07) 4775 7035

Terminal

Terminal & Commercial Precinct Manager

0408 700 274

Customer Service Officer

 1800 225 878

0408 715 500

Security Agencies

Queensland Police Service - Emergency

 000

Queensland Police Service – PoliceLink

 131 444

Australian Federal Police

 131 AFP (237)

Australian Federal Police – Cairns

 (07) 4040 1777

Australian Customs & Border Protection

Service

 1300 363 263

Office of Transport Security Duty Officer

Queensland

 (07) 3838 9967

National Security Hotline:

 1800 123 400

Crime Stoppers

 1800 333 000

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Townsville Airport Aviation Policies & Procedures

The Townsville Airport Aviation Department maintains a range of operational and emergency planning services and monitors airport compliance documentation. Among their responsiblities is the deveolpment, testing and

implementation of plans related to airport safety, security and emergency management.

Safety Management System (SMS)

As part of the Townsville Airport corporate strategy it is important that we maintain the highest safety and security standards in order to protect Townsville Airport passengers, staff, airline partners, contractors and all stakeholders.

The four pillars of Townsville Airports Safety Management System:

 Safety Policy – clearly defined policies, procedures and organisation structure.

 Safety Risk Management – formal system of hazard identification and risk assessment.

 Safety Assurance – continuous quality improvement of processes and products.

 Safety Promotion – continuous communication of safety.

What is your role?

 Carry out all duties in a safe manner.

 Report any potential hazards or unsafe situations.

 Report any incidents or accidents.

 Participate in risk assessments as required.

 Follow documented procedures.

 Be aware of your surroundings.

 Promote safety awareness in others.

 Be aware of the evacuation plan.

The Townsville Airport Aviation Department has primary responsibility for establishing an Aerodrome Safety Management System; however, safety is the shared responsibility of all employees in the workplace.

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Aerodrome Emergency Plan (AEP)

The AEP is a documented plan to respond to aviation emergencies. It details the multi-agency coordinated response to support the resolution and recovery from a major aviation incident or emergency. Access to this on-line

document will only be given to organisations that have a legitimate need.

The document is available on application in writing by email to the Townsville Airport Aviation Department-

TSVAviation@tsvairport.com.au.

Townsville Airport in conjunction with Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Townsville facilitate an Aerodrome Emergency Committee as well as ongoing airport emergency exercises to practice the procedures within the AEP.

Townsville Airport Transport Security Program (TSP)

The TSP is a document, approved by the Office of Transport Security (OTS) that details how TAPL will meet its obligations under the ATSA and ATSR. Access to this on-line document will only be given to approved Aviation Industry Participants (AIPs) that have a legitimate need.

This Safety and Security Awareness Guide summarises your responsibilities under the TAPL TSP.

Evacuation Plans

Evacuation plans have been developed for the Townsville Airport Terminal and Management Offices.

If your place of work is outside of these buildings, it is a requirement that plans are implemented for your particular building or work area.

You must familiarise yourself with the evacuation plans for your particular work areas. If you have any queries regarding these plans please contact your immediate management.

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Security Roles

Everyone is responsible for ensuring the safety and security of the airport; we also

have specific support from:

Townsville Airport Pty Ltd (TAPL)

TAPL is responsible for the physical infrastructure of the airport and operates airport security arrangements in accordance with Office of Transport Security approved Transport Security Program (TSP).

TAPL has the following responsibilities:

 Development of the Transport Security Program (TSP) for TAPL.

 Management of the Airport Security Committee (ASC).

 Maintenance of security infrastructure.

 Development of security procedures and incident response contingencies.

 Airport Screening Authority.

 Managing implementation of security screening, checked baggage screening, security guarding and patrols.

 Queensland Airports Limited (QAL) issues and manages the ASIC program on behalf of TAPL.

 Issuing security identification cards.

 Control access arrangements to airside.

 Ensure compliance with the TSP and Aviation Transport Security Regulations (ATSR) in conjunction with airport tenants and agencies

 Overall security of the airport and co-ordination of security response on site.

TAPL have appointed a Security Contact Officer (SCO) for the Airport and the contact details are listed on page 5.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA)

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) is responsible for ensuring airside safety including that the Airport Safety Management System (SMS) and Aerodrome Emergency Plan (AEP) complies with the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations.

Australian Federal Police (AFP)

Members of the Australian Federal Police stationed at Cairns and Brisbane Airports perform a range of duties for Townsville Airport including the following:

 Investigation of all breaches of Commonwealth legislation e.g. all narcotic seizures, immigration offences, any offences occurring on international flights, Family Law enquiries and enforcement of Family Court orders.

 Assistance to Queensland Police where required.

 Response availability to any major incidents that occur on Townsville Airport.

Queensland Police Services (QPS)

The Queensland Police Service has operational responsibility for preventing, responding to and investigating terrorist activity, threats and incidents in the state. This role is in addition to their general community policing.

ISS – Contracted Security Service Provider

An external security contractor, primarily responsible for passenger, baggage and staff inspection and screening requirements for both the Domestic and International terminals as well as other security functions where TAPL may require their services.

Department of Immigration and Border

Protection

Managing and securing Australia's Borders, entry requirements for travelling to Australia and prevention of illegal entry into Australia.

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Department of Infrastructure and Regional

Development - Office of Transport Security

Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development – Office of Transport Security (OTS) works with industry to improve security of Australia’s transport systems and reduce the likelihood of transport being targeted or used as a vehicle for terrorism.

