CAE Practice Tests Tb

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(1)

Virginia Evans

For the revised Cambridge

ESOl CAE Examination

,~

Express Publishing

Teacher's

Book

(2)

Published by ElCpress Publishi

ng

liberty House

,

New Greenham Park, Newbury,

Berks

hire RG19 6HW

Tel: (0044) 1635

817

363 - Fax: (0044)

1635

8

17

463

e-mail

:

tnqulrles@expresspubl

tsh

lng

.co.uk

http

://

www

.

elCpresspubllshlng

.co.uk

o

V

i

rgi

ni

a

E

va

n

s,

2

0

09

D

es

i

g

n and Illu

s

tr

a

tion

C>

Express Publishing, 2009

F

i

r

s

t pu

b

li

s

h

ed 200

9

Mad

e

In EU

All

ri

g

ht

s

r

ese

rved

.

No part of this publication may be rep

roduced, stored in a retrieval system,

or tran

s

m

i

tt

e

d

I

n any form

,

or by any means

,

electronic, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior

wr

i

tte

n

perm

iss

ion of the publishers

.

Thi

s

book

Is

not meanl

lO be changed In any way.

I

S

BN 978

·

1

·

84679

-

756·9

A

cknowledgements

We would like 10 thank alllhe staff at Express Publishing who have contributed their skills to the production of this book. Thanks for th81r support and patience ate due In particular to: A1bert West (Editor in Chief): Antony O'Naill and AIel( Baker (senior editOfS): Stacey Hill and Sally White (edrtorial assistants); Eric Parson (senior production controller); the Express Publishing design team; Tlm Asher (recording producer): and Ann Morris, Usa Travis, William Sharp and Eddle Gibson, We would also like to thank those institutions and teachers who piloted the manuSCllpt, and whose comments and feedback were invaluable in the completion of this book.

The authors and publishers also wish to thank the following for their kind permission 10 adapt copyright material: p 7 from "Notes From a Big Counlry', from 'Notes From a Big Country' by Bill Bryson, Black Swan 1999, C Bill Bryson 1998; p 9 from 'My job: Andrew Baker, sports fealure writer, Dally Telegraph', Press Gazette Journalfsm Today, 17 September 2007, C 2007·2006 Wilmlngton Business Information: pp 10·11 from 'Unfrozen Tundra', Time Magazine 25 September 2006, Cl Tlme Inc.: p 12 from 'Step back in time', The Guardian 24 September 2008, Cl Guardian News and Media Umited 2009; p 15 from 'Malcolm Tait's top 10 wildlife books', The Guardian 16 August 2006, C Guardian News and Media Umited 2009; p 19 from 'Gift of the Nile', Focus November 1995; p 27 tram review of Wall E, Empire online, Cl Bauer Consumer Media; p 28 from 'No Courses at RADA are easy', y.'WW.@da.org; p 29 from 'A Utopian fantasy', The GuardIan 3 June 2002, C Guardian News and Media Limited 2009: pp 30-31 from 'Here be dragons', The Independent 30 October 2004, C Independent News and Media Limited 2009; p 32 from 'Who's that girl?', The Independent 16 Seplember 2006, Cllndependenl News and Media Umited 2009; pp 35-36 from '00 try this al home', The GuardIan 13 October 2006, Cl Guardian News and Media Umited 2009: p 39 from 'Dyslexia "can be identified alone day old"', Guardian Weekly 26 August 1999, Cl copyright Sarah Boseley, The Guardian Weekly; p 40 from 'Antarctic tourism and non-governmental expeditions: a summary of currenl activities' 10 May 2000, C Commonwealth of Australia. Used by kind permission: p 41 from 'Aexible answer to life In space', Focus November 2000; p 49 from 'What the teachers taught the judges', The Guardian 13 October 2006, Cl Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 50 from 'Going 10 work on general English', Guardian Weekly/BBC world service 20 June 1999 Cl John Hughes, The Guardian Weekly; pp 52-53 from 'Voluntary service underseas', Wanderlust February 2007, C Wanderlust; p 54 from 'Alpha couple', Vogue Ailstralia September 2008, Cl 2006 New Magazines Ply Ud; P 57 from 'Daring to be different', The Guardian 16 April 2005, Cl Guardian News and Media Limited 2009: p 60: p 62 from 'Penguins in peril', The Guardian W~ 4 April 1999, C The Guardian Weekly; p 70 from 'Weird or wonderful? A weekly look at alternative therapies', The Guardian 7 March 2000, C Guardian News and Media Umited 2009; p 74 from 'Thought crime', The Guardian 23 October 2008, Cl Guardian News and Media Umited 2009: p n from 'The eccentric's guide to London', The Guardian 19 November 2006, Cl Guardian News and Media Umited 2009: p 60 from 'Your get·ahead guide to powerspeak', Fair Lady 19 July 2000 Cl Fair lady Magazine; p 90 from 'Hire educalion', The Guardian 13 August 2007, Cl Guardian News and Media Umiled 2009; p 91 from 'ThIs column will change your life', The Guardian 15 November 2006, Cl Guardian News and Media Umited 2009: p 92 from 'Aquaseiling: sparkling water, on the rocks', The Telegraph 16 November 2006, Cl Telegraph Media Group Limited 2009: P 94 from 'Season of mists and unwanted guests', The Guardian 6 October 2002, C Guardian News and Media Umiled 2009; pp 97-98 from 'Top girls' (parts one, two & three)', The Guardian 30 September 2003, Cl Guardian News and Media Limited 2009; p 102 from 'Take a bough', Homes and Garriens February 1997 (pp 107-108), Cl 1997 Homes and Gardens; p 103 from 'Dubai: hot city seriously cool', Fair LlIdy Inspirations Summer 2000, C Fair Lady Magazine: p i l i from 'Household robols', ScienCentral News, 14 June 2007, C ScienCentraI2000-2007; p 1131rom "Chore Wars,' where 'World of WarcraJt' meels toilet cleaner', cnet News, 19 October 2007, C 2009 CBS Interactive Inc.: p 114 from 'On the chilli trail In Assam, India', The TImes 15 November 2008, Cl 2008 Times Newspapers Ltd,; p 116 from 'ling Tlngs are looking up for Katie White and Jules De Mattlno', The TImes 21 November 2006, C 2006 Tlmes Newspapers Ltd.: p 123 from 'Office karma', Fair Lady 12 April 2000, Cl Fair Lady Magazine: p 124 trom 'Ash Thursday', Focus October 1996:

Photograph Acknowledgements

p 27 Wall, from govemmenlexecutive.com, p 35 isolated Batman image, from fantasy-lllustration.com copyright C RABZ Art & Illustration, p 93 aquaseiling, ww.v.adventura21.co.uk

(3)

Introduction

...

. . . . . . . .

. . . ..

p. 5

CAE Test 1

Paper 1 .

Reading

Paper 2

.

Writing

...

...

....

...

...

.

....

.

...

.

Paper

3 -

Use

of

English

...

.

.

....

.

.

.

.

.

...

.

.

.

....

.

.

.

.

...

.

Paper

4 -

Listening

. ...•...

..

...•...

.

.

.

CAE Test 2

Paper

1

.

Reading

Paper 2

. Writing

...

.

...

.

...

...

.•

...

.

...

Paper

3 -

Use

of English

Paper

4

-

Listening

. ... .

CAE Test 3

Paper

1

-

Reading

Paper

2

-

Writing

...

.

....

.•

...

...

.

....

.

...

Paper

3

.

Use

of

English

...

.

.

...

.

.

..

.

....

.

...

.

...

..

. .

Paper

4 . Ustening

...

.. .

CAE Test 4

Paper 1 -

Reading

p.

7

p.16

p.

18

p.23

p.27

p.37

p

.3

9

p

.

44

p

.4

9

p

.

58

p.60

p

.

65

p.69

Paper

2

.

Writing

...

.

...

....

...

.

..

.

..

...

..

p. 78

Paper

3 -

Use

of English

...

...

...

.

...

.

....

p.

80

Paper

4

-

Ustening

. . . . . • . . .

. . .

.

. . . . • . ..

p. 85

CAE Test 5

Paper

1 - Reading

Paper 2

-

Writing

...

.

...

..

...

.

..

.

.

.

..

....

.

.

.

..

...

.

...

.

Paper 3

- Use of English

...

.

.•

.

...•..•

...

.

.

.

...

..

...

.

Paper

4 - Ustening

...

.

.

...

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.

.

.

..

.

....

.

.

..

.

...

..

.

..

..

...

.

...

.

...

.

p.89

p.99

p.

1

01

p.l06

3

(4)

CAE Test 6

Paper 1 . Reading

Pape

r 2

-

Writing

...

.

.

.

.

.

••

..

•...

•.

.

.•.•..•

.

.

..

..

..

..

.

...

Paper 3

-

Use of English

..

..

..

...

...

...

...

.

Paper 4

-

Liste

n

ing

..

.

..

...

....

.

..

.

...

.

•..

.

...

.

.

...

.•

.

...

.

.

.

Further Exam Practice -

U

se of

E

ng

l

ish .

.

.

....

.

•...

.

....

.

...•....

...

Speaking Tests

..

.

.

.

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.

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..

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.

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..

.

...

..

.

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.

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....

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...

.

.

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.

.

.

Sample Answer '

Sheets

.

....

.

...

••

...•...•...

Appendix

1

-

Word and P

r

eposition Combination

s ....

.

.

•.

..

.

....•.

•...

2

- Collocat

i

ons and

I

d

i

oms

...

.

.

•...•.

•...

p.

111

p

.

121

p

.

12

3

p.

1

28

p.133

p.145

p

.

1

5

7

p. 161

p

.

l64

3

- Word

f

orma

t

ion tables

...

,

.

,

...

,

. ,

,

'

.

.

... , .

••

.

.

...

,

.

.

p

. 1

66

4

-

P

u

n

c

tu

at

i

o

n

and spelli

n

g

. , .. , ... , . , , .... , . ' •

.. , .. ,

..

p

, 1

69

5

-

F

unctiona

l P

hrases for the Spea

k

ing Test

....

, •

.•

.

.

.

• , .••• .

.

.

p. 170

Model Answers for Writing

p. 171

Suggested Answers for Speaking Tests

.

.

p. 181

(5)

CAE

Practice

Tests

contains six complete tests

designed to help students to

prepare

for the

University

of

Cambridge ESOL Examinations

Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) examination.

The tests offer comprehensive practice

in

all

five

papers of the examination and reflect the most recent

CAE specifications (introduced

for December

2008),

thus providing students with the tools to deve

l

op the

s

kills required

to

succeed in this examination and

obtain the CAE qualification.

CAE

Practice

Tests includes a wide

range of stimulating,

authentic texts in examination format,

listening texts

with authenticated recordings and a variety of

accents,

and full-colour

visual material for

the

Speaking Paper.

The book

provides

a

detailed

overv

i

ew of the CAE

examination, with a description

of

all

the sections of

e

ach paper, exam guidance sections and further exam

practice for

Paper

3 -

Use of English

followed

by

useful Appendices as well as

Sample

OMR Answer

Sheets at

the back of

the

book.

Tests

1-4

contain helpful

exam

tips and reminders,

while Tests 5 and 6

are

like real exam papers, with no

guidance,

for further exam practice.

The

Teacher's Book

contains

all

the

Student's

Book

material, together with over-printed answers, model

written

answers for the Writing Paper, tapescripts of

the recorded

material

for

the Listening Paper, and

guidelines for the Speaking Test.

In

CAE there are five Papers as shown below:

Paper 1

(1

hour

15

mins)

Reading

4 parts

Paper

2

(1

hour 30

mins)

Writing

2 parts

Paper 3

(1

hour)

Use of English

5 parts

Paper 4

(approximately

40

mins)

Listening

4 parts

Paper 5

(approximately 15

mins)

Speaking

4 parts

'tOTAL

About CAE

CAE is the fourth

level in the Cambridge ESOL

five-level series

of

examinations and is

design~

to

offer

an advanced

qualification,

suitable

for those who

want to use English for

professional

o

r

stu

d

y

purposes. The CAE

examination

can also serve

as a

useful step in

the development of

the language skills

necessary for

the CPE examination.

The CAE examination can

be used

as

proof of the

language level

necessary to work

at managerial

or

professional

l

eve

l

or

to

follow

a course of study at

Cambridge Level Five

Certificate of Proficiency

in

English (CPE)

Cambridge Level Four

Certificate in Advanced English (CAE)

Cambridge Level Three

First Certificate in English (FCE)

Cambridge Level Two

Preliminary English Test (PET)

Cambridge Level

One

Key English Test (KET)

..

.

.

univeTSlty.

CAE

15 recognised by most

Bntish

wuVersJties

for English language

entrance requirements.

40 marks

40 marks

40

mar

ks

40 marks

40

marks

200 marks

5

(6)

PAPER 1

READING

(J

Ilour

15

mw)

ThiI

paper hae four parta

with

34

Questiona drawn from

reading

texts

which

contain about 3,000

wordl

in

total.

Part

f

Three themed textl

with

2 multiple-choice questions on each

ten.

Tesl{octa."detail.

opinion,

toM.~

main

idea, implication,

attitutk,

tut

organiaation features.

tic

Part 2

A gapped

text

with 6 missing paragraphs.

Test

foe'": text $1rudure, cohesion

and

coherence

Part 3

A

text

foUowed by 7 four-option multiple-choice questions.

Test

focus: detail, opinion. tone,

PUI"[J<J«,

main

idm, impIification.

athtuck,

tut orgallUalion ftaturu

Part 4

A text prec:eded by 16 multiple-matdring questions.

Te.sJ

focus: 3pecifjc information, chtail, opinion and

altitude

PAPER 2

WRmNQ

(J hoor 30 miM)

This paper bu

two parte. Part! requires 180-220 words

and Part 2 requires 220-260 words.

Part 1

One

compulsory task based on given input.

Test (ocra: mGy iru:lutk eualuating,

t:ZplTUing

opinimu,

hypotMsuing,

ilUtifying,

comparing. T«.Ommending.

supporting, tIc.

Ta.s.u

will

aiwaYl

incluck an ekment of

persUt1.8ion.

Part 2

One task

from

a choice of four

.

Question

5

is alway1I

ba&ed

on set

text..

Test

[OCU8:

comparing, giving

opinions,

p€raUllding,ju8tifying.

giuing

aduice,

cUscnbing, evaluating,

hypothesi8ing,

judging

prioritiea (2 or

fTl()re

of

t~ a&

.p«ifUd in tod

)

PAPER

3

USE OF ENGUSH

(llwur

)

Thi.a

paper has

five

parts with

a

tota1

or

50

questions.

Part 1

A multiple-choice elote or approximately 200

words

containing 12 gaps and rollowed by 12 rour-option

multiple-choice anawera.

Test foeus: luice

- grammalicallle:cical

Part 2

A modified

open elote or approximately

200

words

containing

15

gaps.

Teat

{oc1U: grammaJiooJIkxioo - grommolicol

Part 3

One text or up

to

130 words

each. Words muM.

be

rormed to

complete 10 gtlJ» using

the

given prompt words.

Tnt

focla:

laKolIk:xioo -

grotTIJTtLJtico

Part 4

Five

sets o

r

S sentences with gaps to be completed with the

same word.

Teat

(ocuI..

luicol

Part 5

Eight key word transrormation sentences.

PAPER

4

USTENING

(

ApproximJJl,ely40 minuies

)

This paper

has

rour parts

with

30

questiona

All

parts

are

heard twice

.

Part 1

Th.ree

short unrelated exchanges

with

two

multiple-cboioe

quettions ror each

.

Test

focus: feelin&, altitude, opinwn,

purpose,

function,

aareerrumt,

gist,

etc

Part 2

A

monologue with 8 lentence completion queat.ions.

Test {ocus:

'p«i/ic in{ormaJicn, slated opinion

Part 3

A

conversation between

2

or more

speakers with

6

multiple

choice quett.ions

.

TaJ {ocua: oUitlUk and opinion

Part 4

A seriet

or five

short

extracts

with two multiple matching

""u.

Teat

{ocus.

:

gUt, altitude, main point., interpreting

contat

PAPER

5

SPEAKING

(ApproximoJ.ely

15

minutes

)

This

paper

contains

rour

parts, and

is

taken by the

candidatea in pairs with

two examiners

present

.

One or

the

euminera

acta ... Interlocutor and the other one

as

...

,,,

.

Part 1

A

conversation between the Interlocutor and each candidate

.

TaJ {OCIU

:

g4!Mral intera.ctionoJ

and

socuul4nguoge

Part 2

Ind

ividuall minute '

l

ong

turn'

ror

each candidate with brier

30 second response rrom

2nd candidate.

Each candidate

is

given

S

visual stimuli with questions.

Test

focua

:

orgoniJing a larger unit o{ di8course, comparing,

dacribing,

t::qJtUling opinioru,

~ng

Part 3

Two-way conversation

between the

candidates. The

candidates

are

given spoken

instructions with written and

visual stimuli, which

are

used in

a

decision-making

task.

T~Bt

{ocus: exchanging

Uktu,

upTftSing and justifying

opinions,

tJ81tting

and/or

clisagreei.ng,

.uggating. 'p«u1oting,

reaching a

ckci8ion

through

negotiation, ttc

Part 4

A

conversation between the candidates and the

In

te

rl

ocutor

related to the topic introduced in Part 3.

Te

st {OCIU.'

upre"ins and

justifying opinion.s,

OjJreeing

andJ

o

r disagreeins

(7)

Exam~

Don

'

t forgel that

three of the answers

are there to distract

you from the correct

one. There may be

small but significant

differences in

meaning in the

answer sentences

so read carefully

and make sure you

understand how

one sentence differs

from another.

PART 1

(1 hour 15

minutes)

Test 1

You a.re gOing to read three extracts which are all

'

questIons

1-6, choose the

answer

(A B

CO DJ

ch~nhcerned

I

,

" some way with sports. For

text.

"

r

W

le you

think

fits best accortling to Ihe

If the traditional sports are losing their

J!,

\

sp,arkle

and you feel the need to risk life

I

i

if you do feel you have the courage to

give it a whirl, it is bound to get your pulse

they now hurtle down at speeds reaching

70 mph (115 km/h). And to make it even

more risky

,

the use of brakes is

strictly

forbidden! These riders are not ashamed

to take pleasure in risking everything in

§J

pursuit of an adrenaJin buzz.

You might be

wondering how they

stop-racing.

before they hit that brick wall that

I

r?\

Street

luging

bears little relation to its

approaches at speeds

usually only seen

~

wintry counterpart,

ice

luging,

and wiU

on motorways? Well, it's down to

gravity

probably neve

r

be recognised as an

and a

sturdy pair of

leather or Kevlar

Olympic sport. Street luge riders lie down

boots.

Perhaps you've heard of Kevlar

-flat on their backs and try to steer a it's the material that bullet-proof vests are

ine

30

street1uge board,

which is very similar to

made of. This is a sport that, as long as

the good old skateboard. It doesn't sound

you survive and are able to walk away

too hazardous, does it? The real danger

w

i

th no broken bones

,

will have you

comes from the steep, winding road that

ooming back for more!

1

Accor~ing

t

o the write

r

, st

r

eet

luge riders

A

believe the sport sh

Id b

B

have seen the

sport~

e

aCknowle~ged

at an international level.

©

se~m

to

thnve on

.

th

e danger involved in the sport

ecome progressIvely more dangerous

.

o

beheve the sport is often unfairly labe/ed as too

d~ngerous.

2

®Wh Y does the wr

it

er ment

i

on

bullet-proof

vests

(line 30)?

A

to show what is needed to stop when moving at hi

h

s ee

B

to recommend clothing suitable for street luging g

p d

C

to reassure readers that street luging is safe

o

to emphasise the risks the riders are taking

)

7

(8)

PART 1

~crrnQ::>~

~\)V""

~~

~

People

somelines os!< me,

'\\Mt

is

the

~

difference

between

baseball

and

cricket?'

~

The

answer

is

simple

,

Both

are

games

of

greot

sI<II

i1voM1g

boIs

and

bafs,

but

with

this

crucial

difference;

boseballs

exciting and

wIlen

you

go

home at

the

end

of tne

day

you

know

who

won

,

I'm

joking,

of course.

Cricket

Is

a

wondeffuI

game,

fUI

of

deIcIoloIy

scattered micro-morTle1

Its of rear action.

If 0

doctor ever Instructs me to

fake a

complete rest

and

not get

over-exclted. I shaH become

a

fon

at

once.

" the

fl'18Q111me,

howe"""

I hope you wI

undeIstond wIlen

I tal you that my

heart

beIOI ogs

to

baseboI.

In what r grew up

with

,

what

I played as 0

boy

and

that of course

ts

vital

to

any meaningful

appredotlon

of

a

sport.

I hod this

brought home

to me many years

ego

n

England

when I

went out

onto

a

foolbol pIIch with

a

ccq>Ie

of

guys to knocI<

a

bel around.

I had

watched

foo~

N

and

thought t

had

a fair Idea

of

"""'at

was

required.

so

when

one of

the~

ban

n

my direcllon

, I

decided

to

tick tt casually Into the

with

my head,

the way I hod seen KeIIIn Keegon do

tt

.1

thought

that tt would

be

like

heading a

beochban

-

that

there

wou1d

be

a

gentle

'ponk'

sound

and

that tne

ban

would IIghIly

leav

e my brow and dlIft

In

a pIeosIo I\l ar

c

Into the

net.

SUI

of

COllSO tt

was

11<.

heading a

bowing bel. I

hove never ten

onvthi"lg so

stortt!ng!y

not

lI<e

I thought tt

would

feel.

I walked

around

'Of

'our hours

on

wobI>y

legs with 0

big red

c'cia

and the word

MITJlE

inprhted on

my fOfeheod, and

vowed

never again to do anything

so

foolish and poInf\J.

M /

I;V

/.I"

(lffll4r/

3 The writer compares baseball and cricket in order to

@

explain

his preference for one over the other.

B

emphasise the pointlessness of cricket.

C

show how different they

are

to each other.

o

explain his reasons for liking them

.

4

The writer believes that he once

h

ad

a bad experience while playing football

because

V

®

his expectations of playing differed to the reality

of

it.

S

he

chose

to head the ball

instead

of kicking

it.

C

he had overestimated his

sporting

talent.

(9)

Test 1

...

What's

it

like being a

sports feature writer

on

a national newspaper?

Andrew

Ba~er

shares his

e~perience

of sports journalism.

c<AU;

-

(MII

0

I

HQe;V~IJ{;t()

'I-d

c!Pwlvb'

:

1{j1t41t1;1,(

l

etHl

t l(l("'{(

To be a

successful

sports journalist, you need

It

isn't necessary to

hold

a journalism

the

same

curiosity,

perseverance and

literacy

as

any other journalist,

but also specialist knowledge

if

you wish to cover one sport in particular;

diplomacy and humility

if

you

need to cover many

sports (you

will

need to

ask a lot of questions).

Also, the ability to write

sensibly

under extreme

pressure is essential

if you aspire to cover major

events

live

.

degr"

but a degree of some kind

is beneficia

l

,

be;a:se you will have experience

of

marshalling your thoughts under p

ressure.

In

an

ideal

world, all journalists would have an

essay

-based

degree a

nd

a postgraduate course

5

in

journalism, espec

ially important

for knowing

the

nuts and

bolts of

sub-editin and

how

to

avoid

legal howlers.

Perhaps

the

best part

of

being a

sports

journalis

t

is

travelling to interesting places and

meeting interesting people. Often

, these

are not

the

PR-protected megastars,

but

the

passionate

individuals who can tell you what is

so special

about

their sPOrt

and, if you

are lucky,

give

you

some

first-hand

experience.

In my

case,

I

'

ve

messed

about

on Ellen MacArthur's

boat al 3am

in a

Brazilian harbour, had

a special

driving

lesson from

an

F1

star and

done

a

lot more

fun

stuff

that

had better not

be recorded.

5

Acco

r

ding to the writer, one of the main benefits of obtaining a quali

f

ica

t

ion in

journalism is

A

becoming sk

i

lled in writing good quality essays.

B

learning how to express ideas quickly and clea

r

ly.

©

ga

i

ning knowledge of the practica

l

details o

f

jou

rn

alism.

D l

earning how to dea

l

wi

t

h the st

r

ess associated with

j

ournalism.

6

What aspect of sports journalism is the w

r

iter emphasising i

n

the third

paragraph?

A

t

h

e chance to meet famous people

B

the necessity of personal participation

~

J

©

the sa

t

isfac

t

ion ga

i

ned

fr

om contact wi

t

h ent

h

usiasts

IV

D

t

h

e

f

ervour

and dedication of some people he meets

,

(10)

PART 2

You are going to read an extract from a magazine article

.

Six paragraphs have been removed from the extract

.

ChOOl.,j

from the paragraphs

A

-G the one which

fits

each gap (1-12). There

Is

one extra paragraph which you do not need

use.

From 30,000

ft.

in the air, the Greenland ice cap seems

Impregnable, nearly

800 trillion gallons of frozen water

locked safely away. But get doser and the ~cks

begin

to emerge. Dandng

by

helicopter above the mouth of the

Jakobshavn Glader, near

the

western coast of Greenland,

you can make out veins of the purest blue melt water

running between folds of ice.

F

Those Icebe

rg

s are spat out

i

nto Di';.

Ba~iIIiOn

metric tons' worth every year, where

ey loom bove

the tiny fishing

boats

th~

deep, co d waters.

Sail

dose and you'll find

~ese

seemingly permanent

cathedrals of ice, some 200

ft.

to 300

ft

.

high, are leaking

water like broken

pipes.

They're fighting a war and they

appear to be IOSI,

'

?

la I

G

If all the lee on Greenland

were to melt tomorrow,

global sea levels would rise more than 20

ft. -

enough to

swamp many coastal cities. Though no one thinks that

will happen anytime soon, what keeps gladologists

awake at night is that thinking is not the same as

knowing -

and no one can say with certainty what

Greenla

n

d's fate will

be.

-D

I

got a firsthand look

at such heroism this summer

when I joined a team of international researchers led by

Oahl-lensen at the NEEM camp in Greenland. NEEM

stands for North Green

l

and Eemlan Ice Drilling (the

acronym is Danish, as are the leaders of the project), and

the scientists are digging deep into the Greenland ice

-more than a mile

and

a half deep

to

be

precise - to

try

to understand

its

pedigree

.

B

It's like

tree

rings but for dimatic hiStory. -In order to

predjct the future, we have to understand

the past,·

says

Min

l

k Rasing, a geologist at the University of

Copenhagen. NEEM is focused on the Eemian stage, a

period from about 11S,OOO to 130,000 years ag

o

, right

be

fore the last ice age, when

the worid was warm - quite

warm, about 9

"

F hotter in Europe than it is today.

A

Oahl-Jensen believes that with enough information,

they wlll be able to project forward and understand just

how

vu

lnerable Greenland is to future melting.

·

With 10

~ars

o

f

In

t

ense researCh, [ think we can reach a reUable

estlmate for

that tipping point,

-

she says.

E

I watch a

s a plume of mist

fills the air where the

Iceberg once was, while the fjord chums on. And then I

wonder, just how much time do Greenland and the

rest

of us have before it's too late? That may

be

up to us

-and the heroes we choose to follow.

(11)

A Given that the U.N.'s Intergovernmental

Panel on

Climate Change

estimates that

temperatures could rise

3.24

'

F

to

7.2

'

F

over the

coming

century, the Eemian

could

offer

a model for the

effect

such

thermometer swings will hav

e

on

Greenland's

ice.

A

full dimatic

record

of

the Eemian has never been

constructed,

but over the

next

several summers, the

NEEM researchers

hope

to harvest cores

that will help them track the state of the

ice

throughout that era, when Greenland

was warm enough

to

actually

be

green.

!

~

"'&p

"

'I'

B

Depth

fS

time

and the lower you go, the

further back in history you travel.

As

ice

formed in Greenland, year after cold

year, bits of atmosphere were trapped

in the layers. Drilling into the

ice

and

fishing out samples - ice cores

-

that

contain

tiny bubbles of that andent air

can reveal the temperature, the

concentration of

greenhouse gases,

even

the

ambient

dust from the

year

that layer was formed.

C

It's easy to misunderstand all of this.

Oimate change itself isn't a bad thing

;

It isn't even

unusual. Take a geological

step

back, and you can see

that

our

climate has always changed, alternating

just within the past several

hundred

thousand years between ice ages,

when

glaciers covered much of the Northern

Hemisphere, to eras warmer than

our

own.

r:>

o

That's why

researchers

like Dorthe

Dahl-Jensen,

stationed

on

a

barren

speck of

la

nd

near

the

heart

of Greenland's ice

sheet, are considered a hero

for

the

environment.

His work there

involves

decoding the

island's dimatic history. He,

along

with

numerous other

scientists,

activists,

financiers and

pol

itical

leaders

display a

passion

for the

planet that just

might save it.

,

,

'

h

I

.J; 'g~, J

E

It's that

ty

pe

of confidence that

serves as

our light in

the

dimatic

darkness, living

proof that hope hasn't vanished. You

need

that comfort when you're standing

on a rocky hilltop in Greenland, watching

the ice disappear.

As

Jakobshavn gives

way

to

the

dium-size

Iceberg

sudde

implodes,

isintegrating

like

a

collapsing s

scraper.

F

What you can't

at height, is

Jakobsh

av

n' inexorable

de toward

the sea at 65 ft.

to 115

ft.

a day

-

an

alarming rate that has accelerated in

recent years.

As the glacier nears the

coast, it breaks off Into

e Ilullssat

fjord, a stream

0

churnin

Ice

that

might have birthed t e

monster

that

sunk the

Titanic.

~

1((

r

G

Sadly, Greenland

is

the front

line

in

humanity's

battl

eV

against

climate

change. The warming

-

that

IS

easy to

dismiss elsewhere

i

s undeniable on this

860,000-sq.-mi. isJand

of

fewer than

60,000 people, More and more

of

Greenland, whose

frozen expanses are

a livIng remnant of

the last

Ice age,

disappears each year, wIth as much as

150 billIon

metric

tons of

g

l

acier

vanishing annually.

T

e

st 1

~~Tip

Look for any

grammatical or

logical clues

which can

help you place

the missing

paragraphs In

Jt

)!1~ ~ght

gaps

.

(12)

PART 3

You

are going to read

a magazine article. For questions 13-19

.

choose the answer (A.

B

.

C

Of

0

) which you thi~k

best

according 10 the text

.

~tep

back

in

time

Historicol biographer Antonia Fraser reveals the pleasures af

studying a bygone

era.

Gibbon

was

inspired

to write

The

Decline

and

Fall of

the

R

oman

Empire sitting

on the

steps of the

Capitol

;It

Rome one evening, listening

to

the sound of monks

chanting.

My

own Inspiration

to

become a historical

biographer came in rather

less

elevated circumstances,

as

a teenager

one rainy

Oxford

afternoon:

I

began to read

Lytton Strachtis EmlnentVtctorians. and was in particular

fascinated by

his essay on

Cardinal Manning.This was going

to

be

the life for me! Once back

at

school

I plunged into

further research in the library. A very

different picture

cf3)

emerged

.

Gradually as

r pursued the

topic.

I became aware

~

of Strachey's dari

ng sallies into

-artistic truth

-

(as opposed

to

historical

truth).

N~rtheles$

I

neyer forgot

my

original

sense of

oong

transported into a

world

more

vivid

than

my

own.

An

mlity

to

coovey this

sensation

is.,

I believe.

at

the

n.('heart of the

matter. ~

the biographer; don't

thrill to

~you

r

subiect.

you can

hardly

in all fairness

expect

the

reader to do so. In a sense (not of course the commercial

sense) the choice

of

subject is irrelevant so long as it

21

meets

that requirement You could say that I

was extremely

lucky

to choose

Mary

Queen of Scots

for

my

first foray

since there proved to

be

a world-wide public for the

troubles of the ill-fated Queen

.

But you could argue equally

that I made

my own luck. since I had always

been

obsessed

by

Mary's

story from childhood,

Nor

was success

fore-ordained.

It

was, after

all, the leading publisher

Mark

Bonham-Carter of (men) Collins

who

$aid

to

me when

I

115'!

confessed

my

project, ''They say that all

books

on

Mary

"-'.

Queen of Scots

sell

and

no

books

on

South America do-,

before

adding with a

laugh,

"Perhaps yours will

be

the

exception.-Nevertheless

I

did have

luck.

In

the 60s,

so-called

IUrrative

biography

was said

to

be

OUt

of fashion. Mary

Queen of

ScOts

was

an

early

from

the fact that

me

public

continued

to

have

an

for

it.

so

long as

the research

was

felt to be,~

!~:~

"""

not

Scracheyesque

of

Or Johnson's

wise dicwm: "A

man

wilt

tum over half a

libnry

to

make a book..

And

what

about those fabled

things

boasted of on

blurbs:

hitherto unpublished

doc.umentsl

Obviously

it

is

f!'iery researcher's dream

to

discover such

papers.

and

their discovery once apin

may

make a protect commercial

which would not othefWise

be

so. At the same time

I

would issue a

caveat about hitheno

unpublished

documents

.

HUDs are not

in

themselves more valuable

than

the princed sources

-

it's a historical coincidence that

Ofl@

set

has become

known

early

on, the

other not One

needs

to

evaluate

them

even

more

closely. Here

I speak

from personal

experience

.

A series

of

chances

led

me

to

discovering s

ome hitherto

unpublished letters

of

Ollver

Cromwell JUSt as I was finishing

my manuscript I

bbzoned

my finds

acros

s

the

text

only

to

realise

at

the

proof stage.

that they

might

be

unpUblished

but they

were not very

important In

the

grand scheme of things

._

an expensive

mistake.

Where the

perils and pleasures of writing historical

biography are concemed, there are two perils which seem

to

me

to

raise points of principle

.

The first is me peril of

anachronistic judgements

.

For example, in the

16th century

6ne

more or less f!'ierybody tOOk astrology seriously and more

'@>

or less everybodY

enjoyed

a

lolly aftemoon out to see the

bears

baited.

It's

no

good

dismissing the former as

meaningless

and

aingfng from

th

e latter as disgusting.

I

would further cite. the peril of hindSight

We may know

that Henry

VIII Will

marry

six times. but

he didn't, and he

would

have

been amazed

if

it

had

been

predicted at the

time

of

his first marriage

to

Catherlne of Aragon.

And

the

pleasure

sl

Manifold!

Principal among

them

however is the opporwnity

to

lead

a

life less ordinary,

As a biographer;

I

can rule

over

kingdoms.

lead

the

cavalry Into battle, patronise

the great

artists

of the past

and

all

without

leaving

my

chair.

(13)

ExamJ!eS'?

R

ea

d the text

oxtremely carefully

I

n order to

d

i

s

tinguish between

opparently similar

vie

wpoints,

outcomes or

reasons.

-~

13 What did the writer learn while researching a historical figure as a teenager?

A There was a surprising amount of information available.

®

It was not possible to take everything she read as fact.

C

I

t

was

difficult to interpret the true meaning of what she

r

ead.

o

I

t

was necessary to consult a wide range of sources.

14 What does 'that requ

i

rement' in line 21 refer to?

A

the reader's response to a writer's subject

B

the correct choice of subject

C the commercial appeal of the book

@

the writer's ability to communicate their enthusiasm

1

5 What did Mark Bo

n

ham-Carter believe about

t

he writer's choice of subject?

A

He

r

long-standing interest in it may ensure her book's success.

®

It did not guaran

t

ee her book's success.

C

There are already too many books wr

i

tten on it.

o

It was a wise c

h

oice for her first biography.

1

6 The main po

i

nt that the wr

i

ter is making in the fourth paragraph is that

A

a biography is more like

l

y to be successfu

l

if it con

t

ains new in

f

ormation.

B

researchers must be careful to check all facts thoroughly.

C

research material can include inaccurate in

f

ormation.

@

extensive reading is crucially important.

Test 1

17 What warning does the writer give to biograp

h

ers about unpublished documents?

A

They are difficult to obtain as their discovery is down to chance

.

®

Their overall significance to the book must be carefully considered.

C

Their use could result in diminished commercial success for a book.

o

It should not be assumed that they are authentic

.

(£\I.f.~~O

lW31,lf

1

8

An examp

l

e of an '

anachronistic judgement'

(line 64) that the writer gives is

A

not being able to imagine oneself

l

iving in the sixteenth century.

B

being uninformed about sixteenth century customs and practices.

©

viewing the s

i

xteenth century from a twenty-first century perspective.

o

focusing only on the negative side of life in the sixteenth cen

t

ury.

19

In

t

he article as a whole, the writer imp

l

ies that her main motivation for becoming an

historical biographer was t

h

e chance

t

o

A

carry o

u

t extensive research.

®

become im

mersed in history.

C

discover unpublished documents.

o

es

t

ab

l

ish historical t

r

ut

h

.

(14)

Read the questions

first and uoo

the key word

that you kn()1

exactly what

looking for in

texts.

PART

4

You are going to read some reviews of wildlife books. For questions

20-34

, choose fro

the reviews

(A.-G)

. The reviews may

be

chosen more than once.

In which review are the following mentioned?

feelings of

inad~uacy

In relation

to

others

the fact that the reviewer

does

not apologise for selecting the book

a

failLffft

10

respond

suffidenUy to an

OPQASU,

the fact that

an

author openly reveals details of a

personal

nature

readers

being able to Identify with an author's

line

of

thinking

~

an authors successful exploration of the

most

central aspects

of a matter

the successful portrayal of an instincbVe connection

an ignorance of deeper meanings, which

later

became apparent

a well.arganised and aesthetically pleasing book

a reviewer's changed reaction

10

a creature since reading the

book

the book provokes a reaction even if readers' opinions

differ from

those

of

the

author's

a suggestion that a

book

was

not an obvious

choice

for

a reviewer

an

a~4~a

lost

~oseness

with

the

~~t~~1

wo~

an assurance

that

knowledge acquired will enhance

a reader's

appreciation of nature

multiple

descriptions of the same thing

120

I

C

121

I

F

1221

F

123 1

A

1241

Cl

-.

._

-1311

G

-

.-

.

(15)

-~

Tal(e a

.-

:-,

M,lIcolm Tail, editor of Going. Going, Gone?, an illustrated mmpilation of 100 animals and plants in danger of extinction,

It

'\l

iews his favourite wildlife books.

A: Nature Cure by Richard Mahey

If the best wildlife writing reveals as much aboullhe writer as the

h ..

,lIdllllr,

itself, then this is the best of them all.

Mabey

is brutally

'

~~:;;~~~~~~~~':hi;"=depression,

IhJt nature for him. The more he

and his fear

disconnected from the world he

his path out of

despair

,

as

he finds a

:

~::~~~!~:~'~~iand

book,

fire up the

written in

wild bits

of

richly

his

it's painful

too:

IhlCure, out

R: The Jungle Book

by

Rudyard Kipling

K

ipling..

r

think

, was where much of it began for me.

r

adored his

iUlirnaltales as a lad, such as the idiosyncratic, rock ing-chair-by-the-fireside fables of the Just

So

Stories and the heroic and ~uspense-filled Rikki·tikki-tavi. But it was The Jungle Book that

('I

t;

r(,.llly gripped

me,

a rite of passage yarn in which the vicissitudes ' of life were represented by the forces of nature. Of course, I didn't understand all this at the time I just loved reading about l!.aloo, Bagheera and all and singing along to the songs of the Disney version - but I now realise that I grew

up

with Mowgli,

.m

d

that I've been going back to the jungle ever since.

C:

How to be a Bad 8irdwatcher by Simon Bames

You

know

the feeling:

you're

reading a book, and as

you

turn

every

Q~

page you're nodding i.n

agreement.

as if

the

writer has

popped

into your head and committed your

own

thoughts

to paper. This is

one

of

those

books. It's about being a

normal

birdwatcher, reasonably knowledgeable, constantly passionate,

but

often a bit confused as to ~O what you've seen

or

heard, and

INith

the

vague feeling that

everyone

" else you're

with knows

so

much more. It's

the book

for those

of us

who

find birdwatching pleasurable, not competitive,

and it's

terribly funny to boot.

I

ahvays smile,

now, when

I

see

a sparr

owha..w.

I urge

you

to

read

this book

to

find out why.

~

0: Field Guide to the DTagonflies and Oamselfties of Great

Britain and Northern Ireland

by

Sieve Brooks and Rit:hard lewington

You can't have a list of wildlife books without including a guide ~~ book. I've gone for this excellent little number, partly because it's "-\ dearly written and

well

laid out, partly because it's superbly illustrated, but mainly because a whole new world has opened up for me since buying it. If you've never looked closely at nature

631

before, this book will set you in the right direction, and I ",-guarantee that as you get to know these fascinating

creature~

you'll have new marvels to understand and enjoy every time you

Test 1

E: The Future of life

by

EO Wilson

Here's a fascinating book which is a great example of conservation-based writing. The ecological debate will always rage on - should mankind continue to experiment with new sciences and discoveries, or are we destroying our world and ourselves in the rocess -

',~~ ~;;:;;;~~~~;-;~;T,~~

ar umenls u rbl , iven by a

which

we

planet.

I

i I

F: The World's Vanishing Animals by eyril LiHlewood and DW

OVenden ~

An unashamedly nostalgic choice. Published in two volumes <mammals and birds) in

1969,

this was my introduction to the idea that extinction wasn't just for dinosaurs and dodos. I used to pore over Denys Ovenden's illustrations of familiar polar bears and black rhinos, and less familiar takahes and nyalas, and wonder whether I could do anything to help. Published by the Wildlife Youth Service, part of Peter 5cott's WWF i

11

action for young folk. Trouble is. we haven't fully listened to it. The book's dust jacket records that about 1,000 animal species were faced with extinction at time of publication: today, the World Conservation Union's Red Ust of animals about which to

be concerned contains over

16,000

entries.

G: The Peregrine by lA Baker

~

The last in my list is. perhaps oddly, a book I haven't yet read. I've included it because I've only recently heard about it, I can't wait to read it, and I don't see why I can't find something new in this list, as well as you. By all accounts, the book is a reminder of the wildness of England (it was published in 196n, and a tour de force of language as Baker

~~~-!-~!.:!!!j~¥:::~~:!,~

~

grippingly and compellingly,

(16)

PART 1

(1 hour

30

mins)

••

Exam

~

You

must

answer th

i

s question

.

Write y

o

ur an

s

wer

i

n

180..220 words

I

n an appropri

style

.

Both parts of Paper 2

take the same

number of marks

,

so

spend the same

length of time on

each one

.

1

You are a student at an international school. The prin

ci

pal of the school is looking for

venue for this year

'

s end-of-term party and has asked you to write a proposal suggesti

a suitable one

.

Read the memo

below

,

on which you have made some notes

,

the

notes you made aft

hearing

students

'

comments

about

last

year's party

and

the

advertisements fort\ovo possib

venues

.

Then.

using the information

appropriately

,

write

your proposal

f

or the princi

explain

i

ng why you think a different venue should

be chosen

this

year

.

recommencfing

.,

..,

(

(

(

(

of the

venues in

the

advertisements

and

explaining

why

it

may

cost

more

this

year .

em

n",1o

'/'"

fo' ,,¥U;~

n,

f><.Ip with

~

",9';~"

of

jj,;~ .".,,~ ooJ-~

po""!

,

lA,I.

'/'" t.ll

'"~

what

~

~tv~

jj,

..

g.t

of

Ixt

.".,,~

po,,",?

c..,.I

...e

oM-

~

<>ou

...

-,~

',9;'

jj,;~

.".,?

0.

pm'~

,,~

of

~

\'t:.tIlleI; '"

fhe:.

iiJlIe+"'fi~ I'~

~

wOllld

~e,. MOn:.

S:lJitab

le

?

A-I~,

do

~OV

thill/:::.

that

;all~

adJitioll;a/

fi";a~

wHl

~

'"1!';...d

fo'

jj,k

.".y'~ ~?

n,,~

'I""

',9;"

p~t.rtt""mond

(S<.hool Fn"'"P'i)

(

No

,

because

...

)

"

Yes, probably. (give reasons)

Notes from Students

'

comments

not enough

food

-

only

nlbblesl

hotel

Dj

'

s music unoriginal

'

movie stars' theme

successful

hotel venue a bit

formal/impersonal

r

Paradise

Club

8eachslde Nightclub

&

Restaurant

Available tor hire now for new

·

Hawaiian

Barbeque

'

night. Uve band on

request-Call us on 5984857

~

'IIII~

Need

a venue

for

Q

reception

,

conference

or party?

We offer hot or cold buffet, resident DJ,

speclof

price for

earlv

bookings

CoIl

Gory

ftJ!toes

at

G._

...

ParIc

M""",

on

987-4231

Figure

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References

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