Cost Comparison of Spent Fuel Storage and Deep Geological Disposal

Full text

(1)

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an Unstable, 

C b C i d W ld

Carbon Constrained World

Cost Comparison of Spent Fuel Storage  and Deep Geological Disposal p g p

Graham Smith Graham Smith GMS Abingdon Ltd

gmsabingdon@btinternet.com

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel  Prague, March 2008        Graham Smith

(2)

Two Assertions

• That the costs of storing spent fuel above ground in  dry casks a. at the reactor site or b. at an agreed 

t l ti t h l th d l i l

remote location, cost much less than deep geological  disposal of the sort associated with a. Yucca Mountain  b a proposed European site

b. a proposed European site.

• That there would be merit in giving the utilities which  produce the spent fuel some financial stake in the

produce the spent fuel some financial stake in the 

management of the spent fuel, if only to discipline the  process from becoming unhinged from cost 

constraints.

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(3)

Some interesting references..?

• Stepwise Approach to Decision Making for Long‐term  Radioactive Waste Management. NEA‐OECD, 2004

• The Role of Storage in Management of Long lived Radioactive

• The Role of Storage in Management of Long‐lived Radioactive  Waste. NEA‐OECD, 2006

• Costing methodologies. EC TREN/05/NUCL/S07.55436

• Cost Estimates for Disposal of Spent Fuel from New Build 

Reactors in the UK. Chapman and McCombie. MCM‐TR‐06‐01,  2006

2006

Uranium and Plutonium: Macro‐Economic Study. UK NDA, 2007.

Spent Fuel Management: Life Cycle Analysis Model. UK NDA,Spent Fuel Management: Life Cycle Analysis Model. UK NDA,  September 2007

• Yucca Mountain Licence Support Network (www.lsnnet.gov/)

More in accompanying paper…

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(4)

What costs, who pays, who  benefits?

Risks of action...  and inaction 

• Will I die? 

• Will you die?

• Will you die?

Do I have to pay so that you don’t die?

And Benefits...

• A hazard has been reduced, or eliminated ,

Can I get the liability off the books!

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(5)

Perspective on risk...

Perspective on risk...

Spent Fuel Storage NW Russia Would you pay for this to be done better?

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(6)

Perspective on benefits...

Perspective on benefits...

Making the world a safer place for

democracy democracy.

Did MAD work?

Does it still?

Are we in Are we in fact, still enjoying the benefit?

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(7)

Pros and Cons: Disposal

Pros

• Major hazard reduced sooner honestly It says so on Major hazard reduced sooner, honestly.. It says so on  the label!

• Liability is managed and controlled in shorter time‐ Liability is managed and controlled in shorter time scale... by the generation (or so) that caused the  problem. (IAEA Safety Fundamental principle.) Cons

• Other management options foreclosed g p

• Political uncertainties in being able to deliver the  option... You might decide to do it and then fail...

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(8)

Pros and Cons: Storage

Pros Pros

• Option remains open for re‐use of materials

• And to develop safer disposal, or other ‘final’ solutionp p

Cons

• Major hazard left on the surface...

accidents

misuse of material later by the owner or others

degradation of store containment before ‘final’ solution implemented degradation of store containment before  final  solution implemented

• Responsibility left to others. 

They may not be as responsible as the US DOE is today Intergenerational equity etc...

• At the end of storage period, you still have a hazardous material  to manage!!!

to manage!!!

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(9)

NEA Stepwise Approach p pp

“... is meant to help build closer ties between  the radioactive waste management and the the radioactive waste management and the  social science communities, contributing to  the reflection on stepwise decision making the reflection on stepwise decision making  through the provision of several perspectives  supported by an extensive set of references ” supported by an extensive set of references.

“Stepwise decision making allows for  reversibility of decisions ”

reversibility of decisions.”

What does this mean for confidence in cost  estimates?

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(10)

NEA Role of Storage

Storage is not one thing. There are different or multiple  objectives

R di i d d h d i

Radioactive decay and heat rate reduction

Logistic buffer within on‐going disposal

Interim until deep disposal available

Interim awaiting strategic decision on use of materials Whichever, the conditions of storage and hence costs, 

will be dependent on the objective.

Any cost strategy for storage which does not say how  long the storage is for, and what the next step will be,  is reckless and will lead to more costs later

is reckless and will lead to more costs later. 

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(11)

Arguments

Two housewives from Glaswegian tenements  were shouting at each other about who could were shouting at each other about who could  next use the washing line strung between 

their two opposite 5

th

floor windows their two opposite 5

th

floor windows.

But it was obvious they would never agree –

h i f diff i !

they were arguing from different premises!

