Boys of (Maybe Not This)

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County

to vote on

bond sale

on April 3

Whitfield Regional Hospital received some good news recently. The bond-backed ex-pansion project moved a step closer to reality.

WRH officials an-nounced that a buyer had been found for the $15.5-million bond the hospital had been seek-ing. Marengo Coun-ty voters approved a 4-mil property tax in-crease in December to help the medical facil-ity make needed im-provements.

Members of the Marengo County Com-mission were expected

With the state deal-ing with the COVID-19 pandemic emergency, officials with Pine Belt Wireless decided to of-fer free internet access to local residents in an effort to help them stay informed with the cur-rent conditions in the state, as well as the na-tion.

Under its plan, Pine Belt Wireless will make drive-up WiFi hotspots

available at its seven area offices during the coronavirus emergen-cy. Individuals seek-ing to take advantage of the WiFi service will be required to get a voucher to gain ac-cess to the service for 30 days. To receive a voucher, individuals can contact one of the local offices.

“This service is in-tended to help

stu-dents that may need to remotely access school-work and instructional material,” Pine Belt of-ficials said in a release to the media.

Students through-out Alabama are work-ing from home durwork-ing the pandemic. Ala-bama Gov. Kay Ivey has suspended all K-12 public school opera-tions.

The Marengo Coun-ty Fire and Rescue Thrift Store will not be opening to customers for a few more days.

Last Thursday, MCFR officials said the store would remain closed to the public for

another week in an ef-fort to protect employ-ees and to help pre-vent the spread of the COVID-19 virus. The announcement came on the heels of Whit-field Regional Hospital announcing a case of

the highly-contagious flu had been confirmed in Demopolis.

“As many of you know there has been a positive case of the coronavirus in Maren-go County,” MCFR The COVID-19

vi-rus made its first ap-pearance in Marengo County last Wednes-day when officials with Whitfield Regional Hospital announced one of its employees had tested positive for the virus.

According to the Al-abama Department of Public Health, several new cases have been reported in the county since then. As of Mon-day, ADPH officials have confirmed five cases of the virus with-in Marengo County.

“The thing we knew was coming, came,” said WRH administra-tor/CEO Doug Brew-er in announcing the county’s first case had been discovered. Brew-er, noting the hospi-tal had been working for several weeks to prepare, said the em-ployee diagnosed with the coronavirus was believed to have con-tracted the illness while traveling out of state. Since being diagnosed last week, the employee has been isolated in an attempt to prevent the spread of the flu-like disease.

ADPH officials,

on Monday morn-ing, said the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 had almost quadrupled over the previous week, rising to more than 830 cases as of 9 a.m. on Monday. Last Wednesday, as of press time, the state to-tal stood at 242.

As part of its state-wide count, ADPH

offi-Volume 140, No. 21

‘Determined to Be As Good As The County It Serves’

Published in Marengo County, Alabama

April 2,

2020

COVID-19

reported in

Marengo Co.

Pine Belt Wireless offering free

Internet access during pandemic

MC Thrift store to remain closed

D-R PHOTO

Social distancing ...

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many residents to keep their distance from others in an effort to prevent the virus from spread-ing.

See STORE on Page 3 See VIRUS on Page 3

See FREE on Page 3

See SALE on Page 3

COVID-19

MTU to

adjust hours

Whitfield Re-gional Hospital announced it had adjusted the oper-ating hours for its Covid-19 Mobile Testing Unit to better serve the public ear-lier this week. Hos-pital officials said they are adjusting the hours according to the community’s need. Beginning Monday, the hours for the testing unit were announced as Monday, Wednes-day and FriWednes-days from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WRH officials

en-D-R PHOTOS/MARIA JOHNSON The baseball field at Scott Park sits empty and unused earlier this week due to the coronavirus pandemic. In March, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey sus-pended all K-12 public school activities for the remainder of the school year, effectively ending the baseball and softball seasons for Marengo County teams. Local youth teams are scrambling to determine if they will be able to play seasons. Local teams aren’t the only teams being affected, college and professional football teams are also wondering if they will be able to play this coming fall.

Boys of (M

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SUMMER

See MTU on Page 3

BY TOMMY WELLS The Democrat-Reporter Mother Nature brought some excitement to Linden this past week - and sent Marengo County firefighter into action.A lightning strike caused a fire on the Linden Ele-mentary School campus on Thursday, June 27. Emer-gency responders were quickly called into action and suppressed the blaze.

A summer storm, com -plete with several cloud to ground lightning strikes, made its way through w est-ern Alabama on Friday af -ternoon. One of the strikes caused a power line to ov er-load, leaving a scorched mark on the exterior of the building.

The storm, which pro -duced winds of more than 40 mph and hail in some areas, prompted Alabama weather officials to warn residents to take shelter, and to be wary of the potential for heavy rains and local -ized flooding. No flooding was reported in the greater Linden area as a result of rainfall.The full extent of the damage to the school was unknown as of the Demo -crat-Reporter’s press time. Calls to the Linden City School Superintendent Tim -othy Thurman and the Lin -den Fire Department were not returned.Linden schools, as well as those throughout the coun -ty, are gearing up for the start of the 2019-20 year. BY TOMMY WELLS

The Democrat-Reporter After five decades of educating western Alabama students, Marengo Academy’s bells will ring no more.The Marengo Academy school board decided to shut the school’s doors last Thursday night during an emergency meeting. The board, cit -ing dwindl-ing enrollment numbers, said school could not financially sup-port itself any further.

“It’s pretty bad for the folks around here,” Marengo Academy Headmas -ter David Akins told the T uscaloo-sa News after the announcement to close was made. “It’s been a staple in this community for going on 50 years now. The enrollment has been declining over the last two or three years. We kept trying to increase the numbers and were not able to do that.”

