BOE Approved June 2020

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NEW MILFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS New Milford, Connecticut

Global Studies CP February 2020

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New Milford Board of Education Angela C. Chastain, Chairperson Joseph Failla, Vice Chairperson

Wendy Faulenbach, Secretary Eileen Monaghan, Assistant Secretary

Pete Helmus Brian McCauley Tammy McInerney Cynthia Nabozny Olga I. Rella Superintendent of Schools Dr. Kerry Parker Assistant Superintendent Ms. Alisha DiCorpo

Author of Course Guide Cara Abraham

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New Milford’s Mission Statement

The mission of the New Milford Public Schools, a collaborative partnership of students, educators, family and community, is to prepare each and every student to compete and excel in an ever-changing world, embrace challenges with vigor, respect and appreciate the worth of every human being, and contribute to society by providing effective instruction and dynamic curriculum, offering a wide range of valuable experiences, and inspiring students to pursue their dreams and aspirations.

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Global Studies CP Grade 10

Global Studies is a full-year course designed to help students develop organizational, reading, researching, writing, cooperative, and analytical skills through the study of four of the following regions: the Middle East (Southwest Asia and North Africa), Central Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, and Latin America.* Each region of study incorporates an emphasis on the following themes: geography and culture, historical highlights, and contemporary challenges. Students will have ample opportunities to examine unique cultural characteristics and reflect learning through a variety of media. The selection of contemporary challenges will be determined by current events and often incorporates multiple case studies. Prior to our regional inquiry, students will be introduced to common global concerns that will be focused upon throughout the course, such as self-determination, human rights, and sustainable development. Particular attention will be paid to the manner in which globalization has brought various regions of the world closer. The course is also intended to provide a hands-on opportunity for students to practice problem resolution skills and assess the manner in which nations have related toward one another in the past and present. Therefore, the course includes simulations wherein students represent interest groups pertinent to an issue of international concern and engage in constructive negotiation. The course also includes an examination of the role that the United Nations plays in world affairs and a study of how it functions.

* The selection and sequence of regions and of case studies within regions may be determined by the teachers to address current political, economic, and social conditions in the world for any given school year. At times, teachers may opt to follow a conceptual, rather than a regional approach, in order to emphasize cross cultural issues and/or patterns in global history.

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Pacing Guide

1. Introduction to Global Studies Four 80 minute block periods

2. The Middle East (Southwest Asia and North Africa) & Central Asia Eighteen 80 minute block periods a. Land & People (9 periods)

b. Modern (9 periods)

3. SubSaharan Africa Eighteen 80 minute block periods

a. Land & People (9 periods) b. Modern (9 periods)

Midterm Exam

4. South and Southeast Asia Seventeen 80 minute block periods

a. Land & People (8 periods) b. Modern (9 periods)

5. East Asia Seventeen 80 minute block periods

a. Land & People (8 periods) b. Modern (9 periods)

6. Latin America Seventeen 80 minute block periods

a. Land & People (8 periods) b. Modern (9 periods)

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Global Studies Unit 1 Introduction to Global Studies

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and

domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary

knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to… 1. Analyze commonalities and diversity among societies.

2. Recognize when nations work together to solve global problems.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. Through advances in technology, communication, and trade, the nations of the world have become increasingly linked.

2. Disparities in levels of development exist among nations.

3. Tremendous linguistic, ethnic, and cultural diversity exists across the globe.

4. Different regional histories often reveal patterns of development similar to

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. What is meant by the expressions “global community” and “global village”?

2. What factors account for the variation in levels of development that exists among nations?

3. What are some of the greatest challenges facing the global community today?

4. What mechanisms exist to meet these challenges and what mechanisms need to be developed?

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presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

others.

5. Nations formulate treaties, blocs, and alliances to advance common interests and attain global stability and

well-being.

6. The United Nations was created in an effort to promote peace and avert the outbreak of wars.

7. The goals and responsibilities of the United Nations have increased since the inception of the organization.

5. Does the United Nations provide an effective forum for nations’ efforts to resolve differences and tackle problems of global magnitude?

Acquisition Students will know…

● Indigenous peoples ● Colonization ● Imperialism ● Nationalism ● Developing nation ● Developed nation ● Geo-political region ● Alliance ● Cold War ● Diplomacy ● Human rights ● Non-governmental organization ● Nuclear proliferation ● Sanctions ● Sustainable development ● Trade deficit

Students will be skilled at…

● Explaining the challenges that increasing world population poses.

● Describing how nations have become increasingly linked through advances in technology.

● Describing the concept of human rights. ● Describing the functions of the major

organs of the UN, and the importance of a UN resolution

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Stage 2 – Evidence

Code Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence

T, M, A Teacher created rubric with 3 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Required Elements ● Authentic Content ● Presentation Style

PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students will show that they really understand evidence of…

The global community represents cultural diffusion of goods, ideas, and technologies through trade, migration, and warfare and every person is a part of the global community.

Goal/Challenge = Create a postcard that shows how they are a part of a global community.

Role = A researcher in the student’s own family history and cultural experience.

Audience = Classmates within and outside of their class period. Situation = Using research methods (interview, picture & image search, data collection) students will identify examples of goods, ideas, and technologies that make up a significant part of their families’ material culture (items frequently used , i.e. phone, car, clothing); intellectual/spiritual culture (political, religious beliefs); and aesthetic culture (art, music); and how their families came to call New Milford home (i.e., where did their ancestors come from?) Product and performance = Students use an index card or 2

Google slides to display an image or collage of images on one side and 4-5 sentences on the other side to show and tell their personal part within the global community.

Standards/criteria for success = Postcards are personally authentic and complete with all required elements displayed in an easy to read format.

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Evaluation of student notebooks with these criteria for success: accuracy in definitions and descriptions of vocabulary terms, key people, and historical concepts.

Evaluation of student participation in collaborative small group and whole class discussions with these criteria of success: cooperation, effective time management, accurate and thoughtful contributions that move discussions in a positive direction. Evaluation of student critical thinking and/or creative generation of ideas with these criteria for success: cooperative and collaborative approach; accuracy and comprehensive responses to prompts; focused and articulate presentation of ideas.

Evaluation of student test-taking skills with these criteria of success: accuracy and completion, ability to eliminate distractors.

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will show they have achieved Stage 1 goals by… Guided reading and note-taking from primary and secondary sources, global studies textbook, and teacher-created slideshows about globalization and the United Nations.

Answering daily review, preview, summary, and speculative questions.

Creating visual, oral, and/or written responses to show, organize, analyze, document, propose, role-play, and/or assess a political, economic, social, and/or cultural crisis presented before the UN General Assembly or UN Security Council.

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Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Code Pre-Assessment

Know-Want to Know discussion of terms like globalism and United Nations

Show 8-10 illustrative photos of classrooms around the world and of international organizations at work around the world on white board and ask students to ask questions, make connections to things they already know, make predictions about what content they might learn in this unit.

Ask students to recall when and why the United Nations was created?

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Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Student success at transfer meaning and acquisition depends on…

Reading and taking notes from textbook, teacher-created slideshows, or internet-based primary and secondary sources (Newsela and NYTimes/Scholastic Upfront) according to Unit Responsibility sheet focusing on acquiring domain specific vocabulary, general and specific biographical details; guided practice of constructing and interpreting infographics, graphic organizers, illustrations/photographs; paraphrasing and evaluating sources; and responding to study questions. Daily prompts that ask provocative, open-ended questions using unit vocabulary, concepts, and skills often connected to current political, economic, and social events.

Viewing short videos (from NYTimes Learning Network, PBS, National Geographic) and answering interpretive, inferential, and analysis questions.

Working cooperatively to interpret, analyze, make judgments, and discuss in pairs and small groups for peer-guided

dialogue of concepts and/or skills.

Progress Monitoring

Teacher review of notes as students pair with a partner to review difficult concepts, unfamiliar terms, and questions. May result in whole class review and discussion if the majority of students are struggling with a vocabulary term, concept, and/or skill.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses to scaffolded questions from multiple students.

Teacher circulates to ensure that students are practicing low to higher level thinking skills. Periodic pauses for students to explain answers in their own words.

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Practicing test-taking strategies with practice quizzes to explain why the right answer is correct and how the other choices serve as distractors.

Practicing argumentative writing strategies to isolate elements of the argumentative writing process, i.e. claim/thesis,

historical context, reasoning, gathering evidence, explaining evidence, documenting evidence, summarizing, making conclusions, and transitioning.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students. Students can also peer assess for multiple opportunities for feedback.

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Global Studies Unit 2 Middle East: Land and People

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and

domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary

knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. NCSS IV b: Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual’s daily life.

RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

❖ Analyze how families heavily influence language, religion, and ethnic identity. ❖ Describe how people alter their environments and use resources for survival.

❖ Compare and contrast how governments are formed to organize people and resources in times of cooperation and conflict.

❖ Give multiple examples of cultural diffusion: the spread of goods, ideas, and technology through trade, migration, and warfare.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. Water is a limited resource which influences the culture and lifestyle of the region’s people.

2. Religious and linguistic diversity exists within the Middle East.

3. Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each arose within the region.

4. In time, Islamic civilization spread throughout the region known as the Middle East as well as other parts of Asia and Africa.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. How has geography and climate

influenced the culture of the Middle East? 2. In what ways are the monotheistic

religions that originated in the region alike and different?

3. Why Islam is often referred to as a way of life?

4. How did the creation of an Islamic civilization prompt a highly developed artistic and scientific civilization over time?

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RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

Acquisition Students will know…

Geographic Features:

● Major rivers, deserts, and bodies of saltwater

Political Entities: (teacher selects focus countries) ● Tunisia ● Egypt ● Turkey ● Syria ● Israel ● Iraq ● Iran ● Afghanistan ● Saudi Arabia ● Yemen

● United Arab Emirates ● Bahrain

● West Bank ● Gaza Strip ● Mecca ● Medina

● Capital cities of case study countries Demographics: ● nomadic pastoralists/sedentary farmers ● Bedouins ● Arabs/Arabic ● Turks/Turkish ● Kurds/Kurdish ● Jews/Hebrew

Students will be skilled at…

● Correctly labeling and identifying political, physical, religious, social and

demographic features of the Middle East region.

● Distinguishing between sedentary and nomadic cultures of the region.

● Identifying commonly spoken languages by name and location within the region. ● Contrasting the rituals and major tenets of

three monotheistic faiths.

● Researching and presenting cultural achievements of the region such as art, cuisine, architecture, music, and poetry and scientific and engineering

breakthroughs such as algebra, astronomy, and cartography.

● Citing critical events and turning points in the region’s history that impacted the political, economic, and social

characteristics of the region.

● Writing persuasively about the role of religious beliefs in the everyday life of women.

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● monotheism ● Judaism/Hebrews/synagogue/Torah ● Christianity/Christians/church/Old and New Testaments ● Islam/Muslims/mosque/Quran ● Five Pillars

Humanities & STEM Features:

● art, i.e. arabesque and miniature paintings

● architecture, i.e. pointed arches and courtyards

● literature, i.e. poetry and Scheherazade

● music, i.e.

● science, i.e astronomy and cartography

● mathematics, i.e. algebra and geometry

Society:

● family structure

● sharia law, i.e. marriage and modesty Historical People and Events

● Abraham ● Moses ● Jesus ● Muhammad

● Schism, i.e. Sunni and Shi’a ● caliphate ● Moors ● Umayyads ● Abbasids ● Ottomans ● Safavids ● Sulieman ● Crusades

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Stage 2 – Evidence

Code Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence

T, M, A Teacher created rubric with 4 criteria and 4 bands of success: ● Content ● Style ● Drawing Conclusions ● Collaboration PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students will show that they really understand evidence of… Geographic, demographic, economic, religious, linguistic, and historical evidence collected on a map can be used to make comparisons and draw conclusions about the values and lifestyles of people in a region.

Goal/Challenge = Create an oversized map (​24”x30”) ​that synthesizes visual, text, and quantitative data around a specific theme for use as a classroom resource.

Role = An expert and a collaborator on a geographic, demographic, economic, religious, linguistic, or historical theme

Audience = Classmates within and outside of their class period. Situation = Working as a team, students gather data from multiple sources, plan, and produce a map that is prominently displayed in the classroom.

Product and performance = Student groups create and present a map to their classmates, including answering key questions that synthesize the multiple pieces of information and present

conclusions about the region based on their theme.

Standards/criteria for success = Maps are accurate and complete with all required elements displayed in an easy to read format. Presentations of maps and conclusions are accurate and go

beyond a simple read of the map. Group members share workload where everyone’s strengths are maximized.

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T, M, A Teacher created rubric with 3 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Content ● Style

● Following Directions

***Teachers may choose to assign this writing prompt or the writing prompt in the Modern unit for students to write.***

Cultural achievements include art, music, literature, architecture, science, technology, engineering, and math. Taken as a whole, a region’s cultural achievements can be appreciated and celebrated for their breadth and depth. The achievements also reveal a region’s values and lifestyles.

Goal/Challenge = Create a museum display (12”x16”) poster with illustration and informational placard that synthesizes visual and text data about a specific cultural achievement for use as a classroom resource.

Role = An expert on an artistic, musical, literary, religious, linguistic, scientific, technological, architectural, mathematical,or historical person or artifact.

Audience = Classmates within and outside of their class period. Situation = Students research data from multiple print and

electronic sources, plan, and produce a poster that is prominently displayed in the classroom.

Product and performance = Students create and present a poster to their classmates as part of a museum gallery walk, including a Works Cited page in proper MLA format.

Standards/criteria for success = Posters are accurate and complete with all required elements displayed in a colorful, easy to read format.

There are different perspectives on a region’s cultural or social ways of life which present an opportunity to take a stance and defend a position using evidence from primary and secondary

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T, M, A Social Studies Department Argumentative Writing Rubric with 5 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Introduction with claim and historical context

● Support using evidence

● Support using explanatory bridges ● Critical thinking

● Conventions

Students will demonstrate the following facets of understanding: explain, apply, interpret, take a perspective, and show empathy when writing a formal essay in response to a prompt. The response will include a claim, reasons to support the claim, and historical context in the introduction. Each reason will have its own paragraph and be supported with evidence from multiple sources and

explained (bridged) to show its support of the claim. Evidence will be documented within text citations and a Works Cited in proper MLA format. The essay will have a conclusion that restates the claim and reasons and offers some insight or calls the reader to action.

Possible prompts:

● How does Islam impact the daily lives of women in the Middle East?

● Do Islamic religious beliefs limit women’s freedom and rights in the Middle East?

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Evaluation of student notebooks with these criteria for success: accuracy in definitions and descriptions of vocabulary terms, key people, and historical concepts.

Evaluation of student participation in collaborative small group and whole class discussions with these criteria of success: cooperation, effective time management, accurate and thoughtful contributions that move discussions in a positive direction. Evaluation of student critical thinking and/or

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will show they have achieved Stage 1 goals by… Guided reading and note-taking from primary and secondary sources, global studies textbook, and teacher-created slideshows about Middle Eastern geography, history, religion, culture, and society.

Answering daily review, preview, summary, and speculative questions.

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creative generation of ideas with these criteria for success: cooperative and collaborative approach; accuracy and comprehensive responses to prompts; focused and articulate presentation of ideas.

Evaluation of student test-taking skills with these criteria of success: accuracy and completion, ability to eliminate distractors. Evaluation of student mastery of content and skills with these criteria of success: accuracy, depth in detail, and completion of all tasks.

analyze, document, propose, role-play, and/or assess a political, economic, social, and/or cultural situation within the Middle East. For example, chart of three monotheistic faiths, sketches of mosques from across the Islamic world, word webs of Muslim expansion out of Arabia

Multiple choice and short answer quizzes

Multiple choice, stimulus-based, short answer, and short essay tests.

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Code Pre-Assessment

K-W chart for Middle East

Show 4-5 illustrative photos of the Middle East on white board and ask students to ask questions, make connections to things they already know, make predictions about what content they might learn in this unit.

How long have people lived in the Middle East? Why is it sometimes referred to as the “crossroads of the world”?

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Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Student success at transfer meaning and acquisition depends on…

Reading and taking notes from textbook, teacher-created slideshows, or internet-based primary and secondary sources (Newsela and NYTimes/Scholastic Upfront) according to Unit Responsibility sheet focusing on acquiring domain specific vocabulary, general and specific biographical details; guided practice of constructing and interpreting infographics, graphic

Progress Monitoring

Teacher review of notes as students pair with a partner to review difficult concepts, unfamiliar terms, and questions. May result in whole class review and discussion if the majority of students are struggling with a vocabulary term, concept, and/or skill.

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Daily prompts that ask provocative, open-ended questions using unit vocabulary, concepts, and skills often connected to current political, economic, and social events.

Viewing short videos (from NYTimes Learning Network, PBS, National Geographic) and answering interpretive, inferential, and analysis questions.

Working cooperatively to interpret, analyze, make judgments, and discuss in pairs and small groups for peer-guided

dialogue of concepts and/or skills.

Practicing test-taking strategies with practice quizzes to explain why the right answer is correct and how the other choices serve as distractors.

Practicing argumentative writing strategies to isolate elements of the argumentative writing process, i.e. claim/thesis,

historical context, reasoning, gathering evidence, explaining evidence, documenting evidence, summarizing, making conclusions, and transitioning.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses to scaffolded questions from multiple students.

Teacher circulates to ensure that students are practicing low to higher level thinking skills. Periodic pauses for students to explain answers in their own words.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students. Students can also peer assess for multiple opportunities for feedback.

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Global Studies Unit 3 Modern Middle East

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and

domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary

knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. NCSS IV b: Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual’s daily life.

RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

❖ Give examples of when history and tradition clash with modern ideas of democracy and civil rights.

❖ Analyze the reasons why economic prosperity has not come to all people.

❖ Give examples of when ethnic and religious identities can lead to unexpected conflict and cooperation.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. Nationalism was an important force in the region in the post-WWII era. 2. The land known as Israel and

Palestine has been a major source of contention.

3. The demise of colonial rule often gave way to the assumption of power by monarchies or dictatorial regimes. 4. The Islamic world has experienced a

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. How might the Israeli-Palestinan conflict be resolved or minimized over time? 2. Is there a place for religion in politics and

governance?

3. Have the forces of technology enhanced the potential for “grassroots” revolutions? 4. How have external forces and actors

taken active or bystander roles in facilitating change in the region and to

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RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting

evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are

addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and styles are appropriate to

purposes, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

5. Recent years have witnessed a growing demand for political

accountability on the part of the people of many Middle Eastern nations.

Acquisition Students will know…

Historical Concepts: ● nationalism ● imperialism ● colonialism ● Zionism ● Anti-Semitism ● self-determination ● fundamentalism ● terrorism ● revolution

● Authoritarian regimes, i.e. dictatorship, theocracy, monarchy

Case Studies: (teacher selects focus countries)

● Israel & Palestine ● Iraq ● Syria ● Iran ● Tunisia ● Egypt ● Saudi Arabia ● Afghanistan

Students will be skilled at…

● Describing the impact of wars in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in terms of changing geographic boundaries and relations between Israelis and

Palestinians.

● Assessing various tactics used by

Palestinians and Israelis to advance each side’s political aims.

● Mediating a mock Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement.

● Contrasting the causes and outcomes of the two Persian Gulf wars fought between the U.S. and Iraq.

● Describing the chain of events that led to the Islamic Revolution in Iran.

● Describing the chain of events that prompted the Arab Spring.

● Comparing and contrasting the levels of democratization in Arab Spring countries. ● Debating the role that external forces

should play in promoting political change in the region.

● Writing persuasively about a modern political and/or economic crisis.

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Stage 2 – Evidence

Code Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence

T, M, A

***Teachers may choose to assign this writing prompt or the writing prompt in the Land & People unit for students to write.***

Social Studies Department Argumentative Writing Rubric with 5 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Introduction with claim and historical context

● Support using evidence

● Support using explanatory bridges ● Critical thinking

● Conventions

PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students will show that they really understand evidence of… There are different perspectives on a region’s political, cultural, or social ways of life which present an opportunity to take a stance and defend a position using evidence from primary and secondary sources.

Students will demonstrate the following facets of understanding: explain, apply, interpret, take a perspective, and show empathy when conducting a formal debate and/or writing a formal essay in response to a prompt.

The response will include a claim, reasons to support the claim, and historical​ ​context in the introduction. Each reason will have its own paragraph and be supported with evidence from multiple sources and explained (bridged) to show its support of the claim. Evidence will be documented within text citations and a Works Cited in proper MLA format. The essay will have a conclusion that restates the claim and reasons and offers some insight or calls the reader to action.

Possible prompts:

● How can the Israeli-Palestinian conflict be resolved? ● How can Iraq and/or Afghanistan best move forward as a

democracy?

● What is the best option for US policymakers in dealing with Iran?

● Should Saudi Arabia give equal rights to its female citizens? ● Why has Tunisia succeeded and Egypt failed as functional

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Evaluation of student notebooks with these criteria for success: accuracy in definitions and descriptions of vocabulary terms, key people, and historical concepts.

Evaluation of student participation in collaborative small group and whole class discussions with these criteria of success: cooperation, effective time management, accurate and thoughtful contributions that move discussions in a positive direction. Evaluation of student critical thinking and/or creative generation of ideas with these criteria for success: cooperative and collaborative approach; accuracy and comprehensive responses to prompts; focused and articulate presentation of ideas.

Evaluation of student test-taking skills with these criteria of success: accuracy and completion, ability to eliminate distractors. Evaluation of student mastery of content and skills with these criteria of success: accuracy, depth in detail, and completion of all tasks.

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will show they have achieved Stage 1 goals by… Guided reading and note-taking from primary and secondary sources, global studies textbook, and teacher-created slideshows about Middle Eastern politics, economics, geography, modern history, religion, culture, and society.

Answering daily review, preview, summary, and speculative questions.

Creating visual, oral, and/or written responses to show, organize, analyze, document, propose, role-play, and/or assess a political, economic, social, and/or cultural situation within the Middle East. For example, perspective drawing of Israeli and Palestinian concerning Jerusalem, Venn diagram of Arab Spring, role play Tunisia revolution

Multiple choice and short answer quizzes

Multiple choice, stimulus-based, short answer, and short essay tests.

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Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Code Pre-Assessment

Where have US military forces been stationed since 9/11/2001?

How does political Islam affect international relations between the US and the countries of the Middle East and Central Asia? M, A M, A M, A M, A M,A

Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Student success at transfer meaning and acquisition depends on…

Reading and taking notes from textbook, teacher-created slideshows, or internet-based primary and secondary sources (Newsela and NYTimes/Scholastic Upfront) according to Unit Responsibility sheet focusing on acquiring domain specific vocabulary, general and specific biographical details; guided practice of constructing and interpreting infographics, graphic organizers, illustrations/photographs; paraphrasing and evaluating sources; and responding to study questions. Daily prompts that ask provocative, open-ended questions using unit vocabulary, concepts, and skills often connected to current political, economic, and social events.

Viewing short videos (from NYTimes Learning Network, PBS, National Geographic) and answering interpretive, inferential, and analysis questions.

Working cooperatively to interpret, analyze, make judgments, and discuss in pairs and small groups for peer-guided

dialogue of concepts and/or skills.

Working cooperatively in role playing dramatic events and debriefing in whole class discussions.

Progress Monitoring

Teacher review of notes as students pair with a partner to review difficult concepts, unfamiliar terms, and questions. May result in whole class review and discussion if the majority of students are struggling with a vocabulary term, concept, and/or skill.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses to scaffolded questions from multiple students.

Teacher circulates to ensure that students are practicing low to higher level thinking skills. Periodic pauses for students to explain answers in their own words.

Teacher looks for engaged participation by actors and active listening by audience members. Teacher

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T, M ,A

T, M, A

Practicing test-taking strategies with practice quizzes to explain why the right answer is correct and how the other choices serve as distractors.

Practicing argumentative writing strategies to isolate elements of the argumentative writing process, i.e. claim/thesis,

historical context, reasoning, gathering evidence, explaining evidence, documenting evidence, summarizing, making conclusions, and transitioning.

looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students. Students can also peer assess for multiple opportunities for feedback.

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Global Studies Unit 4 Africa: Land and People

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

NCSS IV b: Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual’s daily life.

RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

❖ Analyze how families heavily influence language, religion and ethnic identity. ❖ Describe how people alter their environments and use resources for survival.

❖ Compare and contrast how governments are formed to organize people and resources in times of cooperation and conflict.

❖ Give multiple examples of cultural diffusion: the spread of goods, ideas, and technology through trade, migration and warfare.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. Africa has a unique climatic pattern due to its position that straddles the equator.

2. The continent of Africa consists of thousands of ethnic and linguistic groups with a rich diversity of artistic, literary, and musical achievements. 3. Many city-states, kingdoms, and

empires flourished in Africa which were loosely linked through trade. 4. In time, outsiders including Arabs and

Europeans exploited many of Africa’s

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. Can one speak of a common African heritage or is Africa too diverse?

2. In what ways might African civilizations be described as rich?

3. What were the immediate and long-term impacts of transoceanic slavery and European colonization in Africa?

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sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

resources and eventually colonized and settled most of the continent. 5. The impact of colonial rule varied

throughout the continent and ultimately led to a blending of outside and

indigenous influences.

Acquisition Students will know…

Geographic Features:

● major rivers, landforms, and bodies of saltwater

Political Entities: (teacher selects focus countries)

● Democratic Republic of the Congo ● Cote D’Ivoire ● Ethiopia ● Kenya ● Liberia ● Mali ● Mozambique ● Nigeria ● Rwanda ● Senegal ● Somalia ● South Africa ● South Sudan ● Sudan ● Tanzania ● Zimbabwe ● Timbuktu

Students will be skilled at…

● Correctly labeling and identifying political, physical, religious, social and

demographic features of the Middle East region.

● Distinguishing between sedentary and nomadic cultures of the continent. ● Identifying commonly spoken languages

by name and location on the continent. ● Comparing and contrasting the major

tenets of indigenous folk religions, Islam, and Christianity.

● Researching and presenting the history, spiritual beliefs, artistic and musical heritage of select African ethnic/tribal societies.

● Describing the political and economic achievements of African kingdoms, empires and city states such as Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Great Zimbabwe, and the Swahili States.

● Citing critical events and turning points in the region’s history that impacted the

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● nomadic pastoralists/sedentary farmers

● Bantu people and language family ● Nilotic people and language family ● Khoi people and language family ● Swahili

Religious Features:

● Indigenous folk religious beliefs ● Christianity

● Islam

Humanities & STEM Features:

● art, i.e. masks adn Kente cloth ● literature, i.e. folktales and griots ● music, i.e. drumming and dance Society:

● family and tribal structure ● village governance

Historical People and Events ● Mansa Musa or Ibn Battuta ● Trans-Saharan trade network ● Swahili-Indian Ocean trade network ● Timbuktu libraries and universities

trans-Atlantic slave trade, European explorers and eventual European colonization.

● Writing persuasively about the level of cultural achievement in African tribal societies.

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Stage 2 – Evidence

Code Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence

T, M, A Teacher created rubric with 4 criteria and 4 bands of success: ● Content ● Style ● Drawing Conclusions ● Collaboration PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students will show that they really understand evidence of… Geographic, demographic, economic, religious, linguistic, and historical evidence collected on a map can be used to make comparisons and draw conclusions about the values and lifestyles of people in a region.

Goal/Challenge = Create an oversized map (​24”x30”) ​that synthesizes visual, text, and quantitative data around a specific theme for use as a classroom resource.

Role = An expert and a collaborator on a geographic, demographic, economic, religious, linguistic, or historical theme

Audience = Classmates within and outside of their class period. Situation = Working as a team, students gather data from multiple sources, plan, and produce a map that is prominently displayed in the classroom.

Product and performance = Student groups create and present a map to their classmates, including answering key questions that synthesize the multiple pieces of information and present

conclusions about the region based on their theme.

Standards/criteria for success = Maps are accurate and complete with all required elements displayed in an easy to read format. Presentations of maps and conclusions are accurate and go beyond simple read of the map. Group members share workload

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T, M, A Teacher created rubric with 3 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Content ● Style

● Following Directions

***Teachers may choose to assign this writing prompt or the writing prompt in the Modern unit for students to write.***

African societies are organized through tribal affiliations. Each tribal society developed their own means of sustenance, governance, religious, artistic, and musical traditions, experienced their own histories and face present-day challenges.Taken altogether, a continent’s social organization and cultural achievements can be appreciated and celebrated for their breadth and depth. These elements also reveal a continent’s values and lifestyles.

Goal/Challenge = Create a digital slideshow (4-8 slides) with illustrations and information that synthesizes visual and text data about a specific tribal society for use a classroom resource. Role = An expert on a tribal society and its geographic, historical, political, religious, artistic, musical, and literary characteristics. Audience = Classmates within and outside of their class period. Situation = Students research data from multiple print and

electronic sources, plan, and produce a slideshow that is presented and prominently displayed in the classroom.

Product and performance = Students create and present a slideshow to their classmates, including a Works Cited page in proper MLA format.

Standards/criteria for success = Slideshows are accurate and complete with all required elements displayed in a colorful, easy to read format.

There are different perspectives on a region’s cultural or social ways of life which present an opportunity to take a stance and defend a position using evidence from primary and secondary sources.

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T, M, A Social Studies Department Argumentative Writing Rubric with 5 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Introduction with claim and historical context

● Support using evidence

● Support using explanatory bridges ● Critical thinking

● Conventions

Students will demonstrate the following facets of understanding: explain, apply, interpret, take a perspective, and show empathy when writing a formal essay in response to a prompt.

The response will include a claim, reasons to support the claim, and historical​ ​context in the introduction. Each reason will have its own paragraph and be supported with evidence from multiple sources and explained (bridged) to show its support of the claim. Evidence will be documented within text citations and a Works Cited in proper MLA format. The essay will have a conclusion that restates the claim and reasons and offers some insight or calls the reader to action.

Possible prompts:

● Did Africans produce rich and diverse societies in terms of trade, history, religious beliefs, art, and music?

● Is Africa a continent culturally united in spite of its diversity?

A

M, A

Evaluation of student notebooks with these criteria for success: accuracy in definitions and descriptions of vocabulary terms, key people, and historical concepts.

Evaluation of student participation in collaborative small group and whole class discussions with these criteria of success: cooperation, effective time management, accurate and thoughtful contributions that

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will show they have achieved Stage 1 goals by… Guided reading and note-taking from primary and secondary sources, global studies textbook, and teacher-created slideshows about SubSaharan African geography, history, religion, culture, and society.

Answering daily review, preview, summary, and speculative questions.

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T, M, A

T, M

T, M, A

Evaluation of student critical thinking and/or creative generation of ideas with these criteria for success: cooperative and collaborative approach; accuracy and comprehensive responses to prompts; focused and articulate presentation of ideas.

Evaluation of student test-taking skills with these criteria of success: accuracy and completion, ability to eliminate distractors. Evaluation of student mastery of content and skills with these criteria of success: accuracy, depth in detail, and completion of all tasks.

Creating visual, oral, and/or written responses to show, organize, analyze, document, propose, role-play, and/or assess a political, economic, social, and/or cultural situation within SubSaharan Africa. For example, word web for cultural elements that unite Africans, research stations on African trade

Multiple choice and short answer quizzes

Multiple choice, stimulus-based, short answer, and short essay tests.

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Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Code Pre-Assessment

K-W Africa

Show 4-5 illustrative photos of Africa on white board and ask students to ask questions, make connections to things they already know, make predictions about what content they might learn in this unit.

Is Africa a country or a continent? Why do you think so many people misunderstand the size and diversity within Africa?

M, A

M, A

M, A

M, A

Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Student success at transfer meaning and acquisition depends on…

Reading and taking notes from textbook, teacher-created slideshows, or internet-based primary and secondary sources (Newsela and NYTimes/Scholastic Upfront) according to Unit Responsibility sheet focusing on acquiring domain specific vocabulary, general and specific biographical details; guided practice of constructing and interpreting infographics, graphic organizers, illustrations/photographs; paraphrasing and evaluating sources; and responding to study questions. Daily prompts that ask provocative, open-ended questions using unit vocabulary, concepts, and skills often connected to current political, economic, and social events.

Viewing short videos (from NYTimes Learning Network, PBS, National Geographic) and answering interpretive, inferential, and analysis questions.

Working cooperatively to interpret, analyze, make judgments, and discuss in pairs and small groups for peer-guided

dialogue of concepts and/or skills.

Progress Monitoring

Teacher review of notes as students pair with a partner to review difficult concepts, unfamiliar terms, and questions. May result in whole class review and discussion if the majority of students are struggling with a vocabulary term, concept, and/or skill.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses to scaffolded questions from multiple students.

Teacher circulates to ensure that students are practicing low to higher level thinking skills. Periodic pauses for students to explain answers in their own

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T, M, A

explain why the right answer is correct and how the other choices serve as distractors.

Practicing argumentative writing strategies to isolate elements of the argumentative writing process, i.e. claim/thesis,

historical context, reasoning, gathering evidence, explaining evidence, documenting evidence, summarizing, making conclusions, and transitioning.

responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students. Students can also peer assess for multiple opportunities for feedback.

(38)

Global Studies Unit 5 Modern Africa

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and

domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary

knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. NCSS IV b: Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual’s daily life.

RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

❖ Give examples of when history and tradition clash with modern ideas of democracy and civil rights.

❖ Analyze the reasons why economic prosperity has not come to all people.

❖ Give examples of when ethnic and religious identities can lead to unexpected conflict and cooperation.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. African nations emerged from the colonial period relatively unprepared for the challenge of self-government. 2. Ethnic rivalries and the ascent of

single party rule or autocratic rulers often led to civil wars and a host of related economic and social problems. 3. Due to its wealth of natural resources,

sub-Saharan Africa has remained a region ripe for outside interests in both

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. Can African nations rely upon traditional forms of economy or must industry play a greater role in order to meet their needs? 2. Can alternatives to popular democratic

forms of government provide effective governance?

3. Can more proactive steps be taken in order to ward off civil wars and

humanitarian disasters seen in recent decades?

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RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting

evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are

addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and styles are appropriate to

purposes, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and over-reliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

4. Recent decades have witnessed a steady rise of multi-party states and improving economic conditions in some sub-Saharan countries.

humanitarian crises?

Acquisition Students will know…

Historical Concepts: ● nationalism ● imperialism ● colonialism ● self-determination ● revolution

● Authoritarian regimes, i.e. dictatorship, monarchy

● genocide ● apartheid

Case Studies: (teacher selects focus countries)

● Congo ● Nigeria ● Rwanda ● South Africa

Students will be skilled at…

● Describing the paradigm sometimes referred to “Africa’s Cycle of Despair”. ● Assessing various tactics used by African

tribal societies and external actors to advance each side’s political aims. ● Contrasting the experiences of two

African countries emerging from colonial rule and pursuing independence.

● Describing the chain of events that led to the Rwandan genocide.

● Mediating a mock Hutu-Tutsi agreement in Rwanda.

● Describing the chain of events that led to the apartheid in South Africa.

● Debating the role that external forces should play in promoting political change in the region.

● Writing persuasively about how best to settle violent conflict within or between African countries.

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Stage 2 – Evidence

Code Evaluative Criteria Assessment Evidence

T, M, A

***Teachers may choose to assign this writing prompt or the writing prompt in the Land & People unit for students to write.***

Social Studies Department Argumentative Writing Rubric with 5 criteria and 4 bands of success:

● Introduction with claim and historical context

● Support using evidence

● Support using explanatory bridges ● Critical thinking

● Conventions

PERFORMANCE TASK(S):

Students will show that they really understand evidence of… There are different perspectives on a region’s political, cultural, or social ways of life which present an opportunity to take a stance and defend a position using evidence from primary and secondary sources.

Students will demonstrate the following facets of understanding: explain, apply, interpret, take a perspective, and show empathy when conducting a formal debate and/or writing a formal essay in response to a prompt.

The response will include a claim, reasons to support the claim, and historical​ ​context in the introduction. Each reason will have its own paragraph and be supported with evidence from multiple sources and explained (bridged) to show its support of the claim. Evidence will be documented within text citations and a Works Cited in proper MLA format. The essay will have a conclusion that restates the claim and reasons and offers some insight or calls the reader to action.

Possible prompts:

● To what extent were African countries, such as Nigeria and Congo, ready for independence?

● How different might South African history have been if Nelson Mandela had not joined the African National Congress?

● Was the Rwandan genocide caused by colonialism or tribalism?

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A

M, A

T, M, A

T, M

T, M, A

Evaluation of student notebooks with these criteria for success: accuracy in definitions and descriptions of vocabulary terms, key people, and historical concepts.

Evaluation of student participation in collaborative small group and whole class discussions with these criteria of success: cooperation, effective time management, accurate and thoughtful contributions that move discussions in a positive direction. Evaluation of student critical thinking and/or creative generation of ideas with these criteria for success: cooperative and collaborative approach; accuracy and comprehensive responses to prompts; focused and articulate presentation of ideas.

Evaluation of student test-taking skills with these criteria of success: accuracy and completion, ability to eliminate distractors. Evaluation of student mastery of content and skills with these criteria of success: accuracy, depth in detail, and completion of all tasks.

OTHER EVIDENCE:

Students will show they have achieved Stage 1 goals by… Guided reading and note-taking from primary and secondary sources, global studies textbook, and teacher-created slideshows about SubSaharan African politics, economics, geography, modern history, religion, culture, and society.

Answering daily review, preview, summary, and speculative questions.

Creating visual, oral, and/or written responses to show, organize, analyze, document, propose, role-play, and/or assess a political, economic, social, and/or cultural situation within SubSaharan Africa. For example, graphic organizer on consequences of Trans-atlantic slave trade, tweets from the Belgian Congo, reflection on Hotel Rwanda

Multiple choice and short answer quizzes

Multiple choice, stimulus-based, short answer, and short essay tests.

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Stage 3 – Learning Plan

Code Pre-Assessment

Is the Africa portrayed in movies like Black Panther and Blood Diamonds accurate?

Why do you think modern Africa is often characterized as a place of hardship and violence? How closely related are the histories of South Africa and the United States?

M, A

M, A

M, A

M, A

M,A

Summary of Key Learning Events and Instruction

Student success at transfer meaning and acquisition depends on…

Reading and taking notes from textbook, teacher-created slideshows, or internet-based primary and secondary sources (Newsela and NYTimes/Scholastic Upfront) according to Unit Responsibility sheet focusing on acquiring domain specific vocabulary, general and specific biographical details; guided practice of constructing and interpreting infographics, graphic organizers, illustrations/photographs; paraphrasing and evaluating sources; and responding to study questions. Daily prompts that ask provocative, open-ended questions using unit vocabulary, concepts, and skills often connected to current political, economic, and social events.

Viewing short videos (from NYTimes Learning Network, PBS, National Geographic) and answering interpretive, inferential, and analysis questions.

Working cooperatively to interpret, analyze, make judgments, and discuss in pairs and small groups for peer-guided

dialogue of concepts and/or skills.

Working cooperatively in role playing dramatic events and debriefing in whole class discussions.

Progress Monitoring

Teacher review of notes as students pair with a partner to review difficult concepts, unfamiliar terms, and questions. May result in whole class review and discussion if the majority of students are struggling with a vocabulary term, concept, and/or skill.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and varied responses to scaffolded questions from multiple students.

Teacher circulates to ensure that students are practicing low to higher level thinking skills. Periodic pauses for students to explain answers in their own words.

Teacher looks for engaged participation by actors and active listening by audience members. Teacher

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T, M ,A

T, M, A

Practicing test-taking strategies with practice quizzes to explain why the right answer is correct and how the other choices serve as distractors.

Practicing argumentative writing strategies to isolate elements of the argumentative writing process, i.e. claim/thesis,

historical context, reasoning, gathering evidence, explaining evidence, documenting evidence, summarizing, making conclusions, and transitioning.

looks for engaged and varied responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students.

Teacher looks for engaged and evidence-based responses from multiple students. Students can also peer assess for multiple opportunities for feedback.

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Global Studies Unit 6 South and Southeast Asia: Land and People

Stage 1 Desired Results ESTABLISHED GOALS

L.6: Acquire and use accurately general academic and

domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary

knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. NCSS IV b: Identify, describe, and express appreciation for the influences of various historical and contemporary cultures on an individual’s daily life.

RH.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

RH.9: Integrate information from various sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Transfer

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

❖ Analyze how families heavily influence language, religion and ethnic identity. ❖ Describe how people alter their environments and use resources for survival.

❖ Compare and contrast how governments are formed to organize people and resources in times of cooperation and conflict.

❖ Give multiple examples of cultural diffusion: the spread of goods, ideas, and technology through trade, migration and warfare.

Meaning UNDERSTANDINGS

Students will understand that…

1. Though geographically isolated, the region of South Asia has been

exposed to outside influence such as Aryan migrants from the Caucasus, Alexander of Macedonia, Central Asian steppe peoples, and Muslim merchants and armies.

2. Tremendous linguistic, ethnic, and social diversity exists within South and Southeast Asia with correlations to its varying topography and climate. 3. Over time, South Asia, particularly

India, produced an extremely rich body

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

Students will keep considering…

1. Why were “the Indies” considered so desirable?

2. What are the core principles of Hinduism? 3. How did Buddhism begin and spread

beyond Nepal?

4. How can the changing kingdoms and empires of South and Southeast be explained?

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RI.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually,

quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. SL.4: Present information, findings, and supporting

evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are

addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and styles are appropriate to

purposes, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks. WHST.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced

searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the specific task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and

of spiritual and social traditions. 4. Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam have

each had tremendous influence on the cultures of Southeast Asia.

5. Prior to the period of colonization, much of South and Southeast Asia was ruled by indigenous kingdoms.

Acquisition Students will know…

Geographic Features:

● major rivers, landforms, and bodies of saltwater

Political Entities: (teacher selects focus countries) ● Afghanistan ● Pakistan ● India ● Bangladesh ● Myanmar-Burma ● Thailand ● Laos ● Cambodia ● Vietnam ● Singapore ● Indonesia

● Capital cities of case study countries Demographics:

● India population 1.4 b

● Indonesia Muslim population 237m

Students will be skilled at…

● Describing the major principles and traditions associated with Hinduism ● Describing the influence of the caste

system or social stratification in India over time

● Describing the major principles of Buddhism and contrasting it with Hinduism

● Explaining fundamental differences between the Theravada and Mahayana streams of Buddhism

● Examining organized attempts to bring unity to the Indian subcontinent

● Describing traditional patterns of life and culture in Southeast Asia

● Identifying indigenous kingdoms that ruled Southeast Asia and briefly describe the legacies that they left

● Describing how outside religious influences have altered the nature of

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● Hinduism ● Brahman ● Brahma ● Shiva ● Vishnu ● Ganesha ● Buddhism ● Dharma ● Karma ● Enlightenment/nirvana/moksha ● The Middle Way

● Islam in India

Humanities & STEM Features:

● art, i.e. henna, religious statues ● literature, i.e. Vedas, Bhagavad Gita,

Upanishads, Ramayana ● music, i.e. dance

● architecture, i.e. Meenakshi Temple, Angkor Wat, Taj Mahal

● math, i.e. Arabic numerals, concept of zero

Society:

● family structure ● village governance

● caste system: brahmins, ksatriyas, vaisyas, sudras, dalits

Historical People and Events ● rajah

● Indian Ocean trade network ● Asoka ● Akbar ● Maurya Empire ● Gupta Empire ● Delhi Sultanate ● Mughal Empire

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Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :