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NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS NHC 45

HURRICANE GILBERT (1988) IN REVIEW AND PERSPECnVE

Prepared by:

Edward N. Rappaport and Colin J. McAdie National Hurricane Center

National Hurricane Center Coral Gables, Florida November 1991

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UNITED STATES National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service [. ~

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE John A. Knauss Dbert W. FrKlay '1 II

Robert A. Mosbacher, Sa:retary Under Sa:retary and Administrator Assistant Administrator ""'~~~~""

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Abs tract. . 1

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1. Introduction 1

2. Tropical cyclone characteristics and climatology. 4

2.1 Life cycle of a tropical cyclone. 4

2.2 Tropical cyclone data base. 4

2.3 Classification of hurricanes. 5

2.4 Frequency of severe hurricanes. 5

2.5 Differences among hurricanes. 13

2.5.1 The Labor Day hurricane of 1935 14

2.5.2 Hurricane Camille. 15

2.5.3 Hurricane Gilbert. 17

2.5.3.1 Gilbert prior to category 5 status. 17

2.5.3.2 Category 5 landfall on the Yucatan peninsula. .19

2.5.3.3 Final landfall. 19

3. Observations and analyses of Gilbert and its environment.20

3.1 Satellite imagery. 20

3.2 Surface weather maps. 47

3.3 Inner core structure as deduced from reconnaissance

aircraft data. 60

3.4 Deep-layer mean analyses. 66

3.5 Sea-surface temperatures. 78

4. NHC forecasts and warnings of Gilbert. 80

4.1 Numerical model track forecasts. 80

4.2 NHC forecasts. 86

4.3 NHC watches and warnings. 86

5 .Summary 86

Acknowledgments. 89

Re f erences 90

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HURRICANE GILBERT (1988) IN REVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE Edward N. Rappaport

.and

Colin J. McAdie

.ABSTRACT

The 7volut~on of Hurr,icane Gilbert is described. This very intense hurr~cane ~s placed ~n meteorological and historical perspective.

The nature of tropical cyclones is first sketched out. Gilbert's

size, one of its most remarkable attributes, is illustrated by

comparison with two other very intense hurricanes (the Labor Day

Hurricane of 1935 and Hurricane Camille of 1969) which, like

Gilbert, had winds exceeding 155 mph at the time of their landfall.

Damage caused by these intense hurricanes is explored. Gilbert's

evolution and environment are then illustrated with satellite

imagery, surface and deep-layer mean analyses, and reconnaissance

aircraft data. Gilbert is then examined from a forecasting

standpoint.

1. INTRODUCTION

On the evening of September 13, 1988, about 140 miles south of the western tip of Cuba, Hurricane Gilbert reached the lowest pressure (888 mb) ever recorded in an Atlantic tropical cyclone.

This pressure also currently stands as the lowest sea-level pressure on record for the Western Hemisphere. 1 Accompanying Gilbert's Atlantic record-breaking minimum central pressure were

estimated maximum sustained winds at the surface of 185 mph. The hurricane made landfall with a central pressure of 900 mb about 12 hours later near Isla de Cozumel, a resort area about 10 miles off the northeastern coast of the Yucatan peninsula (Fig. 1). This gave Gilbert the lowest central pressure at the time of landfall in 53 years, in the Atlantic. Sustained winds were near 160 mph at landfall (Table 1).

A total of 319 people were killed by Gilbert over a period of 11 days. As shown in Fig. 1, Gilbert crossed directly over the island

of Jamaica, proceeded to make landfall at Cozumel, Mexico, then continued across the Bay of Campeche and made landfall again at La Pesca, a small fishing village on the Gulf coast of Mexico approx-

imately 150 miles south of Brownsville, Texas. As Gilbert crossed the coast and proceeded inland, it caused torrential rains;

subsequent flooding accounted for most of the deaths in the area of final landfall. The total damage caused by Gilbert is now estimated at $10 billion.

lThe current world's record for lowest central pressure is held by Typhoon Tip, which reached 870 mb on

October 12, 1979, over the western Pacific Ocean.

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Table 1. Position, central pressure, and 1-min maximum sustained .wind speed for Hurricane Gilbert (1988) at 6 h intervals

and at landfall. Times are in UTC, which leads EDT by 4 hours.

. Date Time Lat. Lon. Pressure Wind speed

(UTC) (ON) (OW) (rob) (kt) (mph)

9/08 1800 12.0 54.0 1008 25 30

]

9/09 0000 12.7 55.6 1007 25 30 Tropical

0600 13.3 57.1 1006 30 35 Depression

1200 14.0 58.6 1005 30 35

1800 14.5 60.1 1004 35 40

]

9/10 0000 14.8 61.5 1002 40 45 Tropical

0600 15.0 62.8 998 45 50 Storm

1200 15.3 64.1 995 50 60

1800 15.7 65.4 992 55 65

9/11 0000 15.9 66.8 989 65 75

0600 16.2 68.0 982 80 90

1200 16.1 69.5 975 95 110

1800 16.2 70.7 970 100 115

9/12 0000 16.8 72.0 964 105 120

0600 17.3 73.7 962 110 125

1200 17.6 75.3 960 110 125

1800 18.0 76.9 960 110 125

9/13 0000 18.3 78.5 960 110 125

0600 18.5 79.7 952 115 130

1200 18.8 81.1 934 125 145

1800 19.4 82.5 905 140 160 Hurricane

9/14 0000 19.7 83.8 888 160 185

0600 19.9 85.3 889 155 180

1200 20.4 86.5 892 145 165

1800 20.9 87.8 925 130 150

9/15 0000 21.3 89.5 944 100 115

0600 21.6 90.7 949 90 105

1200 21.9 91.7 950 85 100

1800 22.1 92.8 950 90 105

9/16 0000 22.5 93.8 949 100 115

0600 22.9 94.8 946 110 125

1200 23.7 95.9 948 115 130

1800 23.9 97.0 950 115 130

9/17 0000 24.4 98.2 964 80 90

0600 24.8 99.3 988 50 60 ] Tropical

1200 25.0 100.5 996 35 40 Storm

1800 25.4 101.9 1000 30 35

9/18 0000 26.0 103.2 1002 30 35

0600 27.6 103.7 1004 30 35

1200 29.3 102.6 1003 25 30 Tropical

1800 31.5 101.3 1003 25 30 Depression

9/19 0000 33.2 99.7 1002 25 30

0600 35.8 97.7 1001 25 30

.1200 37.7 93.2 999 25 30

1800 40.2 89.9 998 25 30 ] Extra-

9/20 0000 43.4 86.5 995 25 30 tropical

0600 Merged with Front At landfall:

9/12 1700 17.8 76.8 960 115 130

]

9/14 1500 20.7 87.0 900 140 160 Hurricane

9/16 2200 24.2 97.8 955 110 125

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2. TROPICAL CYCLONE CHARACTERISTICS AND CLIMATOLOGY 2.1 Life Cycle of a Tropical Cyclone

Briefly stated, a tropical cyclone is a rotating, convective .

system that develops over the tropical oceans. Just above the

surface of these oceans we find the warm, moist air that is . necessary to sustain the tremendous release of energy that

characterizes these systems. The tropical cyclone may progress through three stages: tropical depression, tropical storm, and hurricane.

Although tropical cyclones may be initiated by several mecha- nisms, of interest here is the westward-traveling tropical wave.

A number of these waves travel uneventfully across the Atlantic at low latitudes every summer. In a few of these waves, an important transition takes place; a rotary (that is, closed) counterclockwise circulation may develop near the earth's surface from the open wave pattern. If the circulation is sufficiently well-defined, the

system is designated a tropical depression. Official tracking begins, and wind speed estimates are made. If not yet requested,

and the depression is within a reasonable distance from land, aircraft reconnaissance may begin. The depression receives a reference number, issued consecutively throughout the hurricane season. Gilbert, for example, became the twelfth tropical

depression of 1988, and formed from tropical wave 38.

The tropical depression may continue to intensify. If the wind speed (sustained over 1 minute at about 30 feet above the surface) reaches 39 mph, the system receives the designation tropical storm, and is named. Gilbert became the seventh named system of 1988 on September 9 as its center passed over the island of Martinique in the Windward Islands. If the winds increase further to 74 mph, the tropical storm becomes a hurricane. Gilbert reached this stage

fairly rapidly, within 30 hours of being named, becoming a hurri- cane on September 10 (local time, see Table 1).

The threshold wind speeds of 39 and 74 mph correspond to points on the Beaufort scale, developed during the early nineteenth cen- tury as an aid to the sailing ships of that era. Beaufort Force 8 (39-46 mph) is described as a "fresh gale". Beaufort Force 12

(74 mph or more), the highest on the scale, was considered the point at which, in deteriorating weather, a ship could no longer carry any sail.

2.2 Tropical Cyclone Data Base .

If a tropical cyclone attains named status, its successive positions (given in degrees latitude and longitude) and estimated.

maximum sustained winds are archived by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) located in Coral Gables, Florida. This archive con- tains entries, at six-hourly intervals, for all tropical. storms and hurricanes in the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Gulf of Mex~co from 1886 to the present. Hurricane Gilbert is now the eight hundred

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and sixtieth entry in this permanent file, referred to informally as the "best track" file. The positions and wind estimates established "best" that after can be given, the fact hence with all the available name. information ' are th~

. Although there are some earlier records, a few even dating back to the European exploration of the New World, in general, reliable .tracks can only be established beginning in the latter half of the

nineteenth century. Estimates of the wind speed were generally less reliable over the open ocean until the advent of aircraft reconnaissance in the late 1940's.

2.3 Classification of Hurricanes

There are many possible ways to classify hurricanes, given their wide range of wind speeds (from 74 mph to perhaps 200 mph) and variety of damaging effects. As noted by Dunn and Miller (1960), there is no single classification system which can succinctly encompass all aspects of the hurricane. Possible criteria for classification include evaluation of damage (structural damage, beach erosion, effects on vegetation, fatalities, dollar cost, etc.) and characteristics of the hurricane itself (e.g., wind speeds, minimum central pressure, size). Given the uneven dis-

tribution of population along hurricane-prone coastlines, it is perhaps not surprising that compilations of hurricanes by various damage criteria produce quite different lists (Hebert and Case,

1990) .

In the early 1970's, Herbert Saffir devised a damage scale based upon numerous on-site inspections of hurricane damage. His five-

category scale has the advantage of relating ranges of sustained winds to specific effects on structures and vegetation (Table 2).

Robert Simpson, a former director of the National Hurricane Center, added a further reference to expected storm surge which is the rise of a body of water above normal astronomical tide due to a tropical cyclone. The resulting scale, now known as the Saffir/Simpson scale, received the sanction of the National Weather Service in

1972 and has since come into widespread use. Another useful feature of the Saffir/Simpson scale, and part of its original intent, is that it allows coastal residents to compare conditions expected from an impending hurricane with conditions experienced in previous hurricanes affecting the same area (Simpson and Riehl, 1981). The scale is given in quick-reference form in Table 3.

From Table 3, we see that a hurricane reaches category 5 when its maximum sustained winds exceed 155 mph (135 kt). Gilbert .reached category 5 on 13 September after exiting Jamaica. It

remained a category 5 through landfall on the Yucatan peninsula.

.2.4 Frequency of Severe Hurricanes

The best-track file, described in Section 2.2, is a reliable data base that can be used to estimate how often we might expect a hurricane of Gilbert's intensity to occur. Of the 875 cyclones in

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Table 2. The Saffir/Simpson - Scale

Category 1 Winds of 74 to 95 mph. Damage primarily to shrubbery, trees,

foliage, and unanchored mobile homes. No significant damage

to other structures. Some damage to poorly constructed signs.

And/or: storm surge 4 to 5 feet above normal tide. Low-lying coastal roads inundated, minor pier damage, some small craft in

exposed anchorages torn from moorings. .

Category 2 Winds of 96 to 110 mph. Considerable damage to shrubbery and

tree foliage; some trees blown down. Major damage to exposed .

mobile homes. Extensive damage to poorly constructed signs.

Some damage to roofing materials of buildings; some window and door damage. No major damage to buildings.

And/or: storm surge 6 to 8 feet above normal tide. Coastal roads and low-lying escape routes made impassable by rising water 2 to 4 hours before arrival of hurricane center. Con-

siderable damage to piers. Marinas flooded. Small craft in

unprotected anchorages torn from moorings. Evacuation of some

shoreline residences and low-lying island areas required.

Category 3 Winds of 111 to 130 mph. Foliage torn from trees; large trees

blown down. Practically all poorly constructed signs blown

down. Some damage to roofing materials of buildings; some

window and door damage. Some structural damage to small

buildings. Mobile homes destroyed.

And/or: storm surge 9 to 12 feet above normal tide. Serious flooding at coast and many smaller structures near coast des- troyed; large structures near coast damaged by battering waves

and floating debris. Low-lying escape routes made impassable by rising water 3 to 5 hours before hurricane center arrives.

Flat terrain 5 feet or less above sea-level flooded inland

8 miles or more. Evacuation of low-lying residences within

several blocks of shoreline possibly required.

Category 4 Winds of 131 to 155 mph. Shrubs and trees blown down; all

signs down. Extensive damage to roofing materials, windows

and doors. Complete failure of roofs on many small residences.

Complete destruction of mobile homes.

And/or: storm surge 13 to 18 feet above normal tide. Flat

terrain 10 feet or less above sea-level flooded inland as far as 6 miles. Major damage to lower floors of structures near shore due to flooding and battering by waves and floating de- bris. Low-lying escape routes made impassable by rising waters

3 to 5 hours before hurricane center arrives. Major erosion

of beaches. Massive evacuation of all residences within

500 yards of shore possibly required, and of single-story residences on low ground within 2 miles of shore.

category 5 Winds greater than 155 mph. Shrubs and trees blown down; con- siderable damage to roofs of buildings; all signs down. Very

severe and extensive damage to windows and doors. Complete

failure of roofs on many residences and industrial buildings.

Extensive shattering of glass in windows and doors. Some com-

plete building failures. Small buildings overturned or blown

away. Complete destruction of mobile homes. .

And/or: storm surge greater than 18 feet above normal tide.

Major damage to lower floors of all structures less than 15

feet above sea-level within 500 yards of shore. Low-lying .

escape routes made impassable by rising water 3 to 5 hours

before hurricane center arrives. Massive evacuation of

residential areas on low ground within 5 to 10 miles of shore possibly required.

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the Atlantic data base through 1989, 512 or 59% have reached hurricane strength. Of these, only 21 (2%) have reached category 5 intensity (sustained wind speeds of greater than 155 mph).

Tracks of these hurricanes are plotted in Fig. 2; periods during which sustained winds exceeded 155 mph are indicated by a heavier.

line. Names and dates of these hurricanes are given in Table 4.

Of the 21 hurricanes shown in Fig. 2, only eight have had.

category 5 status at the time of landfall, as indicated in Table 4, with two making u.s. landfall. These are the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, striking the Florida Keys, and Hurricane Camille, which hit the coast of Mississippi in August, 1969. These

two systems will be discussed more fully below, and will serve as a basis of comparison for Hurricane Gilbert. The tracks of these three landfalling category 5 hurricanes are shown in Fig. 3.

Using the historical data base, we can obtain a quantitative estimate of the average return period for these catastrophic hurricanes. By plotting the histogram (the relative frequencies)

of maximum winds attained by all tropical cyclones over a certain

Table 4. Summary of Atlantic hurricanes during the period 1886- 1989 having attained sustained winds greater than 135 kt (Saffir/Simpson category 5). Tracks are plotted in Fig.

2, as indicated by storm number. It should be noted that minimum central pressure, when known, will produce a somewhat different list if used as a criterion. Country or commonwealth affected by landfall, as indicated.

Date (UTC) Landfall as

Number storm name Maximum wind attained category 5

1 Not named 140 kt 160 mph Sept 13, 1928 (Puerto Rico)

2 Not named 140 160 sept 5, 1932 (Bahamas)

3 Not named 140 160 sept 3, 1935 (US)

4 Not named 140 160 Sept 19, 1938

5 Not named 140 160 Sept 16, 1947 (Bahamas)

6 Dog 160 185 Sept 6, 1950

7 Easy 140 160 Sept 7, 1951

8 Janet 150 175 Sept 28, 1955 (Mexico)

9 Cleo 140 160 Aug 16, 1958

10 Donna 140 160 Sept 4, 1960

11 Ethel 140 160 Sept 15, 1960

12 Carla 150 175 Sept 11, 1961

13 Hattie 140 160 Oct 30, 1961

14 Beulah 140 160 Sept 20, 1967

15 Camille 165 190 Aug 17, 1969 ..(US)

16 Edith 140 160 Sept 9, 1971 (N~caragua)

17 Anita 150 175 Sept 2, 1977

18 David 150 175 Aug 30, 1979

19 Allen 165 190 Aug 7, 1980 .

20 Gilbert 160 185 Sept 14, 1988 (Mexico)

21 Hugo 140 160 sept 15, 1989

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