Marengo Academy initially opened in 1969, serving students in first through sixth grade. The school expanded to include grades following year. 7-12 the The news of the school’s closing saddened Marengo County alumni.“I can’t adequately put into words

what Marengo Academy meant to me,” said Hannah Freeman on the MA Facebook page. “So many mem -ories and triumphs over the years. I am so thankful for the 14 years I had at this school because I wouldn’t be the person I am today without it. Marengo was more than a school, it was a family full of Christian values and many traditions. It breaks my heart that so many students will not be able to experience just how spe -cial Marengo was. The halls may be empty now, but the memories and lessons learned will last a lifetime.”Collin Sheffield added, “Marengo will forever remain in the minds and hearts of those that had the privilege to walk its halls.”“Through the tears, I find myself thinking of the many great times I had as a longhorn. Even though the halls and bleachers will never again COURTESY PHOTO

The Marengo Academy foundation members voted to close the school at a June 27 meeting. The school’ s enrollment had

dwindled over the past few years.

COURTESY PHOTO Summer fun ...

A young boy shows off the mud and dirt he collected after a the water. full day of playing near

Annual sales tax holiday set for July 19-21

Freedom on the River gala set for today in Demopolis

D-R office to change its summer office hours The Democrat-Reporter Alabama’s back-to-school sales tax holiday will be held July 19-21. The special shopping

period starts at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, July 19, and lasts until mid -night on Sunday, July 21. During this period, shoppers can purchase clothes, computers,

books, school supplies and other items with -out paying state sales tax.

For more informa -tion go to, https://rev e-nue.alabama.gov. BY TOMMY WELLS

The Democrat-Reporter The Independence Day fun will officially get underway this af -ternoon in Demopolis. The Demopolis Cham -ber of Commerce will

be holding its annual Freedom on the River festivities at the De-mopolis City Land-ing. The event is being co-sponsored by the city of Demopolis.The activities will get underway at 3 p.m.,

a large number of ven-dors from throughout the area will open, of -fering a wide array of foods. Arts and crafts, as well as children’s games will follow, starting at 5 p.m. Dwindling enrollment numbers prompts board to close school at emergency meeting

Marengo Academy closes Storm starts fire at school

See FOTR on Page 2 See CLOSE on Page 2

During the change -over in ownership, theDemocrat-Reporter will be altering its summer office hours, Beginningtoday, the office will be open from 1-5 p.m. Mon -day through Thurs-day.The office will not be open on Fridays, said publisher Tommy Wells. The newspaper will also have a new post office number. The new P.O. box number will be 480127. Volume 139, No. 35 ‘Determined to Be As G

ood As The County It Serves’ Published in Marengo County, Alabama

Thursday July 4 2019

Even though the halls and bleachers will

never again be filled, the memories of what was will always remain.

Collin Sheffield MA Class of 2017 Happy Independence Day COURTESY PHOTO Emergency responders move an individual injured in a car accident

near Dixons Mill to a waiting AirEv-ac helicopter. The injured person was transported by ambulance to Linden where the helicopter picked him up and flew him to a medical facility in Birmingham.

COURTESY PHOTO

Summer tradition ...

Hundreds of Marengo County residents turned out over the week-end to attweek-end the annual Summer Carnival in Linden. The carnival was held June 22-22 at ChillyFest Park.

Democrat-Reporter working through postal permit issue City may

begin sale of alcohol on Sunday

Care in the Air

The Democrat-Reporter

If you haven’t re-ceived your copy of the Democrat-Reporter as of yet, be advised it will be in the mail shortly. New Democrat-Re -porter publisher Tom -my Wells noted the newspaper is attempt-ing to work through an issue with the Unit -ed State Postal Service created by the recent sale of the 139-y

ear-old publication to a Virginia-based couple. The paper is waiting for needed documents from the couple to a m e n d the USPS m a i l i n g permits. “It’s a clerical is-sue with the post-al service,” said Wells,

BY TOMMY WELLS

The Democrat-Reporter

The City of Linden moved a step closer to allowing alcohol sales on Sundays. At its recent meeting, members of the Linden City Coun-cil were informed by City Attorney Woody Dinning Jr. the state had passed a statute al -lowing city’s to decide if Sunday alcohol sales were needed.

Dinning said stat -ue was passed by the state recently grant -ing city councils the option of allowing

Freedom on the River

set for next week

Linden PD arrest 5 on drug charges

BY TOMMY WELLS

The Democrat-Reporter

The Linden Police Department took a huge step forward on Satur-day in its battle on the illegal drug trade in the community on Satur -day. Lin-den Po-lice Chief R o b e r t A l s t o n said offi-cers, af-ter more than six months of work, had arrested five peo-ple on drug-re-l a t e d charges. “ T h e operation started last year and I am proud of how it turned out,” said

Alston. “Efforts to combat illegal drugs sold in our com -munities will continue.” On June 22, Linden officers arrested Abner Lequinta Banks, 28; Nor -ris Lee Rogers, 64; Lisa

Crosby Suttles, 57; Kim-berly Fell Windham, 43; and Eric Lamar Wolf, 39. Banks, Suttles, Wind-ham and Wolf were c h a r g ed with two counts of unlawful distribu-tion of a controlled substance. R o g -ers was c h a r g ed with only one count. Linden Police De-partment o f f i c e r s made the a r r e s t s . Involved were Ser-g e a n t R i c h a r d Va r n e r , O f f i c e r K e v i n Johnson and Lt. Cody Cross.

Alston said he expect-ed at least two more in -dividuals to be arrested as a result of the inv

esti-BY TOMMY WELLS

The Democrat-Reporter

Come rain or shine, the Demopolis Area Chamber of Commerce is going to make sure the residents of western Alabama get the opportunity to celebrate Independence Day with a bang.

Chamber officials an-nounced recently they are expecting more than 5,000 to turn out for its annual Freedom on the River

fes-tivities, which are set for July 4 at the Demopolis City Landing. The event is being co-sponsored by the city of Demopolis.

“It’s a celebration of America, yes, but its a cele -bration of Demopolis,” said Meggin Mayben after last year’s event.“People in Demopolis come out to celebrate our city and all that w

e’ve ac-complished. So, its just a fun time for community to get together.”

The activities will get un -derway next Thursday af -ternoon. Starting at 3 p.m., a large number of vendors from throughout the area will open, offering a wide

array of foods. Arts and crafts, as well as children’s games will follow, starting at 5 p.m.

Chamber Office Manag-er Tory Colvin said the an -nual Freedom on the Riv er Children’s Patriotic Parade will also return this year. As part of the event, chil-dren are encouraged to en -ter all non-motorized types of childhood transportation — such as strollers, bikes, wagons or skateboards — to compete for prizes for best

decorations, creativity and the patriotic spirit. There are three age groups: birth to 4 years; 5 to 8 years; and 9 to 12 years old.Registration for the pa -rade will be at 6:45 p.m.

Following the parade, a giant fireworks display will be held over the banks of the Tombigbee River. The fire-works show is slated to start at 9 p.m.

All events take place at the Demopolis City Landing on Commissioners Avenue, Volume 139, No. 34

‘Determined to Be As Good As The County It Serves’

Published in Marengo County, Alabama

ThursdayJune 27 2019

See PAPER on Page 2 See ARRESTS on Page 2

A food safety course for diabetics, cancer pa -tients, older Americans and their caregiv

ers will be held on July 15 at Bry-an W. Whitfield

Memori-al HospitMemori-al. To register for the course, or for more infor -mation, call the Marengo County Extension Office at (334) 295-5959. Food safety course slated for July 15 at Whitfield Memorial

See SALES on Page 3

Eric Wolf Tommy Wells Abner Banks Norris Rogers Lisa Suttles Kimberly Windham

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FREE FOR 30 DAYS

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can purchase a 1-year digital subscription or a copy of the print edition in the mail.

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FILE PHOTO Age-group leaders discuss the Bethel Baptist Association Vacation Bible Clinics in April of 1970. The clinics were set for April 6 at Pine Hill Baptist Church, and April at Fairhaven Baptist Church. From left to right are (seated) Mrs. Gene Walley of Thomaston, Mrs. J.B. Norris of Dixons Mills, and Mrs. George Korpiter of Demopolis, Standing are Mrs. C.N. Spears of Myrtlewood, Mrs. Her-schel Keeton od Demopolis and the Rev. Herman Greer of Linden.

5 Years ago ...

• Cadence Bank of Uniontown (the only bank in town) closed on Wednesday, June 24, at 2 p.m. Accounts were transferred to the Mont-gomery branch of Cadence Bank, according to a letter sent to its customers. Uniontown is 80 miles from Montgomery, and the bank’s loca-tion is probably an addiloca-tional 20 miles or more, contends Janie Stockman of Uniontown.

• Cameron Thomason hit her first career home run – a grand slam – and Demopolis (11-12-1, 3-0) went on to blank area foe Wilcox Central, 11-0, Wednesday, March 25, to remain undefeated in Class 5A, Area 6 competition. Jes-sica Adams was 2-for-2 for the Lady Tigers.

• The Demopolis Tigers (11-5) rolled to a 7-3 win over Thomasville, Friday, March 27. Thom-asville chased Demopolis starter Tripp Perry af-ter only one inning of work, but Luke Yelverton, coming off a no-hit performance over Wilcox Central, came on to work six innings and shut Thomasville down. Yelverton allowed one run, two hits, struck out five batters and walked one.

10 Years ago ...

• Marengo Academy Lady Longhorns im-prove to 16-1 by defeating Patrician Academy Lady Saints, 5-0, in Butler on Tuesday, March 30. The winning pitcher for Marengo was Jessica Brock, she improved to 11-1-1 pitching seven strong innings giving up four hits, striking out nine and walking two. Leading hitters for the Lady Longhorns were; Destiny Huckabee going 2-for-4 with a double with two runs scored. Ka-tie Tucker with one double and two runs scored.

• Mr. and Mrs. Strother Gibbs of Camden and Mr. Robert Miller of Jaspier announced the mar-riage of their daughter, Melody Amelia Miller, to Joshua Ray Thornhill, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Eddie Thornhill of Tuscaloosa. The bride is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bills Drinkard, of Linden and the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wal-lace Miller.

• The Marengo County Emergency Food and Shelter Board (EFS) was chosen to receive $13,945 to supplement emergency food and shel-ter programs in the county.

25 Years ago ...

• Killing doe deer cost a Moulton man $1,513 in Marengo County District Court. Howard William Hagood of 1165 County Road 59, Moul-ton, was fined $400, plus $113 court costs in one case and a $400 fine in two other cases of killing female deer. A second hunter, Steven Bradley Hopkins of 10844 County Road 23, Mount Hope, was also fined $1,313 for three charges of killing doe deer.

• Norman Bruce of Rutledge, Ga., hunted Marengo County’s wild gobblers last week, as guest of Billy Gibbs, right, and scored a 15 1/2 pounder while hunting with Trey Hereford and Lynn Crocker, Jr., between Dayton and Faunsdale. Crocker called in two big gobblers, with Bruce out front. The man from Georgia took the one coming down the hill and Hereford took shots at the other one.

• On March 13-15, eight members of the Class of ’47 of Linden High School had a reunion at the home of Alpha Lewis Linn in Fort Walton, Fla.

5o Years ago ...

• Two Demopolis teenagers are dead as the result of a high-speed crash shortly after mid-night Friday. A 32-year-old Demopolis man, the driver, was charged with manslaughter, ac-cording to reports from reliable sources. Cicero Alston Clem, 17, and Earnest Frank Thompson, 18, both of Demopolis, were killed when the car in which they were passengers left Highway 80 at high speed, knocked down a large metal light pole, two utility poles and burned.

• The city of Linden bought about three acres of industrial property on east Coats Ave-nue for $6,000 from Land Development Corpo-ration.

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THURSDAY Partly Cloudy 74 °F 54 °F FRIDAY Partly Cloudy 78 °F 56 °F SATURDAY Mostly Cloudy 81 °F 58 °F SUNDAY Showers 78 °F 63 °F MONDAY Scattered Thunderstorms 79 °F 69 °F TUESDAY Scattered Thunderstorms 85 °F 69 °F WEDNESDAY Scattered Thunderstorms 86 °F 67 °F

Chickasaw Apartments

Come in and visit us.

Vacancies Available

(334) 295 1104

TDD: 1-800 548-2546

Linden, Alabama

LINDEN ARREST REPORT

Remember when ...

Back in Time ...

Take a look back at Marengo County history with a glance at the news that made the pages of the Demo-crat-Reporter back in the day.

A Florida pastor was arrested on Monday by Florida authorities af-ter he held two Sunday services with hundreds of people attending. The services violated the Florida’s order for res-idents to stay at home and not gather in large numbers to help prevent

the spread of the corona-virus.

According to jail re-cords, Pastor Rodney Howard-Browne turned himself in to authorities Monday in Hernando County, where he lives. He was charged with unlawful assembly and violation of a public

health emergency order. Bail was set at $500, ac-cording to the jail’s web-site.

Hillsborough Sher-iff Chad Chronister said he negotiated with the attorney of How-ard-Browne to turn him-self in to authorities in Hernando County.

Chronister said his command staff met with The River at Tampa Bay Church leaders about the danger they are putting themselves — and their congregation — in by not maintaining appro-priate social distancing, but Howard-Browne held the services.

Fla. Pastor arrested after holding church services

Coastal Alabama

Students, Valerie Hill of Thomasville, Ker-rigan Welch of Excel and Nicholas Wilson of Silverhill, have been named 2020 Coca-Cola Academic Team Bronze Scholars and will re-ceive a $1,000 scholar-ship.

The Coca-Cola Schol-ars Foundation spon-sors the Coca-Cola Ac-ademic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver, and 50 Bronze Scholars with nearly $200,000 in scholarships annually. Each

schol-ar also receives a com-memorative medallion.

“The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation has a long history of providing financial as-sistance to outstanding students at communi-ty colleges,” said Jane Hale Hopkins, Presi-dent of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation. “We are proud to part-ner with Phi Theta Kap-pa and make it possible for deserving students to achieve their educa-tional goals.”

Students are nomi-nated for the academic

team by their college ad-ministrators. Selection is based on academic achievement, leader-ship, and engagement in college and commu-nity service.

Coca-Cola Academic Team members will be recognized in both local and statewide ceremo-nies and will also be rec-ognized internationally during Phi Theta Kap-pa’s annual convention, PTK Catalyst, April 2-4, at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas, near Dallas.

Three Coastal Alabama

students receive scholarship

The following is a look at the police reports. All individuals are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.

• On March 16, 2020,

Lakendall Cardell Jones, b/m, age 2,9 was arrested for Harassment, Attempt-ing to Elude, ResistAttempt-ing

Arrest and Contempt of Court. Arrest made by Ser-geant Richard Varner.

• On March 16, 2020, Charles Goodwill, b/m, age 32, was arrested for Loiter-ing. Arrest made by Officer Terry Hinton, Jr.

• On March 17, 2020, Jamarcus Williams, b/m, age 18, was arrested for Harassment. Arrest made by Officer Terry Hinton, Jr.

• On March 17, 2020, John Andrew Rogers, b/m, age 54, was arrested for Contempt of Court. Arrest made by Sergeant Richard

Varner.

• On March 17, 2020, Kendarius Goodwill, b/m, age 29, was arrested for Contempt of Court. Arrest made by Sergeant Richard Varner.

• On March 17, 2020, Kendarious O’Neal Dun-son, b/m, age 19, was arrested for Possession of Marijuana 2nd degree. Arrest made by Sergeant Richard Varner.

• On March 18, 2020, Martavious Jamal Perkins, b/m, age 2,0 was arrested for Carrying a Gun without a permit. Arrest made by Sergeant Richard Varner.

• On March 19, 2020, James Eugene Gill, w/m, age 46, was arrested for Contempt of Court. Arrest made by Officer Michael Harrington.

• On March 19, 2020, Kavion Tashawn Turner, b/m, age 24, was arrested for Burglary 3rd degree, Criminal Mischief 4th de-gree and Domestic Vio-lence 3rd degree. Arrest made by Officer Michael Harrington.

Area cities

to hold

elections on

Aug. 25

Several commu-nities in the Maren-go County area will send their voters to the poll on Aug. 25 to determine municipal races.

Among the no-table elections will be in Thomasville, where longtime mayor Sheldon Day is expected to seek a seventh term.

The state Primary Runoff election will be held July 14.

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cials said a total of five cases had been report-ed in Marengo County since March 26.

COVID-19 has also shown up in several neighboring counties, including Washington and Tuscaloosa ty. Washington Coun-ty reported the sec-ond-highest total in the immediate area with four confirmed cas-es. Greene County has reported three, while Dallas and Wilcox have two apiece, Choc-taw County has had just one case reported. Clarke, Sumpter, Hale and Perry did not have any cases as of noon on Monday, March 30. Tus-caloosa County had the highest number of con-firmed cases in the area at 23 – an increase of seven from a week ago.

According to the state health depart-ment, only 11 deaths have occurred in the state through Monday morning. The first hap-pened last Wednesday in northeast Alabama.

Much of the state remains under quaran-tine order from Gov. Kay Ivey. Last Thurs-day, in announcing that she had closed all K-12 public schools for the remainder of the year, Ivey urged all

non-es-sential residents to stay at home in an effort to slow the spread of the virus, which originated in China, in December.

Nationally, the coro-navirus has hit the United States hard. Ac-cording to the Centers for Disease Control, on Jan. 19, only 19 cases of the virus were re-ported in the country. On March 30, that total had surpassed 140,000 - with 66,000 of those being reported in New York. Worldwide, there have more than 775,000 confirmed cases.

President Donald J. Trump said Sunday that federal guidance urging social distanc-ing measures will stay in place through April 30. Trump also said his hope that the United States will be “opened up” by Easter might not be possible as the vi-rus continues to spread rapidly.

To see updated coro-navirus statistics, see world0meter.com.

Pine Belt Wireless has offices in Arling-ton, Butler, Camden, Grove Hill, Linden, Marion and Selma.

The Democrat-Re-porter also stepped up

to help area residents stay informed during the pandemic. D-R Publishers Tommy and Pattie Wells said they will be offering free digital issues of the paper for 30 days for new customers.

Tommy Wells said individuals wishing to

receive the paper for free 30 days should email him at newz-boy3@gmail.com to get started. Once the 30-day period ends, sub-scribers will then have the option to subscribe digitally for $20 for a year, or subscribe to the print edition.

D-R PHOTO/MARIA JOHNSON In an attempt to help prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus, many Marengo County businesses and entities have closed their doors to the public. Above, the Marengo County Courthouse parking area sits unoccupied on Monday morning.

In 1957, my last football season at Lin-den High, our game against Orville toward the first of the season had to be postponed, but was played to a 0-0 tie after the regular sea-son. Now, what would have caused a football game to be postponed? Well, a new strain of flu appeared in Asia, and the world watched and waited for it to spread. Ocean liners full of sick passengers were affected by the Asian flu Pandemic. A story appeared in the Wash-ington Evening Star on June l6,1957, noting that two months earli-er, residents of refugee camps in Hong Kong had started experienc-ing fever, lung conges-tion, aching muscles and sore throats. The article then went on to talk about air travel propagating the chain of infection. The H2 N2 Virus would later be traced back to Main-land China. Sound fa-miliar?

Now, this was more severe than seasonal flu, but not as deadly as the Spanish Flu that had killed 50 million people 40 years earli-er, although the Asian Flu from 1947 through

1958 killed 1.1 million folks worldwide, in-cluding 116,000 in the United States. Some people were question-ing whether the com-munists had planted the germs, while others said it was caused by nuclear testing in the Pacific. (I kinda miss having the communists around to blame for everything the way we used to do).

Just as with the pres-ent COVID-19, Italy was hit hard with the Asiatic Flu, but there was not nearly the news exposure for the Asian flu, or much less the Spanish Flu earlier. Why was that, do you suppose? Well, news was pretty much con-fined to newspapers, with some radio, and very little smattering on the nightly TV news 30 minutes with Walter Cronkite.

On July 4, 1957 there was a headline in the Minneapolis Morning Tribune proclaiming, “Minnesota keeps an eye out for Asian Flu.” Well, they seemed to be on top of things Im-portant in that paper ... except for one thing. That headline was on page 23.

There were a few

school closings around the country, although Linden High remained open, despite the fact that most of the foot-ball team had the flu. I don’t recall being very sick with it, and my wife, Alice, says she doesn’t remember anybody having it up around her home in Missouri.

There was a vaccine perfected very quickly, and older people were encouraged to get the vaccine. Many thought that was aimed at President Dwight D. Eisenhower, since Ike declared he would not take it until it was avail-able to all. He finally rolled up his sleeve.

As mentioned

above, this flu was the second major influen-za pandemic to occur

in the 20th century following the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-19, and preceded the Hong Kong Pandemic of 1968.

Way back yonder in the 50s, there was a rapid development of a vaccine against the H2 N2 Virus, and the availability of antibiot-ics developed during World War II to treat secondary Infection such as pneumonia limited the spread and mortality of the Asian Flu pandemic.

So far so good here In the Blackbelt region of Alabama, deep in the southland as to corona-virus. As I write this column about a week ahead of expected pub-lication date. Here’s hoping it continues to be good news. For an old Codger, I feel mighty good myself, and as far as I can re-call, feel about as good as I did when I actually did have that Asian Flu many and many a year ago ... in a land south of the Bogue in the Heart of Dixie, and Capitol of the Cow Country.

Stay healthy, my dear readers, and re-member ... this too shall pass.

Days Gone Bye ...

Tom Boggs

Remembering some of the repeated

events from this old world of ours

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Notice to Contractors

Federal Aid Project No.

NH-HSIP-0013(613)

MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA

Sealed bids will be received by the Director of Transportation at the office of the Alabama Department of Transportation, Montgomery, Alabama until 10:00 AM on April 03, 2020 and at that time publicly opened for constructing the Planing, Resurfacing, Guardrail Reset, and Traffic Stripe on SR-13 (US-43) from the junction of SR-8 (US-80) to the north end of the Black Warrior River Bridge north of Demopolis. Length 3.330 mi.

The total amount of uncompleted work under contract to a contractor must not exceed the amount of his or her qualification certificate.

The Entire Project Shall Be Completed In Fifty (50) Working Days. A 4% DBE Contract Obligation Is Required.

A Bidding Proposal may be purchased for $5.00. Plans may be purchased for $6.00 per set. Plans and Proposals are available at the Alabama Depart-ment of Transportation, 1409 Coliseum Boulevard, Room E-108, Montgom-ery, AL 36110. Checks should be made payable to the Alabama Department of Transportation. Plans and Proposals will be mailed only upon receipt of remittance. No refunds will be made.

Minimum wage rates for this project have been pre-determined by the Secretary of Labor and are set forth in the advertised specifications. This project is subject to the contract work hours and Safety Standards Act and its implementing regulations.

Cashier’s check or bid bond for 5% of bid (maximum - $50,000.00) made payable to the Alabama Department of Transportation must accompany each bid as evidence of good faith.

The bracket range is shown only to provide general financial information to contractors and bonding companies concerning the project’s complexity and size. This Bracket should not be used in preparing a bid, nor will this bracket have any bearing on the decision to award this contract.

The Bracket Estimate On This Project Is From $888,264 To $1,085,656 . The proposed work shall be performed in conformity with the rules and regulations for carrying out the Federal Highway Act.

Plans and Specifications are on file in Room E-108 of the Alabama De-partment of Transportation at Montgomery, Alabama 36110.

In accordance with the rules and regulations of The Alabama Department of Transportation, proposals will be issued only to prequalified contractors or their authorized representatives, upon requests that are received before 10 AM., on the day previous to the day of opening of bids.

The bidder’s proposal must be submitted on the complete original propos-al furnished him or her by the Alabama Department of Transportation.

The Alabama Department of Transportation, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42

U.S.C. 2000D TO 2000D-4 and Title 49 code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of The Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally-assisted programs of the Department of Trans-portation issued pursuant to such act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this adver-tisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in consideration for an award.

The right to reject any or all bids is reserved.

JOHN R. COOPER Transportation Director (4-2)

From our kitchen ...

Enjoy some of our favorite recipes sent in by our subscrib-ers. Submit your favorite recipe by emailing us at:

newz-boy3@gmail.com.

Easy Slow Cooker Chicken

Wings

Ingredients

5 ½ pounds chicken wings, split and tips discarded 1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle chile sauce ¼ cup fresh lemon juice

¼ cup molasses

2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce 3 drops hot pepper sauce 1 Tbsp salsa

2 ½ tsp chili powder 1 tsp garlic powder 2 tsp salt

Directions

Place chicken in slow cooker. In a medium bowl combine the chili sauce, lemon juice, molasses, Worcestershire sauce, hot pepper sauce, salsa, chili powder, garlic powder and salt. Mix together and pour mixture over chicken. Cook in slow cooker on Medi-um Low setting for 5 hours.

Tip: Try using a Reynolds slow cooker liner in your

slow cooker for easier cleanup.

To Sponsor This Recipe Column contact the Democrat-Reporter

at (334) 212-6060

officials wrote on the Facebook page. “Hav-ing said that, the thrift store will remain closed yet another week.”

Thrift store officials asked residents to not drop off items outside the business’s door for now.

“We hope to be open as soon as possible but the safety of our work-ers and those who sup-port us by shopping is most important,” they wrote. “Thank you for your continued sup-port of our effort.”

to meet Friday, April 3, to approve the sale of the bonds. Hospital of-ficials expect the final paperwork to be filed by next week.

MTU

From Page 1

couraged any individual with symptoms who are not in respiratory dis-tress to wait to be tested during mobile hours so as to prevent accidentally exposing other patients.

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It’s a challenge my 106-year-old Uncle Mort hasn’t faced - not ever - and the same is true for the rest of us.

The world teeters on a ful-crum of fear, much of it un-known. Enough is known, though, to shiver the stron-gest timbers and shake boots previously used for putting “get-along” in little “dogies” (pronounced “dough”’-gees), along with kicking aside rattlesnakes, and other critters that think it’s their home and their range.

Mort has been hanging around the general store down in the thicket, giving directions to lost motorists, happily engaging in con-versation. He also pondered stories, riddles and memo-ries accumulated in a long life. He considered hopes for humankind that have “risen to the top” over previously longstanding political rant-ing, and numerous other topics that no longer seem nearly as important as be-fore.

Still, he had to smile when some occasional visitors to the store made observations ranging from the reasonable to the absurd.

A minister, gassing up, mused about amended bib-lical instruction warranting more specificity when men-tioned today. “Jesus said, ‘Get thee behind me, Satan.’

Today, we’d add, ‘by at least six feet.’”

M o r t grinned, “That wouldn’t be rocket surgery, would it?” My uncle figures that most Amer-icans are en-during “cab-in fever,” and that this term deserves clarification. “ S u d d e n l y ,

the expression is expand-ed to include many other structures, including hous-es, tents, apartments, barns, duplexes, mansions, hovels, shacks and double-wides,” he said.

There are more shortages than “longages,” and folks are learning that the pre-ferred spelling of “canceled” has just one “l.” Formerly seldom-used words now commonly include “can-celed, postponed, extend-ed, temporarily, suspendextend-ed, and, the most spotted signs in supermarket aisles are ‘out of stock.’”

In most cases of daily life for the masses, the “old normal” seems preferable to what we often currently re-fer to as “the new normal.”

One 18-year-old--using both bills and silver to buy

a half-tank of gas--had hoped to work at a grocery store during spring break. He learned, though, that his services weren’t need-ed. “Full-tim-ers have taken on shelf-stock-ing, spreading t h e m s e l v e s even thinner,” he said. The cus-tomer said, “As I drove to the thicket, I thought of sights and sounds I’d heard while working at the gro-cery store. And, last night, they returned in my dreams, including scenes of empty shelves that used to bulge with products. Frequent announcements called for ‘clean-up on aisle four.’”

Sadly, when there’s noth-ing there to spill, there’s nothing left to clean up, he lamented.

Mort mentioned that he was going to spend the rest of the day “frog-gigging.” The young man wanted to know more about the sport, and asked if he could come along.

My uncle invited him, of course. They went down well-worn trails on the beau-tiful spring day. Trees were

budding, and early blue-bonnets cast bluish tints on hillsides awakening from winter. Birds sang, frogs croaked and fish splashed. A jet plane droned in the dis-tance, but most sounds were from creatures unaware of viruses, and issues related thereto.

Mort said he then told campfire stories, and that they fried up a mess of frog legs for a light dinner. “Then, just before going to bed, I read a chapter from a Newbury book,” he said. “Soon, I fell into deep sleep--with little on my stomach and nothing on my mind.”

Mort’s telling me of the “put down” didn’t faze me. It was simply “Mort being Mort.”

I yearned to visit him and get his take on these strange days. I’d tell him about lights spelling out “Wash Your Hands” covering an entire side of Dallas’ Omni Hotel, and how businesses, church-es, organizations and indi-viduals are “pitching in” to “flatten the curve.”

I would savor hearing birds in the thicket sing at spring’s awakening. My un-cle and I would claim that day that the Lord had made to rejoice and be glad in.

Dr. Newbury is a former ed-ucator who “commits speeches” round about.

Publishing the news of the Marengo County

since 1879 PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY Wells Publishing P.O. Box 480127, Linden, Alabama, 36748 E-MAIL: newzboy3@gmail.com PHONE: (334) 212-6060 (940) 329-1540 (Cell) OFFICE: 201 3rd Ave. W MAIL: The Democrat-Reporter, P.O. Box 480127, Linden, Alabama, 36748 STAFF Publisher: Tommy J. Wells newzboy3@gmail.com Editor: Tommy J. Wells newzboy3@gmail.com Advertising: newzboy3@gmail.com DEADLINES Letters to the editor

& commentaries 5 p.m. Friday News, announcements, photos Noon Monday Advertising Noon Monday USPS 153-380 The Democrat-Report-er is published evDemocrat-Report-ery day

except Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Sat-urday and Sunday at 201 W. Third Ave., Linden, Marengo County, Alabama, 36748. The paper is pub-lished weekly with the exception of the week be-tween Christmas and New Year’s Day. Telephone: (334) 212-6060. Linden Reporter established 1879. Marengo Democrat estab-lished 1889. Consolidated 1911 as The Democrat-Re-porter.

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General interest letters should be no more than 300 words. Thank you letters should be no more than 150 words.

All letters must include the writer’s name, address and daytime telephone num-ber. Only the writer’s name and city or village of resi-dency are published. Every letter requires the name of a person for the signature. The Democrat-Reporter reserves the right to edit letters for content, length, clarity, grammar and taste. Submit letters before 5 p.m. on the Friday before publi-cation for consideration in the next week’s newspaper. Meeting the deadline does not guarantee that a letter will be published.

Letter writers are en-couraged to send letters by e-mail to newzboy3@gmail. com. Letters delivered by FAX, mail and hand are also accepted.

Opinions expressed on this page are not necessarily those of The Democrat-Re-porter owners or staff.

Sadly, the ‘Toy Cannon’ has been silenced

As a child growing up in Houston in the 1960s, my mother and father would of-ten take me to the Astrodome. As my father, at that point, a milkman who got up early every morning to deliver milk and other perishable items to customers, didn’t make a ton of money, especially consid-ering he was raising seven children, so we didn’t sit in the pricey seats, but rather in the outfield. It didn’t matter to them (as it doesn’t today when I take my family).

Back then it was different because I got to be close to my baseball hero, Jimmy Wynn.

I know the 1960s were a tumultuous time in the na-tion’s history as the Vietnam conflict was raging, the Cold War was chilling everyone and racial tension was abun-dant. Here’s the thing, It didn’t matter when we pulled off Loop 610 and headed into the “:Eighth Wonder of the World.”

From the minute I stepped into the ‘Dome, I was Jimmy Wynn’s biggest fan. I can re-member my parents watch-ing me as I would get near the rail in hopes of catching a ball from the “Toy Can-non.” I didn’t care if he was from Ohio or Mars, or if he was black, green or rain-bow-striped. Jimmy Wynn was the homer-hitting hero that my world revolved around.

I can’t tell you how many days I spent in the backyard pretending to hit towering home runs like him, or how many times I wished I could have afforded a No. 24 jersey.

I can tell you I cried like a baby when he left to go to the Los Angeles Dodgers, who were our divisional ri-vals back in the day. Remem-ber, the Astros are a relative newcomer to the American League. For me, I forgot all of the “hate the Dodger” stuff when Jimmy came home. I

rooted for him every time - whether it was in person or if we were all huddled around the transistor radio my par-ents had next to their bed.

When Jimmy retired, I felt as if part of my world crum-bled. Later, I became a huge fan of relief pitcher Joe Sambi-to and cheered the “Ryan

Ex-press” when he came home to play for his hometown team. I cheered for the likes of Joe Niekro, Alan Ashby and the Killer B’s (Craig Biggio, Jeff Bagwell and Lance Berkman). I cheered for the Lastros and the teams that followed - and I still cheer for them today.

But Jimmy Wynn always had my heart. I can tell you I smiled like a new father when he was enshrined into the Astros’ hall of honor. And I can tell you I was sad as a guy who got a visit from the IRS last Friday when I found out he had passed away at 78.

Play on, Jimmy. As long as I am still above ground, you’ll be deep in the heart of this kid.

It’s amazing how baseball can unite people. It did for me, Jimmy and my dad.

Tommy Wells is the editor of the Democrat-Reporter. Everything in this column is true except for the parts that are exaggerated, made up or just plain lies.

Tommy Wells Publisher/Editor

Off the Beaten Path ...

WASHINGTON U.S. Senate

Sen. Richard C. Shelby

304 Russell Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510 Phone: (202) 224-5744

Sen. Doug Jones

330 Hart Senate

Office Building

Washington, DC 20510 Phone: (202) 224-4124

House of Representatives

Rep. Terri Sewell

2201 Rayburn HOB Washington, DC 20515 Phone: (202) 225-2665 Fax: (202) 226-9567 ALABAMA State Senate

Sen. Malika Sanders-Fortier

11 S. Union Street, Suite 738 Montgomery, AL 36104 Phone: 334-261-0860

State House

Rep. Thomas Jackson

11 S. Union Street, Suite 738

Montgomery, AL 36104 Phone: 334-261-0437

Governor

Gov. Kay Ivey

State Capitol 600 Dexter Avenue Montgomery, AL 36130 Phone: 334.242.7100 FAX: 334.353.0004

H

ow

to

contact

your

elected

officials

The truth may not be what is being told

The media is brazen and the so-called journalist are a joke that have been not so patiently waiting for the U.S. to, technically, have more coronavirus cases than any-one else in the world so they could plaster it all over the front page and all over the TV. And, although it is true, it is also very misleading.

When a person has the privilege of having control over any type of measure-ment, they will always win. If you ask my 7-year-old, he is the fastest person in the world and he can explain to you why, using his own

method of measurement. So, yes, if you look at the bare number of coronavirus cases the U.S., we are leading. But, if you look at the cases per capita, we are actually doing pretty well.

Reporters will jump on the bandwagon and say the death toll has jumped 100 percent in a 24-hour period instead of saying that 10 more people died, up from the five the day before … that 100 percent is scarier. Let’s not forget that fear is what the Liberals are pushing because when peo-ple are scared, they are easier

to control. but is not showing symptoms If someone has the virus

of it and dies of a heart attack, the media will report it as an-other victim of the coronavi-rus. The more the numbers increase, the scarier the sit-uation becomes. The scarier the situation, the more power and control they can get.

Next time you are watching the news or reading the head-lines and stories, remember these deceptive tricks and see then see what the numbers really mean. They might be different from what the so-called reporter are trying to feed you. Tiffany Waddell is an award-winning columnist. Tiffany Waddell Columnist

Common sense...

Don Newberry Columnist

The Idle American...

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White’s Bridge Boat Ramp

at Harris Reservoir closed

BY DAVID RAINER

Alabama DCNR

While Gov. Kay Ivey and Dr. Scott Harris, Chair of the Governor’s COVID-19 Task Force, work hard alongside other state, national, and private enterprise leaders to mitigate the effects of the novel coronavirus and bring its spread to a conclu-sion, it is important that people maintain the so-cial distancing and oth-er health recommenda-tion standards.

“We take these precautions and rec-ommendations very seriously at the Depart-ment of Conservation and Natural Resourc-es,” said Conservation Commissioner Chris Blankenship. “We know many Alabam-ians want to get out-doors during the spring and enjoy some recre-ational opportunities that can refresh in these challenging times; just remember, we must do so safely.”

Not only does our state have some of the best fishing opportuni-ties in the nation, both freshwater and saltwa-ter, but the spring

tur-key season is also about to open in most of the state.

If hunting or fishing is not a preference, con-sider the beautiful nat-ural hiking trails and camping facilities avail-able at Alabama State Parks close to where you live, not to mention the natural beauty on the Forever Wild tracts available to the public. Visit www.alapark.com and www.alabamafor-everwild.com for the many options available.

“I know with the children out of school and many parents home as well, people will want to do things together as a family,” Blankenship continued. “Many will want to take the youngsters who are out of school to explore our state’s great natural wonders, but please do so responsibly.”

Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fish-eries (WFF) Director Chuck Sykes said this is a perfect opportunity for those who love the outdoors to adhere to the “social distancing” guidelines.

“I fully expect Al-abama hunters and fishermen to take

ad-vantage of the social dis-tancing prescriptions by all the coronavirus experts, and I expect many of them will get outdoors, either on the water or in the woods,” Sykes said. “Turkey season in most of the state comes in Saturday (March 21). Fishing is phenomenal from what I understand.”

Sykes said WFF’s operations will be min-imally impacted by the measures instituted to limit the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Alabama’s outdoors offers

solutions for social distancing

The Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division (WFF) of the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (ADCNR) has begun renovating the White’s Bridge (Lonnie White) Public Boat Ramp on Harris Reservoir in

Randolph County, Al-abama. The renovation will extend the length of the launching slab to allow for better and safer loading/unloading of vessels during winter water levels.

The facility will re-main closed until ap-proximately May 2020.

Top 10 Reasons to

ADVERTISE

1, Advertising consistently builds contact

2. Advertsing builds preference

3. Advertising educates and develops prospects

4. Advertising reduces cost of sales

5. Advertising sells existing products/services

6. Advertising helps close the sale

7. Advertising gives your business a successful image

8. Advertising saves time for you and your customers

9. Advertising keeps you in front of customers

10. Advertising works.

Call Earl Johnson or Tommy Wells at

(334) 212-6060

P.O. Box 480127 • (334) 212-6060 • newzboy3@gmail.com

Notice to Contractors

Federal Aid Project No.

STPAA-0069(562)

MARENGO AND HALE COUNTIES, ALABAMA

Sealed bids will be received by the Director of Transportation at the office of the Alabama Department of Transportation, Montgomery, Alabama until 10:00 AM on April 03, 2020 and at that time publicly opened for constructing the Planing, Resurfacing, and Traffic Stripe on SR-69 from the junction of SR-13 (US-43) in Providence to the intersection of SR-8 (US-80) in Prairiev-ille. Length 13.354 mi.

The total amount of uncompleted work under contract to a contractor must not exceed the amount of his or her qualification certificate.

The Entire Project Shall Be Completed In Fifty-five (55) Working Days. A 4% DBE Contract Obligation Is Required.

A Bidding Proposal may be purchased for $5.00. Plans may be purchased for $5.00 per set. Plans and Proposals are available at the Alabama Depart-ment of Transportation, 1409 Coliseum Boulevard, Room E-108, Montgom-ery, AL 36110. Checks should be made payable to the Alabama Department of Transportation. Plans and Proposals will be mailed only upon receipt of remittance. No refunds will be made.

Minimum wage rates for this project have been pre-determined by the Secretary of Labor and are set forth in the advertised specifications. This project is subject to the contract work hours and Safety Standards Act and its implementing regulations.

Cashier’s check or bid bond for 5% of bid (maximum - $50,000.00) made payable to the Alabama Department of Transportation must accompany each bid as evidence of good faith.

The bracket range is shown only to provide general financial information to contractors and bonding companies concerning the project’s complexity and size. This Bracket should not be used in preparing a bid, nor will this bracket have any bearing on the decision to award this contract.

The Bracket Estimate On This Project Is From $2,385,186 To $2,915,227 . The proposed work shall be performed in conformity with the rules and regulations for carrying out the Federal Highway Act.

Plans and Specifications are on file in Room E-108 of the Alabama De-partment of Transportation at Montgomery, Alabama 36110.

In accordance with the rules and regulations of The Alabama Department of Transportation, proposals will be issued only to prequalified contractors or their authorized representatives, upon requests that are received before 10 AM., on the day previous to the day of opening of bids.

The bidder’s proposal must be submitted on the complete original propos-al furnished him or her by the Alabama Department of Transportation.

The Alabama Department of Transportation, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42

U.S.C. 2000D TO 2000D-4 and Title 49 code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of The Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally-assisted programs of the Department of Trans-portation issued pursuant to such act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this adver-tisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in consideration for an award.

The right to reject any or all bids is reserved.

JOHN R. COOPER Transportation Director (4-2)

Place Your

Ad in the

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Today

FILE PHOTO Anna Carol Drinkard, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Billy Drinkard of Lin-den, twirled her way to the top talent award at Linden High School’s Superlative Night in 1970.

Remember when ...

OBITUARIES

Donald Ray Huck-abee, age 69, of Sweet Water, AL, died March 29, 2020, at DCH Re-gional Hospital. He was born Aug. 29, 1950, in Camp Ground, AL to Elvin James and Nannie Mae Hucka-bee. He was retired from Culpepper Elec-tric.

He is survived by his two brothers, Hen-ry (Bo) Huckabee and Herman Huckabee; and five sisters, Evie (Doll) Green,

Bon-nie Parker, Dorothy Smith, Cissy Edmonds and Mandy Craig.

He was preceded in death by his par-ents, Elvin J. and Mae Huckabee; two broth-ers, James Huckabee and Pete Huckabee; and three sisters, John-nie Merle Jarvis, Mary Lou Bromberger, and Betty Jo Bromberger.

Graveside funeral services were held at Beaver Creek Ceme-tery on Wednesday, April 1, 2020, at 11

a.m. with Rev. Clay Davis and Rev. Bob Davidson officiating.

Condolences may be offered at www. obryantchapelfh.com.

Arrangements by O’Bryant Chapel Fu-neral Home.

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