STATE OF THE NONPROFIT SECTOR Surprising Power: The Growing Economy of the Nonprofit Sector in North Texas.

Full text

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Published by the Center for Nonprofit Management, in

partnership with the Conference of Southwest Foundations

Copyright 2012 ©

S

TATE OF THE

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Surprising Power: The Growing Economy of the

Nonprofit Sector in North Texas.

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Copyright: Center for Nonprofit Management 2012 ©

As one of the nation's leading management support organizations, the Center for Nonprofit

Management brings the most current tools for best practices in nonprofit management to thousands of nonprofit boards, staff and volunteers each year. Learn more about CNM on our website cnmdallas.org.

Copyright: Center for Nonprofit Management 2012 ©

As one of the nation's leading management support organizations, the Center for Nonprofit Management brings the most current tools for best practices in nonprofit management to thousands of nonprofit boards, staff and volunteers each year. Learn more about CNM on our website cnmdallas.org

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S

TATE OF THE

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Surprising Power: The Growing Economy of the Nonprofit Sector in North Texas.

In 2009, the Center for Nonprofit Management released “Surprising Power: The State of the Nonprofit Sector in North Texas,” a report that shined the light on the size and scope of the nonprofit sector in North Texas and the economic impact it makes on the local economy. As we move forward in these challenging times, the nonprofit sector has become increasingly important in providing critical

services to those in need while continuing to be a powerful force in driving local economies. The purpose of this report is to highlight how the nonprofit sector is growing and continues to be a critical driver of economic impact. In addition, this report will highlight giving trends and

the impact of the recession on local nonprofits.

As with the previous report, this report is based on research from a variety of local and national sources. Specifically, the data focused on the 16 counties of North Texas: Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Erath, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Navarro, Palo Pinto, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, and Wise.

In partnership with the Conference of Southwest Foundations, the 2012 report adds

information about grantmaking and giving trends in North Texas. This information highlights the importance of philanthropy in our region.

The report as a whole is designed to build awareness about the state of the nonprofit sector in North Texas and is designed to educate and inspire you to continue or expand your support of the nonprofits in our community.

The nonprofit sector continues to

grow and is a driving force for

both the economy and social

change in North Texas.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Number of Nonprofits ………..1

Areas of Service……….3

Economic Impact – Revenue Generation………..3

Size of Nonprofits……….5

Employment………6

Effects of the Recession……….7

National Giving Trends……….9

Local Giving Trends – Private Foundations………..12

Foundations in North Texas………14

Foundation Giving in North Texas………..15

Grant Recipients in North Texas………..20

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 1

Number of Nonprofits

There are 28,105 registered 501(c)(3) organizations in the 16 counties that make up North Texas, up from 19,336 in 2009.

Nationally, more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations are registered with the IRS. The North Texas trend follows the national trend where the total nonprofit sector has been growing steadily over the years. According to the Urban Institute, the nonprofit sector has been growing steadily, both in size and financial impact, for more than a decade. Between 2001 and

2011, the number of nonprofits has increased 25 percent; from 1,259,764 million to 1,574,674 million today. The growth rate of the nonprofit sector has surpassed the rate of both the business and government sectors.

The Internal Revenue Code defines more than 30 different types of tax-exempt organizations. The largest group is 501(c)(3) public charities, such as arts, education, health care, human services, and other organizations to which donors can make tax deductible donations. The tax-exempt sector also includes a variety of other groups, such as advocacy

organizations, labor unions, business and professional associations, fraternal societies, cemetery companies, state-chartered credit unions, and many more.

On June 8, 2011, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released a list of more than 275,000 nonprofits that had their tax-exempt status automatically revoked due to failure to file annual returns. Many of the organizations had dissolved, but many were existing nonprofits who failed to comply with IRS requirements. According to the Texas Association of Nonprofit Organizations (TANO), 21,446 of the 275,000 nonprofits that had their tax-exempt status revoked

were Texas-based entities. Of these 14,178 are 501(c)(3)s and 2,074 are 501 (c)(4)s. This is a reduction of approximately 20%, bringing the total number of charitable nonprofits in Texas to approximately 58,000. Many of these organizations have applied to have their status reinstated.

There are

28,105

nonprofits

in North Texas.