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(12)

Assumptions behind cost estimates

St i i t i i i ki d f

Storage is an interim measure, requiring some kind of  disposal eventually; but these later disposal costs are  set aside in estimating the costs of storage Thus the set aside in estimating the costs of storage. Thus, the  comparison sticks to the question in the assertion.

Options are assumed to be implemented without Options are assumed to be implemented without 

accident; according to plan; within the law and 

meeting relevant regulatory requirements on safety.

Storage introduces flexibility in later stages – but only  the options evaluated in specific cost studies 

referenced are considered here

Only the financial costs are included. E.g. the cost of the 

l d l h l h d l d d

planned implicit health detriment is not included.

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(13)

Costing methodologies

St d d t di t t ?

Standard current discount rates...?

Rates of return expected on government investment in  infrastructure ?

infrastructure...?

Even the most rapid disposal programmes involve  timescales beyond our capacity to estimate either timescales beyond our capacity to estimate either  reliably...

“The only way to make decisions is to pull numbers out The only way to make decisions is to pull numbers out  of the air, call them 'assumptions' and calculate the  net present value.  p

Of course, you have to use the right discount rate,  otherwise it's meaningless.” Dilbert

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(14)

US Spent Fuel and Yucca Mountain

Current disposal cost estimate 58 billion£ (USDOE)

Disposal commencing in 2025, or deferred 100y or Disposal commencing in 2025, or deferred 100y or  200y or indefinitely

Discount rates from 3 – 7%

For 3%

Earliest disposal 2025: NPV cost: 31.7 billion $ Earliest disposal 2025: NPV cost: 31.7 billion $

Indefinite storage cost: 7.5 billion $

Intermediate costs for 100 200y deferral Intermediate costs for 100, 200y deferral

Savings are higher for higher discount rates The NPV cost of final disposal after 200y are 0 The NPV cost of final disposal after 200y are ... 0.

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(15)

Logistics Sensitivity Illustration: 

EPRI 1015046 EPRI 1015046

70,000 MTHM ‘authorised’ for Yucca Mountain. 

Is this enough...? Not if there is new build...

Analysis of alternatives:

• Larger area

• Three instead of one layer

• Three instead of one layer

• Denser packing

All found acceptable to varying degrees,  allowing up to 570,000 MTHM

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(16)

Disposal Cost: UK New Build 

• Range of current costs for stand alone direct disposal of new

• Range of current costs for stand‐alone direct disposal of new 

build spent fuel for a UK programme of 10 APRs operating for 60  years is from $6.5 billion to $7.2 billion. Management costs 

based on UK, Swedish, Swiss and Belgian historic data.

• Unit cost would be lower if legacy HLW were co‐disposed. Twice  mass of spent fuel increases costs by 50%

mass of spent fuel increases costs by 50%.

• 0.2 cents per kWh on‐going generates $10 billion after 60 years,  with no interest accrued. Sufficient funds for the entire disposal  programme generated after 30 years (c.f. the 60 year 

programme) assuming a 2.5% interest rate on deposits.

• The interim storage programme over 60 years represents only a

• The interim storage programme over 60 years represents only a  small fraction of the total spent fuel management programme,  i.e. 22% on Swedish model; 9% on the Swiss.

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(17)

U‐Pu, an Asset or Liability? Study  for UK  Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

Nuclear Decommissioning Authority

3 Bounding scenarios

Waste : No further development of nuclear power uranium

Waste :  No further development of nuclear power, uranium  prices low and all the materials are disposed of as soon as a  repository can be constructed.

Storage: places all materials into long‐term storage assuming  value in the future, but after 300 years this has not been the  case, so the materials are then disposed of.

case, so the materials are then disposed of.

Use : materials have value now, uranium used in new fuel, Pu  used in MOX, spent fuel reprocessed, with product used in  programme of 12 GW, running for 60 years, followed by a fast  reactor programme on the same scale, and disposal of all 

wastes at 300 years.y

Logistical variants on the storage and use options.

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an  Unstable, Carbon Constrained World

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(18)

Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel 

Graham Smith Prague, March 2008 

(19)

Who best to manage civilian spent fuel?

R ibilit f t f l t i b t i t

Responsibility for spent fuel management is best given to  a central national agency, not left to a set of disparate  waste producers who may not have the same long‐

waste producers who may not have the same long term goals or capacities to ensure delivery. 

NEI note TAD canister program dropped in ‘97 NEI note TAD canister program dropped in  97

– Uncertainties in final repository design – Uncertainties in program funding

B ti i di t

– Bureaucratic impediments – Lack of market diversity

But the pricing situation has improved in a renewed But the pricing situation has improved in a renewed 

programme (circa 2005) with competitive tendering  and reasonable confidence in a repository design.

Similar DOE experience in legacy site management.

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(20)

Conclusions 1

Storage v Disposal is the wrong contest! It should  be Disposal As Soon As Possible (ASAP) v

be Disposal As Soon As Possible (ASAP) v  Planned Storage and Disposal Later.

l ll d

Since Disposal ASAP still needs interim storage,  the real questions are how long to store for, 

d h l i i l h d

and what cost, logistical or other advantages  can be taken from an extended storage period?

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(21)

Conclusions 2

Storage is not one thing. There are different or  multiple objectives.

The conditions of storage and hence costs will be  g dependent on the objective.

Don’t unthinkingly compare costs for strategies which Don t unthinkingly compare costs for strategies which 

have different objectives!

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(22)

Conclusions 3

New technology will not make things massively  safer – at least according to designs, all realistic  options are already reasonably safe. 

Early action introduces some risks in solving the  problem, but indefinite storage will introduce 

p , g

long term risks, as well as shifting responsibility.

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(23)

Implementation of different actions

No Action

f Risk

No Action

Risk d i

Level of

A ti 1 during

implementation

Action 1 Action 2 Action 3

Time

2000 2002 2004 2006 2030

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(24)

Conclusions 4

All strategies present costs which are small c f the All strategies present costs which are small c.f. the 

overall cost to the power user. 

Assuming discount rates commonly used in Assuming discount rates commonly used in 

financial planning, storage is cheaper than  disposal

disposal.

There are important continuing uncertainties 

h h d b l d b h l

which need to be explored, but they only 

present possible ranges in costs which are still 

l l h

only marginal to the power user.

These uncertainties arise from socio‐economic and  political factors.

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(25)

Conclusions 5

Planning long term operations with very hazardous Planning long term operations with very hazardous 

material like spent nuclear fuel needs a central  and strong authority

and strong authority. 

However, management models should be adopted  which allow for transparent technical and

which allow for transparent technical and 

financial over‐site, involving waste producers  and independent technical expertise

and independent technical expertise.

Both assertions raised in the introduction are true, 

b h l

subject to the assumptions also set out.

Furthermore, these assertions are robust to the  many technical and other uncertainties. 

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

(26)

Major Uncertainties 1

Di t t

Discount rates 

Store it for ever, invest a penny now and pay  the storage costs at the restaurant at the 

end of the universe... Hmmm?

Technology DevelopmentsImproved disposal Improved disposal

Cure for cancer

A ti lif ti t h i

Anti proliferation techniques

Logistical variants within any option

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(27)

Major Uncertainties 2

Energy policy developments

Pu/U become resources not wastePu/U become resources not wasteCarbon imperative

Knowledge of very low‐level radiation risks Is  the actual risk residing in relatively few 

individuals in the population?

Is there a threshold to radiation risks... Or Is there a threshold to radiation risks... Or  not?

Commercial Nuclear Energy in an 

Unstable, Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel: Prague, March 2008  Graham Smith

(28)

Socio‐political questions

Have the security costs been included? 

Does involving a wider set of stakeholders lead  to safer, or better, solutions? 

How do you cost social compensation? How do you cost social compensation?

How can one integrate the inputs to the  decision?

decision? 

How do you recognise virtue?

(Justify your answers...)

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel NPEC 5 November 2007       1 Graham Smith

(29)

Risk and benefit assessments!

Probability of

Success (POS) Failure (1-POS) Probability of

Lack of knowledge

Probability of

Success (POS) Failure (1-POS) Probability of

Lack of knowledge

Evidence for Remaining Evidence against

Classical Lack of knowledge

not differentiated

0 . 0 0 3 2 .0 0 6 8 .0 0

Evidence for Remaining Evidence against

Classical Lack of knowledge

not differentiated

0 . 0 0 3 2 .0 0 6 8 .0 0

Evidence for Success

g Uncertainty

g Success

Evidence based reasoning

Shows what is not known

0 . 4 2 0 .3 0

0 .2 8 Evidence for

Success

g Uncertainty

g Success

Evidence based reasoning

Shows what is not known

0 . 4 2 0 .3 0

0 .2 8

Based on supporting evidence

Based on refuting evidence

reasoning

Plausible – either supported

b id k

Based on supporting evidence

Based on refuting evidence

reasoning

Plausible – either supported

b id k

Evidence-based reasoning differentiates the Remaining Uncertainty from the evidence against success Allows better analysis of how to tackle the remaining uncertainty

by evidence or unknown

Evidence-based reasoning differentiates the Remaining Uncertainty from the evidence against success Allows better analysis of how to tackle the remaining uncertainty

by evidence or unknown

success. Allows better analysis of how to tackle the remaining uncertainty.

success. Allows better analysis of how to tackle the remaining uncertainty.

Future of Nuclear Energy in a 

Carbon Constrained World Storage v Disposal of Spent Fuel Prague, March 2008 

Graham Smith

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :