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HUMA 578 (Spring 2011) CRITICAL APPROACHES TO THEORIES OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

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HUMA 578 (Spring 2011) CRITICAL APPROACHES TO

THEORIES OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY Instructor : Cheung Siu-woo

Office : Rm 3339

Office hours : 14:00-15:30, Wednesday and Thursday Phone : 2358-7763

Email : hmcheung@ust.hk Course Web : http://lmes2.ust.hk Class meetings

Time : 19:00-21:50, Tuesday

Venue : Rm 3416

Course description

This course examines the relationship between anthropological knowledge and the politico-economic circumstances under which it is produced. Concentrating on cultural anthropology, we will take a historical approach, drawing examples from the development of the discipline since the late nineteenth century in three national traditions: beginning with France, moving to Britain and then turning to the United States. We will give particular attention to four issues: (1) the

relationship of anthropological practice to domestic political and economic concerns; (2) the interplay between anthropology and different forms of

colonialism and imperialism; (3) the significance of class, gender and ethnicity in the production of anthropological understanding; and (4) the politics of fieldwork and ethnographic writing. We will address these issues from perspectives related to several recent developments that have been international in scope, notably the (re)turn to practice, the growing audibility of feminist and minority voices, and the mounting debate about poststructuralism and postmodernism.

Seminar organization

The course will be organized as a seminar and normally will involve a close reading of both major anthropological works and secondary texts that relate these works to the historical conditions under which they have emerged. For the bulk of the course, principal responsibility for running each class will fall upon those participants who have been assigned as chief discussants for individual reading materials. The assignment for each week--one participant being responsible for one reading item according to the reading schedule shown below--will be made one week before following the alphabetical order of the participants' names running in a cycle. Each chief discussant is required to make a handout for the class that outlines questions or topics related to the reading item to organize the discussion. This handout will be passed out to the class at the beginning of each meeting. The chief discussant should have not only "a firm grasp" on the subject but also a fully positioned stake in the direction of the discussion. The person will open the discussion with an extremely clear and extremely concise 10 to 15 minute presentation of issues to address. S/he is then responsible to elicit and to

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direct the discussion and to see that important points get covered. Every participant is required at all times to actively contribute to the discussion. Everyone should come every week, having read all of the readings extremely carefully and creatively.

Written requirements

Participants are required to work on 3 writing projects: write 1 critical essay, 1 book review and 1 term paper:

(1) A critical essay focusing on one particular topic from week 1 to 8. (6-page long)

(2) A book review on George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986) . (6-page long)

(3) Participants are required to work on one seminar paper 15-20 page-long. The paper should address two particular topics from week 9 to week 15 in relation to your own research project. It should analyze related

ethnographic and theoretical works written by the theorist with critical approaches as discussed in this course, and how the issue being discussed is related to other trends of anthropological theories. It should also explore the subjectivity of the theorist, and the interaction between the theorist and his/her research subjects, by situating the work in the

theorist's life experiences and the historical and politico-economic context in which his/her work emerged.

Grading

Grades will be based on the four components of the course work: (1) Class presentation and discussion 20%

(2) Critical Essay 20%

(3) Book review 20%

(4) Term paper 40%

TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE AND READING ASSIGNMENTS (A) THE NATURE AND PRACTICES OF ANTHROPOLOGY Week 1: Course Organization

The Nature and Practices of Anthropology: An Introduction Readings

Garrick Bailey and James Peoples,“Chapter1:The Study of Humanity,” “Chapter 2: Culture,” and “Chapter 3: Studying Culture: Approaches and Methods.” In Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, pp. 1-68. Belmont, CA: West/Wadsworth, 1999.

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Week 2 : Ethnographical Imagination and Anthropological Knowledge Readings

Robert Layton, “Chapter 1: The Idea of A Social System.” In An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 1-26. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Clifford Geertz, "From the Native's Point of View: On the Nature of

Anthropological Understanding," in his Local Knowledge, pp. 55-72. New York: basic Books, 1983.

Tzvetan Todorov, "Knowledge in Social Anthropology: Distancing and Universality." Anthropology Today, 1988, 4(2): 2-5.

Fuyuki Kurasawa, “Introduction: Western Social Theory and the Ethnological Imagination.” In The Ethnological Imagination: A Cross-Cultural Critique of Modernity, pp. 1-34. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004. References

Alan Barnard, “1: Visions of Anthropology.” In History and Theory in Anthropology, pp. 1-14. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

( B ) THEORIZING MODERNITY:

FROM MORAL PHILOSOPHY TO SOCIAL SCIENCE Week 3 : Civilization and British Victorian Anthropology

Readings

E.B. Tylor, “The Science of Culture.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 41-55. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Lewis Henry Morgan, “Ethnical Periods.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 56-66. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

George Stocking, “The Idea of Civilization Before the Crystal Palace (1750-1850).” In Victorian Anthropology, pp. 8-45. New York: The Free Press. George W. Stocking, Jr., "Matthew Arnold, E. B. Tylor, and the Uses of Invention." in Race, Culture and Evolution: Essays in the History of Anthropology, pp. 69-90. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1968. References

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Herbert Spencer, “The Social Organism.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 24-40. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Week 4: The Crisis of Modernity: Foundations of Social Theory in Germany Readings

Karl Marx, “The Process of Capitalistic Production,” excerpt from Capital, Volume 1.

Fuyuki Kurasawa, “2. Disenchanting the Commodity: Marx and the Defetishization of Capitalism.” In The Ethnological Imagination: A

Cross-Cultural Critique of Modernity, pp. 51-71. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004.

Max Weber, “On Protestantism and Capitalism,” excerpt from The Protestant Ethic (To be posted)

Fuyuki Kurasawa, “The View from the Magical Garden: Weber’s Comparative Sociology of the Modern Ethos.” In The Ethnological Imagination: A Cross-Cultural Critique of Modernity, pp. 72-92. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004.

References

A. Gingrich, “The German Speaking Countries.” In Fredrik Barth, Andre Gingrich, Robert Parkin, and Sydel Silverman, eds. One Discipline, Four Ways: British, German, French, and American Anthropology. Univerisity. Chicago: Univeristy of Chicago Press.

Week 5: Holding it all Together: Foundations of Social Theory in France Readings

Émile Durkheim, “Elementary Forms of the Religious Life.” (To be posted) Marcel Mauss, “The Gift.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 92-101. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Michele Richman, "Anthropology and Modernism in France: From Durkheim to the College de sociologie." In Marc Manganaro, ed., Modernist Anthropology: From Fieldwork to Text, pp. 1 Princeton University Press, 1990.83-214. Princeton, NJ.:

Fuyuki Kurasawa, “4. In the Shadow of the Other: Durkheim’s

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Cross-Cultural Critique of Modernity, pp. 93-112. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004.

References

Émile Durkheim, “The Cosmological System of Totemism and the Idea of Class.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 92-101. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Robert Layton, “Chapter 4: Interactionist Theories.” In An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 98-126. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Robert Parkin, “The French Speaking Countries.” In Fredrik Barth, Andre Gingrich, Robert Parkin, and Sydel Silverman, eds. One Discipline, Four Ways: British, German, French, and American Anthropology, pp.157-207. Univerisity. Chicago: Univeristy of Chicago Press.

( C ) EARLY 20 TH

CENTURY ANGLO-AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGY: VANISHING PASTS AND ENDURING PRESENTS

Week 6: The Invention of U.S. Cultural Anthropology and German Racial Science Franz Boas, “The Methods of Ethnology.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard

Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 132-139. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

George W. Stocking, Jr., "Anthropology as Kulturkampf: Science and Politics in the Career of Franz Boas," in Walter Goldschmidt, ed., The Uses of

Anthropology, pp. 33-50. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1979.

Julia Liss, “Diasporic Identities: The Science and Politics of Race in the Work of Franz Boas and WEB du Bois, 1894-1919” (To be posted)

Gretchen Schafft, “Anthropology in Germany before the Second World War: The Kaiser Wilhelm Institute” (To be posted)

Ruth Benedict, “Psychological Types in the Cultures of the Southwest.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An

Introductory History, pp. 220-229. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Alfred Kroeber, “The Concept of Culture in Science” (To be posted)

George W. Stocking, Jr., "Ideas and Institutions in American Anthropology: Thoughts Toward a History of the Interwar Years," in George W. Stocking, Jr., ed., Selected Papers from the American Anthropologist, 1921-1945, pp. 1-50. Washington, D.C.: American Anthropological Association, 1976.

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Richard Hardler, "Ruth Benedict and the Modernist Sensibility," in Marc

Manganaro, ed., Modernist Anthropology: From Fieldwork to Text, pp.163-180. Princeton, NJ. Princeton University Press, 1990.

Sydel Silverman, “The United States.” In Fredrik Barth, Andre Gingrich, Robert Parkin, and Sydel Silverman, eds. One Discipline, Four Ways: British, German, French, and American Anthropology. Univerisity. Chicago:

Univeristy of Chicago Press.

Week 7: The Development of British Social Anthropology

B. Malinowski, “The Essentials of the Kula.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 157-172. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

E.E. Evans-Pritchard, “The Nuer of the Southern Sudan.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 184-201. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

A.R. Radcliffe-Brown, “The Mother’s Brother in South Africa.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 173-183. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Adam Kuper, "Chapter 6: Leach and Gluckman," in his Anthropology and

Anthropologists: The Modern British School, pp. 142-166. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

Robert Layton, “Chapter 2: Functionalism.” In An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 27-62. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Adam Kuper, "Radcliffe-Brown." In his Anthropology and Anthropologists: The Modern British School," pp. 36-68. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983. Adam Kuper, "The 1930s and 1940s--From Function to Structure." In his Anthropology and Anthropologists: The Modern British School," pp. 69-98. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

Adam Kuper, "Chapter 6: Leach and Gluckman," in his Anthropology and

Anthropologists: The Modern British School, pp. 142-166. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

Week 8: Colonialist Anthropology and the Post-Colonial Critique

Henrika Kuklick, "Tribal Exemplars: Images of Political Authority in British Anthropology, 1885-1945," in George W. Stocking, Jr., ed., Functionalism Historicized: Essays on British Anthropology, pp. 59-82. Madison, WI.: The University of Wisconsin Press, 1984.

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Renato Rosaldo, "From the Door of his tent: The Fieldworker and the Inquisitor," in James Clifford and George E. Marcus, eds., Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, pp. 77-97. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1986.

Wendy James, "The Anthropologist as Reluctant Imperialist," in Talal Asad, ed., Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter, pp. 41-70. Atlantic Highlands, NJ.: The Humanities Press, 1973.

Renato Rosaldo, “Imperialist Nostalgia” (To be posted)

Arjun Appadurai, “Putting Hierarchy in its Place” (To be posted)

James Clifford, “On Ethnographic Self-Fashioning: Conrad and Malinowski” by (To be posted)

Talal Asad Talal Asad, “Introduction” from Anthropology and the Colonial Encounter (To be posted)

Edward Said, "Representing the Colonized: Anthropology's Interlocutors." Critical Inquiry, 1989, 15(2): 205-225.

Adam Kuper, "Chapter 1: The Idea of a Primitive Society," in The Invention of Primitive Society: Transformations of an Illusion, pp. 1-14. London and New York: Routledge, 1988.

Johannes Fabian, "Culture, Time, and the Object of Anthropology." Berkshire Review: 7-23.

Auturo Escobar, "Power and Visibility: Development and the Invention and Management of the Third World." Cultural Anthropology, 1988, 3(4): 428-443. George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 5:The Repatriation of

Anthropology as Cultural Critique.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp. 111-136. (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986).

D) The Semiotic Turn

Week 9: Structuralism, Structural Marxism and Anthropology

Claude Levi-Strauss, “Structural Analysis in Linguistics and in Anthropology” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 347-361. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Claude Levi-Strauss, “The Structural Study of Myth” (To be posted)

Mary Douglas, “External Boundaries” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 526-535. Boston:

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McGraw-Hill.

Robert Layton, “Chapter 5: Marxist Anthropology.” In An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 127-156. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

James Clifford, “On Ethnographic Surrealism” (To be posted) “Triangulating the Surrealist Fetish” (To be posted)

Robert Parkin, “The French Speaking Countries”, in One Discipline, Four Ways, 207-end

Robert Layton, “Chapter 3: Structuralism.” In An Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 63-97. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997. Ino Rossi, "Intellectual Antecedents of Levi-Strauss' Notion of Unconscious," in Herbert Applebaum, ed., Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology, pp. 411-415. New York: State University of New York Press, 1987.

Adam Kuper, "Chapter 6: Levi-Strauss and British Neo-structuralism," in his Anthropology and Anthropologists: The Modern British School, pp. 167-184. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.

Week 10: Symbolic and Interpretive Anthropology:

From Structure to Meaning/From Structure to Process

Victor Turner, “Symbols in Ndembu Ritual.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 536-552. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Victor Turner, “Betwixt and Between,” (To be posted)

Victor Turner, “Passages, Margins, and Poverty: Religious Symbols of

Communitas.” In Turner, Dramas, Fields, and Metaphors: Symbolic Action in Human Society (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1974)

Clifford Geertz, “Deep Play: Notes on a Balinese Cock Fight.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 553-574. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Clifford Geertz, “Thick Description” (To be posted)

Vincent Crapanzano, “Hermes Dilemma” (To be posted) Stephen Greenblatt, “The Touch of the Real” (To be posted)

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Sherry B. Ortner, “Introduction.” In Sherry B. Ortner, ed., The Fate of "Culture": Geertz and Beyond, pp. 1-13. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1999.

William Roseberry, “Balinese Cockfight and the Seduction of Anthropology.” Social Research, 1982 49: 1013-28.

Tala Asad, "Anthropological Conceptions of Religion: Reflections on Geertz." Man NS 1985, 18: 237-259.

Andrew B. Kipnis, “The Flourishing of Religion in Post-Mao China and the Anthropological Category of Religion.” The Australian Journal of

Anthropology, 2001, 12(1): 32-46.

Vincent P. Pecora, "The Limits of Local Knowledge," in H. Aram Veeser, ed., The New Historicism, pp. 243-276. New York and London: Routledge, 1989. William H. Sewell Jr., "Geertz, Cutlural Systems, and History: From Synchrony to Transformation." In Sherry B. Ortner, ed., The Fate of "Culture": Geertz and Beyond, pp. 35-55. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1999.

Sherry B. Ortner, “Thick Resistance: Death and the Cultural Construction of Agency in Himalayan Mountaineering.” In Sherry B. Ortner, ed., The Fate of "Culture": Geertz and Beyond, pp. 1-13. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1999.

George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 2: Ethnography and Interpretive Anthropology.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp 17-44. (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986).

Alan Barnard, "Interpretive and Postmodernist Approaches." In History and Theory in Anthropology, pp. 158-177. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.

( E ) THE POWER TURN

Week 11: From Structure to Practices: Some Legacies of Marx

Julian Steward, “The Concept and Method of Cultural Ecology” (To be posted)

Leslie White, “Energy and the Evolution of Culture.” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 256-274. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004. [you might find it interesting to take a look at this too: “The Cold War context of the FBI’s Investigation of Leslie White” at http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.2001.103.1.164]

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Ray Rappaport, “Ritual Regulation of Environmental Relations among a New Guinea People” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 316-328. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004. Eric Wolf, “Introduction” to Europe and the People Without History” (To be posted)

Pierre Bourdieu, “Structures and the Habitus” (To be posted)

Pierre Bourdieu, "Structures, habitus, power: Basis for a theory of symbolic power." In Outline of a Theory of Practice, pp. 159-197. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1977.

Marshall Sahlins, “Utility and the Cultural Order” (To be posted)

George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 3: Conveying Other Cutlural Experience: The Person, Self, and Emotions.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp. 45-76.(The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986) .

Sherry Ortner, "Theory in Anthropology Since the Sixties." Comparative Studies in Society and History, 1984, 26(1): 126-166.

Week 12: Feminist Anthropology

Margaret Mead, “Introduction” to Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 230-236. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Sherry Ortner, “Is Female to Male as Nature is to Culture?” In R. Jon McGee and Richard Warms, eds., Anthropological Theory: An Introductory History, pp. 371-384. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2004.

Gayle Rubin, “The Traffic in Women: Notes on the ‘Political Economy’ of Sex” (To be posted)

Judith Stacey, “Can there be a Feminist Ethnography?” (To be posted) Chandra Mohanty, “Under Western Eyes: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses” (To be posted)

Karen Sacks, “Toward a Unified Theory of Class, Race and Gender” (To be posted)

Catherine Lutz, “The Gender of Theory” (To be posted)

Pat Caplan, "Engendering knowledge: The politics of ethnography." Anthropology Today, 1988, 4(5): 8-12; 4(6): 14-17.

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Henrietta L. Moore, "Chapter 2-Gender and Status: Explaining the Position of Women." In her Feminism and Anthropology, pp. 12-41. Minneapolis, MN.: University of Minnesota Press, 1988.

Marilyn Strathern, "An Awkward Relationship: The Case of Feminism and Anthropology." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 1987, 1292): 276-292.

Week 13: Breaking it all Apart: Critiquing Humanism, Rethinking Modernity, and Theorizing Postmodernity

Michel Foucault, excerpts from Discipline and Punish (To be posted) Michel Foucault, excerpts from History of Sexuality, Vol. 1 (To be posted) Fredric Jameson, “Postmodernism, or, the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism” (To be posted)

David Harvey, “Time-Space Compression and the Postmodern Condition,” excerpt from The Condition of Postmodernity (To be posted)

Arjun Appadurai, “Here and Now” from Modernity at Large (To be posted) Joan and Jean Comaroff, “Introduction” to Modernity and its Malcontents: Ritual and Power in Postcolonial Africa (To be posted)

George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 6: Two Contemporary Techniques of Cutlural Critique in Anthropology.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp. 137-164. (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986)

James Clifford, "On Ethnographic Authority," in his The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature and Art, pp. 21-54. Cambridge, MA.: Harvard University Press, 1988.