The role of OTS in relation to aviation security is to:

 Provide policy advice to the Australian Government.

 Set standards for aviation security measures.

 Test, monitor and evaluate compliance with those standards, policies and procedures consistent with the Aviation Transport Security Act and Aviation Transport Security Regulations.

Australian Customs and Border Protection

Service

Customs and Border protection is responsible for protecting Australia’s border; facilitating the legitimate movement of people, goods and aircraft into and out of Australia while detecting unlawful activity at the border. Some Customs personnel also conduct airport patrols and are empowered to stop, search, seize possessions and detain people under the Customs Act 1901.

Department of Agriculture

Department of Agriculture manages quarantine controls at our borders to minimise the risk of exotic pests and diseases entering the country. Department of Agriculture also provides import and export inspection and certification to help retain Australia’s highly favourable animal, plant and human health status and wide access to overseas export markets.

Airlines and Ground Handlers

All airlines and ground handlers are responsible for the security of their passengers and aircraft as well as for controlling access to the Security Restricted Area (SRA) through any boarding gates they utilise when conducting flight operations (including boarding and disembarkation).

The following airlines operate Regular Passenger Transport (RPT) screened services out of the

Townsville Airport in accordance with their Office of Transport Security approved Airline Transport Security Program.

These airlines have security responsibilities at Townsville Airport, which may include the:

 Issue of Aviation Security Identification Cards (ASICs) to their employees.

 Control access to airside from their leased areas.

 Control of their passengers during aircraft boarding and disembarkation.

 Security of their aircraft.

 Assistance to TAPL with airport security matters.

 Issue TAC’s.

Charter and General Aviation Operators

All Charter and General Aviation Operators are responsible for their passengers and aircraft. They are also responsible for controlling access by their passengers and employees to Secure Areas and Access Points through their leased premises when conducting flight operations (including boarding and disembarkation).

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Townsville Airport Security Zones

You are responsible for knowing where different airport zones are and if you are authorised to access them.

Under the legislation, Townsville Airport is known as a security controlled airport. As a security controlled

airport, Townsville Airport is required to have specific security areas and zones, each created in order to

protect the critical sections of the airport from unlawful interference.

Townsville Airport operates within a Joint User Airfield; this means that we share the airside area with the

Australian Defence Force (ADF).

The ADF are based on the western and southern side of the runway.

No person is to enter the Defence Airside Area without the approval from the Commanding Officer 27

Squadron or the Base Support Manager, RAAF Base Townsville.

Airside Area – Prohibited Area

The airside Area encompasses the whole of the airport within the landside/airside boundary fence line of Townsville Airport. Private hangars and other building that have access to both airside and landside are included within the airside area and the tenants of such facilities are responsible for maintaining the airside security and preventing unlawful access to airside through their premises.

Aerodrome Reporting Officers or TAPL contracted Security Guards may physically remove unauthorised people and/or vehicles.

To enter and remain in the airside area you must:

 Be on duty or have a lawful requirement to enter airside.

 Not tailgate to enter Airside.

 Not allow anyone to tailgate you.

 Display a valid redASIC.

 Display a valid VIC or greyASIC and be escorted by a valid

redASIC holder at all times.

 Not meet, greet or farewell, friends, relatives or colleagues.

 You must challenge/question on the spot anyone who isn’t wearing an ASIC or a VIC and report them to your supervisor or Aerodrome Reporting Officer.

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Security Restricted Area (SRA)

This area is found within the airside area and covers the aircraft parking area directly adjacent to the terminal building where screened passengers board the aircraft from the sterile area. The SRA covers those parts of the Airside Area that are used by Regular Passenger Transport (RPT) aircraft for embarking and disembarking screened passengers.

The SRA includes baggage make-up, mezzanine area, and maintenance areas. The airside boundary of the SRA is delineated by a painted line and the words ‘Security Restricted Area – No Entry.’

The SRA is regarded as security sensitive with controlled or restricted access which is marked accordingly.

The SRA is in force for 24 hours per day. This means that the requirements for entry, display of ASIC, handling of firearms, Tools of Trade and other requirements apply continuously.

As scheduled screened passenger aircraft are operated from the SRA stringent security controls apply.

These controls include random inspection of persons and vehicle within the SRA. Inspections may be conducted by Aerodrome Reporting Officers or Contracted Security Guards.

Unauthorised vehicles are also prohibited from access. Unauthorised people and/or vehicles may be physically removed from the SRA.

Breaches will be reported to the Office of Transport Security Operations Centre and penalties may apply. To enter and remain in the SRA you must

 Be on duty or have a lawful requirement to enter the SRA.

 Have specific authorisation to enter the SRA.

 Have duties or other lawful functions to perform in the SRA.

 Not tailgate to enter the SRA.

 Not allow anyone to tailgate you.

 Display a valid redASIC.

 Display a valid VIC or greyASIC and be escorted by a valid redASIC holder at all times.

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Sterile Area (Landside Security Zone)

The TAPL Landside Security Area encompasses that part of the terminal commonly known as the “sterile area”. Sterile areas are located wholly within the terminal buildings. All persons accessing this area must be screened in

accordance with Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 and Aviation Transport SecurityRegulations 2005. The sterile area (Departure Lounge) is used primarily to hold and transfer screened passengers before they board their aircraft.

Should a person have a lawful requirement to enter the sterile area after operational hours, access can be requested by contacting TAPL Management.

Sterile areas are designed to prevent passengers from taking weapons, or prohibited items, on board an aircraft. All persons and goods entering the sterile area (not just passengers and their carry-on items) are required to be screened and kept segregated from non-screened persons and items.

You can only enter the sterile area unscreened if you have been specifically exempted to do so under legislation.

Note: All food, beverages and other items destined for airline lounges and retail outlets located in sterile area are subject to screening and clearing.

Any person breaching the security measures and procedures established for sterile area will incur penalties. To enter and remain in the Sterile Area you must:

 Be screened and cleared (unless exempted).

 Have authorisation and a valid operational requirement to enter the sterile area.

 Have duties to perform in the sterile area.

 Not carry any item that might be used as a weapon into a sterile area unless exempted to do so under the legislation.

 Display a valid redor greyASIC.

 Display a valid VIC and be escorted by a valid redor greyASIC holder at all times.

Entry to the sterile area is via a Security Screening point. Persons, machinery and goods may not enter these areas until given clearance.

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Australian Customs & Border Protection Service (ACBPS) Controlled Areas

Customs and Border Protection Controlled Areas are those areas defined under the Customs Act 1901 (Cth)where passengers with international connections are processed. Customs Controlled Areas include all areas where international passenger, baggage and freight operations are processed including the airside are when there is an international flight operating.

ACBPS Restricted Area Signs identify entrances to ACBPS Controlled Areas.

Access to Customs Controlled Areas is limited to passengers holding valid travel documentation and those who are required to perform their duties in the area or provide services for those passengers. The Customs Act 1901 (Cth)allows for persons breaching entry requirements to be fined and prosecuted.

The display of an ASIC or approved Visitor Identification Card (with escort) does not by itself authorise you to enter ACBPS Controlled Areas.

To enter and remain in a ACBPS controlled Area you must:

 Display a valid redor greyASIC

 Display a valid VIC and be escorted by a valid redor greyASIC holder at all times.

 Not tailgate

 Not allow anyone to tailgate you.

 Not meet, greet or farewell friends, relatives or colleagues.

 Comply with the provisions of the Customs Act 1901.

 Comply with any direction given to you by an ACBPS Officer.

Other Secure Areas

The check-in desks and baggage facilitation areas of the terminal are also classed as Secure Areas and as such appropriate identification must be worn. There are a number of other Secure Areas within the airport precinct, e.g. Fuel Zones, which are not accessible to the public. These must not be entered unless on business and in the company of authorised personnel from the airport or the agency responsible for the zones and the relevant building or facilities.

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Signs

Replicas of signs placed along the airside boundary, airside/landside SRA boundary and Sterile Area are shown below. You will note that these signs warn people not to enter airside without authorisation and warn people not to carry weapons airside without authorisation. The penalties that apply to persons who fail to comply with these requirements are also described.

Signs positioned on Airside Entry Points (Gates)

Signs positioned at Airside Fences (Fencing and Physical barriers)

Signs positioned at entrance to and along SRA Boundary

Signs position at entrance to sterile Area

You Must Challenge/Question any non-passenger not displaying the correct, valid ASIC (red/grey)

or VIC for the area.

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Airport Security Zones – Example Test Questions

Here are some sample test questions relating to this section of the guide to help you prepare for you Security Induction:

 You are permitted to enter the airside area unescorted when displaying a valid Grey ASIC: True or False?

 Unauthorised entry to Customs Controlled Areas may lead to prosecution: True or False?

 Where is the Sterile Area located at Townsville Airport?

 Where is the Security Restricted Area located at Townsville Airport?

 Is the check-in desks and baggage facilitation areas of the terminal considered Secure Areas? True or False?

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Security Screening

Persons and goods entering a Sterile Area through a screening point must undergo screening and be cleared before entering the area. This process includes x-ray of goods/items, walking through a metal detector and may include explosive trace detection on persons and goods. Persons who refuse to be screened, and unscreened goods, will not be permitted in to the Sterile Area.

Random and continuous Explosive Trace Detection (ETD) is also carried out at the screening point as an additional security measure. As an airport worker you must still undergo all security screening and refusal of any of the security processes will result in denial of access to the Sterile Area. All flight crew on aircrafts departing from the Regular Passenger Transport Apron, regardless of the access control permissions they may have, must pass through the main security screening point prior to boarding their aircraft.

If you are exempt under the ATSR you may only enter the Sterile Area at a point other than the screening point if you are

on duty and have a specific operational requirement at that time to do so.

There are strict penalties applied to those found breaching these conditions.

Prohibited items and Dangerous Goods

Items not permitted in the Sterile Area include firearms, dangerous goods, prohibited goods, weapons, sharp or stabbing implements. Some examples of these items include:

 Sporting goods, kitchen utensils, tools and other things with sharp edges or points capable of injuring a person.

 Sharp objects that are not weapons, but are capable (with or without modification) of causing harm by penetration.

 Blunt things able to be used to bludgeon or threaten to bludgeon a person.

 Dangerous goods as indicated in the International Air Transport Association Regulations.

 Things capable of being used to restrain a person and not otherwise permitted under the Act or these Regulations.

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Tools of Trade

A tool of trade is an item that a person requires for the purpose for which he or she is in the airside area, SRA or sterile area for, and that purpose is lawful.

All such items mustbe registered into the sterile area at the entry screening point and removed from the register on exit.

The Tools of Trade register is managed by the ISS contracted security.

Retailers and food outlets must ensure all “tools of trade” such as knives used in the preparation of food, scissors, carton cutters, etc., are only used in areas

of the tenancy that are not able to be accessed by the public generally or, if they are, they are securely fastened (this means, at a minimum, the use of a metal chain or wire and screws) to an immovable object. All sharps, such as knives must be kept locked away in a secure area when not in use.

Retail Goods Deliveries

All retail goods and deliveries being taken into the Sterile Area must be screened using X-ray equipment, with the exception of oversize items (as determined by the Screening Officers) which will be screened manually. Delivery of bulk retail goods is only permitted during certain restricted times to ensure that the processing of passengers is not affected. Please refer to you company’s procedures or contact the TAPL Security department on 07 4727 3211 to enquire about current restricted times.

Firearms

The only people permitted to carry a firearm in the Airside of Townsville Airport are:

 A person who with the consent of TAPL, is engaged in controlling wildlife or other animals on the airport.

These persons must:

□ Display a valid redASIC.

□ Hold and have on his/her person a valid QLD firearms licence.

□ Hold and have on his/her person a valid drivers licence.

 A screening officer who is carrying the firearm to or from an aircraft because the firearm has been accepted for carriage by the aircraft operator or is being removed from the aircraft.

□ These persons must display a valid redASIC.

 An authorised representative of an airline operator who is carrying the firearm to or from an aircraft because it has either been accepted for carriage or is being removed.

□ These persons must display a valid redASIC.

 A law enforcement officer.

 An ACBPS officer.

 An Air Security Officer.

 A member of the Australian Defence Force who is on duty.

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Firearms are not permitted in sterile areas or in the cabin of an aircraft on domestic or international flights, unless exempted by the regulations.

International Screening - Liquid, Aerosols and Gels (LAGs)

The Aviation Transport Security Act 2004 (Cth) imposes additional screening requirements upon passengers on international flights (including airport staff that enter the sterile area) relating to liquids, aerosols and gels. The requirements are as follows:

If you are a passenger travelling on an international flight, or an employee entering or working in the International Sterile Area, you must be screened for liquids, aerosols and gels by passing through an international screening point. There are restrictions on taking Liquids, Aerosols and Gels (LAG products)

through international screening points. A LAG product is any thing which is a liquid when at room temperature, a gel, a cream, a paste or an aerosol.

You may not take any LAG product though an international screening point unless:

 It is in a container that has a capacity of 100ml or less (a container which has a capacity of 100 grams or less, and contains only liquid, cream, gel or paste, will be regarded as a container with a capacity of 100ml or less) AND

 The container is inside one sealed LAGs bag.

A LAGs bag is a transparent, re-sealable bag that has a capacity of not greater than 1 litre and a sealable area with a total outer edge measurement, while flat, of 80 centimetres or less. More than one LAG product in an acceptable container may be placed inside the single LAGs bag.

You may take only one LAGs bag containing LAG products through an international screening point. All LAGs bags must be presented to the screening officer at the international screening point for inspection before you pass through the screening point.

Note: Airport employees, crew, engineers or aircraft are not exempt from this direction.

For more information on regulations relating to LAGs, please visit the following web pages:

http://www.travelsecure.infrastructure.gov.au/ or

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Security Screening – Example Test Questions

Here are some sample test questions relating to this section of the guide to help you prepare for your Security Induction:

 What are the rules for carrying Tools of Trade (prohibited items) into the Sterile Area?

 Airport and Airline staff are exempt from the Explosive Trace Detection (EDT) Process: True or False?

 Delivery of bulk retail goods is only permitted during certain restricted times: True or False?

 If you have access to enter the Sterile Area other than through a screening point you may do so at any time: True or False?

 Persons who refuse to be security screened into the Sterile Area will be permitted entry into the area True or False?

 All flight crew on aircrafts departing from the SRA must pass through the main security screening point prior to boarding their aircraft: True or False?

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Identification and Access Cards

You must know all of the different Identifications Cards, what they look like, what

they mean and where they provide access to.

The purpose of identification cards at Townsville Airport is to identify you and your company of employment whilst in a Secure Area. However, the identification cards do not give you automatic access to Secure Areas. Access through secure doors and gates is provided on individual valid ASICs or specific access cards. You must have an operational requirement to access Secure Areas and this access is only granted following application to Townville Airport Aviation Department and after validation from your employer. The identification card simply indicates that the holder has had a background check and that the check revealed that they are of suitable character to be in a Secure Area if TAPL authorises them to be there. The following information details the various types of identification and access cards TAPL issue.

Display of Identification

You should wear your valid Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC)/Visitor Identification Card (VIC) wherever you are working on-airport, whether in a Secure Area or not.

Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC)

ASICs are used at all security controlled airports in Australia. The form of the ASIC is nationally consistent and mandated under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005. An ASIC must be held by anyone who requires frequent access to enter Secure Areas at security controlled airports.

The purpose of an ASIC is to identify you while you are in a Secure Area. Each ASIC has its own conditions of use. The next few pages of the Safety and Security Awareness Guide describe the types of ASICs that are used at TAPL and the Secure Areas where they are valid.

An ASIC is not an access card and does not automatically entitle the holder to be in a Secure Area. The holder must have a lawful reason to be in a Secure Area.

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Types of ASICs

Valid ASICs for Townsville Airport must display either a TSV or AUS identifier and have a current expiry date.

Permanent

Red

Background ASIC

Airport Specific (RED) ASICs are valid for all Secure Airside Areas (including SRA/Sterile areas), within the specified airport. The specific Airport is detailed on each individual ASIC.

AUS identified – Australia (AUS) wide ASIC allows access to more than one security controlled airport.

This ASIC is sometime referred to as the ‘airside ASIC.’

Note: Australian Customs Service (ACS) approval and an ASIC (Red) are required to enter ACS Controlled areas.

Permanent

Grey

Background ASIC

Airport Specific (GREY) ASICs are valid for all Secure Areas (excluding the airside) within the specified Airport. The Specific Airport is detailed on each individual ASIC.

AUS identified – AUS wide ASIC allows access to more than one security controlled airport.

The ASIC is sometimes referred to as the ‘landside ASIC.’

This is the Sterile Area and Custom Controlled Areas. A person wearing a

greyASIC must not access the Airside Security Zone unless escorted by a valid redASIC holder.

Aviation Security Relevant Offence (ASRO)

ASIC holders are required to inform TAPL within 7 days if they are convicted of an Aviation Security Relevant Offence (ASRO).

Note: - Penalties apply to persons not informing TAPL of a conviction ($5500) ATSR 2005.

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Visitor Identification Cards (VIC)

All visitors without an ASIC who require access to secure areas of the airport for work related purposed must obtain a Visitor Identification Card (VIC) and be supervised by a valid ASIC holder at all times. This includes areas such as airside hangars and behind check-in desks. Any ASIC holder who leaves a VIC holder

unsupervised in a secure area commits an offence under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005. A person who is operating on a VIC, and is being supervised by an ASIC holder in a secure area, must leave the area immediately if the ASIC holder is no longer supervising them.

A visitor may only be issued up to a total of 28 days’ worth of VICs within a 12 month period.

If a person requires access beyond 28 days in 12 months, they must apply for an ASIC.

To obtain a VIC the applicant must be accompanied by a valid ASIC holder at the time of issue and the applicant must present valid identification. A VIC that is issued for longer than a 72 hour period is required to contain a photograph of the applicant.

Visitor Identification Card without Photo

 Valid for Visitors up to 72 hours Issue only.

 Maximum of 28 days in a twelve (12) month period.

 Must constantly be under the supervision of an ASIC holder whilst in a secure area.

 Produce valid identification.

Photo Visitor Identification Card

 Must have a valid reason for obtaining a Photo Visitor Card.

 Only issued to persons who have lodged a completed ASIC application, pending approval.

 Must constantly be under the supervision of an ASIC holder whilst in a secure area.

 Have not been refused an ASIC, or had an ASIC suspended or cancelled.

 Produced valid identification

Note: Exemption to the 28 day limitation applies to applicants who have submitted an ASIC Application.

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Temporary Aircrew Card (TAC)

A Temporary Aircrew Card is issued by airlines and will allow aircrew to continue to work where they are required to fly to multiple airports as part of their employment.

The TAC is available for aircrew who’s Aviation Security Identification Card (ASIC) has been forgotten, lost or destroyed.

A TAC holder must be supervised at all times by a person displaying a valid ASIC. For further information go to

http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/transport/security/aviation/asi/tacs.aspx

.

Who does not need an ASIC or VIC to be Airside

Certain persons are exempt under the Regulations from the ASIC requirements. These persons include:

 Bona fide passengers moving directly to or from their aircraft.

 A law enforcement officer.

 Emergency agency personnel responding to an emergency.

 Uniformed military personnel on duty and displaying their military identification.

 Uniformed foreign aircrew in uniform and displaying their company identification card.

 Certain other persons as defined in the ATSRs.

Display of your ASIC and VIC

You must properly display your ASIC at all times in a secure area. This means:

 Above waist height.

 On the front side of your outer clothing or on an armband.

 With the front of the card clearly visible.

Note: Failure to comply with the display requirements is an offence under the ATSRs and may result in the cancellation of your ASIC.

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Conditions to obtain an ASIC

To obtain an ASIC you must have:

 A requirement to enter and remain in a Secure Area of the airport for the purpose of your employment or another lawful reason.

 Have undergone a background assessment check with AusCheck which checks through the following agencies:

□ Australian Federal Police.

□ Australian Security Intelligence Organisation.

□ Department of Immigration.

 Successfully completed the Security Awareness Test.

Discretionary ASIC

If your application for an ASIC has been unsuccessful due to an adverse criminal record, you have the option of applying to the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development for a Discretionary ASIC.

The discretionary ASIC may be issued to applicants who were unsuccessful in their initial ASIC Application; this card can only be approved by the Secretary of the Department who takes into account the applicants individual circumstances.

The ASIC Applicant may write to the Secretary of the Department, requesting a discretionary ASIC

A Brochure outlining the process and requirements is available from the QAL ASIC Office or obtainable from the following website:

http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/transport/security/aviation/asi/files/ASIC_Discretionary.pdf

Security Awareness Testing

An ASIC applicant must read the Safety and Security Awareness Guide and successfully complete a Security Awareness test prior to being issued with an ASIC by the Queensland Airports Limited (QAL) Issuing Body.

This process is used as a mechanism to confirm your understanding of the safety and security requirements at Townsville Airport.

The test questions are based on the information in this Safety and Security Awareness Guide and ASIC Terms of Condition of Use.

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Conditions of Issue and Use of Identification Cards

The conditions of use include, but are not limited to:

 You can only enter and remain in a secure area for the purpose of your employment or for another lawful reason.

Note: It is an offence under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 if you contravene this requirement.

 The ASIC or VIC is issued for the use of the individual it is assigned to only whilst on duty. It MUST NOT

be given to anyone else to use.

Note: It is also an offence under the ATSRs if you are in a secure area using an ASIC that was not issued to you.

 YouMUST keep your ASIC or VIC secure at all times (even when you are not using it).

 You MUST NOT deliberately damage or deface your ASIC or VIC.

 Never use your ASIC or VIC (on duty or not) for meeting, greeting or farewelling friends, family or colleagues in a secure area.

 Your ASIC or VIC is to be prominently displayed in the approved manner at all times whilst entering, remaining on or leaving a secure area.

 Always ‘badge’ your ASIC (or access card) on the card reader before you access a door.

 Do not tailgate others or allow anyone to tailgate you.

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Supervision of VIC holders

 An ASIC holder must escort or accompany the VIC holder at all times when the VIC holder is in a secure area.

 The ASIC holder watches the VIC holder at all times when the VIC holder is in the secure area.

 The ASIC holder ensures the VIC holder stays within a particular part of the secure area.

 The ASIC holder must be able to see if the VIC holder leaves the area.

Returning your ASICs, VICs and Access Cards

You MUST immediately return your ASIC, VIC or access card to TAPL Management Office if:

 Your ASIC, VIC or access card has expired.

 TAPL notifies you that your ASIC, VIC or access card has been cancelled.

 Your ASIC, VIC or access card has been damaged, altered or defaced permanently or temporarily.

 You no longer have an operational need to enter a secure area for the purposes which your ASIC, VIC or access card was issued to you.

 If the kinegram strip is damaged or illegible.

 You have left your current employment.

Note: It is an offence under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 if you fail to return your ASIC and penalties apply.

Lost/Stolen or Destroyed ASICs, VICs and Access Cards

You MUST immediately notify Townsville Airport Aviation Department if your identification card or access card has been lost, stolen or destroyed on 07 4727 3254 (business hours) or a Townsville Airport Aerodrome Reporting Officer telephone 0418 771 999 all hours. TAPL will block any access privileges for the card to ensure no unauthorised persons obtain access to secure areas.

Within seven days of becoming aware (and notifying Townsville Airport) you must provide Townsville Airport with a Statutory Declaration detailing the loss, theft or destruction of your ASIC, VIC or access card. If you have lost, or had your ASIC stolen, the ATSR states that you must also report the loss or theft to Queensland Police who will provide you with a report number, this report number is to be included on the Statutory Declaration provided to Townsville airport.

Note: It is an offence under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 if you fail to notify TAPL that your ASIC has been lost, stolen or destroyed. A Statutory Declaration must be completed and submitted to the Townsville Airport Aviation Department.

Refusal, Cancellation or Suspension of an ASIC or Access Control Card

TAPL may refuse to process an application if the applicant:

 Does not complete all sections required in the application form.

 Provided information by the applicant in the application form which TAPL determines or discovers was false or misleading.

Townsville Airport may also cancel or suspend any form of ASIC and/or Access Control Card privileges if the holder fails to comply with the Conditions of Issue and Use of that ASIC/Access Control Card or the requirements under the Townsville Airport Transport Security Program or the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005.

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Notification of Changes

Change of Name: An ASIC holder who changes his/her name must notify TAPL within 30 days of the change. The

notification must be in the form of a completed ASIC Replacement Form with a Statutory Declaration and a copy of the Name Change Certificate or Marriage Certificate attached. It is an offence under the ATSR if an individual fails to notify TAPL of a change of name.

Change of Employer: An ASIC holder who changes employer and still has a requirement to hold their ASIC must

notify TAPL in order to have their ASIC details changed to their new employer. This notification is in the form of a completed ASIC Transfer Application Form that must be signed the new employer and the ASIC holder.

Change of Visa details: An ASIC holder who becomes an unlawful non-citizen must notify TAPL. An ASIC holder

that is granted a new Visa must notify TAPL and provide evidence of the new Visa grant.

Change of address, gender and/or contact details: If any of your personal and/or contact details change you

must notify TAPL of the change/s so that our records can be amended.

Confiscation of an ASIC

TAPL operations staff, TAPL contracted security officers and law enforcement officers are authorised to confiscate an ASIC or VIC if a security breach, potential security breach, breach of the terms and conditions of issue or a breach of the ATSR occurs.

Suspension and Cancellations

Townsville Airport may cancel or suspend your ASIC, VIC and/or access control card or access privileges if you fail to comply with the Conditions of Issue and Use associated with that identification/access control card or the requirements under the QAL ASIC Program or the ATSR. Some of these include, but are not limited to:

 Failing to supervise a VIC holder while they are in a Secure Area.

 Failing to notify Townsville Airport if:

□ You become an unlawful non-citizen.

□ You no longer need access to a secure area for operational purposes.

□ There is a change of employer.

□ There is a change of residential address, name, gender and/or contact details.

□ Your ASIC has been lost, stolen or destroyed.

 Providing information in your application that Townsville Airport discovers was false or misleading.

 Failing to correctly display a valid identification card.

 Failing to surrender identification cards to airport security officers, Townsville Airport operations staff or law enforcement officers for the purpose of verifying identify and validity of ID (spot checking).

 Being found in a secure area, other than for operation purposes.

These situations may lead to investigation and potential prosecution by law enforcement. You could lose your ASIC and/or other approved ID. This means you could lose your right to work at the airport. Note: It is an offence under the Aviation Transport Security Regulations 2005 if you fail to notify Townsville Airport that your VIC has been lost, stolen or destroyed.

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Remember

YOU MUST:

Appropriately display your valid ASIC or VIC.

Challenge any non bona fide customer without correct identification.

NOT meet, greet or farewell family, friends or colleagues in secure areas.

Contact TAPL if you see someone without identification, or with incorrect or expired identification.

Notify TAPL if your ASIC or VIC is lost, stolen or damaged.

Return your ASIC or VIC when it expires, is cancelled or you no longer have an operational requirement to hold it.

ID and Access Cards – Example Test Questions

Here are some sample test questions relating to this section of the guide to help you prepare for your Security Induction:

 How many days’ worth of VIC can be issued to one person in a 12 month period?

 Grey ASICs permit access to where?

 Red ASICs permit access to where?

 When your VIC or ASIC expires or you no longer require it you can securely destroy it and notify

TAPL: True or False?

 If you have an ASIC and you change your name you are required to notify TAPL within 30 days:

True or False?

 If your ASIC is stolen or lost you must notify TAPL and the QLD Police: True or False?

 Where must your ASIC be displayed when you are on duty?

 TAPL can cancel or suspend your ASIC if you fail to comply with any of the Conditions of Issue

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Security Access Control

You must know how access control works and what your responsibilities are.

Moving Through Secure Areas

All points of entry to secure areas at Townsville Airport are controlled by Electronic Access Controlled doors. Passing through these entry points requires you to use your access privileges programmed to your ASIC, access card or restricted/air key. In order to open an access controlled door, access cards are to be swiped over the card reader and the door handle is to be pushed. You must not force any door or access point which your card does not grant you through. This will activate an alarm in the Townsville Airport Security Office and law enforcement officers may respond. Your access card should not be used on card readers that you are not authorised to use. The card reader system detects any attempt to open a door without an authorised card. This may result in your access card and ASIC being withdrawn.

Security doors and gates to the airside or sterile areas are never to be left ajar or propped open. Doors and gates should always be physically checks that they are closed securely. If you open a door, you are responsible for closing and locking it. If you see a door or gate to an Airside or a Sterile Area wedged open, close it, and report it immediately to Townsville Airport.

Access Cards and Restricted Air Keys

An Access Control Card or Key is issued to staff at Townsville Airport who require access to secure areas and have been issued with a valid ASIC, and who have completed the Security Awareness Test.

Note: Access Control Cards or Keys will not be issued to VIC holders.

A Townsville Airport Access Control Card or Restricted/Air Key will only be issued to you if you are the holder of a valid ASIC with either a TSV or AUS designator and you require frequent access to airside due to your

employment or for other lawful reasons.

Access Control Cards and Restricted/Air Key access is only issued to persons at the discretion of Townsville Airport Management. Townsville Airport may refuse to process an application or cancel/suspend any form of Access control Card privileges if the holder fails to comply with the Conditions of Issue and Use.

Access Control Cards and Restricted/Air Key Access are valid for a maximum period of two (2) years or for the period to the date when your ASIC expires.

Use of Access Control Cards or Restricted/Air keys

 You can only use your Access Control Card or Restricted Air Key to gain entry to a Secure Area for a lawful purpose.

 You must not give your Access Control Card or Key to anyone else to use. It is for your use only while on duty.

 You must keep your Access Control Card or Key secure at all times (even when you are not using it).

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Access Privileges

An access privilege permits you to access certain area of the airport. Access privileges are granted on an individual basis. The access level you are granted will be dependent upon the type of ASIC or identification car you have, as well as what your operational need is to access certain area of the airport. Your access privileges do not give you the right to explore or access anywhere in the airport. You must have a lawful reason to access secure areas of the airport.

Airside Vehicle Access Gates

All persons accessing the Security Restricted Area (SRA) through vehicle access gates must display a valid red

ASIC or VIC under escort and have a valid Airside Driving Authority (ADA) licence. Access to the airside through gates in the airside fence is strictly controlled by Restricted Keys, Air Keys and ASIC/Access cards. All vehicles entering the airside area must display a valid Authority to Use Airside (AUA), locally known as Airside Vehicle Permit (AVP), and have a lawful reason to do so.

Once your vehicle is clear of the gate you must stop and hold until the Gate has fully closed behind you. If the gate is controlled by a Restricted Key you must lock the gate behind you. If you see an airside gate open without supervision you must close it and report it to Townsville Airport.

Tailgating

Tailgating is the practice of a person going through an access point with an authorised user without ‘badging’ their own access card to gain entry. Never tailgate others, or allow anyone to tailgate you through access controlled doors or gates. It is the responsibility of the person who ‘badged’ or ‘swiped’ open the door initially to ensure only authorised person enter through the door and wipe their card also. If you are unsure if a person is authorised to enter, don’t allow them to enter with you.

You must question/challenge any person who attempts or does tailgate you into a secure area and report anyone engaging in tailgating.

The only exception is when you are the supervisor of a VIC holder. In this circumstance you should provide the access, allow the VIC holder to enter, and then proceed directly behind the VIC holder.

Closing doors and gates

Always ensure doors and gates are closed and secure following entry/exit. Doors left open and unattended may allow unauthorised access to secure area, and as such pose a security risk. If you see a door propped open or open and unattended, close it and report it immediately to the TAPL Aerodrome Reporting Officers (Callsign ‘Safety One’) on 0418 771 999.

Damaged Fences, Doors and Gates

Damaged fences, doors and access points make it easy for people to gain unauthorised access to Secure Areas and can increase the airport wildlife hazard risk. Report any damaged fences, doors or gates to the Aerodrome Reporting Officer.

Off Duty Staff

You must always have a lawful reason to enter Secure Areas. When you are off duty, you are not authorised to go into Secure Areas. Should you do so, you may be prosecuted and have your ASIC and access privileges cancelled.

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Security Access Control – Example Test Questions

Here are some sample test questions relating to this section of the guide to help you prepare for your Security Induction:

 If you see a security door open with no staff member present, what should you do?

 When passing through an access control door you must badge/swipe you ID card, even if the

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Physical Security Measures

Physical Security Measures are in place to enhance the security of the airport.

Doors

Townsville Airport controlled doors providing access to the airside area are equipped with a Door Open Too Long (DOTL) alarm which will activate if a door is left open or is unsecured for a period of time. These alarms are monitored 24 hours a day by security officers and CCTV and a security officer will attend immediately if deemed appropriate.

Front of House and Parking Control

The control of vehicles and enforcement of parking is carried out by Townsville Airport contracted Customer Service Officers (CSOs) in accordance with aviation security requirements. The immediate pick up/drop off lane is signposted and also enforced by CSOs to ensure that no vehicles are left unattended.

CCTV

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) surveillance is used extensively throughout Townsville Airport. CCTV footage may be used by TAPL as well as law enforcement agencies for investigative purposes. CCTV significantly increases the ability to monitor areas of the airport and aims to:

 Assist in the prevention and detection of crime.

 Reduce crime levels by deterring potential offenders through fear of detection.

 Assist Police with the detection and identification of offenders.

 Aid in a more effective Police response to crime and emergency situations.

 Help ensure a fast and effective response to aviation security related incidents.

 Assist in the efficient operation of the airport.

Airside Fence Obstacle Free Zones

There are prescribed Security Fence clearance zones at Townsville Airport.

All objects that may facilitate unauthorised access to the airside area, such as trees, parked vehicles, airport equipment and cargo are required to be kept clear of the airside security fencing by a minimum distance of two metres airside and three metres landside. If you observe an item infringing these requirements, please contact the TAPL Aerodrome Reporting Officers (Callsign ‘Safety One’) on 0418 771 999. Damaged fences create easy access points for those wishing to gain unauthorised access to the airside area. If you see a damaged fence or a potential access point, report it immediately to the TAPL Aerodrome Reporting Officers (Callsign ‘Safety One’) on 0418 771 999.

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Physical Security – Example Test Questions

Here are some sample test questions relating to this section of the guide to help you prepare for your Security Induction:

 What is the minimum distance that object or vehicles can be located next to an airside security

fence?

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Security Reporting

Townsville Airport is responsible for the overall security of the airport. For aviation security matters please contact to TAPL Security Department on 07 4727 3211.

The Queensland Police Service (QPS) is responsible for counter terrorist first response and community policing at Townsville Airport. Report criminal or suspicious behaviour to the QPS. Airline Operators, tenants and concessionaires reporting crimes and requiring police assistance should telephone PoliceLink on 131 444. In an emergency call 000.

The See Something, Say Something campaign is an initiative undertaken by the Queensland Police Counter Terrorism Group to assist owners and operators of critical infrastructure sites in the reporting of suspicious activity, security incident management and crime scene preservation.

Small pieces of information from members of the public can help keep Australia safe from Terrorism. If you see something that is suspicious or doesn’t seem right then report it to the Queensland Police Service. You and your fellow staff know your business and surroundings better than anybody else. You will know what is unusual or suspicious.

Suspicious activity may include:

 Taking notes or drawing maps or plans.

 Photographing facilities.

 Purchasing an unusual quantity of particular products.

 Overdressed considering the weather.

 Interference with security related features of your infrastructure.

 Asking detailed questions about security or other processes.

Reporting should be done by:

 Filling in the CIPS reporting template.

 Emailing the completed report to PolicelinkPriority@police.qld.gov.au  Subject line of your email should read – ‘CIPS’

For further information call the Stakeholder Engagement Unit 07 3406 3677

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Unattended Items

Unattended items are a security issue within the Townsville Airport environment. It is the responsibility of all airport employees to be vigilant and report anything that they consider is suspicious. This includes identifying unattended items which could pose a risk to both employees and the general public.

Listed below is a basic procedure to follow if an unattended item is discovered in or close to your place of work.

Remember, DO NOT put yourself at further risk. Suspicious or unattended items should only be approached by trained personnel, such as Queensland Police Bomb Appraisal Officers and only visually assessed by Customer Service Officers or contracted security personnel.

If you identify that the item is unattended or suspicious:

DO NOT open, touch or move the item.

 Attempt to identify the owner. If you cannot identify the owner, report the unattended item to the Customer Service Officers on 1800 225 878 or 0408 715 500.

 If in the meantime the owner collects the item or is identified, give an updated report to the Customer Service Officer.

Whilst waiting for the Customer Service Officer to arrive:

DO NOT approach the item.

DO NOT allow any other person to approach or sit in the area of the unattended item.

DO NOT allow any other person to touch, open or move the item.

 Try to recall who was last in the area or why you believe the item to be suspicious

 Pass all relevant information to the Customer Service Officer when they arrive.

HOT-UP

Principle

1

.

IS the item/substance

H

idden?

2

.

IS the item/substance

O

bviously suspicious?

3

.

IS the item/substance

T

ypical of what is in the area?

4

.

IS the item/substance

U

nusual?

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects : Airport Security