The CIO s Chance of a Lifetime

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Dan Vesset, Henry Morris | December 2013

White Paper

The CIO’s Chance

of a Lifetime

Using Big Data and Analytics as the

Ticket to Strategic Relevance

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IDC identified a number of

stumbling blocks that

busi-nesses face in their path to

fully embracing analytics,

in-cluding overcoming existing

organizational mindsets and

settling upon the

appropri-ate home in the organization

for the analytics function.

Today is a time of unprecedented oppor-tunity and risk for CIOs and the enterprises they support. We are in the early stages of what IDC refers to as the “3rd Platform” of computing in which new technologies — cloud, mobile, social, and Big Data — are coming together to form a new platform for industry and enterprise innovation and growth. These innovations will reset the landscape for every industry that uses IT, with Big Data and associated analytics play-ing a critical role.

As our society becomes increasingly digi-tized, the volume of data that organizations need to manage and analyze continues to grow. To make sense of and drive maxi-mum value from this data, businesses are spending at unprecedented levels, which IDC estimates at $95 billion worldwide, on relevant information management, access,

and analysis technologies and services (source: IDC’s Worldwide Business Analytics Technology and Services 2013–2017 Forecast,

forthcoming).

But even as Big Data and analytics are fun-damentally transforming business, many organizations don’t know how to calculate — or even articulate — the value of analyt-ics. In a March 2013 study on analytics in the enterprise, IDC identified a number of stumbling blocks that businesses face in their path to fully embracing analytics, in-cluding overcoming existing organizational mindsets and settling upon the appropriate home in the organization for the analytics function. And for businesses that do have a defined home for analytics, it often lives outside IT, with a chief data officer or chief analytics officer.

In This White Paper

This white paper describes the results of a study conducted by IDC and sponsored by SAS Institute to examine the role that the CIO and the IT group play in enabling, supporting, and leading analytics programs and projects within their organizations. Insights about analytics strategy and investment drivers, analytics culture, and outcomes of analytics projects are presented along with recommendations for CIO/IT organizations to maximize their impact on positive outcomes of analytics projects, productive collaboration and interactions with line-of-business and analytics counterparts, and optimized utilization of scarce IT resources toward high-impact analytics projects. The research was conducted in the first half of 2013 and was based on four roundtable sessions of IT, LOB, and analytics leaders from North America, northwestern and southwestern Europe, and the Asia/Pacific region and a survey of 578 IT, LOB, and analytics managers and executives across 11 coun-tries in the United States, Europe, and Asia/Pacific.

Executive Summary:

Using Big Data and

Analytics as the Ticket

to Strategic Relevance

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Big Data is creating a new,

unique role for the CIO that

will contribute directly to

organizational success and

that is fully appropriate to

the CIO function.

The Continuing Disconnect

Between IT and Lines of Business

Our study found that there is an ongoing disconnect between IT and lines of busi-ness (LOBs) with regard to analytics. IT is too frequently seen as a roadblock to rather than an enabler of analytics, and many lines of business are developing workarounds and “shadow IT” approaches. Among the specific areas of disconnect we identified are that LOBs see faster time to ROI from analytics than IT, many LOBs are actively working with chief analytics officers while IT is less plugged into them, IT is less involved in setting analytics strategy than it believes, and LOBs are less satisfied than IT with IT/LOB analytics collaboration. Further, while LOB executives we spoke with were able to articulate their business’ analytics strategy, IT participants were not particu-larly clued into it.

Big Data Changes Everything

While the concept that IT is a roadblock and LOBs are working around central IT is not new, what is different is the changing nature of analytics in the world of Big Data and the opportunities this presents to the CIO. Previously, individual departments or business units had sufficient data at their disposal, and with access to cloud

com-puting, in-department business analysts, and other workarounds, they were able to cobble together sufficient IT resources to handle their analysis needs. But in the era of Big Data, many of the sources required to achieve a 360-degree view of the customer and other aspects of the business are scat-tered throughout and even outside the enterprise. Taking full advantage of these sources requires a more holistic, enterprise-wide approach to gathering, integrating, and ensuring the integrity of the data. This is good news for the CIO. Big Data is creating a new, unique role for the CIO that will contribute directly to organizational success and that is fully appropriate to the CIO function. The CIO should be taking an active role in developing an analytics strat-egy, establishing the IT department as a trusted advisor, and setting the foundation to support analytics within the enterprise. The CIO should perform the difficult task of gathering, integrating, and normalizing the diverse sets of data from within and outside the enterprise and present the business with a trusted “single version of the truth.” This includes establishing data advisory boards and steering committees to coor-dinate activities and share best practices and helping LOBs measure and assess the outcomes of analytics projects. The CIO also

% of respondents who agreed that:

IT

LOB

They are satisfied with IT/LOB

65% 55%

analytics collaboration

IT is primary analytics

39% 25%

strategy developer

IT decides analytics

19% 10%

projects funding

Areas of Disconnect Between

IT and Lines of Business

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Our thesis — that Big Data is

changing the CIO’s role — is

supported by four key

findings that debunk

commonly held beliefs and

that serve as the foundation

for IDC’s recommendations.

needs to become better at telling stories of IT’s role in successful analytics projects to continue building awareness among LOB and CXO audiences.

The Four “Busted Myths”

Our thesis — that Big Data is changing the CIO’s role — is supported by four key findings that debunk commonly held beliefs and that serve as the foundation for IDC’s recommendations. Table 1 provides a summary of the findings and implications for CIOs.

Lessons Learned from the

Analytic Achievers

In our study, 95% of those surveyed saw benefits from analytics; however, a smaller group (31%) of respondents 1) were able

to measure the value of analytics to their business and 2) reported that the benefits either met or exceeded their expectations. We classified these organizations as Analytic Achievers.

IDC used the Analytic Achievers to under-stand how organizations that are getting greater value out of analytics differ from the rest of the organizations in the study. For example, we found that Analytic Achiev-ers place a higher priority on investment in analytics as a factor in achieving their organization’s goals. Furthermore, Analytic Achievers are three times more likely to be in complete agreement that IT places appropriate value on analytics. This white paper looks to draw lessons from Analytic Achievers to understand the best practices they are using and how those best practic-es are contributing to succpractic-ess in analytics.

Myth

IT controls all things data. Technology poses the biggest challenge. Everyone understands the value of analytics.

You can’t have analytics without IT.

Table 1 – The Four Busted Myths and Implications for CIOs

IDC Finding

Analytics is finding a home, but not in IT.

The greatest stumbling blocks are organizational mindset and culture. Businesses have trouble articulating the value of analytics.

IT is part of the problem, not the solution.

CIO Implications

• Support creation of and work closely with analytics groups.

• Help define the components of an enterprisewide analytics strategy. • Key role: Take an active role in developing your company’s

analytics strategy.

• Become a clearinghouse to share and disseminate best practices. • Use the strategy of influencers.

Key role: Actively influence the data-driven decision-making organizational culture.

• Assist LOB and analytics staff in measuring and assessing the outcomes of analytics projects.

• Develop more consultative skills.

Key role: Tell better analytics success stories.

• Focus on the information management steps — data integration, data management, data quality, and data security — of the analytics life cycle. • Focus on providing a single version of the truth.

Key role: Provide a world-class analytics platform; then know when to step aside.

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“We have just built an

analytics group to

get everybody

who does this into the

same room.”

— Data Scientist, leading U.S. membership organization

Our research shows that irrespective of title, the CIO does not hold a monopoly on all things “information.” In today’s market, where analytic capabilities are increasingly viewed as competitive differentiators, ana-lytics is increasingly being entrusted to a separate group with responsibility not only for performing analysis but also for invest-ing in analytics technology and services. According to our study, 38% of organiza-tions indicated that the majority of their analytics human resources (HR) reside in a centralized analytics group outside IT — a figure that would have been close to 0% five to ten years ago — and 21% said their analytics strategy is primarily determined by a centralized analytics group.

These organizations and their “data scien-tists” — a relatively recent title but one that has grown rapidly in popularity — tend to operate under technology procurement and HR guidelines that are separate from those of the typical centralized IT group. In fact, in our study, only 15% of respondents said that IT alone is responsible for decid-ing analytics project funddecid-ing; nearly 50% of respondents indicated that IT and LOBs collaborate on this decision.

These analytics organizations are headed by new leadership roles with titles includ-ing chief analytics officer and chief data officer. As a senior vice president in the analytics group of one of the largest insur-ance companies said in one of our round-table sessions, “We have a chief data officer and a program around data management capabilities that ranks as the second most important initiative within our company.” In addition, there are powerful business lead-ers across industries whose positions are largely defined by analytics and data. These

can include roles such as the chief risk of-ficer in banking, chief actuary in insurance, and head of merchandising in retail. The emerging analytics organization is an area where IDC observed a major discon-nect between IT and LOB respondents. LOB respondents were well aware of chief analytics officers and the critical role they play, while IT respondents discounted their significance. But the CIO ignores this trend at his or her peril: The halo effect on analytics groups may be temporary or may last for years, but in the short term, it can marginalize the CIO’s role in enabling analytics solutions to the detriment of the broader organization. The CIO risks being left behind.

On the other hand, there is an important role the CIO can and should play in analyt-ics. One of the key findings of our survey is that an enterprisewide analytics strategy leads to better outcomes from analytics projects: We found that Analytic Achiev-ers have a significantly higher incidence of analytics strategy that spans the whole enterprise or multiple business — 56% have an enterprisewide strategy compared with 32% of the rest of the organizations in the study (see Figure 1). The implication is that while incremental, department-level deployments are the preferred method, analytics works best when the strategy is guided at the corporate, CXO level and not within specific business units or depart-ments. As a vice president of one of the world’s largest hospitality companies said in one of our roundtable sessions, “Analyt-ics strategy is critical for us. We have many different analytics projects, and they need to be in concert.”

Myth #1: IT Controls All Things Data

IDC Finding: Analytics Is Finding a Home, But Not in IT

“It’s not possible to

centralize the analytics

function. Different skills

are needed across

different areas.”

— Head of CFO Data Governance, European financial services firm

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“When you are talking …

with cross-functional teams,

never use the word ‘change.’

Always use the word

‘improve.’ Because nobody

wants to change, but

every-one wants to improve.”

— Director, Analytics, major U.S. online retailer

CIO Implications

• Support creation of and work closely with analytics groups.

The CIO needs to be plugged into and cooperate closely with emerging analytics groups such as data advisory boards, analytics steering committees, and analytics competency centers. Only by being part of such cross-functional management bodies can IT leaders expect to have an opportunity to influence their organiza-tion’s culture of analytics.

• Help define the components of an enterprisewide analytics strategy.

The CIO should take an active role in helping the organization articulate all the necessary components of an analytics strategy. The strategy should include refer-ences to technology, process, people, and data.

• Key role: Take an active role in developing your company’s analytics strategy.

The CIO has the opportunity and the responsibility to take an active role in devel-oping the analytics strategy and to act as the hub of analytics-related communica-tion and coordinacommunica-tion among all stakeholders. Part of the strategy should include methods and metrics for evaluating analytics project and program success. IT should focus its strategic contribution on IT core competencies and actively com-municate those competencies to internal audiences.

Figure 1 – Analytic Achievers Have Enterprisewide Analytics Strategy

Question: Which of the following best describes your organization’s analytics strategy? Percentages reflect those stating “enterprisewide.” Source: IDC, March 2013

56%

32%

Analytic Achievers

The Rest of the Organizations

Analytic achievers have a

significantly higher

incidence of enterprisewide

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“The culture of analytics is

not very deep. There is no

top-down push for analytics.”

— Business Intelligence Unit Manager, European government tax agency

With issues such as data integration and reconciliation, many organizations think that the biggest obstacle to realizing the value of analytics is the lack of proper technology to perform data integration and analysis. But our study found that while having the proper technology is important to success in analytics, the most significant stumbling blocks are the mindset and culture of the organization. Resistance by top management, organizational silos, and disconnect between IT and the business are issues that organizations must over-come to maximize the business benefits of analytics.

Many organizations make the move to ana-lytics not in a proactive, strategic manner but in response to key triggering events. These could include executive turnover, merger and acquisition activity, major eco-nomic shocks or changes in growth phases,

and new regulation or deregulation. On the other hand, Analytic Achievers have a much stronger strategic, centralized, and proactive approach to analytics. They have significantly stronger involvement by senior IT leadership in promoting and encourag-ing the use of analytic capabilities (see Figure 2). And although the largest percent-age of survey respondents indicated that LOB groups are primarily responsible for developing the analytics strategy, among Analytic Achievers, analytics strategy lead-ership was evenly divided between IT and LOB. It is possible for IT leaders to take an active leadership role not only in provid-ing and supportprovid-ing analytics technology but also in influencing the data-driven decision-making culture of the organiza-tion. This role has a significant impact on positive outcomes of analytics projects.

Myth #2: Technology Poses

the Biggest Challenge

IDC Finding: The Greatest Stumbling Blocks Are

Organizational Mindset and Culture

Figure 2 – IT Is More Involved Among Analytic Achievers

Question: How involved are the following managers in promoting and encouraging the use of your organization’s analytic capabilities? Source: IDC, March 2013

Analytic Achievers

The Rest of the Organizations

34%

indicated that

Percentage of respondents who

IT leaders

are

very

15%

involved

in

promoting

and

encouraging

the use of

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“Ironically, we are the analytic

function. We tell other

people the ROIs on their

projects — but we have

a difficult time sitting

down and saying how

much money [analytics]

is going to make.”

— Director, Strategy & Analytics, major U.S. hospitality chain

Our study showed that organizations be-lieve in the business value of analytics. 95% of respondents indicated that they have seen real benefits from analytics projects. Previous IDC studies found that organiza-tions classified as “Fact Finders” — those that are more analytically oriented — are 20% more likely to be among leaders within their industry.

But despite this belief, few organizations were able to actually quantify the benefits

of analytics. Part of the challenge is the dif-ficulty in tracking and measuring benefits. Few organizations have the discipline and methods to perform pre- and post-project assessments that are needed to quantify analytics project outcomes. This was a com-mon theme acom-mong our roundtables and was borne out in the survey results. As Figure 3 illustrates, 61% of respondents said they have seen benefits but have not quantified them.

CIO Implications

• Become a clearinghouse to share and disseminate best practices.

As a central entity, the CIO organization is in a unique position to be able to col-lect, assess, and share best practices with business units and other departments around the enterprise. Instead of merely providing reactive responses to user requests or focusing on incremental technology enhancements, IT leaders should take advantage of their depth of technology expertise, best practices, and use cases to proactively seek out and expose LOBs to what’s possible with analytics.

• Use the strategy of influencers.

The CIO should identify champions throughout the enterprise, particularly in LOB and analytics organizations, and work with them to promote the role of IT and the value that IT provides.

• Key role: Actively influence the data-driven decision-making organizational culture.

While it’s true that the CIO plays a huge role in providing and supporting the data platforms and analytics technology on which the organization depends, that alone is not enough. IT leaders must take an active leadership role in influencing the data-driven decision-making culture of the organization.

Myth #3: Everyone Understands

the Value of Analytics

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“We need to tell more

[analytics] success stories.”

— Business Intelligence Unit Manager, European government tax agency

CIO Implications

• Assist LOB and analytics staff in measuring and assessing outcomes.

CIOs must work to quantify the value of analytics projects and the impacts those projects have had on the business. Having access to data from all enterprise ap-plications, systems, and data warehouses, CIOs can monitor the quality of analytic models and results of decisions made based on analytics. Key success factors include defining the business case, identifying metrics, and tying analytics to business outcomes. IT was involved in monitoring the analytics model quality and decision outcomes for 72% of Analytic Achievers versus only 57% of the rest of the organizations.

• Develop more consultative skills.

CIOs should develop departmental skills to act as an internal consulting organi-zation to ensure the success of analytics projects and should not limit their role to providing infrastructure support. This not only will help establish the CIO as a trusted advisor but also will help spread the mindset of analytics throughout the organization and better equip the organization with the necessary tools and methodologies to quantify the value of analytics.

• Key role: Tell better analytics success stories.

IT cannot simply complete a project and walk away. Many best practices hinge on the ability of IT leaders to articulate and market their core competency and value proposition to other internal stakeholders. By better communicating the value of analytics and IT’s role in realizing it, IT can help LOBs better assess the value of analytics. This helps sharpen the story of what analytics does for an organization and can help stimulate wider analytics deployment.

Figure 3 – Most Organizations Have Not

Quantified Benefits from Analytics

Question: Has your organization seen tangible benefits from its analytic capabilities? Source: IDC, March 2013

5%

61%

34%

5%

Have not seen benefits Have seen benefits but have not quantified them Have seen benefits and have quantified them

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“There’s a lot of ‘us versus

them.’ If we keep working like

this, IT will not survive.”

— VP, Enterprise Technology, Architecture, and Processes, European pharmaceutical company

“The reality is that IT

is a constraint.”

— Director, Analytics, major U.S. online retailer

The Ongoing IT/Line-of-Business

Disconnect

Our research found large differences between the views of LOBs and IT in regard to how helpful IT is as part of the analytics process. This came across clearly in the sur-vey data, which shows a 14% disconnect between IT and LOB respondents with re-gard to whether IT is the primary developer of analytics strategy (39% of IT respondents versus 25% of LOB respondents) and a 10% disconnect in terms of satisfaction with IT/LOB collaboration around analytics (65% of IT respondents versus 55% of LOB respondents). Perhaps most telling is that nearly twice as many IT respondents as LOB respondents believe that IT decides which

analytics projects receive funding — 19% versus 10% (see Figure 4).

This data suggests a lack of communica-tion between the two groups and possibly different interpretations of what should be part of an analytics strategy. And the dis-connect was evident not only in the survey data. LOB respondents in the roundtable sessions saw IT having ownership of man-aging service-level agreements, keeping the systems running, and keeping the data clean, but not setting the analytics agenda, while IT respondents saw themselves driv-ing the value proposition for analytics and driving analytics proposals. LOB respon-dents told us that the mindset of IT depart-ments is focused on how much analytics

Myth #4: You Can’t Have

Analytics Without IT

IDC Finding: IT Is Part of the Problem, Not the Solution

Figure 4 – The IT/LOB Disconnect Over Analytics

Questions: How would you rate your satisfaction with the quality of business and IT collaboration/interaction around analytics? Which group in your organization is primarily responsible for developing your organization’s analytics strategy? Who in your organization decides which analytics projects receive funding?

Source: IDC, March 2013

They are satisfied with IT/LOB collaboration around analytics

65

55

39

19

25

10

IT is primarily involved in setting analytics strategy IT decides which analytics projects

receive funding

IT

LOB

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“The reason there is shadow

IT is because IT is too slow

and expensive. The business

does not have time to wait.”

— Head of IT Domain Business Intelligence, European financial services company

“The best, most successful

projects that I have worked

on have had a very tight

re-lationship between analytics

and IT no matter how much

tension there might be.”

— VP, Advanced Analytics, U.S. travel services company

will cost the business and how data can be stored and not (LOB’s desire) how it can be used by the business.

Lines of Business Are

Using Shadow IT

The pressure to succeed with Big Data and analytics initiatives is putting great pressure on technology teams, and in many cases, IT has failed in key aspects to support the analytic needs of the organization. A com-mon complaint acom-mong business executives and data scientists in our roundtables is that IT is too slow to address their require-ments. In their efforts to achieve their goals, many lines of business have turned to siloed projects using “shadow IT” groups dedicated to analytics, and many analytics organizations have the power to operate outside IT. This has added to the ongoing friction between IT and LOBs.

A key challenge for the CIO is the lack of expertise and time to address all the steps of the analytics life cycle. Unfortunately, many CIOs are not focusing their attention

on IT’s core competencies or placing much value on the role of other groups in the analytics life cycle. These IT groups strive for greater efficiency in processes where their involvement should be minimal. But orga-nizations that are successful with analytics have a role for IT: In our research, Analytic Achievers exhibited greater IT involvement in analytic life-cycle steps of data collection and data preparation and greater shared responsibility between IT and LOBs for analysis, deployment of analytic models, and monitoring of model and decision quality. The effort by IT to be all things to all people leads to inefficiency and substan-dard quality outputs and support for LOBs. A huge challenge is the ability to provide a “single version of the truth.” Roundtable participants talked about the importance of having a single version of the truth. But to a person, they also described how difficult it is to develop a single version of the truth, particularly in the era of Big Data with the need to integrate data from repositories spread throughout or outside the organiza-tion.

CIO Implications

• Focus on the information management steps — data integration, data management, data quality, and data security — of the analytics life cycle.

IT should focus on the steps of the analytics life cycle for which it is best equipped and leave the actual data analysis to analytics groups and lines of business. Appropriate IT roles include ensuring high levels of data quality and security, availability of all the necessary data, and certain aspects of master data management while also providing a flexible analytics technology infrastruc-ture that encourages agile experimentation with data.

• Focus on providing a single version of the truth.

This is a critical need for the organization and fits squarely with the CIO’s responsibilities. In the era of Big Data, the CIO is in a unique position to gather, integrate, and ensure the integrity of data from multiple data sources inside and outside the organiza-tion. CIOs who can deliver against this goal will be able to demonstrate clearly how they are driving value to the business.

• Key role: Provide a world-class analytics platform; then know when to step aside.

In the context of analytics, the IT core competency lies in data collection and data preparation. Our survey data shows that when IT is more involved in these two steps of the analytics life cycle, the organization tends to reap greater benefits from analytics projects. But when IT is involved in every step of the analytics life cycle, it slows everything down.

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The key to uncovering this

new path is the emergence

of Big Data: Prior to the

advent of Big Data, lines of

business could make due

with the resources they

had at their disposal, but

in the world of Big Data, in

which information must be

com bined and integrated

from throughout the

enterprise and often from

external sources, this is no

longer possible.

In this study, we identified many ways that IT is perceived to be a roadblock to a successful analytics strategy and a num-ber of disconnects between how IT and lines of business view IT’s role. While this fundamental story is not necessarily new, what is new is the path forward for the CIO that not only helps IT look out for its own interests but also better supports business needs in a very strategic, outcome-oriented capacity. The key to uncovering this new path is the emergence of Big Data: Prior to the advent of Big Data, lines of business could make due with the resources they had at their disposal, but in the world of Big Data, in which information must be com-bined and integrated from throughout the enterprise and often from external sources, this is no longer possible.

In this new world, the CIO can gain new relevance by:

• Staking out the appropriate analytics role for the IT organization. Analytics teams are gaining new prominence in the enterprise, but the CIO organiza-tion still has a critical role to play. While supporting and assisting the creation of analytics teams, it should establish itself as the custodian and integrator for data across the enterprise. It should also stake its position as a coleader of establishing enterprisewide analytics strategy.

• Working to remove organizational mindset stumbling blocks. As the logi-cal central repository for best practices, the CIO organization should act as the internal information hub, connecting disparate LOBs, sharing lessons learned, encouraging collaboration, and guiding

the analytics process forward. And, in part by using the strategy of influenc-ers, CIOs should take an active role in promoting the organization’s data-driven decision-making culture.

• Quantifying the value of analytics.

CIOs should focus on the methodol-ogy and metrics necessary to quantify the business benefits of analytics. They should develop greater consultative skills to help organizations assess the value of analytics, and they should apply internal marketing techniques to promote IT’s capabilities and highlight IT’s success stories in developing and supporting analytics solutions.

• Partnering with LOBs to add value as a data integrator. CIOs should focus on what they do best: the information management steps of the analytics life cycle. They should provide the neces-sary infrastructure to present a trusted, single version of the truth. But most of all, they should focus on the portions of the analytics life cycle to which they are best suited — providing the data and technology foundation for analytics — and know when to step aside.

This new role is unique to the CIO’s func-tion; it can be implemented only by a centralized IT organization. It is also a new role that is evolving with the emergence of Big Data. This role cannot be performed by shadow IT. Big Data and analytics provide a potentially career-changing chance for CIOs to increase their strategic relevance within the enterprise — truly the chance of a lifetime. n

Conclusion: Realizing the

Chance of a Lifetime

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The research, which was conducted in the first half of 2013, is based on interviews con-ducted during roundtable sessions and a survey of IT, LOB, and analytics leaders.

Roundtable Sessions

IDC conducted four roundtable sessions with IT, LOB, and analytics leaders from North America, northwestern and southwestern Europe, and the Asia/Pacific region. Two ses-sions were held in San Francisco and one session each was held in London and Taipei. Each session, which was attended by 7 to 15 participants, was moderated by an IDC analyst with expertise in the business analytics market. Participants were led by analysts through a multihour session covering three primary topics: analytics strategy, analytics culture, and outcomes and benefits of analytics projects.

The Survey

IDC surveyed 578 IT, LOB, and analytics managers and executives across 11 countries in the United States, Europe, and Asia/Pacific. The research participants represented a wide range of private and public sector organizations with 500+ employees (82% of survey respondents’ companies had 1,000+ employees). 63% of survey respondents identified themselves as being part of their organization’s IT group, with the remaining 37% of re-spondents being part of their organization’s business groups.

Analytic Achievers

Part of the survey response analysis included the correlation of results from 28 questions, including questions about the outcomes of analytics projects. We asked survey partici-pants if their analytics projects resulted in quantifiable benefits and if the benefits met their organizational expectations. As a result of this analysis, we isolated a group of organi-zations where analytics projects either met or exceeded their expectations for quantifiable benefits. We call this group of organizations Analytic Achievers. This white paper includes references to Analytic Achievers and the rest of the organizations. The latter group is defined as organizations whose benefits did not meet expectations or whose benefits are not quantified.

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About IDC

International Data Corporation (IDC) is the premier global provider of market intelligence, advisory services, and events for the information technology, telecommunications, and consumer technology markets. IDC helps IT professionals, business executives, and the investment community make fact-based decisions on technology purchases and busi-ness strategy. More than 1,000 IDC analysts provide global, regional, and local expertise on technology and industry opportunities and trends in over 110 countries worldwide. For more than 49 years, IDC has provided strategic insights to help our clients achieve their key business objectives. IDC is a subsidiary of IDG, the world’s leading technology media, research, and events company. You can learn more about IDC by visiting www.idc.com.

Copyright Notice

External Publication of IDC Information and Data – Any IDC information that is to be used in advertising, press releases, or promotional materials requires prior written approval from the appropriate IDC Vice President or Country Manager. A draft of the proposed document should accompany any such request. IDC reserves the right to deny approval of external usage for any reason.

IDC Corporate Headquarters 5 Speen Street Framingham, MA 01701 USA Tel: +1 508.872.8200

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