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SAN DIEGO COUNTY LEADERS URGE SUPPORT OF PROP. 55 TO FIX OUR LOCAL SCHOOLS!

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PAID FOR BY YES ON 55 - CALIFORNIANS FOR ACCOUNTABILITY AND BETTER SCHOOLS

A coalition of taxpayers, parents, seniors, educators, builders, labor and business, California Teachers Association and Californians for Higher Education. 1121 L Street • Suite 803 • Sacramento, CA 95814 • Tel: 888-563-0055 • Fax: 916-442-3510

www.Yeson55.com

The

Kindergarten-University

Public Education Facilities

Bond Act of 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: KATHY FAIRBANKS

January 28, 2004

916.443.0872 or 916.813.1010 (cell)

SAN DIEGO COUNTY LEADERS URGE SUPPORT OF PROP. 55

TO FIX OUR LOCAL SCHOOLS!

BROAD COALITION DESCRIBES WHY SCHOOL BOND FUNDS ARE CRITICAL TO

THE FUTURE SUCCESS OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY STUDENTS

Prop. 55 Would Help Fix Rundown Schools in Need of Repair, Build New Classrooms to Relieve

Overcrowding and Provide Voters with Strict Accountability

El Cajon, CA – Citing the overwhelming need to fix rundown schools and build new classrooms in communities throughout California,

a broad and diverse coalition gathered Wednesday in front of Grossmont High School in El Cajon to support Proposition 55 – the

statewide school repair construction bond on the March 2 ballot. San Diego County organizations representing parents, teachers,

business leaders, taxpayers, seniors, labor and community groups have launched an aggressive campaign to educate voters about

the need for Proposition 55 and the importance of passing the measure.

“We cannot afford to put this off. Our kids’ schools need help,” said educator Steve Haiman, who is also the president of the

Grossmont Education Association. “We’re confident San Diego County voters recognize the desperate need for Prop. 55 to improve

our local schools and will pass the measure on March 2.”

A look at the condition of California schools demonstrates just how badly school children need Prop. 55. One million children in

California attend schools with broken bathrooms. Seventy-three percent of California classrooms are more than 25 years old. And

California has the third most overcrowded classrooms in the nation.

Teachers throughout California are strongly supportive of Prop. 55. “Ask any teacher, parent, or student and they’ll tell you students

can’t learn, and teachers can’t teach in classrooms that are rundown and overcrowded,” continued Haiman. “Teachers see first hand

the dire condition of many California schools. Too many kids go to schools in overcrowded classrooms where one-on-one

student-teacher instruction time suffers. Many other schools lack the basics – bathrooms don’t work, roofs leak, air conditioning and heating

aren’t available.”

Terry Ryan, superintendent of the Grossmont Union High School District, said, “Here in San Diego, we’ve made very good progress on

repairing and building school facilities. But we’ve still got much, much more to do. Prop. 55 is absolutely key to continue the progress

we’ve made improving our local schools.”

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San Diego County Leaders Urge Support of Prop. 55 to Fix Our Schools!

January 28, 2004

Page Two

According to State Superintendent of Public Instruction Jack O’Connell, there is a massive backlog of local school repair projects

waiting for state funding. This backlog could grow by as much as $50 to $60 million per month. What’s more, there are more than 50

school funding measures on local ballots in March. These school districts are counting on Prop. 55 matching funds to make necessary

progress fixing schools in their communities.

Ryan added, “We cannot afford to put off Prop. 55. Our kids’ schools need help. We have a long list of projects right here in San Diego

County that need this matching state funding that will only be provided if Prop. 55 passes on March 2.”

Jeff Marsten, president of the San Diego State University’s Ambassadors for Higher Education group, said “Prop. 55 will preserve

higher education opportunities for young adults and allow California’s colleges and universities to continue serving as the training

ground for our future leaders in our state’s economy. California’s colleges and universities are the springboard for students

transitioning into our workforce.”

Ginger Hovenic, president of the San Diego Business Roundtable for Education, stressed the commitment of the business community

to passing Prop. 55: “The business community, including the California Chamber of Commerce, California Business Roundtable and

many local business owners stand firmly behind Prop. 55 because business groups believe this measure is exactly the type of

investment needed to be made today to improve our economy and to invest in a better educated workforce.

“Waiting to address our school repair needs will cost more in the long run, and will penalize our kids and our economy,” Hovenic said,

stressing that California and San Diego County kids and our state’s economy cannot afford NOT to pass Prop. 55.

Hovenic also hailed Prop. 55’s strict accountability standards that have won support from various groups like the League of Women

Voters, California Taxpayers’ Association, and many other organizations. “Prop. 55 funds can only be used for local school repair and

construction – not bureaucracy or overhead. The business community supports these strong accountability provisions in Prop. 55 –

including independent audits, cost controls, and oversight of all projects – that give voters confidence that their investment will go

directly to building and repairing local schools.”

Prop. 55 will provide funding to build higher education classrooms, research labs and other learning facilities. It will also help fix the

older facilities that need seismic upgrades and other repairs. Every district in California will be eligible for its fair share of funds. Prop.

55 will allocate $12.3 billion to repair, upgrade and build new school facilities as follows:

$10 billion to repair and build K-12 schools;

$920 million to repair and build California community college facilities;

$690 million to repair and build University of California facilities; and

$690 million to repair and build California State University facilities.

Coalition supporters said they are confident that California voters would pass Prop. 55 in March to address the need to fix and repair

schools throughout the state.

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Why San Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Estimated Needs for State Matching Funds for New Repair and Construction

New Construction (NC) $845,391,701

Repair (R) $346,262,113

Total Need

$1,191,653,814

By School District NC R Total Need

Alpine Union $420,515 $420,515

Bonsall Union Elementary $4,983,301 $1,966,925 $6,950,226 Cajon Valley Union Elementary $22,188,386 $200,762 $22,389,148 Carlsbad Unified $51,466,661 $7,377,798 $58,844,459 Chula Vista Elementary $12,952,683 $1,635,939 $14,588,622

Coronado Unified $5,152,967 $5,152,967

Del Mar Union $10,605,073 $10,605,073

Encinitas Union Elementary $474,775 $474,775

Escondido Union Elementary $35,598,443 $189,910 $35,788,353

Escondido Union High $38,690,678 $38,690,678

Fallbrook Union Elementary $32,556 $32,556

Grossmont Union High $55,548,961 $67,403,070 $122,952,031 Jamul-Dulzura Union Elementary $13,141,446 $13,141,446 La Mesa-Spring Valley $4,623,771 $11,460 $4,635,231

Lemon Grove Elementary $252,530 $252,530

Mountain Empire Unified $3,122,951 $1,794,412 $4,917,363

National $2,634,323 $2,634,323

Oceanside City Unified $47,924,471 $26,771,560 $74,696,031 Poway Unified $135,776,087 $14,948,226 $150,724,313

Ramona Unified $15,735,842 $15,735,842

San Diego City Unified $97,343,772 $91,701,319 $189,045,091 San Diego County Office Of Education $16,670,072 $16,670,072 San Dieguito Union High $28,849,511 $6,685,530 $35,535,041

San Marcos Unified $98,370,111 $98,370,111

San Ysidro Elementary $20,774,876 $4,446,607 $25,221,483

Santee Elementary $18,312,568 $18,312,568

South Bay Union Elementary $10,409,781 $10,409,781

Spencer Valley Elementary $67,825 $67,825

Sweetwater Union High $106,069,677 $82,811,877 $188,881,554

Vallecitos $221,571 $221,571

Valley Center-Pauma $10,739,560 $10,739,560

Vista Unified $13,993,797 $558,878 $14,552,675

Note: This information is based on approved eligibility applications on file with the State Office of Public School Construction. The numbers represent only the state’s matching obligation to fund these new school construction and repair projects, not the entire school repair and construction needs a given county or district. It is important to note that many more districts may need funding but have not yet filed eligibility

applications with the state

.

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San

Why San Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Examples of Projects that would benefit from Prop. 55:

Grossmont Union High School District

ƒ Grossmont High School – Replace leaky, deteriorated roofs; repair or replace aging plumbing systems; repair

and upgrade deteriorated restrooms; Increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to

technology; improve safety systems; Repair and renovate academic classrooms; Add new academic classrooms to relieve overcrowding; Upgrade outdated science labs; Remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; Upgrade inadequate ventilation systems: $7.9 million

ƒ Helix Charter High School - Repair or replace aging restrooms and plumbing; replace deteriorated roofs;

Upgrade electrical systems for safety and access to technology; repair and upgrade academic classrooms; upgrade unreliable fire alarms and safety systems; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; upgrade deteriorated ventilation systems; repair and renovate academic classrooms; replace aging portables with permanent academic classrooms: $8.8 million

ƒ El Cajon Valley High School - Replace deteriorated roofs; repair and upgrade deteriorated restrooms and

plumbing systems; increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; repair and renovate existing academic classrooms; add permanent academic classrooms to relieve overcrowding; upgrade safety systems; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; renovate and expand library/career center; repair and upgrade deteriorated ventilation systems; repair and upgrade outdated science labs: $4.9 million

ƒ Mount Miguel High School – Replace deteriorated roofs; repair and renovate deteriorated restrooms and

plumbing; increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; upgrade safety systems; repair and renovate 46-year-old academic classrooms; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; replace and repair inadequate ventilation systems; reconfigure school drop-off zones and parking lots to improve traffic and pedestrian safety; install energy efficient lighting for improved safety: $7.9 million

ƒ El Capitan High School – Replace deteriorated roofs; repair and renovate aging restrooms and plumbing;

increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; upgrade fire alarms and safety systems; repair and renovate academic classrooms; replace aging portables to relieve overcrowding; upgrade inadequate ventilation systems; upgrade outdated science labs; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings: $7.9 million

ƒ Granite Hills High School – Upgrade fire and other safety systems; replace deteriorated roofs; repair and

renovate aging restrooms and plumbing; upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; replace old portables with permanent academic classrooms; repair and renovate existing academic classrooms; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; expand and renovate library; upgrade inadequate ventilation systems; upgrade outdated science labs: $8.3 million

ƒ Monte Vista High School - Repair and renovate 42-year old restrooms and plumbing; replace deteriorated

roofs; increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; repair and renovate

academic classrooms; add academic classrooms to relieve overcrowding; upgrade fire and other safety systems; remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; upgrade outdated science labs; repair and upgrade inadequate ventilation systems; expand and renovate library: $7.4 million

ƒ Santana High School - Remove asbestos and lead paint from buildings; increase and upgrade electrical

capacity for safety and access to technology; replace deteriorated roofs; renovate library; renovate 40-year old restrooms and plumbing; repair and renovate academic classrooms; upgrade fire and other safety systems; upgrade inadequate ventilation systems; expand and upgrade science labs: $6.8 million

ƒ Valhalla High School - Remove lead paint from buildings; replace deteriorated roofs; renovate 30-year old

restrooms and plumbing; increase and upgrade electrical capacity for safety and access to technology; repair and renovate academic classrooms; upgrade fire and other safety systems; upgrade inadequate ventilation systems; expand and upgrade science labs: $7.4 million

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Why San Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Examples of Projects that would benefit from Prop. 55:

Sweetwater Union High School District

Sweetwater Union High School Districts expects to receive approximately $81,757,975 will be used to repair of classrooms, restrooms, storage including new roofing, exterior painting, replacement of doors and windows, new flooring, new suspended ceilings, new light fixtures and exposed duct work, new roof top HVAC, new cabinets and new marker/tack boards. Also, upgrading of underground utility infrastructure; improve ADA compliance; asbestos abatement, termite repair and removal of lead paint:

ƒ Bonita Vista High School - $7,828,100

ƒ Bonita Vista Middle School - $3,441,868

ƒ Castle Park Middle School –$4,165,533

ƒ Chula Vista High School –$8,357,280

ƒ Chula Vista Middle School - $105,261

ƒ Granger Junior High School - $3,245,016

ƒ Hilltop High School - $7,675,646

ƒ Hilltop Middle School - $3,434,958

ƒ Mar Vista High School - $3,904,682

ƒ Montgomery High School - $7,780,388

ƒ Montgomery Middle School - $3,469,738

ƒ National City Middle School - $2,371,632

ƒ Southwest High School - $6,708,710

ƒ Southwest Middle School - $2,755,608

ƒ Sweetwater High School - $5,331,844

San Diego City Schools

ƒ Benchley/Weinberger Elementary - Repair and replace outdated electrical system, damaged ceiling tiles,

existing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; replace door and windows; upgrade fire security systems/ fire alarms; replace asphalt; and replacement of playground equipment with new equipment which meets state and federal safety regulations: $1.35 million

ƒ Edison Elementary - Repair and replace roofing, outdated electrical systems, carpeting, asphalt & concrete

paving; interior/exterior painting; improved ADA compliance; electrical upgrades; All classrooms without water will receive a sink with drinking fountain: $577,000

ƒ Franklin Elementary – Repair and replace roofing, outdated electrical systems, damaged ceiling tiles, repair

plumbing, drainage, sewers, repair existing heating, ventilating & air conditioning systems; upgrade fire security systems/ fire alarms; electrical upgrades; improve ADA compliance; expand or replace library: $1.8 million

ƒ Holmes Elementary – Update outdated electrical systems; repair roofing, damaged ceiling tiles, windows and

doors; replacement of playground equipment with new equipment which meets state and federal safety regulations; improve disabled access; new lunch court structure: $1.3 million

ƒ Language Academy - Repair existing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; Update outdated

electrical systems; repair and replace damaged ceiling tiles; reduce percentage of portable classrooms; expand or build new library: $1.5 million

ƒ Spreckels Elementary – Upgrade fire security systems and fire alarms; repair and replace outdated electrical

systems, carpeting, asphalt and concrete paving; improve ventilation; improve ADA compliance: $1.4 million

ƒ Standley Middle School – Repair plumbing, drainage, sewers; upgrade science classroom facilities to meet

new district standards for laboratory science courses; repair existing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; replace doors and windows: $ 2.1 million

ƒ Emerson/Bandini Elementary – Repair and replace outdated electrical systems carpeting, damaged ceiling

tiles; Repair plumbing, drainage, sewers; interior/exterior painting; repair existing heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems; upgrade fire security systems and fire alarms: $1.9 million

Wh

(6)

Why San Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Examples of Projects that would benefit from Prop. 55:

y San Diego County Needs Prop. 5

San Dieguito Union High School District

ƒ Earl Warren Middle School – Replacement of utility systems, ADA, low-voltage work, updating of bathrooms:

$1.5 million

ƒ Sunset Continuation High School - adding nine new modular classrooms: $1.5 million

ƒ New construction of at least one middle school: $10-12 million

Poway Unified School Distric

ƒ Westwood Elementary School – Repair and replace ceilings in 22 classrooms; New lighting, carpeting,

tackable wall surface, painting; HVAC upgrade; new alarm systems; improve ADA compliance school-wide; and add 12 new classrooms to campus: $3.3 million

ƒ Mt. Carmel High School - New lighting, carpeting, and paint; HVAC upgrades, new ceilings in 70 classrooms;

upgraded communications; new alarm systems; ADA upgrades, irrigation improvements in fields; addition of 12 new classrooms to campus: $11.7 million

ƒ Twin Peaks River School – New alarm systems, lighting, carpeting, new tackable wall surface, paint; HVAC

upgrade, new ceilings in 30 classrooms; upgraded communications, improved ADA compliance: $4 million

ƒ Poway High School – Addition of 28 new classrooms to campus; new ceilings in 60 classrooms; new lighting,

carpeting, paint; HVAC upgrade, upgraded communications, new alarm systems, ADA upgrades; irrigation improvements in fields and gardens: $14.5 million

Del Mar Unified School District

ƒ New Construction of Elementary School #7 ƒ New Construction of Elementary School #8

Cajon Valley Union School District

ƒ Rancho San Diego Elementary School – Electrical repairs and upgrades, improve ADA compliance, new

restrooms.

University of California, San Diego

ƒ Mayer Hall – This project will address growth needs of Physics Department by providing laboratories and

offices; repair and upgrade existing research labs; provide building code upgrades including a building-wide sprinkler system: $25,096,000

ƒ Student Academic Services Facility - This project will address enrollment growth and serious existing space

deficiencies for key student academic services such as Admissions and Relations with Schools, Financial Aid Office, Office of the Registrar, Office of Graduate Studies and Research: $19,461,000

ƒ Pharmaceutical Sciences Building – will provide classrooms, laboratories, laboratory support space and core

facilities to accommodate the new School of Pharmacy: $2,049,000

ƒ Satellite Utilities Plant, Phase 1 – Will build new chiller, water towers, and related chilled water distribution

system improvements; add new emergency generators; provide connection of utility services from the proposed plant to the West Campus chilled water and emergency power distribution system and structure to house the equipment: $8,200,000

ƒ Applied Physics and Mathematics Building – Project includes creations of wet labs, dry computer labs, and

upgrading of the building’s telecommunications infrastructure: $8,809,000

San Diego State University

ƒ Social Sciences Building – Provide equipment for the new, 100,000-square-foot Social Sciences building that

the university will break ground on later this year at the existing Family Studies building site. Will provide computers, furniture, telecommunications equipment and other essentials: $3.4 million

(7)

Why San Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Diego County Needs Prop. 55

Examples of Projects that would benefit from Prop. 55:

Cal State San Marcos

ƒ Academic Hall Upgrade – The project is designed to manage the instructional needs of the general campus

and house the College of Business Administration and the programs of political science and economics. Includes furnishings and equipment: $3,425,000

ƒ Craven Hall Renovation – Administrative service units will be relocated to Craven Hall from a leased facility

that is two and one-half miles from campus. By moving these units to the campus, service delivery will be enhanced, and the university will eliminate annual lease costs. Will provide needed student services facilities such as student advising, financial aid, and admissions services: $6,366,000

Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District

ƒ Cuyamaca College - New construction of a Communication Arts Building including lecture rooms and

instructional lab facilities: $14,719,000

ƒ Grossmont College - New construction of a Digital Arts Building including lecture rooms and instructional lab

facilities: $4,869,000

Southwestern Community College District

ƒ Otay Mesa Center – Equipment to complete the new locally-funded initial buildings phase that includes

instructional lecture rooms, instructional labs and related office and institutional service space: $3,033,000

ƒ Southwestern College - Equipment to complete a new locally funded Student Services Center that includes

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