2015 WEST VIRGINIA HOUSING CONFERENCE TECHNOLOGY FOR ELDER LIVABILITY AND HEALTH

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West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities

2015 WEST VIRGINIA HOUSING CONFERENCE

T

ECHNOLOGY FOR

E

LDER

L

IVABILITY AND

H

EALTH

Phil Schenk, MS Executive Director

West Virginia Partnership for Elder Living, Inc. 1-304-542-2116

pschenk@wvpel.org Regina A. Mayolo, C.A.P.S.

Technical Assistance Specialist

West Virginia Assistive Technology System (WVATS) 1-800-841-8436

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A part of West Virginia University

& WVU Health Sciences Center

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Part

of a

National

Network

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CED’s role:

 Education and training to University students in multiple disciplines to

prepare a workforce that is able and willing to serve persons with disabilities

 Technical assistance to individuals with disabilities and direct care

providers who serve them to enhance their skillset and improve service quality

 Gap filling direct services and supports in an effort to improve

availability and acceptability of services for West Virginians

 Dissemination of information about the status of disabilities services in West Virginia and the nation

 Research activities conducted in collaboration with partners, to improve services and policies related to individuals with disabilities and their families.

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About CED

 Serves individuals

with disabilities across the life span in all 55 counties

 13 Programs

 3 Clinics

 Approx. 90 Staff

 Multiple state and federal partners

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West Virginia Assistive Technology System

(WVATS)

 Increases access to and acquisition of assistive technology

devices and services

 Assistive technology is any device used to perform tasks

that would otherwise be difficult or impossible

 Areas of emphasis in Education, Employment, Community

Living, Information Technology and Telecommunications

 Exchange, Loan, Demonstration

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OBJECTIVES

1. Identify reasons why technology is and will be more important in lowering care costs for a

growing aging population

2. Identify easily obtainable assistive devices and technology to help people stay in their homes by making tasks of daily living easier

3. Identify benefits and barriers to in-home medical monitoring technology.

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CHARACTERISTICS

OF HOUSING IN

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

WV POPULATION BY GENERATION

Traditionalists (1925-1945) − 11.1%

− In 90% of counties over 65 in excess of the national average − 62.4% have Internet • Boomers (1946-1965) − 27% − 79.6 have Internet • Generation X (1970-late 1980’s) − 26% − 82.7% have Internet

Millenials – Generation Y (after 1988)

− 35.9%

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

Generational Diversity

Traditionalists (1925-1945) – what matters most to them is the work itself, they will “take one for the team,” sacrifice for the common good, patriotism – for this group, the world is HUGE

Boomers (1946-1965) – what matters most to them is getting respect, let’s enjoy the moment, anything is possible, cause-oriented – for this group, the world is a little more accessible, i.e. British invasion in music, Vietnam War

Generation X (1970-late 1980’s) – what matters most to them is “am I appreciated,” want to be different or unusual, more diverse with less sense of home or security, very independent and informal –for this

group, the world has always been accessible, international corporations, international banking, international flights

Millenials – Generation Y (after 1988) – what matters most to them is the challenge that impacts the world, are tech-savy but don’t even think of it as technology (just the way it is), “echo-Boomers” – largest population group since the Boomers, full of self-esteem, also patriotism (the 9/11 impact) – for this group, they are “global” citizens, world is small

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

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WV HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS

More than 50% of housing is more than 50 years old

15% of the population has lived in the same home for 40 years

Elderly are less likely to change residences than any other age group

Highest homeownership rate in the country (75.2%); 48% have no mortgage

99% have complete plumbing and kitchen facilities

Majority of homes use gas (48%) or electricity (32%) for heat (more people use wood than coal)

More than 10% of the population have no vehicle; 5% have no phone

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IN-HOME MEDICAL

MONITORING

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

LOW TECH

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Assumption:

It’s better to prevent trips to the

hospital or other facility in terms of

better mental health, physical health,

and cost

One way to do that is to get important health data about the patient to a member of a health team in a timely

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“Providers … can potentially spot changes in patient

status or condition before they result in unnecessary acute care utilizations, hospital readmissions, adverse events or

other episodes of costly and preventable healthcare expenditures. Clinicians monitoring patient status are alerted in real-time to act, based on customizable patient data range settings, which can be configured at both the population and individual patient levels. Clinicians now have the power to intervene earlier and faster, armed with real-time data to drive better diagnosis, decision making, triage and treatment…”

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Independa has created an integrated system for monitoring a person in the home that can include gathering clinical

measurements such as blood pressure and glucose, to sensors that monitor motion, toilet flushing and door opening. The

system is intended to enable independent living for seniors, while letting caregivers passively monitor and be alerted if something seems wrong, like no movement in the house for some period. The system can monitor a patient's activity via those sensors and reports data back via an online app.

Independa also provides tablet and television interfaces for email and for medication and appointment reminders.

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

MODERN TECH

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Toto's newest smart john, the Intelligence Toilet II, is proving that it is more than an ordinary porcelain throne by recording and analyzing important data like

weight, BMI, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels.

There's a "sample catcher" in the bowl that can obtain urine samples. Even by Japanese standards that's impressive. Yes it has the bidet, the air dryer, and heated seat, but it's also recording pertinent information … Graphs on your

desktop PC will show how your glucose levels have been fluctuating, along with urine temperatures.

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ASSISTIVE

TECHNOLOGY FOR

AGING-IN-PLACE

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities HOME AUTOMATIONEnergy Management − Thermostats − Outlet Controls − Irrigation Systems

Home & Entertainment − TV & DVD Players

− Music

− Appliances

Lighting

− Dimmers and Switches − Light Bulbs

− Landscape Lighting

Safety & Security − Security Cameras − Door Locks

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

LOW TECH

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

FUTURE TECH MODERN TECH

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THE COST OF CARE

FOR AN AGING

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

Health Care - In 2011, beneficiaries ages 80 and older

comprised 24 percent of the traditional Medicare population, but 33 percent of total Medicare spending on this population Institutional Care – private room US $91,250 (WV $102,748)

Assisted Living – single bedroom US $43,200 (WV $42,000) In-Home Care – US $45,600 (WV $36,608)

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

Major Kitchen Remodel – US $53,931 (WV $51,198) Master Suite Addition – US $101,873 (WV $95,647) Minor Kitchen Remodel – US $18,527 (WV $17,512) Bathroom Addition – US $37,501 (WV $35,442)

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Center for Excellence in Disabilities

COST OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY • Tado $250

• Video Monitor $200 • Crock Pot $130

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West Virginia University Center for Excellence in Disabilities

2015 WEST VIRGINIA HOUSING CONFERENCE

T

ECHNOLOGY FOR

E

LDER

L

IVABILITY AND

H

EALTH

Phil Schenk, MS Executive Director

West Virginia Partnership for Elder Living, Inc. 1-304-542-2116

pschenk@wvpel.org Regina A. Mayolo, C.A.P.S.

Technical Assistance Specialist

West Virginia Assistive Technology System (WVATS) 1-800-841-8436

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