Mary Louise Pratt, "Fieldwork in Common Places." in James Clifford and George E. Marcus, eds., Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, pp. 27-50. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1986.

James Clifford, "Introduction: Partial Truths," in James Clifford and George E. Marcus, eds., Writing Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, pp. 1-26. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1986.

Paul Rabinow, "Representations Are Social Facts: Modernity and Post-Modernity in Anthropology," in James Clifford and George E. Marcus, eds., Writing

Culture: The Poetics and Politics of Ethnography, pp. 234-261. Berkeley, CA.: University of California Press, 1986.

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George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 1: A Crisis of Representation in the Human Sciences.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp. 7-16.(The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986) .

James Clifford, “Introduction: Partial Truths” (To be posted)

George Marcus and Dick Cushman, “Ethnographies as Texts” (To be posted) Renato Rosaldo, “The Erosion of Classic Norms” (To be posted)

Fan Mascia-Lees, Pat Sharpe, and Colleen Cohen, “The Postmodernist Turn in Anthropology: Cautions from a Feminist Perspective” by (To be posted) Lila Abu-Lughod, “Writing Against Culture” (To be posted)

Fran Mascia-Lees and Pat Sharpe, “Culture, Power, and Text: Anthropology and Literature Confront Each ‘Other’” (To be posted)

Robert Layton, “Chapter 7: Postmodernism and Anthropology.” In An

Introduction to Theory in Anthropology, pp. 184-215. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

Stevan Sangren, "Rhetoric and the Authority of Ethnography: "Postmodernism" and the Social Reproduction of Texts." Current Anthropology, 1988, 29(3): 405-424.

Deborah Gordon, "Writing Culture, Writing Feminism: The Poetics and Politics of Experimental Ethnography." Inscriptions 1988, 3 / 4: 7-26.

Nicole Polier and William Roseberry, "Tristes Tropes: Postmodern

Anthropologists Encounter the Other and Discover Themselves." Economy and Society, 1989, 18(2): 245-264.

( F ) THEORIZING THE CONTEMPORARY MOMENT Week 15: State, Globality, and Neoliberalism

Arjun Appadurai, “Difference and Disjuncture in the Global Economic System” (To be posted)

Akhil Gupta and James Ferguson, “Beyond ‘Culture’: Space, Identity and the Politics of Difference” (To be posted)

Benjamin Lee and Edward LiPuma, “Cultures of Circulation: the Imaginations of Modernity”.

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Rethinking Anthropology’s Spatial Geophysics” (To be posted)

G. Agamben, “Beyond Human Rights” and “What is a Camp?” (To be posted) G. Agamben, “State of Exception as a Paradigm of Government” (To be posted)

Aiwha Ong, “Introduction: Neoliberalism by Exception, Exception as Neoliberalism” (To be posted)

George E. Marcus and Michael M. J. Fisher, “Chp 4: Taking Account of World Historical Political Economy: Knowable Communities in Larger System.” In Anthropology as Cultural Critique: An Experimental Moment in the Human Sciences, pp. 77-110 (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 1986) .

Ted C. Lewellen, "The Anthropology of Globalization." In The Anthropology of Globalization: Cultural Anthropology Enters the 21st Century, pp. 29-60. Westport, CT.: Bergin & Garvey, 2002.

Norma Long, “Globalization and Localization: New Challenges to Rural Research.” In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., The Furture of Anthropological Knowledge, pp. 37-59. London: Routledge, 1996.

Wazir Jahan Karin, “Anthropology Without Tears: How a ‘Local’ Sees the ‘Local’ and the ‘Global’.” In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., The Furture of Anthropological Knowledge, pp. 115-138. London: Routledge, 1996.

Debbora Battaglia, Toward the Ethics of the Open Subject: Writing Culture in Good Conscience.” In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., Anthropological Theory Today, pp.114-150. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1999.

Aihwa Ong, “Clash of Civilizations or Asian Liberalism? An Anthropology of the State and Citizenship.” In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., Anthropological Theory Today, pp.48-72. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1999.

Aihwa Ong, “Anthropology, China and Modernities: The Geopolitics of Cutlural Knowledge.” In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., The Furture of Anthropological

Knowledge, pp. 60-92. London: Routledge, 1996.

Mayfair Yang, “Tradition, Travelling Theory, Anthropology and the Discourse of Modernity in China. In Henrietta L. Moore, ed., The Furture of Anthropological Knowledge, pp. 93-114. London: Routledge, 1996.

References

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