Growth of nonprofit sector

exceeds both business and

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Growing in Size

Even with the revocation of status for many organizations, the number of nonprofits has increased and continues to increase as new agencies emerge. In the 16 counties of North Texas, Dallas continues to have the most registered nonprofits, with Tarrant County coming in second. All counties have seen an increase in the number of nonprofits. The total number of registered nonprofits in North Texas has increased by 45.35% since 2008.

County Number of Registered

501(c)(3) Organizations Number of Registered 501(c)(3) Public Charities Collin 2,393 1,820 Dallas 12,810 8,000 Denton 2,151 1,703 Ellis 529 392 Erath 192 104 Hood 230 137 Hunt 329 208 Johnson 548 402 Kaufman 364 251 Navarro 265 160 Palo Pinto 159 96 Parker 448 293 Rockwall 298 234 Somervell 54 36 Tarrant 7,135 4,675 Wise 200 145 Total 28,105 18,656 Texas 98,901 65,342 Since 2008: +45.35% +8.28%

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 3

Areas of Service

Nonprofits in North Texas continue to serve a diverse range of missions with the majority serving human service areas, religion-related and education.

Economic Impact – Revenue Generation

Nationally, public charities contributed over $1.51 trillion in total revenues. The US nonprofit sector’s revenue alone would represent the 11th largest economy in the world; ahead of

Russia, Spain, Australia and Mexico.

According to the Urban Institute, in 2010 nonprofits contributed products and services that added $779 billion to the

nation’s gross domestic product; 5.4 percent of GDP.

The total revenue generated by all nonprofit organizations in

North Texas in 2011 was $27,234,091,045 (over $27 billion dollars) and the total assets for all nonprofit organizations in North Texas were $178,698,434,387.

Nonprofits

contributed

$27.2 billion

to the

local North Texas economy

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The total assets for all nonprofit organizations in North Texas have increased by $139.4 billion dollars since 2008, and represent 51.88% of nonprofit assets for all of Texas.

Dallas and Tarrant County continue to report the highest revenues at $18.2 and $5.8 billion respectively, increased from $12 and $4.3 billion in 2008.

County Total Revenue for All 501(c)(3) Organizations Collin $938,106,648 Dallas $18,220,028,440 Denton $909,729,125 Ellis $30,015,299 Erath $52,172,200 Hood $38,553,762 Hunt $134,512,113 Johnson $309,168,339 Kaufman $217,206,778 Navarro $87,059,381 Palo Pinto $11,541,948 Parker $85,668,062 Rockwall $257,119,314 Somervell $14,723,648 Tarrant $5,856,994,767 Wise $71,491,221 Total $27,234,091,045.00 Texas $93,191,609,550 Since 2008 + $9.6 billion

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 5

Size of Nonprofits

Nonprofits also continue to rely on very small budgets to do their work and struggle to do more with less. Most operate with an income less than $100,000 (75%). At the same time, North Texas is home to 160 nonprofits with budgets over $5 million and 244 nonprofits with budgets over $10 million, which includes national headquarters based in North Texas, nonprofit hospitals and educational ISDs.

Income

Range Percentage of All 501(c)(3) Institutes in North Texas

Less Than $100K 74.85% $100K-$500K 14.62% $500K - $1 Million 3.58% $1 Million - $2.5 Million 2.67% $2.5 Million - $5 Million 1.34% $5 Million - $10 Million 0.87%

More Than $10 Million 1.33%

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Employment

Nationally, nonprofits accounted for 9.2% of all wages and salaries paid in the US. Nonprofits are a major employer with over 10% of all jobs in 2009.

The total employment in the nonprofit sector for all the North Texas counties for which data was available is 102,154. This employment in the nonprofit sector represents 3.15% of all private employment.

The estimated total payroll for all employees of the nonprofit sector in North Texas counties for which data was available is $4,257,120,000 (over $4 billion), which represents 25.34% of the total payroll for all Texas employees of the nonprofit sector. Employment growth in the nonprofit

sector continues to outpace the private sector by leaps and bounds. Employment in the nonprofit sector grew by 8% since 2004 while employment in the private sector grew by only 0.2%.

County Employment in

Nonprofit Sector Nonprofit Employment as % of Private Employment

Collin 5,048 1.9%

Dallas 54,458 4.1%

Denton 2,501 1.8%

Ellis 1,066 3.2%

Erath 486 4.0%

Hood N/A N/A

Hunt 437 2.0%

Johnson 798 2.3%

Kaufman 561 2.7%

Navarro 519 4.3%

Palo Pinto N/A N/A

Parker 684 3.2%

Rockwall N/A N/A

Somervell N/A N/A

Tarrant 35,596 5.3%

Wise N/A N/A

Total 102,154 Average: 3.15% Texas 403,196 Average: 4.6% Since 2004 Data +8.06% +0.2%

102,154

people

employed at nonprofits

in North Texas

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 7

Effects of the Recession

A majority of reports indicate that the recent recession has served to amplify preexistent financial struggles and economic challenges of the nonprofit sector.

However, according to the Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project, nonprofit employment saw a cumulative increase of 5% between 2007 and 2010 despite the current economic downturn. Furthermore, during what was considered to be the worst part of the

recent recession, second quarter of 2007 to second quarter of 2009, nonprofit employment grew

steadily by and average of 2.5% per year. Comparably, for-profit

employment experienced a

cumulative decline of 8% between 2007 and 2010.

Daring to Lead, a national study of nonprofit executive leadership, reported that upwards of 84% of nonprofits were negatively impacted by the recession, the intensity of which varies across the board. For instance, the recession and challenges are disproportionately affecting new

leaders. Thirty-two percent (32%) of executives in their first year on the job have less than one month of operating reserves. As the report states “those on the steepest part of the learning curve often have the smallest margin for error.” The report also states that “the recession has only exacerbated an endemic challenge of leadership in the

nonprofit sector: developing a sustainable business model that fully finances a nonprofit’s desired impacts and allows for strategic organizational development and growth over time.” With only 46% of executives reporting cash reserves of fewer than three months, they have very limited savings with which to take risks, underwrite growth or invest in their own capacity.

In addition, the report found that, “for the majority of nonprofit leaders, boards of directors are not a buffer against this harsh financial reality” where a minority of boards are active in fundraising. Only forty-eight percent (48%) reported that they had someone on their boards who participates in donor identification; 41% had someone who participates in donor cultivation and 42% had someone who participates in asking for donations. According to the

84% of nonprofits were

negatively impacted by

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report only half of boards (56%) have achieved 100% giving, “a fairly standard expectation of board support.”

The following table represents levels of negative recessionary impact to their organization’s financial health and stability both regionally and nationally:

Level of Negative Impact North Texas Nationally

Minor 28% 26%

Moderate 36% 38%

Significant 19% 20%

Data gathered from Daring to Lead 2011: A National Study of Nonprofit Executive Leadership A report from Giving USA adds, “the Great Recession’s impact on charitable giving should not be minimized. The average growth in charitable giving in 2010 and 2011 is the second slowest of any two-year period following all recessions since 1971.”

Whereas stimulus funding has been somewhat of a boost in the sector over the past few years, varied timing of funding and changes from other sources such as individual giving and grantmaking have caused unanticipated shifts in budgeting. In 2010, 40% of organizations responded that they were operating with approximately the same budget as the previous year, while 26% of organizations had a smaller operating budget. Thirty-four percent (34%) of organizations were operating with a budget larger than the previous year.

On the whole, regional data collected by CNM based on the Daring to Lead 2011 survey indicates local cash reserve trends to be consistent with national trends. The following table compares trends for operating cash reserves (unrestricted cash on hand in excess of

operating needs) between North Texas and the United States:

Length of Cash Reserve North Texas National

Less than 3 Months 44% 46%

Between 3 and 6 Months 31% 27%

More than 6 Months 22% 23%

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 9

National Giving Trends

According to Giving USA, the total estimated charitable giving in the United States increased 4.0% from 2010 to 2011. As Giving USA states, “individual Americans and our country’s foundation and corporations

continue to be generous during a time of slow economic growth.” In 2011, the total charitable giving by American households, bequests and family foundations is estimated to total $298.42 billion. Most

notably, charitable bequests rose an estimated 12.2% in 2011. In

addition, individuals increased their giving by 3.9%. From Giving USA: “These increases are encouraging signs of two things: that Americans are feeling better about their personal financials situations, as measured by several economic indices, thus allowing them to continue – and slightly increase – their donation levels; and, that they feel philanthropy remains a core value worthy of support.”

While there is celebration in order because 2011 was the second year of growth in individual giving, Giving USA warns that the American economy remains volatile and that could have an impact on giving going forward. In addition, they show that giving grew only slightly when adjusting for inflation: .9% growth overall with .9% growth from individuals. Suggesting that while Americans gave a greater amount, the value for nonprofits was on par with the amount they received in 2010. In 2011, corporations and corporate foundations gave a total $14.55 billion which is estimated to have held steady compared with 2010. When adjusted for inflation, however,

Charitable giving in the

US increased 4% to

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this indicates a 3.1% decline in current dollars. Giving by foundations increased 1.8% to $41.67 billion in 2011. Adjusted for inflation, giving by foundations declined 1.3% in 2011.

Source of Contributions Dollars Contributed Percent

Individuals $217.79 billion 73%

Foundations $41.67 billion 14%

Bequests $24.41 billion 8%

Corporations $14.55 billion 5%

TOTAL $298.42 billion 100%

Nationally, religion received the most contributions with education organizations and foundations receiving the next most. However, giving to religion decreased by 1.7% percent from 2010 or 4.7% when adjusted for inflation. Reports indicate giving to religious organizations reveal downward trends particularly among certain Christian denominations.

Giving to education is estimated to have increased 4% to $38.87 billion. Adjusted for inflation, giving to education was flat with a .9% increase. Contributing to this increase was strong growth in giving to higher education. Giving to human services rose an estimated 2.5% to $35.59 billion. Adjusted for inflation, giving to human service organizations held flat between 2010 and 2011, however inflation-adjusted giving to these organizations is the third-highest amount ever recorded (behind 2008 and 2010).

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 11

Recipient Organization Dollars Contributed Percent

Religion $95.88 billion 32%

Education $38.87 billion 13%

Human Services $35.39 billion 12%

Foundations $25.83 billion 9%

Health $24.75 billion 8%

International affairs $22.68 billion 8%

Public-society benefit $21.37 billion 7%

Arts, culture & humanities $13.12 billion 4%

Other $12.72 billion 4%

Environment/animals $7.81 billion 3%

TOTAL $298.42 billion 100%

The following table represents 2011 giving trends by field, summarized by Giving USA:

Field Estimated Shift in Giving 2010 to 2011 Education +4% Religion -1.7% Foundations -6.1% Health +2.7% Human Services +2.5%

Public-Society Benefit Organizations +4%

Arts, Culture and Humanities +4%

International Affairs +7.6%

Environmental and Animal Organizations +4.6%

Data gathered from Giving USA 2012 The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2011 Executive Summary

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Local Giving Trends – Private Foundations

The 2012 Giving Study, published by the Conference of Southwest Foundations, studies the grantmaking of private foundations in the Southwest region. The goal of the study is to make foundations in our region aware of the grantmaking by their colleagues. CSF hopes this information will ultimately help grantmakers identify both potential funding partners and areas of

unaddressed need. Policymakers also need this critical

information to better understand the importance of philanthropy to our region. Key Findings from the study included:

Funders in CSF’s seven state region gave to Educational Institutions & Related activities at almost double the amount of any other subject area.

On average, foundations give 60% of contributions in their home state and 40% out of state. In Texas, foundations gave 69% in state.

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 13 Texas Quick Facts‡

Total Giving by Foundations

$1,864,310,275

Number of Foundations

2,949

Number with grants $100,000+

1,396

Percentage of total giving by foundations making grants of $100,000+

96.6%

Total Number of Grants to Texas-based Organizations

34,422 (68.9%)

Average Grant $37,852 Texas-based grantmaking foundations contributed over $1.2 billion to

organizations within Texas. Over $593 million, or 33% of all grants from Texas-based foundations surveyed, was dedicated to Educational Institutions and Education-related Activities during 2009.

TEXAS

Top 20 Grantmaking Private Foundations by Giving‡‡

Amon G. Carter Foundation* Fort Worth AT&T Foundation Dallas BP Foundation Houston Brown Foundation* Houston Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation The Woodlands ExxonMobil Foundation Houston Harold Simmons Foundation* Dallas Houston Endowment* Houston Laura and John Arnold Foundation Houston Meadows Foundation* Dallas Michael and Susan Dell Foundation Austin Moody Foundation* Galveston O’Donnell Foundation Dallas Perot Foundation Plano Rainwater Charitable Foundation Fort Worth Rees-Jones Foundation* Dallas Robert A. Welch Foundation* Houston T. L. L. Temple Foundation* Lufkin Valero Energy Foundation San Antonio William Stamps Farish Fund Houston

Grant Dollars by Subject Area

Texas, 2009

‡Based on grantmaking foundations filing the IRS 990PF, with $5 million in assets or $10,000 or more in grants paid in 2009.

‡‡Listed alphabetically and based on grantmaking foundations filing the IRS 990PF, with $5 million in assets or $10,000 or more in grants paid in 2010. * Denotes CSF Member Foundation

Education 33% Health 16% Human Services 15% Public Benefit 12% Religion 4%

Int'l, Foreign Affairs & Natl Security

3.6% Environment &

Animals 5.2%

Arts, Culture & Humanities

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Foundations in North Texas

In partnership for the 2012 State of the Nonprofit Sector report, the Center for Nonprofit Management and the Conference of Southwest Foundation commissioned Jankowski Associates to study foundation giving in the 16 counties of North Texas.

According to the results, in 2009, the 948 foundations located in the 16 counties of North Texas had assets of $7.3 billion and giving of $549.2 million. Foundations in Dallas County held 64% of assets and made 65% of contributions.

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County Number Assets Giving

Collin 49 $212,755,729 $22,312,120 Dallas 630 $4,667,350,660 $357,456,529 Denton 16 $85,943,406 $4,786,097 Ellis 6 $7,104,763 $554,939 Erath 2 $680,235 $35,353 Hood 2 $609,124 $514,420 Hunt 2 $1,979,697 $221,004 Johnson 11 $26,185,323 $1,426,551 Kaufman 2 $318,270 $814,600 Navarro 19 $61,435,702 $2,910,056 Palo Pinto 3 $3,970,371 $206,788 Parker 4 $3,317,250 $573,946 Rockwall 4 $5,250,769 $328,476 Somervell 2 $18,020,194 $1,195,763 Tarrant 195 $2,191,812,300 $155,873,601 Wise 1 $234,572 $16,500 948 $7,286,968,365 $549,226,743

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 15

Foundation Giving in North Texas

In order to profile the grantmaking scope and interest areas of North Texas foundations, Jankowski Associates analyzed 15,570 grants made from 778 foundations, totaling $537.7 million, 98% of giving.

Key Findings:

9,688 grants were made to Texas nonprofits, totaling $381.9 million, amounting to 70% of giving by North Texas foundations.

5,440 grants were made to nonprofits in the 49 other states and the District of Columbia, totaling $146.3 million, amounting to 27% of giving.

Less than 1%, or 88 grants, was made outside the United States, totaling $2.2 million.

Foundations based in the 16 counties of North Texas made 7,577 grants to nonprofits in North Texas, totaling $311.2 million. This amount is 80% of grants paid in Texas, and 57% of total contributions. See chart below for information on the number of grants and total grants paid in the 16 counties of North Texas and statewide.

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County Grants # of Paid Total Grants Paid Collin 196 7,087,484 Dallas 4,957 192,907,429 Denton 166 5,792,402 Ellis 18 275,595 Erath 25 281,581 Hood 26 217,583 Hunt 9 55,000 Johnson 89 655,405 Kaufman 9 656,700 Navarro 129 2,633,007 Palo Pinto 24 204,238 Parker 41 9,198,147 Rockwall 15 213,600 Somervell 6 76,000 Tarrant 1,839 90,856,744 Wise 8 67,080

Total for North Texas 7,557 311,177,995

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Educational Institutions and Related Activities was the top recipient area for foundations in North Texas, receiving 30.3% of total contributions, with an average grant of $39,963 and a median grant $5,000. See the attached chart, Giving by Interest Area – All Grants, for a complete breakdown of the 948 foundations in North Texas giving by category.

Arts organizations in North Texas received a higher percentage of total

contributions by interest area than arts organizations in general from foundations based in North Texas. After Educational organizations, contributions were evenly divided among Arts, Health, Public/Society Benefit, and Human Services

organizations. See the attached chart, Giving by

Interest Area – Grants in North Texas, for a complete

breakdown of giving in the 16 counties of North Texas by interest area.

Category % Distributed by Interest Area-- All Grants

% Distributed by Interest Area -- Grants

in North Texas

Arts, Culture, and Humanities 13.8% 17.8% Educational Institutions and

Related Activities 30.3% 26.3% Environment and Animals 3.6% 3.4%

Health 14.2% 16.4%

Human Services 16.0% 17.0%

International, Foreign Affairs,

and National Security 2.8% 0.9% Public, Societal Benefit 14.0% 13.0% Religion Related, Spiritual

Development 5.2% 5.2%

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 17

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Category Number Amount Percent Average Median

Total, All Categories 15,570 $537,685,229 100% $34,533 $5,000

Arts, Culture, and Humanities 1,890 $74,371,148 13.8% $39,350 $5,000

Educational 4,073 $162,768,087 30.3% $39,963 $5,000

Environment and Animals Total 505 $19,235,675 3.6% $38,090 $5,000

Animal Related 251 $9,476,395 1.8% $37,755 $5,000 Environmental Quality, Protection, and

Beautification 254 $9,759,280 1.8% $38,422 $5,000

Health Total 2,038 $76,549,051 14.2% $37,561 $5,000

Health — General and Rehabilitative 783 $37,396,371 7.0% $47,760 $6,600 Mental Health, Crisis Intervention 218 $4,601,946 0.9% $21,110 $5,000 Disease, Disorders, Medical Disciplines 725 $18,554,603 3.5% $25,593 $5,000 Medical Research 312 $15,996,131 3.0% $51,270 $9,000

Human Services Total 3,670 $86,136,961 16.0% $23,471 $5,000

Crime/Legal Related 219 $3,700,001 0.7% $16,895 $5,000 Employment, Job Related 64 $1,240,300 0.2% $19,380 $7,500 Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition 335 $5,574,668 1.0% $16,641 $5,000 Housing, Shelter 165 $5,155,120 1.0% $31,243 $10,000 Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness,

and Relief 56 $1,141,071 0.2% $20,376 $5,000 Recreation, Sports, Leisure, Athletics 248 $9,851,964 1.8% $39,726 $5,000 Youth Development 478 $10,894,817 2.0% $22,793 $5,000 Human Services: Multipurpose, Other 2,105 $48,579,020 9.0% $23,078 $5,000

International, Foreign Affairs, and

National Security 394 $15,061,940 2.8% $38,228 $5,000

Public, Societal Benefit Total 1,651 $75,207,617 14.0% $45,553 $6,000

Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy 74 $1,165,908 0.2% $15,756 $6,000 Community Improvement, Capacity

Building 258 $10,760,416 2.0% $41,707 $8,650 Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and

Grantmaking Foundations 1,033 $37,790,817 7.0% $36,584 $5,000 Science and Technology Research

Institutes, Services 86 $19,559,343 3.6% $227,434 $20,000 Social Science Research Institutes,

Services 9 $123,000 -- $13,667 $5,000 Public Policy Research, Analysis 191 $5,808,133 1.1% $30,409 $10,000

Religion Related 1,317 $28,141,053 5.2% $21,368 $5,000

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Category Number Amount Percent Average Median

Total, All Categories 7,557 $311,177,995 100% $41,177 $6,000

Arts, Culture, and Humanities 1,053 $55,456,034 17.8% $52,665 $5,000

Educational 1,488 $81,959,692 26.3% $55,080 $10,000

Environment and Animals Total 206 $10,566,631 3.4% $51,294

Animal Related 114 $5,969,676 1.9% $52,366 $5,000 Environmental Quality, Protection, and

Beautification 92 $4,596,955 1.5% $49,967 $10,000

Health Total 1,216 $51,031,649 16.4% $41,967 $5,000

Health — General and Rehabilitative 519 $29,905,580 9.6% $57,622 $7,500 Mental Health, Crisis Intervention 135 $2,340,8766 0.8% $17,340 $5,000 Disease, Disorders, Medical Disciplines 439 $12,744,727 4.1% $29,031 $5,000 Medical Research 123 $6,040,466 1.9% $49,109 $10,000

Human Services Total 2,239 $52,804,422 17.0% $23,584 $5,000

Crime/Legal Related 132 $1,938,172 0.6% $14,683 $5,000 Employment, Job Related 40 $501,700 0.2% $12,543 $5,000 Food, Agriculture, and Nutrition 229 $4,011,206 1.3% $17,516 $5,000 Housing, Shelter 125 $3,518,120 1.1% $28,145 $10,000 Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness,

and Relief 24 $433,571 0.1% $18,065 $4,500 Recreation, Sports, Leisure, Athletics 120 $7,796,601 2.5% $64,972 $5,000 Youth Development 245 $4,581,562 1.5% $18,700 $7,500 Human Services — Multipurpose and

Other 1,324 $30,023,490 9.6% $22,676 $5,000

International, Foreign Affairs, and

National Security 89 $2,963,227 1.0% $33,295 $5,000

Public, Societal Benefit Total 574 $40,318,060 13.0% $70,241 $9,650

Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy 23 $284,408 0.1% $12,366 $5,500 Community Improvement, Capacity

Building 162 $6,219,869 2.0% $38,394 $6,970 Philanthropy, Voluntarism, and

Grantmaking Foundations 304 $16,233,539 5.2% $53,400 $8,500 Science and Technology Research

Institutes, Services 28 $15,635,539 5.0% $558,412 $10,000 Social Science Research Institutes,

Services 1 $1,000 -- $1,000 -- Public Policy Research, Analysis 56 $1,943,705 0.6% $34,709 $10,000

Religion Related 684 $16,057,241 5.2% $23,475 $5,500

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 19 Nearly 400 Texas foundations based outside the 16 counties of North Texas made grants of at least $1,000 to nonprofits in North Texas, totaling $44.1 million. Among these, 62 foundations

made grants of $100,000 or more, and 12 foundations made grants of $500,000 or more.

The grants analysis identified more than 1,000 Texas foundations making grants in the 16 counties of North Texas, with

contributions totaling $355.6 million; 68 foundations made grants of $1 million or more in the counties, and 15 foundations made grants of $5 million or more in the counties. The following table lists the top 15 foundations.

T

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IVING IN

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Foundation City County

Burnett Foundation Fort Worth Tarrant Amon G. Carter Foundation Fort Worth Tarrant Michael and Susan Dell Foundation Austin Travis HABJR Foundation Fort Worth Tarrant Hillcrest Foundation Dallas Dallas Eugene McDermott Foundation Dallas Dallas Meadows Foundation Dallas Dallas O'Donnell Foundation Dallas Dallas Perot Foundation Plano Collin Rainwater Charitable Foundation Fort Worth Tarrant Rees-Jones Foundation Dallas Dallas Sid W. Richardson Foundation Fort Worth Tarrant Harold Simmons Foundation Dallas Dallas Texas Instruments Foundation Dallas Dallas Robert A. Welch Foundation Houston Harris

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Grant Recipients in North Texas

Texas-headquartered foundations made grants to 2,300 recipients in the 16-county region of North Texas; 61 recipients received $1 million or more.

The top 30 recipients received $2 million or more, as follows: Number

of Grants Amount Received Recipient Name Recipient City

14 $14,850,033 Botanical Research Institute of Texas Fort Worth 133 14,109,342 UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Dallas 23 13,244,500 Parkland Foundation/Parkland Health & Hospital System Dallas 143 12,950,596 Southern Methodist University Plano 20 9,995,637 Amon Carter Museum Fort Worth 87 9,596,562 Texas Christian University Fort Worth 13 8,416,862 Advanced Placement Strategies Dallas 1 8,416,366 City of Azle for the Azle Memorial Library Azle 34 8,035,403 Museum of Nature and Science Dallas 64 7,646,727 Children's Medical Center of Dallas Dallas 30 7,215,619 University of Texas at Dallas Richardson 56 6,879,693 Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Fort Worth 47 5,184,011 Dallas Center for the Performing Arts/Foundation Dallas 22 4,750,515 Dallas Foundation Dallas 50 4,650,214 United Way of Metropolitan Dallas Dallas 16 4,023,500 George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation Lewisville 69 3,487,078 Dallas Symphony Orchestra Dallas 47 3,357,650 St. Mark's School of Texas Dallas 4 3,130,000 National Math and Science Initiative Dallas 43 3,032,824 Dallas Opera Dallas 34 2,999,600 UT Southwestern Medical Foundation Dallas 86 2,581,856 Dallas Museum of Art Dallas 26 2,532,502 Harris Methodist Health Foundation Fort Worth 26 2,415,765 Fort Worth Zoological Association Fort Worth 4 2,333,500 Dallas Independent School District Dallas 34 2,247,314 Episcopal School of Dallas Dallas 19 2,226,050 All Saints Health Foundation Fort Worth 13 2,139,475 Uplift Education Irving 38 2,041,108 Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Society Fort Worth 2 2,000,000 Fort Worth Art Association Fort Worth

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State of the Nonprofit Sector – 2012 Report 21 Foundations headquartered in the 16 counties made 2,140 grants in the 16 county region; 52 recipients received $1 million or more. The top 26 recipients received $2 million or more, as follows:

Number of

Grants Amount Received Recipient Name Recipient City

12 $14,847,033 Botanical Research Institute of Texas Fort Worth 22 13,239,500 Parkland Foundation/Parkland Health and Hospital System Dallas 103 10,685,396 Southern Methodist University Dallas 16 9,971,637 Amon Carter Museum Fort Worth 54 9,003,864 UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Dallas 58 8,777,512 Texas Christian University Fort Worth 1 8,416,366 City of Azle for the Azle Memorial Library Azle 32 8,021,028 Museum of Nature and Science Dallas 60 7,478,202 Children's Medical Center of Dallas Dallas 47 6,556,106 Fort Worth Museum of Science and History Fort Worth 21 6,126,869 University of Texas at Dallas Richardson 46 5,174,011 Dallas Center for the Performing Arts/Foundation Dallas 21 4,745,515 Dallas Foundation Dallas 48 4,648,214 United Way of Metropolitan Dallas Dallas 66 3,471,078 Dallas Symphony Orchestra Dallas 44 3,119,733 St. Mark's School of Texas Dallas 41 3,016,824 Dallas Opera Dallas 4 2,948,125 Advanced Placement Strategies Dallas 32 2,904,600 UT Southwestern Medical Foundation Dallas 81 2,467,856 Dallas Museum of Art Dallas 23 2,424,502 Harris Methodist Health Foundation Fort Worth 24 2,340,765 Fort Worth Zoological Association Fort Worth 33 2,239,814 Episcopal School of Dallas Dallas 17 2,195,050 All Saints Health Foundation Fort Worth 37 2,036,108 Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Society Fort Worth 2 2,000,000 Fort Worth Art Association Fort Worth

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Sources

Economic Impact of the Nonprofit Sector in North Texas: An Updated State of the Sector Report

A research report by Courtney Cross, Southern Methodist University, with guidance from Dr. Sheri Kunovich

2012 Giving Study, Conference of Southwest Foundations - www.c-s-f.org National Center for Charitable Statistics (NCCS) - www.nccs.urban.org

Johns Hopkins Nonprofit Economic Data Project

GuideStar Premium - www.guidestar.org

Giving USA 2011: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2010 Executive Summary

(Researched and written by The Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University)

Daring to Lead 2011: A National Study of Nonprofit Executive Leadership

(A Joint Project of CompassPoint Nonprofit Services and the Meyer Foundation)

Fundraising Effectiveness Project (2011 Fundraising Effectiveness Survey Report)

(A Joint Publication of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and The Urban Institute) Research by Jankowski Associates, Poolesville, Maryland

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About the Center for Nonprofit Management

The Center for Nonprofit Management (CNM) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, and one of the nation's leading management support organizations. Founded in 1980 to meet a significant need for staff development and management assistance in charitable organizations, CNM continues to deliver expertise to nonprofits striving to grow their professional skills and, most importantly, community impact. CNM brings the most current tools for best practices in nonprofit management to thousands of nonprofit boards, staff and volunteers each year and works to strengthen nonprofits to enhance sustainability and maximize impact.

Visit www.cnmdallas.org to learn more about CNM.

About the Conference of Southwest Foundations

The Conference of Southwest Foundations (CSF) is a nonprofit membership association of grantmaking organizations that provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, experiences and expertise among grantmakers, and resources to enhance the ability of each organization to fulfill its charitable mission. CSF offers a vibrant and collegial community of foundation staff and trustees, bound together by a shared interest and investment in the Southwest, where individuals can learn together and call upon each other for ideas, expertise and joint action, and where new and diverse voices are encouraged to contribute to and help shape the philanthropic conversation.

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philanthropic conversation.

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