Manual Otis

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Elevators

MRVF Elevators

FS310

Rasmuson Library

1984

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UNITED

TECHNOLOGIES

OTIS

Owner's Information Manual

MRVF

GEARED ELEVATOR

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--Prepared for I . ! MM.109

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OTIS

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Otis .Elevator,Company 1983 MM.!!!

Foreword

You have selected the most experienced elevator company in the world to supply your vertical transportation equipment.

Otis Elevator Company, the leading manufacturer of elevators and escalators, traces its beginnings to 1853 when Elisha Graves Otis invented the first safety elevator.

The efficient and safe performance of your Otis equipment, however, depends as much on the knowledge and skill of those who will operate, monitor and maintain it as on the experienoe of those who manufactured it.

Otis provides .many forms of scheduled preventive maintenance, as well as a complete spectrum of repair services, all designed to extend the life of elevator and escalator equipment. With our more than 300 offices throughout the United States and Canada, we can assist all owners in maintaining their equipment for the safest, most reliable

performance available.

We urge you to contact vour nearest Otis office for any assistanceyou may require with your elevator or escalator equipment. Your closest

local Otis Service Office can be reached 24 hours a day, 365 days a year by calling the following teleplione number:

This Owner's Information Manual has been prepared by Otis Elevator Company to give you, the

building owner, your building manager or maintenanoe supervisor, data on the operation of all major

components of your equipment furnished and installed in accordance with our contract terms, conditions and specifications. It will also give

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insight into the preventive maintenance procedures that should be performed at regular intervals to

maintain the equipment and provide for passenger safety.

You, your agents and employees are cautioned that preventive maintenance -or any other equipment maintenance procedure - should be performed only by a skilled mechanic for obvious reasons including, of course, the fact that elevators and escalators contain high-voltage circuits and high-speed machinery that pose hazards to the inexperienced or untrained.

Please note that the information contained in this Owner's Information Manual is not intended nor should it be interpreted to in an\, way alter, expand, amend, modify or otherwise change the express terms and conditions of the contract and its specifications under which your equipment was furnished and installed' by Otis, including specifically all limitations of liability and the exclusive express guarantee against defects in materials and workmanship provider! therein. Further, Otis hereby expressly disclaims any , responsibility for any personal injury or property damage, including damage to the elevator or escalator equipment, as a result of any negligence, misuse or abuse of the equ ipment, misinterpretation of the information in this manual, or any other cause beyond the control of Otis Elevator Company.

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OTIS.

Contents

FOREWORD

1. EMERGENCY AND SECURITY PROCEDURES

1.1 Emergency Procedures 1.2 Owner's Checklist

2. YOUR ELEVATOR SYSTEM

2.1 System Description 2.2 Promotional Literature 3. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE 3.1 3.2 Inspection

Lubrication and Cleaning

4. CONTROL SYSTEM 4.1 Controller 4.2 Position Transducers 4.3 Controller Relays 4.4 Batteries 5. ROTATING MACHINERY 5.1 Motor 5.2 Brakes 6. FIXTURES

6.1 Controls and Indicators 6.2 Speech Synthesizer

6.3 Information Display Module

7. DOOR CONTROL

MM.115

7.1

7.2

Door Operator

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8.

HOISTWAY EQUIPMENT 8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

Rails and Guides

Stopping and Limit Switches Traveling Cable

Governor and Safety Buffer

Ropes

APPENDIX A • PARTS LEAFLETS

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1.1

Emergency Procedures

State-of-the-art elevator and escalator engineering have developed mechanisms that greatly reduce the risks to life and property in emergency .situations, but building personnel still playa vital role at these times in directing occupants to safety,

in monitoring equipment, and in ooerating controls that initiate emergency routines.

The proper hand ling of elevators. and escalators in an emergency could mean the difference between life and death. You should, therefore, insure .' ;that all your building personnel are familiar w'ith

emergency procedures suitable to your building structure and all of its equipment, including elevator and escalator equipment, in case of accidents, fire, earthquake, ,power failure and t~e like, by contacting local authorities including your fire department for ar:lpropriate advice, inspections and drills.

Fireman's Service -. Special Emergency Service (SES lFeature Otis' SES is engineered to allow control of elevator operation in the event of fire or other time-sensitive emergencies, particularly where immediate access to specific building areas or floors may be desirable. One or more of your elevators is equipped with SES.

Phase One: Automatic Return to Lobby

Phase One of SES is designed to capture automatic passenger elevator cars and return them to the lobby or other designated floors.

Phase One is usually initiated manually by operation of a hall-mounted keyswitch, or it is automatically activated through tripping of a fire or smoke sensor or sprinkler system installed by you in your building. Once it is activated or initiated:

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o Registration of calls is inhibited and calls already in registration are cancelled.

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Emergency Procedures

0 As authorized by local code authorities:

- Emergency stop switches are overriden. - Car doors are nudged closed.

Door re-open ing devices are rendered

inoperative. !

0 The PLEASE EXIT WHEN DOOR OPEN

jewel is lighted, and the car travels non-stop to the lobby or other designated floor, or if that is the floor at which the fire is involved, to an alternate service landing.

0 Cars already at the lobby or alternate designated

floor remain parked, with doors open.

0 Doors are opened at the exit floor, allowing

passengers to exit the elevator.

0 Cars traveling away from the lobhy or alternate

.designated floor will reverse and return to the lobby or alternate designated floor, non-stop.

0 Any car not operating automatically will be

given an audible and visual signal to close the

doors, so the car can move to the lobby or alternate designated floor, without stopping.

0 All cars are ultimately brought to one location

and held there ready for use by trained emergency professionals.

Phase Two: Fireman's Use of Elevators

Once the car has been brought to the exit floor by SES, firemen or other emergency personnel can gain control of the parked car by operating the FIRE SERVICE keyswitch in or adjacent to the car operating panel. Then:

0 Car responds only to car calls registered on

its own buttons. The car cannot be 'stolen' by a hall call registered at some other floor.

0 After the car call is registered, doors are

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closed and the car is started by maintaining ~

pressure on the DOOR CLOSE button until \

the doors are fully closed. I

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0 At the called floor, doors are opened by

, maintaining pressure on the DOOR OPEN

button until the doors are fully open.

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MM-117

Restoration of Normal Service

At the appropriate time, normal elevator operating conditions can be restored by bringing all cars with SES to the lobby or alternate designated floor, and by returning Phase One and Phase Two key-switches to their normal positions.

All Elevator Equipment Should Have SES

It is recommended by Otis that all your elevator equipment be equipped with SES if it has not already been installed. Please call your local Otis office for information on its installation ..

Power Failure

Emergency Power Option

If your elevator system is equipped with an emergency power supply (typically, a diesel generator), it can be activated as follows: 1) Elevator electric power feeders may be

switched from normal to emergency power. 2) If your elevator system's Emergency Power Option has an automatic mode and is set to the AUTO mode, each car will be automatically brought down non-stop to a previously designated floor (typically, the lobby or street floor) and doors will open to allow passengers to leave the car. After all cars have been brought to the designated floor, the cars remain parked there, until one or more cars are selected to provide normal service.

3) If your elevator system's Emergency Power Option does not have an Automatic mode, or if that mode is not invoked, selector switches may be operated manually to bring down

each car, in turn. After all cars have been brought to the designated floor and evacuated, the cars will remain parked there, the selector switch may be operated to choose which car or cars will provide normal service .

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Emergency Procedures

"Batte ry-Powered" Elevators

An Otis "VF" elevator can run on battery power for up to four hours during a power outage. The total available service is the sum of the individual battery hours. A four-car group, for example, where each battery pack had three hours of charge remaining, could if desired provide elevator service for up to 12 hours during a power outage if building personnel allow only one elevator to operate at a time.

TM

Aut-Q-Safe . Feature for Hydraulic Elevators

TM

Aut-O-Safe . the Otis emergency battery unit, brings a hydraulic elevator to an exit floor smooth Iy and safely in the event of a building power failure.

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o Upon sensing a power outage. emergency battery power operation is activated, causing the car to descend to the lowest

landing at normal speed.

o Doors open automatically upon arrival at the lowest landing, permitting passenger exit.

o Doors close after a short interval, and the car remains parked with the doors closed for the duration of the power outage. However, the door-open button remains operative.

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MM-11? ,vstem Upkeep General Cleanliness

1.2

Owner's Checklist

Elevators that respond promptly to a call for service, and provide a smooth" ride in a clean, well-lighted car, make a favorable impression on tenants and visitors alike. Thus, elevator performance, because of its hiphly visible nature, plays a significant role in establishing the rental or resale value of a building.

Elevators are sturdy machines, built for long and dependable service. By knowing how to assess elevator performance, the owner can assure the continuously high-quality service for which the equipment is designed. When a shutdown does occur, there are a few simple procedures that can often make the shutdown as short as possible . For the building owner or manager, minimizing shutdowns involves knowing:

o What to do on a daily basis so that serious problems are minimized.

o What to do in case of malfunctions and how to recognize conditions that require immediate service.

Trained service personnel should be engaged to examine, clean and lubricate the elevator equipmen1 at scheduled intervals. There are, however, some areas of general upkeep which are the building owner's or manager's responsibility:

The machine room, the pit and cars (particularly the door sills) must be kept free of debris. Ashtrays placed in the building's lobby encourage passengers to extinguish their cigarettes before entering the elevators, thereby cutting down on litter.

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Owners Checklist

Some environments -- manufacturing plants, for example - can"be unusuallv susceptible to dust or grime. These conditions may call for frequent cleaning by a service examiner. The elevator owner should never attempt to clean machinery.

A Dry Pit

The pit area must be kept dry and clean. The service examiner will" alert the building "owner to any water or oil in the pit, and will supervise cleaning by the building staff.

Machine Room Temperature

For proper equipment operation, the machine room temperature must never fall below 450F

(l0C) or rise above 1000F (3aoC). How To Observe the Operation

Of Elevators

A member of the building staff should go through the following procedures regularly with each elevator car:

o Test the Safety Devices

Test alarm bells, stop switches, intercoms, telephone hookups and emergency lighting systems to be sure they will work if there is an emergency.

o Ride the Elevators

Ride the elevator, paying attention to the smoothness of starting and stopping, to any unusual sounds (such as squeaks or scrapes), and

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any unusual movements, vibrations, or odors. Close your eyes to increase awarenessof irregularities.

o Listen During Rush Hours

Stand in the lobby during peak traffic periods, " listening to passengers'comments. They will probably remark on any shortcomings in elevator service.

What To Look For

The following nine-point Safety and Performance Check List can be applied on a regular basis to most elevator systems.

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o How Long Must Passengers I'!,aitfor an Elevator at the Lobby?

Well-timed arrivals and departures, as well as proper acceleration and deceleration are

critical to fast, efficient service. Typical maximum service intervals for ,various applications are

listed below: Office Buildings

Hospitals

Hotels and Motels Apartments, Luxury Apartments, Development 30 Secs. 60 Secs. 50 Secs. 70 Secs. 90 Secs.

MM.117 o o o

Do the Passengers Have Enough Time to Enter and Exit Before the Doors Close?

In most elevators, the minimum a'cceptable time for doors to remain fully open on a car call is three seconds. However, in many cases, one-half to one seco'nd is sufficient if an acceptable door protection device is used. For hall calls, the minimum acceptable time depends on the number of elevators in the bay and on the distance from a point in the center of the lobby to each elevator. The time is measured from notification that a car is arriving by a lantern and audible signal. Times vary and can be longer for elevators that service many elderly or handicapped persons. The speed at which the doors close is also an important safety consideration. Maximum door closing speed is determined by the weight of the door and the type of door operator emploved.

If the Elevator is Equipped with Electronic Detectors or Light Ray Devices, do the Doors Reverse Direction

without Touching Passengers? '

These devices enable a closing door to reverse direction without touching passengers. Reversal must take place therefore as soon as the doors near the passenger (if an electronic detector is in use) or as soon as the light ray beam is broken. In order to conform to standards, the door should also remain either partially or fully open (depending upon the door operator system employed) until the obstruction is removed from the beam .

If the Doors are Equipoed with a Rubber Safety Shoe, do they Reverse Direction as soon as the Shoe makes Contact with a Passenger?

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'-"---Owner's Check list

1.2-4

The shoe mechanism should operate as soon as the rubber makes contact with an obstruction causing the closing door to immediately reverse direction and open completely. Failure to reverse direction, or to remain open as long as contact with the rubber shoe is maintained, constitutes a code violation and a safety hazard. Officials sometimes shut down a car for such violations.

o Does the Car Stop Level with the Hall Floor?

The car should stop within one-half inch of the hall floor. Leveling should be consistent, whether the car is full or empty.

o Is the Alarm Bell in Working Order?

The alarm bell should be tested once a week. This quick and simple procedure will guarantee that the bell will work when and if it is needed.

o Is the Alarm Bell Connected to the Stop Switches?

When this anti-crime measure is implemented, the alarm bell will ring when the Stop switch is flipped. The bell not only alerts building personnel to an emergency, but often frightens a potential criminal into fleeing the premises before accomplish ing any mischief.

o If the Cabs have an Intercom or Telephone Hook.Up, is it in Working Order?

Intercoms and telephones should be tested

regularly. Passengerscan be spared inconvenience when minor mechanical difficulties occur by following instructions received over the intercom or teleohone. During an emergency, communication with passengershelps to alleviate or avert panic. At these times, information from passengerscan be of great assistanceto emergency personnel.

o Is the Interior of the Elevator Adequatelv Lighted?

Check that all light switches are on, all lamps lighted, and all diffusers clean to oermit maximum transmission of light.

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MM.117 Owner's Checklist In Case of Malfunction

Before Calling for Service

The following points should be checked before calling for service on a disabled car:

o Is the Stop switch in the Run position? o Are the key switches in the correct position? o Are there obstructions in the door track? o Is full power available?

o Is the main-line fuse in the machine room blown? When these items are checked ann the car still

does not run, a service call should be placen immediately. In many cases, however, this check list will minimize unnecessary shutdown and help the service company provide faster service.

Minor problems require neither a shutdown nor a service call. Door timing that is slightly off, or floor indicator lights that no not work, for instance, are minor problems that need only be noted and reported to the service examiner on the next visit.

When Shutdown is Necessary

When a problem appears to threaten passenger safety, the car involved should be shut nown and serviced immediately. Safety is always the first concern. Elevator machinery is not to be serviced by people who lack the necessary training ann expertise. Tinkering in the machine room or hoistway is .hazardous to the person working on the elevator,

to the passenger, and may be detrimental to the

elevator itself. Building personnel should monitor car operation, but should leave more complex tasks to the experts .

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Owner's Check list

1.2.6

CHECKLIST FOR OWNER'S INSPECTION

MM.117

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2.1

System Description

"- MACHINE ROOM UPPER HOISTWAY AND CAR LOWER HOISTWAY AND PIT

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System Description

2.1.2

The principal components of your MRVF elevator installation are shown in the cutaway view of Figure 2.1-1.

The. passenger car is mounted to a carframe, suspended in the hoistway between Tee-shaped guide rails. The car is composed of strong,

lightweight panels that incorporate the principles of honeycomb construction developed for the aircraft industry. The carframe that supports the cab and platform is of conventional construction consisting of two upright members, plus a cross-head above the car and a plank or safetY

channel beneath the car. Roller guides,

affixed to the top and bottom of each upright, hold the car on the rails.

The car is supported in the hoistway by several wire-rope cables called hoist ropes. These hoist ropes go up and around a large, cast-iron pulley called the drive sheave, which is part of the hoist machine. From the drive sheave, the hoist ropes go down and around a deflector sheave (so called

because it deflects the ropes from the center to the side of the hoistway) to the top of the concrete-filled counterweight. The drive sheave grooves are fitted with polyurethane liners which increase the traction between grooves and ropes. The "long wrap" employed, wherein the arc of contact between

groove and rope is considerably greater than with the single-wrap arrangement, also increases the traction. The counterweight weighs as much as the elevator car loaded to about half its rated capacity. It is suspended in the hi:>istway between steel guide

rails. Either sliding guide shoes or roller guides, depending upon the application, are affixed to the top and bottom of the counterweight frame to hold the counterweight against the guide rails.

Counterweighting makes it easier for the hoist machine to lift the car.

The car is moved by the action of the hoist machine turning the drive sheave. The machine consists of an alternating-current motor, a solenoid-controlled disc brake, flexible coupling, helical gear reduction, drive sheave, and deflector sheave, all mounted on a common bedplate.

The primary power source for the drive system is a 16-cell bat.tery pack. Battery charging current is obtained from regenerative power during over-hauling loads, from the single-phase building supply at other times. During a building power outage, the elevators continue to run on battery power, and can do this for several hours, until the battery-pack voltage falls below a preset value.

MM.121

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COUNTERWEIGHT HOISTWAY -SWITCH CAM CIRCUIT BREAKER BATTERY PACK

BRAKE & COUPLING

ROPES CAR OPERATING PANEL DOOR OPERATOR TRAVELING CABLE DOOR DETECTOR

MAIN CONTROLLER WITH INTEGRAL GROUP CONTROLLER

TAPE READER FLOATING TAPE

Top Section of Hoistway

DRIVE SHEAVE ROLLER GUIDE CAR REDUCTION GEAR . DEFLECTOR SHEAVE HOISTWAY UPPER LIMIT SWITCHES

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System Description

2.1-4

CIRCUIT BREAKER

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Battery Cabinet

The motor is driven by a solid-state inverter. This is a device in the main controller which converts the battery voltage into an alternating current of an amplitude and frequency specified by a pre-determined speed profile. The main controller generates the speed profile and enforces it through tachometer feedback from the motor. The main controller also determines direction of travel as a function of car position with respect to calls in registration, and generates commands which open and close the car and hoistway doors.

A car-mounted position reader contains proximity switches, actuated by vanes mounted on

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"floating tape" in the hoistway, which perform the following functions:

o Sense the floor at which the car is located. o Initiate deceleration from rated speed when

the car is "stopping distance" from the called floor.

o Initiate door opening, through the main controller, when the car is 3 inches from the floor.

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FLOATING TAPE i I

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Car Mounted Position Reader

VANES

POSITION READER

MM-121

A power door operator opens and closes both the car and hoistway doors simultaneously in response to commands from the main controller. The controlled horizontal motive force necessary for door operation is supplied by a motor-driven, variable-pitch leadscrew. The door detector, a proximity-type protective device fastened onto the front edge of the car door, initiates re-opening of the car and hoistway doors if a passenger or obstruction is sensed in the path of the closing doors.

Power and control signals are carried between the car and the main controller by traveling cables

attached to the bottom of the car.

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System Description

2.1.6

The governor senses the speed of the car, and trips the safety device if the car overspeeds in the down direction. When tripped, the car safety will grab the steel guide. rails, quickly and firmly stopping the car, independent of the normal braking device.

Additional passenger protection is assured by the following components:

o The buffer is a large hydraulic shock absorber that slows down and stops the car if it moves past the bottom landing. A counterweight buffer stops the counterweight's downward motion if the car should move a short way above the top landing.

o A series of four limit switches, at top and bottom of the ho istway, are actuated by car-mounted cams in the following order:

The normal terminal stopping device initiates a slowdown sequence that becomes effective if the car has not already started to decelerate at the terminal landing.

The emergency slowdown switch will initiate an emergency stop if the car exceeds a predetermined speed at the terminal. The direction limit switch will initiate an emergency stop if the car overshoots the terminal landing by more than 2 inches.

The final limit switch will Initiate an emergency stop if the car approaches the buffer.

A group controller is furnished as part of the main controller whenever there is more than one elevator in the installation. Its function is to coordinate the response of all cars in the group so that only one car starts for any hall call, and the average time to respond to the call is minimized.

The following sections of this manual provide more detailed information on maintaining and adjusting the parts of the elevator system described above.

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MM.121

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MM-121 HOISTWAY LOWER LIMIT SWITCHES COUNTERWEIGHT GUARD COUNTERWEIGHT GUIDE RAIL COUNTERWEIGHT BUFFER CAR GUIDE RAIL

Bottom Section of Hoistway

HALL LANTERN POSITION INDICATOR

GOVERNOR ROPES AND GOVERNOR TENSION FRAME POSITION READER TAPE HITCH PIT EMERGENCY SWITCH BUFFER 2.1-7

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3.1

Inspection

A regular program of preventive maintenance, as described in this manual, will curb depreciation and improve both the appearance and performance of your elevator installation.

As described in this section, preventive maintenance consists of three elements:

o Inspection of the items listed in Table 3-1. This table lists those indications of substandard performance that can be corrected by following the instructions given in the later sections of this manual.

o Cleaning of machine room, top of car, and

equipment to prevent the build-up of dirt and grime that could impede the smooth functioning of mechanical elements.

MM.123

o Lubrication, following the instructions in Table 3-2, below, to minimize wear between mating surfaces, and to promote smooth operation. The virtues of regular cleaning and lubrication are well understood. Less appreciated are the advantagesof a thorough inspection of the complete elevator system. By following the procedures in Table 3-1, an experienced examiner can often uncover and correct a problem in its early stages,when repair and adjustment can be made with least expenditure for time and replacement parts. Perhaps just as important, frequent shutdowns are avoided and service is optimized, resulting in a high level of passengersatisfaction.

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Inspection

TABLE 3-1 INSPECTION CHECKLIST

MACHINE ROOM Items To Be Inspected

Controllers

Application/Notes

1) Fuses .-Check main line and operating circuit fuses to be sure they are of proper size. Check

that clips are clean and tight.

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2) Wires - Examine all wiring for breaks, loose lugs, or loose connections.

3) Resistance Tubes. Inspect for loose connections and check resistances. Examine tubes for

breaks in the enamel. . Replace broken resistance tubes with tubes of equal value.

4)

5)

Contacts. Clean and adjust for proper spring tension. Replace all burned or worn contacts with new parts.

Walking Beams - (Up/Down and Wye/Delta

Interlocks) Check condition and adjust as required.

Do not furnish or replace contacts on sealed or enclosed relays. Replace entire relay as a unit.

6) Switch Pivot Points, Pins and Bushings

-Examine for excessive wear. Lubricate as required. Replace if necessary.

7) Timing of Relays - Adjust to provide the best

possible riding quality in the car. Examine switches for weak springs, or residual magnetism.

8) Reverse Phase Relay - Check for proper

operation. Batteries

1) Connections. Check tightness of connections, remove corrosion if present.

Caution: Follow procedures in Paragraph

4.4.

3.1.2

2) Spilled Electrolyte - Clean up. inspect battery

cases. Replace battery if case is cracked.

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TABLE 3-1 INSPECTION CHECKLIST

MACHINE ROOM

Item. To Be Inspected Application/Notes

Motors and Motor-Generators

1) Brushes - Check for proper spring pressure,

seating, and movement in the holders. See that the holders are securely fastened, and that there are no cracks or breaks in the brush stem insulation. Check for proper type and grade of all brushes.

In hydraulic installations, motors operating submerged under oil in the storage tank should not be pulled for routine inspection.

2) Armatures and Commutators. Clean. thoroughly. For best results the element should be removed, cleaned and painted with insulating varnish. Grind commutators if they are out of true, or if high mica, flat spots, high bars or pitting is apparent. Undercut mica if required.

3) Bearings - (Not applicable to CT types) Where possible check for wear (replace if worn, clean and paint armature and fields at the same time). Check clearances between rotating element and fields for proper air gap.

MM'123

4) Bea.ri"-9Lubrication - Lubricate at intervals

specified in Table 3-2, more frequently if motor is subjected to more severe conditions than usual. 5) Connections - Tighten motor and field connections.

Be sure to check all grounds and bonding of all conduit, the M.G. set, and the controller frame, etc.

Brake

1) Adjustment - Check adjustment. Good brake adjustment is largely responsible for the life of

the equipment.

2) Linings - Inspect lining. If oil-soaked. locate and eliminate the lubricant leak, and replace the lining. Change drum-brake lining if worn to the point where rivets can come in contact with the pulley. Change disc-brake pads after 0.050 inch wear .

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Inspection

TABLE 3-1 INSPECTION CHECKLIST

MACHINE ROOM

Items To Be Inspected Application!Notes

3) Contacts - Check for air gap and wear.

4) Pins - in shoes, levers and cores of drum brakes

should be cleaned and lubricated. Pins, capscrews, and studs in disc brakes should be

free of rust and/or paint, but must not be lubricated.

5) Coupling - Check bolts (if used). Check cotter pins, clean, and see that the armature and worm shafts are tightly clamped with keys and keyways in good condition. A rough or scarred pulley should be turned down.

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Machines

1) End Thrust Bearing - Axial motion of worm

should be within required tolerance.

'2) Lateral Thrust Bearing - Axial motion of sheave

shaft should be within required tolerance.

3) Worms and Gears - Check condition and lubrication. Be sure that gear rim bolts are tight. Refill with lubricant as specified in Table 3-2.

4) Bolts - Foundation, bearing, and sheave rim bolts should be tight.

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Tank - Check hoses for leaks. Check hose tank and valve connections for leaks. Be sure proper oil level is maintained in tank.

Pump Drive Belts - Keep belts adjusted for

proper tension. Replace belts in sets when required.

Windings - Keep free of dirt, water and oil.

Blowout frequently with dry air. Ventilate as much as possible.

Hydraulic installations only.

Hydraulic installations only, and only where pump is outside of tank.

Hydraulic installations where motor is mounted outside of tank.

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TABLE 3-1.

Governors

1)

INSPECTION CHECKLIST

SECONDARIES AND OVERHEAD Item, To Be In,peeled

Jaws - Check wear to be sure jaws will grip the governor rope properly. See that jaws work freely and easily, and that the rope is in line with the center of the grooves.

Application/Note,

2) Tripping Speed and Operation of Field

and Potential Switches

Check with a tachometer. Remove all friction, clean contacts and adjust if necessary.

3) Gears - Gears, if noisy, are probably bottomed. Correct by raising the governor spindle and installing new bearings as required.

Sheaves1) Rope Grooves - Inspect for evidence of unequal

wear that indicates need for equalizing rope tension.

MM.l23

2) Polyurethane Groove Inserts. Replace when tread has worn smooth.

3) Sheave Bearings - Check lubrication.

4) Tape Sheaves - Inspect bearings for wear. Note condition of tape. Remove all dirt and rust from tape and lubricate per Table 3.2 .

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Inspection

TABLE 3-1

Car

INSPECTION CHECKLIST

CAR ENCLOSURES

Item, To Be In,pected Application/Note,

3.1.6

1) Flooring - Inspect for worn, or loose flooring.

2) Emergencv Exits. Check opening of exit and

switch if provided.

3) Lighting and Fans. Check for cleanliness, burnt

out lamps, and lubrication of fan. Be sure that globes are fastened.

4) Fixture Jewels and Lenses. Replace if cracked

or broken. The use of glass in the car should be in accordance with codes.

Car Operating Devices

Push Buttons should not stick, and the "Stop" and "Alarm" buttons should work properly.

Replace worn buttons and switches.

Indicators

Position Indicators and Pilot Lights should be

tested for proper operation and checked for burnt out lamps or poor contacts,

Car Door

1) Contacts ~ Examine fastenings and check range

of door opening.. Examine for broken springs and

loose connections.

2) Hangers - Check for worn tracks and rollers,

making certain that door cannot come out of its guides Or jam at any point.

3) Bottom Guides. Examine for wear, looseness, and the possibility of the guides coming out of

the threshold.

(34)

I , I

TABLE 3-1 Car 1) INSPECTION CHECKLIST TOP OF CAR Items To Be Inspected

Fastenings - Check all tie rods and bolts.

ApplicationlNotes

3)

MM.123

2) Steadier Plates' Check and tighten.

3) Guides - Check for wear, proper clearances and adjustments.

Shackles and Ropes

1) Adjustment - Check tension to be sure ropes are equalized. Examine shackle, check nuts and cotter pins.

2) uTurn_lnH - Inspect all rope connections for

proper babbitting. See that rope has not "lost its lay" where it enters the socket or thimble.

Lubrication - Ropes should be properly lubricated (see Lubrication Section). Lubricant should be applied sparingly.

Doors and Door Operators

1) Wear - Examine thoroughly for wear, friction, or obstructions that may prevent good operation.

2) Adjustment. Clean, align and adjust for quiet operation and proper opening and closing speed. Lubricate (see Lubrication Section) and test operation.

Safety Operated Switch

1) Wiring - Inspect for chafing and wear, or deterioration of insulation.

2) Adjustment - Be sure that safety operated switch will function when governor trips.

Releasing Carrier

1) Spring Tension - See that releasing carrier will operate properly if governor trips. (Check all set screws, keys, levers, pins, nuts and lock nuts) .

3,1.7

,

(35)

Inspection

TABLE 3-1

Ropes I)

INSPECTION CHECKLIST HOISTWAY (FROM TOP OF CAR) Items To Be Inspected

Condition ~Check type, kind and size of rope for each machine.

Application/Notes

2) Lubrication (see Lubrication Section) . Apply rope lubricant sparingly, if necessary.

Traveling Cables

1) Fastenings - Check terminals and fastenings of supporting wires at center junction boxes. 2) Condition. Examine outside coverings for wear,

especially on high speed installations. Look for abrasion from concrete or steel supports.

Hoistway Door and Operation

1) Adjustment. Examine each door carefully. Check for broken glass or structural defects. Try doors to see if they can be opened without releasing the catch. If lock is worn or door has sagged so that latch does not engage properly, repairs should be made at once. Adjust electric operators properly. See that elevator doors are not blocked open. 2) Wear. Clean, lubricate and inspect all pins,

bushings, guides, etc., for wear. Be sure that bumpers are in place and in good condition.

3) Hangers ~Examine for proper operation, wear, upthrust adjustment and condition of guides in bottom of doors. Check tracks for wear and alignment, and tighten all fastenings.

3.1.8

4) Interlocks - It is extremely important that all lock failures be repaired without delay. Check contacts and the point at which the contact closes. Try to pull or lift the do.or open with the car outside the range of the lock. Carefully check springs, fingers, bases, clearances and tightness of bolts and screws to avoid future shutdowns.

MM.123 .1

(36)

TABLE 3-1 INSPECTION CHECKLIST

HOISTWAY (FROM TOP OF CAR)

Items To Be Inspected Application)Notes

5) Door Closer Springs ~ If doors have been in use for

some time and the proper operation earmot be obtained, it may be necessary to change the spring to a different size.

Conduit

C~eck fastenings and inspect to be sure that the conduit has not pulled out of the fittings and that duct is securely fastened to wall.

Counterweight

1) Guides - Check for wear, proper clearances and

adjustment.

2) Rods and Nuts. Tighten, if necessary, and check

cotter pins.

3) Rope Fastenings. See that all rope connections are properly made, and that nuts, check nuts. and cotter pins are in place.

MM.123

limit Switches and Cams

1) Rollers. Check for wear and replace if they

do not engage cams properly.

2) Contacts ~Check direction limits to open

properly for type and speed of elevator.

3) Wiring. Be sure that all connections are tight.

4) Test Operation. See that all switches and cams

are in correct alignment. Check directional switches by running car to top and bottom limits at slow speed. Check operation of UP final limits.

Rails

Check brackets, rail fastenings and fish plates

(37)

Buffers and Springs Inspection TABLE 3-1 1) INSPECTION CHECKLIST PIT Items To Be Inspected

Operation - Run car at slow speed on buffers,

being sure that spring returns properly. If traveling cables can catch in springs, weave and

bind No. 14 wire on side nearest to traveling cable.

.

Application/Notes

3.1.10

2) Fastenings' Check for loose nuts and bolts. Sheaves (Tape and Governor)

1) Bearings' Check for wear, especially those of

the governor tension frames.

2) Fastenings of a/l Frames and Screens. See that

tension frame clamps are in place and tight.

3) Switches - Check contacts and operation of

all switches, including limit, and tape.

Clearances

1) Pit of Counterweght . Check pit and striking

blocks to be sure that the counterweight will land before the car strikes the overhead. 2) Governor Tension Frames - Check to determine

whether or not ropes should be shortened.

(38)

TABLE 3-1 INSPECTION CHECKLIST

HALLWAYS

Item. To Be Inspected ApplicationlNote.

MM.123

1) Hall Buttons - Check for broken or sticking

buttons, and see that all screws are in place and plates properly fastened. If lights are used, inspect for proper operation.

2) Emergency Door Opening Keys - Check operation

of keys on doors arranged for their use. The key is to be left only with a local code~authorized person. Its use by people unfamiliar with elevators may result in an accident if the door is opened when the car is not at that floor .

(39)

Inspection

TABLE 3-1

Safety Devices

INSPECTION CHECKLIST

BOTTOM OF CAR

Item. To Be In.pected Application/Note.

3.1.12

1) Shoes and Safety Jaws - Check clearance between shoes or blocks and the rails. Check all machine screws in links and rods, and be sure that all pins, nuts and kuys are in place and tight. 2) Governor Test of Safety - If a recent safety

test is not a matter of record, then a standard safety test at slow speed should be performed. Be sure and check local code requirements. All equipment should be thoroughly inspected before and after making the test.

Guides

Check for wear, clearance 'and adjustment.

Traveling Cables

Check anchorage and be sure cables do not drag

on hatchway wall when car is traveling.

(40)

3.2

Lubrication and Cleaning

The Cleaning and Lubrication Schedule, Table 3-2, lists those items that must be cleaned and lubricated on a regular basis, as well as the frequency with which this must be done. When an aste(isk is shown for the lubrication interval in Table 3-2, lubrication of that particular part is dependent upon intensity of service and local conditions. All information given in Table 3-2 is based upon average operation and conditions. When dirt, grease, or oil must be dissolved, the use of Cleaning Compound, Otis Spec No.2, is recommended. This compound is a petroleum product, selected because it is an effective cleaner, of low flammability and toxicity, and safe to use on a wide variety of materials. As with any solvent, normal precautions should be taken:

o Use only in an adequately ventilated area.

MM-123

o Wear gloves to protect hands from prolonged exposure to compound.

The cleaning compound, as well as the lubricants listed in Table 3-2, have been selected after extensive experience in the maintenance of elevator equipment, and are highly recommended. These products can be ordered from Otis Elevator Co. by specifying the part numbers given in the following chart .

(41)

Lubrication & Cleaning

ABBREVIATION

IN TABLE 3.2 FULL TITLE ORDER NUMBER

Cleaning Compound, Otis Spec. NO.2 VP-420540

Oil 2 Bearing Oil, Otis Spec. NO.2 VP-418790

BFO 10 Buffer Oil, Otis Spec. No. 10 VP-418935

MPG 12 Multi.Purpose Grease, Otis Spec. No. 12 VP.420240

WGL 33 Worm-Gear Lubricant, Otis Spec. No. 33 VP-419330

DPO 35 Dashpot Oil, Otis Spec. No. 35 VP.419540

HF 36 Hydraulic Fluid, "Otis Spec. No. 36 VP-821600

Oil 41 Door Check Oil, Otis Spec. No. 41 VP-419775

BFO 42 Buffer Oil, Otis Spec. No. 42 VP.419805

HGO 43 Helical Gear Oil, Otis Spec. No. 43 VP-419820

WRL 60 Wire-Rope Lubricant, Otis Spec. No. 60 Vp.419750

(42)

TABLE 3.2. LUBRICATION SCHEDULE

INTERVAL

EQUIPMENT LUBRICANT CHECK LUBE CLEAN REFILL

Machines

Geared Machines

Worms and Gears WGL 33 1MO * 4YR 4YR

Gearshaft Bearing MPG 12 6MO 1YR 2YR 2YR

Sheaveshaft Bearing WGL 33 6MO

Helical Gearbox HGO 43 6MO 1YR

Pedestal Bearing MPG 12 6MO 1YR 2YR 2YR

Gearless Machines

Sheaveshaft Bearings MPG 12 6MO 1YR 2YR 2YR

Hydraulic Machines

Tank HF 36 lMO * * *

Pump, if mounted outside tank MPG 12 1MO * * 4YR

Pump Motor, if outside tank MPG 12 1MO * * *

Motors and Motor-Generators

Bearings, Ball and Roller MPG 12 6MO * 2YR 2YR

Controller and Relay Panels

Open-Frame Relays, Hinge Pins Oil 2 . 1MO * 6MO

Covered or Sealed Relays None

Dashpot Overload Relays DPO 35 6MO *

Brakes

Drum Brakes

Hinge and Lever Pins Oil 2 1MO *

Magnet Cores (except 155, 219,

269 and 339HT machines) MPG 12 1MO 1YR 1YR

Disc Brakes None

Transducers

Primary Position Transducer None

Tape, Toothed Oil 2 3MO *

Primary Velocity Transducer None

MM.123

(43)

Lubrication & Cleaning

TABLE 3.2. LUBRICATION SCHEDULE

INTERVAL

EQUIPMENT LUBRICANT CHECK LUBE CLEAN REFILL

Sheaves

Overhead (Machine Below)

Bearings, Ball and Roller MPG 12 6MO * 2YR 2YR

Secondary (DWT Gearless Machines)

Bearings MPG 12 6MO 2YR 2YR

Deflector

Bearings with grease cups MPG 12 2WK *

Bearings with oil cups WGL 33 2WK *

Bearings, ball and roller MPG 12 6WK * 2YR 2YR

2: 1

Bearings, ball and roller MPG 12 6MO * 2YR 2YR

Compensating

Bearings MPG 12 1MO

Governor Rope Tightener

Bearings, sleeve Oil 2 1MO

.Bearings, ball and roller MPG 12 1MO

Tension and Idler (Governor and Tape)

Bearings with pressure fittings MPG 12 2WK *

Ropes, Hoist WRL 60 2MO * !':

Safeties, Car and Counterweight

Hinge and Link Pins, Pivot Points, Actuating Screws and Tail Rope

Drum Bearings on Safety Oil 2 1MO 1YR 1YR

""Hinge and" Link Pins on

Safety-Operated Switch Oil 2 3MO

Governors

Bearings, ball and roller MPG 12 6MO * 2YR 2YR

Hinge pins Oil 2 6MO

CAUTION: Do not allow lubricant to drip onto rope, jaws or gear

segments.

(44)

TABLE 3.2. LUBRICATION SCHEDULE EQUIPMENT

Guides aml Shoes

LUBRICANT

INTERVAL

CHECK LUBE CLEAN REFILL

Roller Guides Guide Pivots Lever Pins

Sliding Guides (for round rail) Stopping and Limit Switches, Hoistway

Roller Shaft

Hinge and Link Pins Operating Fixtures

"Halo Light" Mechanical-Button Pushbutton Guides

CAUTION: Use only a small amount of powdered graphite.

Door Operator

Types 7770A and OV L Gearbox

Arms, pivot points Check Unit (7770A) Type 7777A

Clutch Vane Assembly

Pivot points on Vertical Pin Pivot points on Horizontal Pin Shaft, Nylon Roller

Leadscrew Door Hangers Bearings Door Tracks Threshold Guides Door Interlock

Pins and Pivots

Oil 2 Oil 2 "Slipit" Oil 2 Oil 2 Powdered Graphite MPG 12 Oil 2 Oil 41 MPG 12 Oil 2 Oil 2 None MPG 12 None None Oil 2 2MO 1MO 6MO 6MO 1MO 1MO 3MO 3MO 3MO 6MO *

*

3MO 3MO * * 3MO * 6MO 6MO 6MO 1YR 6MO 2YR * * * *

*

2YR MM.123 3.2.5

(45)

Lubrication & Cleaning

TABLE 3.2. LUBRICATION SCHEDULE

EQUIPMENT

Buffers

LUBRICANT

INTERVAL

CHECK LUBE CLEAN REFILL

3.2-6

Below 18,000 Lb Gross Load Above 18,000 Lb Gross Load

NOTE: 8e certain that buffer is filled to gauge level.

CAUTION: Water from a flooded pit can seep into buffer, and may contaminate the oil. Always check oil for impurities if pit has been flooded, even if gauge reads full.

*

Lubrication is dependent upon intensity of service and local conditions.

BFO 10 BFO 42 3MO 3MO

*

*

MM.123

(46)

(47)
(48)

4.1

Controller

The main components of the MRVF Drive System are housed in the controller cabinet of Figure 4.1-1. Each of these main components is described below. The three-section transistorized inverter supplies variable-frequency, three-phase power to the AC drive motor. Each inverter section consists of two high-power transistors with associated free-wheeling diodes and suppressors mounted on a common heat sink, plus a printed-circuit board containing a base drive circuit for each of the transistors.

A four-board cardfile, next to the inverter, develops control signals for the inverter. The cardfi Ie contains:

o an Inverter Control Board, consisting of a pulse-width modulator, a current regulator, and the logic required to protect the inverter transistors from damage due to malfunction.

f

I.

~-MM.127

o a Speed Control Board, consisting of a speed regu lator, a torque control, and interfaces to the elevator controller and safety circuits.

o a Frequency and Amplitude Control Board

which provides the reference three-phase control signal of variable frequency and amplitude that dictates the corresponding currents in the three-phase motor windings.

o a Speed Dictation Board which provides the reference speed profile that dictates the actual elevator speed.

The outboard Cardflle Power Supply includes the safety relays that disconnect the transistor base drive power supply each time either a normal or emergency stop is made .

. The hinged relay panel, in the middle portion of the cabinet, contains a complete operation control, . plus some motion control and logic functions. Hall

effect (current-sensing) devices and input filters are located behind the hinged panel.

(49)

Controller BATTERY-DISCHARGE RESISTORS

.-RELAY PANEL INPUT FILTER BATTERY DISCHARGE RELAY THREE-SECTION TRANSISTOR IZED INVERTER •

@

CARDFILE POWER SUPPLY

D

CARDFILE PC BOARDS 1 - INVERTER CONTROL 2 - SPEED CONTROL 3 - FREOUENCY-AMPLITUDE CONTROL 4 - SPEED DICTATION

j}

HALL DEVICES

6.'.0-"

f----'W]

! \~" ...• \ 0

b

0

dDDC:

MAIN POWER SUPPLY BATTERY CHARGER W/TRANSFORMER CHOKES IN SERIES W/MOTOR WINDINGS

4.1-2

Figure 4.1-1. MRVF (30FR) Controller Layout

(50)

The lower section of the cabinet contains a

battery charger; a DC-DC inverter that supplies

power to the main elevator drive, and three

chokes, one ,in series with each of the motor

, windings.

Operating Principles

The MRVF system uses a four-pole AC induction motor driven from a variable-frequency power source.

The speed of a three-phase induction motor depends upon the frequency of the AC power applied to it, the number of poles, and the load conditions.

If the supply frequency were reduced to 30 Hz, the

motor speed would be only 900 rpm: The no-load speed of the motor is called the synchronous speed. When operating without load, the motor speed is directly related to the supply frequency. For example, if a 60-Hz supply frequency is applied to a four-pole motor operating at no load, the motor rotates at

120 x freguency .number of poles 120 xJ2Q. ;4 1800 rpm

MM.127

When the motor is placed under load, its speed changes by an amount called the slip speed (in rpm) or the

slip frequency (in Hz). The slip increaseswith load, reaching a maximum value at full load. The MRVF system maintains a slip frequency of.:!;1Hz at maximum torque.

When the drive is motoring, that is, when power is fed to the motor for acceleration and for driving a positive load (full load up, empty car down). motor speed is less than synchronous speed and the slip frequency is given as a positive number. Assuming a 1 Hz slip frequency, and .a 60-Hz source driving a four-pole motor.

source frequency - slip freguency

speed; 120 x number of poles

60 - 1 59

; 120 x 4 ; 120

xT;

1770 rpm

(51)

Controller

When the drive system is regenerating, that is, when the motor acts like a generator, returning power to the source during deceleration and when driving an overhauling load (empty car up, full load down), the speed of the motor is greater than the synchronous speed and the slip frequency is given as a negative 'number. Assuming a -1 Hz slip frequency and a 60-Hz source driving a four-pole motor, motor speed during regeneration is

••

60-(-1)

120 x 4 120 xT61 = 1830 rpm

4.1-4

Precise slip control is essential in elevator applications. Accurate positioning at the floor requires the ability to operate near zero speed, which is a function of

precise frequency control. A comfortable ride depends upon smooth acceleration and deceleration, which requires precise control of torque (a function of slip frequency and current) and smooth change of speed (a function of smooth change of torque). Finally, the efficiency of an elevator motor depends upon

its ability to regenerate power. Maximum regeneration occurs at maximum speed and at a slip frequency of approximately 1 Hz, and may reach approximately 30 percent of maximum power during motoring. The MRVF system utilizes the 'regeneratedpower to charge a storage battery which servesas the principal source of energy ,to operate the elevator.

As shown in the system block diagram (Figure 4.1-2), the elevator car is propelled by an AC induction motor driven by a battery-powered inverter. The inverter changesthe DC output of the storage battery into three-phase AC power of smoothly. variable frequency and amplitude.

The frequency and amplitude are controlled by the inverter to produce positive slip (corresponding to positive torque) when power is to be taken from the battery for motoring, and negative slip (corresponding to negative torque) when regenerated power is to be used to charge the battery. A separate charger maintains the battery at full charge during motoring and shutdown.

Using a storage b,attery as the principal power source has three important advantages:

o The battery provides the high currents needed during acceleration and deceleration, while the building power lines need supply only the

low-•

(52)

AC STORAGE BATTERY BATTERY CHARGER VF CONTROL (INVERTER)

'DA

Q)B Q)C TACHOMETER

Figure 4.1-2. MRVF System Block Diagram

level average power required for keeping the battery charged. As a typical example, the peak currents delivered by the battery during acceleration and deceleration could reach:!: 150 amperes, while the average charging current could be in the range of 10 to 15 amperes. The battery thus practically isolates the drive system from the building power lines.

o

o

The battery also acts as a low-pass filter, keeping any inverter-generated noise out of the building lines.

Further, as a source of emergency power, the battery is capable of running a single elevator for approximately four hours during a power outage.

MM-127

Motion Control Block Diagram

The MRVF motion controller makes the car follow a speed command produced by the speed dictation circuit and automatically produces the torque required to provide the acceleration and losses corresponding to each point on the speed trajectory. The motion control block diagram of Figure 4.1-3 shows how this is accomplished.

The speed regulator compares the speed dictation command with the actual speed of the motor as determined by the shaft encoder. The difference between these two input signals becomes the

speed error, a DC voltage proportional to the extent

of the error. .

(53)

Control/er

ELEVATOR MOTION CONTROLLER INTERFACE CIRCUIT TRANSISTOR PROTECTION LOGIC CURRENT REGULATOR SPEED FEEOBACI( CURRENT FEEDBACK

"-CHOKES / HAll DEVICES INVERTER

i

r---,

I I I

t£'"i

I

Y

I eoHZ I I lPH

L..

J I BATTERY CHARGER

Figure 4.1-3. Motion Control Block Diagram

The torque control converts the speed error voltage (and an internal "bias" related to the motor

. excitation current) into two torque-related signals; amplitude and slip control.

1) The amplitude control signal is a 0-8VDC voltage that specifies the peak ampl itude of the three-phase motor current.

2) The slip control signal is a O-j;5VDC signal that specifies the slip frequency of the motor.

(The slip frequency is the difference between the synchronous and asynchronous'speeds of the motor for a given frequency of input.) The slip control is a positive voltage during motoring, a negative voltage during regeneration. Torque control circuit constants are chosen so that the torque developed by the drive system is linearly proportional to the input voltage (speed error). The

relationship is independent of motor speed.

4.1-6

The amplitude-frequency control produces three reference sine waves, each representing the desired current level in one of the three phases of the drive

(54)

,.

MM-127

motor input. All three sine waves are of the same amplitude and the same frequency, but are phased

1200 apart.

1) The amplitude of the reference output can be varied from 0 to +10V, in proportion to the 0-8VDC amplitude input control signal. 2) The frequencv of the reference output is

determined by the 0-:t5VDC slip frequency command and the motor shaft frequency as determined by the speed feedback shaft encoder. The reference frequency is the difference between the slip and feedback

frequencies during motoring. During regeneration, the reference frequency is the sum of the slip and feedback frequencies.

The current regulator compares the three-phase current reference signals from the amplitude-frequency control with the actual drive motor current as measured by Hall effect devices that sense the current in each leg of the drive motor. Each of the three regulator outputs is a sinusoid that represents the error

(difference) between the two current regulator inputs . These variable-amplitude sinusoidal outputs specify the current level required in each phase of the drive motor.

The pulse-width modulator converts these sinusoids into three pairs of variable-width, constant-amplitude pulses, each pair specifying the current level to be produced in one phase of the drive motor.

The frequency of each pulse modulator output is constant at 2KC (500 microseconds between pulses). The pulse width varies with the amplitude of the input so that, in each pair, the pulses are mirror images of each other, as follows:

When the input sinusoid passes through 00

~Qv

:-_P-cP-c:P-cFtJ

o--~L1:T%~

.r-

500 USEe-t

(55)

Controller

When the input sinusoid readies a positive peak

;

L\

Va

J

0-When the input sinusoid reaches a negative peak

0-_1

The pulsed signals control the operation of power

transistors in the inverter. These transistors switch

power between the battery and the AC induction

drive motor. During regeneration, .AC power from

the motor is inverted to DC and used to charge

the battery. During motoring, power is applied to

the motor from the battery. The inductance of

the motor and the series chokes serves to filter out the 2.KC high.frequency component of the motor current so that the current builds up to the commanded level at a sinusoidal rate.

o~

A 3D.microsecond dead band is provided between the edges of the two complementary pulses, to be sure that one set of transistors' has had time to

turn off before the other set is turned on. The

deadband prevents the simultaneous conduction of two transistors in the same leg of the inverter, a situation that could cause a dead short across the battery and a potentially destructive current surge through the transistors.

e.

4.1.8 0-0-

MM.127

(56)

,.

MM-127

Special Operational and Motion Control Features

The MRVF system incorporates the following unique features.

Battery Operation During Power Outage

Elevator service is not interrupted by building power fai lure. The elevator continues to run on battery, and can do this for several hours, until the battery voltage decreasesto al1Proximately

150 volts.

Each MRVF elevator can provide normal service up to four hours without a generator after the building loses normal power.

The total available battery back-up time is the sum of the individual battery hours. A four-car group, for example, where each battery pack had three hours of charge remaining, could if desired provide elevator service for up to 12 hours.during a power outage if building personnel allow only one elevator to operate at a time .

If battery voltage falls to less than 150 volts, automatic controller circuits will call the car non-stop, at reduced speed, to the main landing, light the PLEASE EXIT WHEN DOORS OPEN jewel in the car, open the doors to permit exit of passengers at the main landing, and shut down the car, leaving the doors open.

Manual reset is required to restore the car to operation after a low-battery condition.

Releveling

A heavily loaded car will occasionally overshoot the floor by up to 1.5 inches. Upon detection of th is condition, releveling circuits will wait approximately

1/4 second to allow for dropout of relays in the drive logic unit, and will then bring the car back to within 1/2 inch of the floor.

Anti-Stall Circuits

Monitor circuits, in operation during both the . acceleration and deceleration portions of a run, .will initiate remedial action if a stall condition

is detected.

Should the elevator fail to reach a minimum speed of 30 fpm within 5 seconds of receiving the start signal, monitor circuits will drop safety link relays

(57)

Controller

C, CX, CY, DRR, B1R, and B2R, shuttin9 off the drive. After a short delay, the start sequencewill repeat, giving the drive another try.

Should the elevator fail to reach floor level (:t 1/2 inch) within 5 seconds of dropping the URO or DRO relay, the monitor circuits will drop safety link relays C, CX, CY, DRR, B1R, and B2R, shutting off the drive. After a short delay, the safety link relays will be re-energized and the car will relevel into the floor at approxi-mately 10 fpm.

Wrong Direction Sensor

If the direction of rnotor rotation is opposite to that of the dictated direction, relay WRO will pull in and self hold. This will drop out relays C and CX, stopping the car. As a precaution against the possibility that WRO should prematurely release, relay CY stays in, preventing C and CX from pulling in.

Note that this is a different function from that of the J or reverse-phaserelay used in controllers powered from three-phase sources. The conventional

J relay operates upon loss of one of the three-phase input lines, or phase reversal from the A-B-C

sequence, or low voltage on any or all phases. The MRVF system, which derives primary power from a single-phaseline, does not use a J relay.

Adjustments

The following precautions should be considered before attempting any adjustments:

o MRVF circuits seldom require readjustment. Do not perform any of these procedures unless a need for readjustment is indicated as. described in the following paragraphs: o Apply power in the following sequence:

1) Close disconnect switch on wall.

2) Close circuit breaker on battery cabinet. 3) Turn on COS toggle on controller

(Figure 4.1-4).

4) Turn on toggle on cardfile power supply (Figure 4.1-4).

e.

..

4.1-10

o Turn off power in reverse sequence.

(58)

DPU (AI DPU IBI DPU (CI POWER ON ••• LIGHT I' OLU (CARDFILE) ~ ~ POWER ~ L.. __ .ITOGGLE DCAP

D

D

HSB HSA

D

CJ

DPS 32V F4C _ )/4A

I:::~ /

I

OFR1 DFR2 DFC1 DFC2

DODD

D

I

TERMINALS TBO, 1 THRU 294

---•

cos BL FUSES

o

D

1,

THRU 121i PPS 250V 0 ';5A 0 250V 0 O.5A FUSES TERMINALS 300 . 319 320 - 339

EJ

DO

E]

DC II I

;0;

OF2D BCU ~~~

DJF1D

o

-0 LAMP

'.

FUSE 1A, 250V

Figure 4.1-4. Fuse, Control, and Indicator Locations

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :