Tivoli Business Systems Manager V2.1 End-To-End Business Impact Management Sg246610

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ibm.com/redbooks

Tivoli Business Systems

Manager Version 2.1

End-to-End Business Impact Management

Budi Darmawan

Alessio D’Amico

Cedric Foo

Peter Glasmacher

Stephen Nosbisch

Samson Yiu

In-depth product structure revealed

and explained

Detailed implementation of best

practices

Integrated systems

management solution

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Tivoli Business Systems Manager Version 2.1

End-to-End Business Impact Management

April 2003

International Technical Support Organization

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First Edition (April 2003)

This edition applies to Version 2, Release 1 of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager for z/OS (product number 5678-BSM).

Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. iii

Contents

Figures . . . xi Tables . . . xxi Notices . . . xxiii Trademarks . . . xxiv Preface . . . xxv

The team that wrote this redbook . . . xxv

Become a published author . . . .xxvii

Comments welcome . . . xxviii

Part 1. Concept and planning . . . 1

Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management . . . 3

1.1 Business systems management . . . 4

1.2 Tivoli systems management product . . . 5

1.3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager . . . 7

1.3.1 Business system . . . 8

1.3.2 Discovery processing . . . 9

1.3.3 Event processing. . . 10

1.3.4 Views. . . 12

1.4 Document organization and scope . . . 20

1.5 Lab environment . . . 22

Chapter 2. Components and functions . . . 25

2.1 Product structure . . . 26

2.2 Base services . . . 29

2.2.1 Components and data flow . . . 29

2.2.2 Installation directory structure . . . 39

2.2.3 Windows registry structure . . . 40

2.2.4 Log files . . . 43

2.3 Distributed resource feeds . . . 45

2.3.1 Agent Listener . . . 46

2.3.2 Common listener . . . 51

2.4 Mainframe (z/OS) resource feeds . . . 53

2.4.1 OS/390 components . . . 54

2.4.2 Windows servers connection . . . 57

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2.4.4 Bulk discovery . . . 62

2.4.5 Command support. . . 68

2.5 History server, reporting, and health monitor . . . 68

2.5.1 History server . . . 68

2.5.2 The reporting system . . . 70

2.5.3 Health monitor . . . 74

Chapter 3. Database structure . . . 77

3.1 Microsoft SQL Server overview . . . 78

3.2 The databases. . . 80

3.3 Object implementation. . . 80

3.3.1 Important information sources. . . 81

3.3.2 Object structure implementation . . . 82

3.3.3 Business Systems implementation . . . 84

3.3.4 ROOT, BUSC, and LOBC objects. . . 85

3.3.5 Object hierarchy . . . 85

3.4 Status propagation . . . 87

3.5 Agent listener resources . . . 91

3.5.1 Class implementation . . . 91

3.5.2 AMS tables . . . 93

3.6 Common listener resources . . . 95

3.7 Menu and command . . . 97

3.7.1 Menu, menu item, and launcher . . . 97

3.7.2 z/OS subsystems command support . . . 102

3.7.3 Tivoli task support . . . 108

Chapter 4. User interface . . . 113

4.1 Java console . . . 114

4.2 Web console . . . 119

Chapter 5. Implementation planning . . . 129

5.1 Planning overview . . . 130

5.2 Personnel . . . 130

5.3 Hardware specifications . . . 132

5.4 Network and connectivity . . . 133

5.5 Software level and prerequisites . . . 134

5.5.1 Planning for distributed systems . . . 134

5.5.2 Planning for mainframe systems . . . 135

5.6 Operators and users . . . 138

5.7 Business System requirements . . . 139

5.7.1 Business System View theory . . . 139

5.7.2 Business System View design concept. . . 139

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Contents v

Part 2. Distributed implementation . . . 147

Chapter 6. Base services implementation . . . 149

6.1 Hardware and software prerequisites . . . 150

6.1.1 Hardware configuration . . . 150

6.1.2 Software components . . . 151

6.1.3 Hardware and software configuration for this book . . . 152

6.2 Prerequisite software components installation . . . 154

6.2.1 Operating system: Windows 2000 Server . . . 154

6.2.2 MKS Toolkit for Systems Administrators Version 7.5 or 8.0 . . . 155

6.2.3 Windows Resource Kit . . . 155

6.2.4 JDBC Driver: Microsoft SQL 2000 Driver for JDBC . . . 155

6.2.5 Microsoft IIS . . . 155

6.2.6 Microsoft SQL Server . . . 155

6.3 Database server installation . . . 176

6.4 Console and propagation server installation . . . 190

6.5 History server installation . . . 194

6.6 Health Monitor Server implementation . . . 199

6.6.1 HMS Installation . . . 199

6.6.2 Customization . . . 202

6.6.3 Health Monitor Client implementation . . . 208

Chapter 7. TEC components integration. . . 209

7.1 Tivoli Enterprise Console overview . . . 210

7.2 Setting up the TEC connection . . . 211

7.2.1 Installing event enablement and the task server . . . 211

7.2.2 Setting up the user ID . . . 213

7.2.3 Updating the TEC event classes and rules . . . 217

7.2.4 Enabling TBSM agent listener. . . 225

7.3 IBM Tivoli Monitoring modules integration . . . 226

7.4 Creating a generic component . . . 230

7.5 Defining a component from DM monitors . . . 235

7.6 Troubleshooting. . . 242

Chapter 8. IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration . . . 249

8.1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring integration . . . 250

8.2 Adapter installation and configuration . . . 252

8.2.1 Installing JRE 1.3.0 . . . 252

8.2.2 Installing the TBSM adapter for ITM . . . 254

8.2.3 TBSM adapter processes . . . 256

8.2.4 Configuring the IBM Tivoli Monitoring for 5.1.1 TBSM Adapter . . . 259

8.3 Using the TBSM adapter . . . 261

8.3.1 Discovery process . . . 261

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8.4 Tracing an event to the Common Listener . . . 268

Chapter 9. IBM Tivoli NetView integration . . . 279

9.1 What IBM Tivoli NetView is . . . 280

9.2 NetView 7.1.3 installation and configuration . . . 283

9.2.1 Installation prerequisites . . . 283

9.2.2 Suggested configuration steps . . . 284

9.3 Adapter installation . . . 291

9.3.1 Installing the NetView part of the adapter . . . 292

9.3.2 Installing the TBSM part of the adapter. . . 293

9.4 NetView adapter configuration . . . 293

9.5 Using the adapter . . . 295

9.5.1 Bulk discovery . . . 295

9.5.2 How NetView resources are handled . . . 297

9.5.3 Launching NetView Web console from TBSM . . . 303

9.6 Troubleshooting the environment . . . 305

9.6.1 TBSM adapter basics . . . 305

9.6.2 TBSM communication . . . 307

9.6.3 Testing the launch functions . . . 308

9.6.4 TBSM adapter log and trace files . . . 309

9.7 Extending the menus. . . 311

9.7.1 Extending the NetView Web console . . . 312

9.7.2 Extending the TBSM Java console . . . 319

Part 3. z/OS integration . . . 329

Chapter 10. z/OS installation and configuration . . . 331

10.1 Source/390 implementation. . . 332

10.1.1 Pre-installation tasks . . . 332

10.1.2 Installing Source/390. . . 333

10.1.3 Bulk discovery configuration . . . 337

10.1.4 Source/390 tuning considerations . . . 337

10.1.5 Source/390 security . . . 338

10.2 Setting up Tivoli NetView for z/OS . . . 338

10.2.1 Modify the NetView started task procedure . . . 339

10.2.2 Modify the DSIPARM members . . . 339

10.2.3 Enable the PPI connection . . . 339

10.2.4 Enable NETCONV connection . . . 340

10.2.5 Enabling communication between NetView systems . . . 341

10.2.6 Tuning considerations . . . 341

10.3 Implementing the Event Server . . . 342

Chapter 11. z/OS data feeds and discovery . . . 347

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Contents vii

11.2 System Automation for OS/390 Version 2.1 . . . 349

11.2.1 Concept . . . 349

11.2.2 Integration setup . . . 350

11.2.3 Object discovery . . . 351

11.3 Database 2 (DB2) for z/OS . . . 353

11.3.1 Integration setup . . . 354

11.3.2 Object discovery . . . 356

11.4 Information Management System (IMS) . . . 357

11.4.1 Integration setup . . . 357

11.4.2 Object discovery . . . 360

11.5 CICSPlex System Manager Version 2.2 . . . 361

11.5.1 Integration setup . . . 361

11.5.2 Object discovery . . . 370

11.6 Tivoli Workload Scheduler for z/OS . . . 372

11.6.1 Concept . . . 372

11.6.2 Integration setup . . . 373

11.6.3 Object discovery . . . 376

11.7 Resource Object Data Manager . . . 376

11.7.1 Concept . . . 377

11.7.2 Integration setup . . . 377

11.7.3 Object discovery . . . 379

11.8 Resource Measurement Facility (RMF). . . 381

11.8.1 Concept . . . 381

11.8.2 Integration setup . . . 382

11.9 System Managed Storage (SMS) . . . 385

11.9.1 Concept . . . 385

11.9.2 Integration setup . . . 385

11.10 DFSMS Hierarchical Storage Manager . . . 388

11.10.1 Concept . . . 388

11.10.2 Integration setup . . . 389

11.11 WebSphere HTTP Server for OS/390 . . . 391

11.11.1 Integration setup . . . 391

11.11.2 Object discovery . . . 392

Part 4. Advanced configuration . . . 393

Chapter 12. Automatic Business System View creation . . . 395

12.1 Automatic Business System View . . . 396

12.1.1 Automatic Business Systems design . . . 396

12.1.2 Automatic Business Systems configuration file. . . 397

12.1.3 Defining the Automatic Business System . . . 402

12.2 ABS usage example . . . 403

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12.2.2 BSV creation tool . . . 407

12.3 Distributed LOB rules to ABS migration . . . 414

12.3.1 Migration description . . . 414

12.3.2 Migration example. . . 415

Chapter 13. Setting up roles and security. . . 421

13.1 Resource security . . . 422

13.1.1 Protecting files and directories . . . 422

13.1.2 Protecting the registry . . . 426

13.1.3 Windows user ID and groups . . . 429

13.2 Password protection . . . 430

13.2.1 TBSM processes passwords. . . 430

13.2.2 Microsoft SQL Server . . . 432

13.2.3 Reporting system password . . . 433

13.3 TBSM command security . . . 433

13.4 TBSM operators and workspaces . . . 434

Chapter 14. Maintenance and tuning issues . . . 437

14.1 SQL Server Agent jobs . . . 438

14.1.1 z/OS-related jobs . . . 438

14.1.2 Distributed resources jobs. . . 440

14.1.3 Database maintenance jobs . . . 440

14.2 Database maintenance . . . 445

14.2.1 Database statistic and check . . . 445

14.2.2 Database Maintenance Plan . . . 448

14.3 Microsoft SQL Server and Windows 2000 tuning . . . 458

14.3.1 Windows 2000 Advanced Server tuning . . . 458

14.3.2 Microsoft SQL Server 2000 tuning . . . 462

Chapter 15. Automatic problem ticketing . . . 465

15.1 Automatic problem ticketing . . . 466

15.2 Defining the auto ticketing rule . . . 467

15.3 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS integration overview . . . 469

15.4 Installation and configuration. . . 471

15.4.1 Enable problem management . . . 471

15.4.2 Extract and customize the input-output processor . . . 474

15.4.3 Setting up the task server and Tivoli NetView for z/OS . . . 475

15.4.4 Application customization . . . 477

15.5 Using the problem ticket interface . . . 499

15.5.1 Manual problem ticket operation . . . 499

15.5.2 Closing a problem ticket . . . 508

Chapter 16. High availability and failover . . . 513

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Contents ix

16.2 Implementation of failover . . . 515

16.2.1 Prerequisites . . . 515

16.2.2 Installation and customization of failover . . . 516

16.2.3 Setup for z/OS. . . 520

16.3 Performing failover . . . 521

16.3.1 Enabling failover . . . 522

16.3.2 Enabling reverse failover. . . 522

16.4 Limitations and discussion . . . 523

16.5 Troubleshooting tips . . . 525

Chapter 17. Historical reporting with TEDW . . . 527

17.1 Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse overview . . . 528

17.1.1 Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse concepts and components . . . 529

17.1.2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager integration . . . 532

17.2 Installation and configuration for data warehouse . . . 533

17.2.1 Warehouse integration pre-installation steps . . . 533

17.2.2 Setting up the source ETL. . . 534

17.3 Activating collection . . . 538

17.3.1 Changes on the TWH_CDW database . . . 539

17.3.2 Creating an ODBC connection to source database . . . 539

17.3.3 Defining authority to the Warehouse Sources and Targets . . . 543

17.3.4 Scheduling the source ETL . . . 548

17.3.5 Changing the source ETL status to Production. . . 551

17.3.6 Running ETLs . . . 552

Part 5. Appendixes . . . 553

Appendix A. Detailed process flow of services . . . 555

Appendix B. Sample files and scripts . . . 557

The gemmfprod.sh script . . . 558

High-level load sample . . . 560

ASILoad_Highlevel.ksh . . . 560

ITSO_Highlevel - Sample high-level load source . . . 564

Appendix C. IBM Tivoli NetView additional information . . . 565

NetView adapter configuration files . . . 566

The nvid.conf file . . . 566

The topxlistener.properties file . . . 566

The topxtrapgate.conf . . . 569

TBSM adapter files . . . 571

Launch menu item add and delete script . . . 572

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Appendix D. Additional material . . . 577

Locating the Web material . . . 577

Using the Web material . . . 577

System requirements for downloading the Web material . . . 578

How to use the Web material . . . 578

Abbreviations and acronyms . . . 579

Related publications . . . 583

IBM Redbooks . . . 583

Other resources . . . 583

Referenced Web sites . . . 584

How to get IBM Redbooks . . . 584

IBM Redbooks collections . . . 584

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xi

Figures

1-1 Tivoli software product pillars. . . 5

1-2 Tivoli performance and availability solutions . . . 6

1-3 TBSM console: propagation path. . . 12

1-4 TBSM console: tree view . . . 14

1-5 TBSM console: Hyperview . . . 15

1-6 TBSM console: Table view . . . 16

1-7 TBSM console: Business impact view . . . 17

1-8 TBSM console: events view . . . 18

1-9 TBSM properties window . . . 19

1-10 TBSM Web console . . . 20

1-11 Network diagram . . . 22

2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager product structure . . . 26

2-2 TBSM flowchart . . . 30

2-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Windows directory structure . . 39

2-4 Registry tree. . . 41

2-5 Hierarchical setting . . . 42

2-6 Database setting . . . 43

2-7 Flowchart for distributed system . . . 46

2-8 AMS description files . . . 47

2-9 Common listener connection . . . 51

2-10 z/OS components and feeds . . . 53

2-11 TBSM data server startup log . . . 55

2-12 TBSM object server startup log . . . 56

2-13 TBSM object pump startup log. . . 57

2-14 Connection from z/OS to TBSM servers . . . 58

2-15 Initial conversation for TBSM connection. . . 60

2-16 Sample message . . . 61

2-17 Queue file contents . . . 61

2-18 The Resources view after the high-level object load . . . 64

2-19 Parameters of the GTMAOPE0 . . . 65

2-20 MVSIPListener registry definitions . . . 66

2-21 Command aliases . . . 67

2-22 History server setup . . . 69

2-23 Microsoft IIS virtual directories . . . 70

2-24 Reporting system invocation . . . 71

2-25 Object Event Report Selection screen . . . 72

2-26 A generated report . . . 73

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2-28 Registry Editor for Health Monitoring profile . . . 75

3-1 Microsoft SQL Server Enterprise Manager . . . 79

3-2 Part of TBSM containment hierarchy . . . 86

3-3 TBSM inheritance hierarchy. . . 87

3-4 The propagation concept . . . 88

3-5 Propagation algorithm . . . 90

3-6 GEM object classes in TBSM . . . 91

3-7 Tables for CID G02H . . . 92

3-8 GEMLookupCID . . . 93

3-9 GEM_IDlookup. . . 94

3-10 GEM_DMtoCID . . . 95

3-11 CL_Registration . . . 96

3-12 Common listener auto placement table . . . 96

3-13 CL_Severities content . . . 97

3-14 Default context menu for DB2InstanceManager . . . 98

3-15 Context menu processing . . . 99

3-16 Running the asisp_definemenuitem. . . 105

3-17 Invoke MVS D A. . . 106

3-18 Task setting window. . . 107

3-19 Tivoli NetView for z/OS prompt . . . 107

3-20 Task Monitor result window . . . 108

3-21 Context menu for DIRCDrv . . . 111

3-22 Execution result for DIRCDrv . . . 112

4-1 Java console structure . . . 114

4-2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager icon . . . 114

4-3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager sign-on dialog . . . 115

4-4 Welcome screen for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. . . 115

4-5 Primary Menu for Super Administrator. . . 116

4-6 Expanded console . . . 117

4-7 Property page of a DB2InstanceManager object . . . 118

4-8 Expanded console in debug mode. . . 119

4-9 Sign on to the IBM Console . . . 121

4-10 Welcome screen of the Web console . . . 122

4-11 Primary options . . . 123

4-12 User profile. . . 124

4-13 User roles. . . 125

4-14 TBSM Sign On screen . . . 126

4-15 Business System View. . . 127

4-16 All Resources View . . . 128

5-1 Flat BSV for Remote Banking . . . 141

5-2 Hierarchical BSV for Remote Banking . . . 142

5-3 Inverted hierarchy BSV for Remote Banking . . . 143

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Figures xiii

6-1 InstallShield Welcome dialog . . . 157

6-2 Computer Name dialog . . . 157

6-3 Installation Selection dialog . . . 158

6-4 User Information dialog . . . 159

6-5 Software License Agreement dialog . . . 159

6-6 Installation Definition dialog . . . 160

6-7 Instance Name dialog . . . 161

6-8 Setup Type dialog . . . 162

6-9 Choose Folder dialog . . . 163

6-10 Select Components dialog . . . 163

6-11 Services Account dialog. . . 164

6-12 Authentication Mode dialog . . . 165

6-13 Collation Settings dialog . . . 166

6-14 Network Libraries dialog . . . 167

6-15 Start Copying Files dialog . . . 168

6-16 Choose Licensing Mode dialog . . . 169

6-17 SQL Server Enterprise Manager view . . . 170

6-18 SQL Server Security options . . . 170

6-19 Change password . . . 171

6-20 Password confirmation. . . 171

6-21 Log on to SQL Query Analyzer . . . 173

6-22 Current Connection Properties . . . 173

6-23 Connection Properties options . . . 174

6-24 Opening the Options menu . . . 175

6-25 Tools Options dialog . . . 176

6-26 Language selection dialog . . . 177

6-27 System File Update welcome screen. . . 177

6-28 Temporary directory selection . . . 178

6-29 System File Upgrade complete . . . 179

6-30 Welcome dialog for TBSM installation . . . 180

6-31 License agreement dialog . . . 180

6-32 Setup path selection . . . 181

6-33 Setup type selection. . . 182

6-34 Select Components for database server . . . 183

6-35 Enter Information for SQL database server host name . . . 184

6-36 Database parameters dialog . . . 185

6-37 Database upgrade dialog . . . 186

6-38 Start copying files dialog . . . 187

6-39 Setup Complete dialog. . . 187

6-40 Extract seed database files . . . 188

6-41 Changes in AttachDatabases.sql . . . 189

6-42 Services setting . . . 190

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6-44 Create local groups dialog . . . 192

6-45 JDBC driver selection dialog . . . 192

6-46 Installation options . . . 193

6-47 Services list for console and propagation server . . . 194

6-48 TBSM operators groups. . . 194

6-49 History Server component selection dialog . . . 195

6-50 Creating a new database . . . 196

6-51 History database properties . . . 197

6-52 Pop-up message for historyserversetup.ksh . . . 197

6-53 Health Monitor Server component selection dialog . . . 200

6-54 Health Monitor Server host name dialog . . . 201

6-55 Health Monitor Server parameters dialog . . . 202

6-56 Open the Properties dialog for Health Monitor. . . 203

6-57 Health Monitor Log On tab . . . 204

6-58 Health monitor profile . . . 205

6-59 Default services definition . . . 206

6-60 Settings for Common Listener . . . 207

6-61 MonitoredQueueTable . . . 208

7-1 Event flow for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager integration . . . . 210

7-2 Install Product window . . . 212

7-3 Services window . . . 213

7-4 Local Security Settings window . . . 214

7-5 Security setting dialog . . . 215

7-6 Tivoli BSM Event Enablement Properties window . . . 216

7-7 TME Desktop of Administrator window . . . 217

7-8 Event Server Rule Bases window . . . 221

7-9 Import Into Rule Base window . . . 222

7-10 TBSM console: All Resources - Descendents window . . . 229

7-11 GEMLookupCID content . . . 231

7-12 New generic test object created. . . 234

7-13 Properties window . . . 235

7-14 Flow diagram . . . 237

7-15 Event Viewer: Group All - All events . . . 238

7-16 All Resources - Descendents window . . . 239

7-17 Note editor for closing an event . . . 240

8-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager for ITM diagram . . . 251

8-2 Installing JRE 1.3.0 via GUI . . . 253

8-3 Install Product window, ITM adapter for TBSM . . . 255

8-4 Install Options window . . . 256

8-5 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console window . . . 263

8-6 Instrumentation mapping to enterprise . . . 264

8-7 Profile Properties window . . . 265

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Figures xv

8-9 All Resources - Descendants window . . . 267

8-10 Windows 2000 - Properties window . . . 268

8-11 SQL Window: Query-ibmtiv5.Object.sa . . . 275

8-12 SQL Window: Query-ibmtiv5.object.sa . . . 276

9-1 NetView’s main capabilities . . . 280

9-2 The NetView Web console. . . 282

9-3 Invoking Web console Security from nvsetup . . . 286

9-4 The Web Console Security dialog box . . . 287

9-5 The Add User dialog box . . . 287

9-6 The NetView Web Console download page . . . 288

9-7 Changing the default path for the NetView Web Console . . . 289

9-8 Web Console login dialog . . . 290

9-9 Open a map . . . 291

9-10 The TBSM Bulk Upload entry . . . 296

9-11 NetViews bulk upload message . . . 297

9-12 The initial NetView Map contents. . . 298

9-13 Initial NetView resources uploaded to TBSM. . . 299

9-14 Hyperview view of NetView resources . . . 300

9-15 The final discovery in NetView . . . 301

9-16 The corresponding TBSM hierarchy . . . 302

9-17 Various network views in TBSM . . . 303

9-18 TBSMs Launch submenu. . . 304

9-19 The Web Console Launch results . . . 305

9-20 Launch error message . . . 308

9-21 The Roles dialog with the new menu entry . . . 317

9-22 Parsing error . . . 317

9-23 NetView Web console and the new menu . . . 318

9-24 The resulting output . . . 319

9-25 The Launch submenu . . . 320

9-26 NetView Console launch process . . . 321

9-27 3beansalad.js display. . . 323

9-28 The new menu entry . . . 326

9-29 The Web console display launched by the new menu . . . 327

10-1 Property page of OS object to enable upload . . . 344

11-1 Feeds for z/OS systems. . . 348

11-2 System Automation for OS/390 2.1 connection to TBSM . . . 350

11-3 Subsystem objects from System Automation for OS/390 . . . 353

11-4 DB2 topology display . . . 357

11-5 IMS descendants . . . 361

11-6 CPSM main panel . . . 363

11-7 View selection panel . . . 363

11-8 RTASPEC panel . . . 364

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11-10 Action definition selection panel. . . 365

11-11 Creating TBSMA1 action definition . . . 366

11-12 Updated action definition list . . . 366

11-13 CICSPlex System Manager panel . . . 367

11-14 CPSM primary option . . . 368

11-15 BATCHREP display panel . . . 368

11-16 BATCHREP submission panel. . . 369

11-17 Property of a CICSPlex definition . . . 370

11-18 Initiating CICSPlex SM discovery . . . 371

11-19 CICSPlex SM CICS Topology display . . . 372

11-20 Detailed operation information . . . 374

11-21 Inserting SNA APPN network object . . . 378

11-22 Setting the NetID name . . . 379

11-23 Setting the OS path . . . 379

11-24 SNA topology view . . . 381

11-25 Event flow and component descriptions for TBSM/RMF integration . . 382

11-26 Invoking RMF registration . . . 384

11-27 SMS information flow . . . 385

11-28 Register monitoring interval for SMS resources . . . 387

11-29 Disk configuration . . . 388 11-30 Creating an HSM object . . . 389 11-31 HSM creation . . . 390 11-32 DFSMShsm topology view . . . 391 11-33 HTTP Server objects . . . 392 12-1 ABS processing . . . 396

12-2 Sample business system view . . . 403

12-3 Database tables with the loaded ABS configuration . . . 405

12-4 ITSO RESOURCES business system view . . . 406

12-5 ABSMain window . . . 408

12-6 First BSV ITSO Resources . . . 409

12-7 BSV tree for the example . . . 410

12-8 Adding Production OS filter . . . 411

12-9 Defining condition for production OS . . . 412

12-10 Condition for Production DB2 . . . 413

12-11 Distributed Line of Business . . . 415

12-12 GEM_InstFiltering table . . . 415

12-13 Table GEM_Options . . . 419

13-1 Changing TivoliManager directory’s property . . . 423

13-2 Sharing property for the TivoliManager directory . . . 424

13-3 Security property of TivoliManager directory . . . 425

13-4 Advanced security setting . . . 426

13-5 Protecting TBSM registry key . . . 427

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Figures xvii

13-7 Advanced permissions setting . . . 429

13-8 Automatic logon for Event Server . . . 431

13-9 Historical database users. . . 433

13-10 Extract of the MenuItem table . . . 434

13-11 Saving a workspace . . . 435

13-12 Opening a workspace . . . 435

13-13 Editing a workspace permission . . . 436

14-1 Cleanup Old Log Files job window. . . 441

14-2 Delete Old MVS Upload Output Files window . . . 443

14-3 Cleanup Old DB Queues window . . . 445

14-4 Update ObjectEvents stats job wIndow . . . 446

14-5 Update Object Stats job wIndow . . . 447

14-6 Database Maintenance Plan creation . . . 448

14-7 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Welcome. . . 449

14-8 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Select Databases . . . 450

14-9 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Data Optimization settings . . . . 451

14-10 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Database Integrity Check . . . 452

14-11 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Backup settings . . . 453

14-12 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Backup Disk Directory settings . 454 14-13 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Transaction Log Backup settings455 14-14 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Reports to Generate . . . 456

14-15 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard: Maintenance Plan History. . . 457

14-16 Database Maintenance Plan Wizard summary . . . 458

14-17 Windows 2000 System Properties . . . 459

14-18 Windows2000 Performance Options . . . 459

14-19 Windows 2000 Local Area Connection Properties. . . 460

14-20 Windows 2000 File and Printers Sharing Properties . . . 461

14-21 SQL Server Properties Memory window . . . 462

14-22 SQL Server Properties Processor window. . . 463

15-1 Problem and change management interface . . . 466

15-2 Data flow: TBSM operation . . . 470

15-3 TBSM event ID assisted entry panel . . . 478

15-4 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager class ID assisted entry panel . 479 15-5 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS s-word display . . . 480

15-6 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS p-word display . . . 480

15-7 Users to notify . . . 481

15-8 Deleting of the BRANCH control line . . . 482

15-9 Change DEFAULT to MVS user ID . . . 483

15-10 Control panel update . . . 485

15-11 Function line summary . . . 486

15-12 First line option 1: Control flow processing . . . 487

15-13 First line oOption 2: Data collection processing . . . 488

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15-15 Second line option 1: Control flow processing . . . 489

15-16 Second line option 2: Data collection processing . . . 490

15-17 Second line option 3: Test data processing . . . 490

15-18 Third line option 1: Control flow processing . . . 491

15-19 Third line option 2: Data collection processing . . . 492

15-20 Third line option 3: Test data processing . . . 492

15-21 Fourth line option 1: Control flow processing . . . 493

15-22 Fourth line option 2: Data collection processing . . . 494

15-23 Fourth line option 3: Test data processing . . . 494

15-24 Fifth line option 1: Control flow processing . . . 495

15-25 Fifth line option 2: Data collection processing . . . 496

15-26 Fifth line option 3:Test data processing . . . 496

15-27 Panel list . . . 497

15-28 List of modified panels . . . 498

15-29 Panel Copy specification . . . 498

15-30 Problem ticket creation dialog . . . 500

15-31 Authentication dialog . . . 501

15-32 Problem ticket created . . . 501

15-33 Problem ticket icon. . . 502

15-34 Tivoli Information Management for z/OS with the problem ticket. . . 503

15-35 Searching for a problem ticket . . . 504

15-36 Problem ticket list . . . 505

15-37 Problem ticket window . . . 506

15-38 Problem ticket updated . . . 507

15-39 Creating new problem ticket . . . 508

15-40 Searching Tivoli Information Management for ticket no 00000009 . . . 509

15-41 Search result for ticket no 00000009 . . . 509

15-42 Closing problem . . . 510

15-43 Closing problem dialog . . . 511

17-1 A typical Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse environment . . . 529

17-2 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager warehouse component . . . 532

17-3 Installation type . . . 535

17-4 Path to the installation media for the GTM. . . 536

17-5 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager program installation . . . 537

17-6 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager ETL Installation summary . . . 538

17-7 System DSN tab . . . 540

17-8 Selecting the data source for ODBC System DSN . . . 541

17-9 SQL Server data source settings . . . 541

17-10 User authentication for the new data source . . . 542

17-11 Other options . . . 542

17-12 Completing the data source definition . . . 543

17-13 IBM Tivoli Monitoring Version 5.1.1 Generic ETL1 Sources . . . 544

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Figures xix

17-15 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager ETL target . . . 546

17-16 GTM_TWH_CDW_Target user ID information . . . 547

17-17 GTM_c05_LOBState_Process flow . . . 548

17-18 Schedule GTM_c05_s010_Load_LOBStage . . . 549

17-19 Schedule configuration for GTM_c05_s010_Load_LOBStage . . . 550

17-20 Promoting scheduled processes to Production status . . . 551

17-21 Work in Progress window . . . 552

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxi

Tables

1-1 Reading paths . . . 21 1-2 Operating system and software detail . . . 22 2-1 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager services by component . . . 31 2-2 TBSM services log files . . . 43 2-3 AMS types . . . 48 2-4 TEC exits for event forwarding. . . 49 5-1 List of mainframe information. . . 136 5-2 Subsystem naming convention . . . 137 5-3 IMS subsystems checklist . . . 137 5-4 DB2 subsystems checklist . . . 137 5-5 CICS subsystems checklist . . . 138 5-6 Pro and cons of BSVs creation . . . 145 6-1 Required hardware configuration for TBSM. . . 151 6-2 TBSM server configuration running in the lab . . . 152 6-3 Prerequisite software components installed . . . 153 6-4 Database attributes for reporting system . . . 199 7-1 IBM Tivoli Monitoring tasks . . . 229 9-1 nvid keywords . . . 294 10-1 z/OS data sources . . . 333 10-2 Modification to IBM Tivoli NetView for z/OS startup procedure . . . 339 11-1 TBSM batch jobs for SMS . . . 386 12-1 Distributed rules not supported by the migration script . . . 416 14-1 z/OS Resources SQL jobs: suggested settings . . . 438 14-2 Distributed Resources Jobs . . . 440 14-3 Database Maintenance Jobs suggested settings . . . 440 14-4 Queues tables cleaned up by the Cleanup Old DB Queue job . . . 444 15-1 Problem management parameter . . . 471 15-2 Create a problem ticket . . . 499

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxiii

Notices

This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.

IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the user's responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.

IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:

IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.

The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION

PROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you. This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time without notice.

Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.

IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.

Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.

This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate them as completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products. All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business enterprise is entirely coincidental.

COPYRIGHT LICENSE:

This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrates programming techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application programs conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which the sample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of developing, using, marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to IBM's application programming interfaces.

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Trademarks

The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both:

AIX® CICS® CICSPlex® Database 2™ DB2® DFS™ DFSMShsm™ Domino™ IBM® IBM.COM™ IMS™ Informix® Lotus® MVS™ NetView® Notes® OS/2® OS/390® OS/400® RACF® Redbooks™ Redbooks (logo)™ RMF™ Tivoli® Tivoli Enterprise™ Tivoli Enterprise Console® Tivoli Management Environment® TME® TME 10™ VTAM® WebSphere® z/OS™ The following terms are trademarks of other companies:

ActionMedia, LANDesk, MMX, Pentium and ProShare are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.

Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.

Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.

C-bus is a trademark of Corollary, Inc. in the United States, other countries, or both.

UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries. SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure Electronic Transaction LLC.

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. xxv

Preface

This IBM® Redbook gives a broad understanding of the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager architecture and internals. The in-depth discussion covers the product’s inner workings and includes log files to illustrate the processing of its various components.

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is designed to display all aspects of the enterprise’s IT system as they affect the users’ business systems. This book enables easy implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in distributed environments. Procedures are illustrated with examples of the installation and configuration process to explain the deployment of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager into a customer’s environment.

It also covers the implementation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in z/OS™ with most of its major interfaces. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager can monitor all major IBM subsystems in z/OS including IMS™, DB2®, CICS®, storage, and Web solutions.

A book about concepts and implementation would not be complete without a comprehensive discussion about using, maintaining, and troubleshooting the system. We devote several sections to these topics.

The team that wrote this redbook

This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center.

Budi Darmawan is a Project Leader at the International Technical Support

Organization, Austin Center. He writes extensively and teaches IBM classes worldwide on all areas of systems management, database systems, and

business intelligence. Before joining the ITSO in 1999, Budi worked in Integrated Solution Services for IBM Indonesia as lead solution architect and implementer. His current interests are in performance and availability and business systems management.

Alessio D’Amico works as a Technical Consulting IT Specialist for the EMEA

South Region TBSM services team. He joined IBM in 1998 as a Tivoli® Software Engineer covering various positions including level 3 customer support and development. He moved to the TBSM services team in 2001.

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Cedric Foo works as a Technical Consulting IT Specialist for Tivoli Software at

IBM United Kingdom. Before joining the Pan EMEA TBSM Services Team two and a half years ago, Cedric worked as an OS/390® specialist in the ITS North Region Enterprise Assist Technical Support team for more than two years. He has more than 22 years of IT experience, from small, specialized subsystems to large mainframe complexes.

Peter Glasmacher is a certified Systems Management Expert professional from

Dortmund, Germany. After joining IBM in 1973, he worked in various positions including support, development, and services covering multiple OS platforms and networking architectures. Currently, he works as a consulting IT specialist for the Integrated Technology Services branch of IBM Global Services, concentrating on infrastructure and security issues. He has more than 15 years of experience in the network and systems management areas. For the past eight years, he concentrated on architectural work and the design of network and systems management solutions in large customer environments. Since 1983, he has written extensively on workstation-related issues, both external and internal. He has authored or co-authored a number of Redbooks covering network and systems management topics.

Stephen Nosbisch is a Senior IT Specialist from Boulder, Colorado. His current

assignment includes developing architectual design solutions for enterprise wide automation platforms within SDC-West for both IBM internal and commercial accounts. He has more than 15 years of experience in the network and systems management areas. For the past two years he has focused heavily on business systems management solutions.

Samson Yiu is a Senior IT Specialist working with the IBM Support Centre in

Australia. He holds a degree in Computer and Mathematical Sciences as well as professional certification as an MCP+Internet, MCSE, Tivoli Enterprise™ Consultant, Citrix, and IBM Certified Systems Expert. He has worked for IBM Australia for 10 years, primarily in software defect support, and is a senior member of the Tivoli PACO support team. His time is spent exclusively supporting Tivoli products. This is the fifth book to which he has contributed.

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Preface xxvii

Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project: Betsy Thaggard

International Technical Support Organization, Austin Center Pam Geiger, Mike Odom

IBM Tivoli Software Group Jessie Zhang, Vivian Roberts IBM Australia

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 1

Part 1

Concept and

planning

Part 1 provides some background information about and discusses the concept and planning information for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager. The chapters are:

򐂰 Chapter 1, “Introduction to business systems management,” on page 3 discusses background information and the environment setup that we used for the project. This chapter also provides a guide for using this redbook.

򐂰 Chapter 2, “Components and functions,” on page 25 explains in-depth the components and functions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager.

򐂰 Chapter 3, “Database structure,” on page 77 goes into detail about how the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database is organized. Here we also present some component-specific extensions of the database, such as Common Listener, TEC interface, and the Menu system.

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򐂰 Chapter 4, “User interface,” on page 113 discusses both available user interfaces for IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager: the Java console and the Web console.

򐂰 Chapter 5, “Implementation planning,” on page 129 explains information that you must prepare and understand before starting IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implementation.

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2003. All rights reserved. 3

Chapter 1.

Introduction to business

systems management

This chapter presents some basic information about business systems

management with IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and introduces the rest of the book with the description of the environment that we use in examples. The sections are:

򐂰 1.1, “Business systems management” on page 4 explains the value of business systems management.

򐂰 1.2, “Tivoli systems management product” on page 5 describes the Tivoli systems management product structure.

򐂰 1.3, “IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager” on page 7 explains the features of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager.

򐂰 1.4, “Document organization and scope” on page 20 shows how this book is organized and provides some suggestions for using it effectively.

򐂰 1.5, “Lab environment” on page 22 discusses the setup that we use in the examples.

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1.1 Business systems management

Over the past 20 years we have seen a dramatic increase in complexity in the variety of computer systems and software used to run a business. Gone are the days when a computer system was isolated and used for the single purpose of word processing or producing a spreadsheet. Now we have multiple systems, such as a cluster of database servers, providing a single service, or multiple services provided by a single machine such as a mainframe.

Most often, these computers are all networked to form a single, very complex enterprise. The IT departments that maintain these computers specialize in such infrastructures and have an extensive understanding of how these machines work and how to fix the technology when it breaks.

However, as the environment becomes more complex, business users also want to understand the health of the infrastructure and the IT environment for their particular functions. Each sector of the business may have its own opinion about which machines or resources are most important. All need to understand the state of their operation so they can proactively manage their resources. The IT department may understand that all resources are important, but most likely would not know the overall impact of each of these resources in the business sense. When multiple resources fail at one time, they may need to prioritize repairs, which means understanding the impact of each single resource on the enterprise’s operations.

These requirements from both the business and the IT department can be addressed together: Business users can see the resources that they are using and how they affect their function, and IT personnel can use a reversed model to see which function from the business user is affected by the resources.

To be able to perform this function, the system must coordinate and collect the status of all IT resources from the different parts of the enterprise using various systems management tools. It also must be able to make an abstraction of the entire business structure that incorporates the IT resources. It also needs interfaces to other parts of the business, such as problem and change management.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 5

1.2 Tivoli systems management product

Tivoli, as part of the IBM Software group, provides IT resource management software. The complete systems management approach from Tivoli is grouped into four pillars, as shown in Figure 1-1.

Figure 1-1 Tivoli software product pillars

Underlying the Tivoli solution set is a group of common services and an infrastructure that provides consistency across Tivoli management applications and enables integration.

Within the Tivoli product family, specific solutions target four primary disciplines of systems management: Performance and Availability, Configuration and Operation, Storage Management, and Security. Products within each of these areas have been made available over the years and, through generations of enhancements, have become accepted solutions in enterprises around the world. With these core capabilities in place, IBM has been able to focus on building applications that take advantage of these pillars to provide true business systems management solutions.

With this end-to-end set of solutions built on a common foundation, enterprises can manage the ever-increasing complexity of their IT infrastructures with reduced staff and increasing efficiency.

Tivoli Mgmt Solution

Tivoli Mgmt Solution

Common Infrastructure/Services

Business Systems Management

Business Systems Management

Performance Performance and and Availability Availability Configuration Configuration and and Operations

Operations StorageStorage SecuritySecurity

Monitoring Monitoring Analysis Analysis Central Central Console Console Reporting Reporting Access Access Management Management Indentity Indentity Management Management Risk Risk Management Management Storage Storage Management Management Storage Area Storage Area Network Network Management Management Data Data Protection Protection Disaster Disaster Recovery Recovery Storage Storage Management Management Storage Area Storage Area Network Network Management Management Data Data Protection Protection Disaster Disaster Recovery Recovery Centralized Centralized Control Control Service Service Delivery Delivery Web Web Management Management Pervasive Pervasive Management Management Performance Performance and and Availability Availability Configuration Configuration and and Operations

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In the performance and availability area, products are structured as shown in Figure 1-2.

Figure 1-2 Tivoli performance and availability solutions

The Tivoli performance and availability portfolio is an integrated family of products that span Web, client-server, and host environments and are designed to provide a comprehensive and scalable solution for centralized management of e-business operations. Tivoli can simplify performance and availability

management by consolidating and integrating products into three independent layers that offer three distinct types of value, yet provide superior management capabilities when used together. All offerings are designed to help provide out-of-the-box value and rapid return on investment, while minimizing total cost of ownership through high quality and comprehensive functionality.

Tivoli simplifies autonomic prevention and recovery of IT problems at their source with out-of-the-box IBM best practices in the IBM Tivoli Monitoring products (yellow layer). Event correlation and automation products (green layer) provide centralized autonomic prevention and recovery of IT problems that span multiple resources. By providing better root-cause analysis and automated responses to identified problems, these products can help you:

򐂰 Eliminate the cost of downtime

Real time Management Predictive Management

Business Impact Management

Event Correlation and Automation

Monitor Systems and Applications

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager

IBM Tivoli NetView

IBM Tivoli Monitoring

IBM Tivoli Service Level Advisor IBM Tivoli Web Site Analyzer IBM Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 7 򐂰 Reduce personnel costs

򐂰 Improve your return on IT investments

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is a focal-point monitoring solution that provides you with a business view of your IT environment. In the next section we cover how it achieves these goals.

Discussion in this redbook focuses on IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager and its integration interface to other IBM performance and availability products.

1.3 IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is an enterprise management product that monitors the data processing resources that are critical to a business application. (We sometimes will refer to it as TBSM, mainly in captions and figures.) It enables end-to-end monitoring of systems, subsystems, applications, and other resources in your enterprise, from OS/390 and z/OS systems to distributed systems. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager provides your operations with a view of the system components as they relate to your overall business.

We use IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager to:

򐂰 Construct monitoring views that reflect the enterprise’s current applications and business systems, which can contain a complex mixture of system resources across the entire enterprise.

򐂰 Enable real-time monitoring.

򐂰 Support existing Tivoli Global Enterprise Manager instrumentation, Tivoli Distributed Monitoring, IBM Tivoli Monitoring, and IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console®.

򐂰 Provide an open archtecture to enable third-party product integration.

򐂰 Manage business system components on a variety of platforms.

򐂰 Provide trend-analysis data for Tivoli Enterprise Data Warehouse.

򐂰 Enable effective operation of your entire enterprise.

After resources are defined to or discovered by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, they are registered with IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, and the information is stored in an SQL database. You can access the database using a GUI-based console. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors for state changes that occur in the various resources within your enterprise. An event management facility helps you determine and troubleshoot system

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rules to events and data collected from various sources, even when business systems span several platforms, IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to graphically monitor and control the interconnected business components and operating system resources.

Some new concepts are pertinent to understanding the operation of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager:

򐂰 Business system

򐂰 Discovery Processing

򐂰 Event Processing

򐂰 Views

1.3.1 Business system

A business system is a group of diverse but interdependent applications and other system resources that interact to accomplish specific business functions. A business system can contain applications or other resources that run on a variety of platforms, including host, distributed, and network environments. For example, a banking business system designed to support transactions over the Web typically includes a Web server running outside the company’s intranet that is connected directly to the Internet and a firewall that provides secure connectivity to a machine running a custom business component, such as loan processing. The loan processing business component usually runs on a distributed platform and interfaces to business components running on a host computer. The host handles all bank transactions. This business system presents challenges to a system manager because it crosses the typically isolated environments of host and distributed systems.

Another example of a business system is an e-mail system. E-mail business systems include all instances of e-mail business components that are being used in your network. You might have a mix of Lotus® Notes®® servers and clients, POP mail or Microsoft® Exchange servers and clients, and other e-mail business components.

An e-mail business system includes definitions that tell whether each of its entities is a server, a client, or both. It also includes definitions of the monitors that collect status information for each component in the business system, as well as definitions of the relationships between the components in the business system.

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to use an automated approach for creating business systems. Using commands provided in IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager results in faster implementation and completeness

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 9

of the business views. When the configuration is completed, the automatically created Business System View continues to monitor the system for the creation of new resources and automatically adds them to the view. In Chapter 12, “Automatic Business System View creation” on page 395, we will cover the creation.

1.3.2 Discovery processing

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors resources for state changes and performance characteristics that indicate availability. However, before you can monitor resources in your enterprise, the resources must be discovered and registered in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database, a process that varies depending on the data source.

The process for resources monitored by OS/390 involves running batch jobs that detect the configuration of your resources and update the database. Resources discovered through the Tivoli Enterprise Console require that the classes first be defined in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The resources are then created dynamically as events are received from the Tivoli Enterprise Console. Resources discovered through the common listener interface are dynamically populated through bulk and delta discovery transactions.

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has three discovery processes for z/OS objects:

򐂰 Pre-discovery: Batch jobs are run initially when, or before, IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager is installed and configured.

򐂰 Rediscovery: Batch jobs can be customized and run on a scheduled basis to gather updated information about resources in your enterprise.

򐂰 Auto-discovery: Programs automatically detect updates, resulting in updates to the database.

The identification or discovery process uses various data sources to initially populate resources in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The z/OS process involves a series of batch functions that create a sequential file, which is then forwarded to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager servers. The data is then processed and stored in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The discovered resources are imported into IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager in a process called resource registration.

Note: In previous versions of IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager this was

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IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two methods for discovering distributed resources. Rules can be added to the IBM Tivoli Enterprise Console to forward events to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database using the agent listener. The first event from a resource triggers the creation of the resource in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. The common listener provides bulk and delta transactions. Bulk transactions are a snapshot of the instrumented environment. Bulk transactions identify which resources exist, resources that have changed since the last bulk transaction, the associations between resources, and resources that no longer exist since the last bulk transaction. The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database is populated with the information in the bulk transaction. The delta transaction updates the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database as new resources are

discovered. We will see various examples of the usage of the discovery process for different products throughout the book.

1.3.3 Event processing

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager consolidates events from a wide range of IBM and independent system vendor products. Event processing involves capturing specific events and routing them to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager server. The events result in updates to the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database, which are then displayed on the IBM Tivoli Business

Systems Manager console. Events also can trigger the discovery of resources. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager has two event types: messages and exceptions.

A fundamental principle of an effective centralized command center is to make alerts meaningful. The lights that indicate problems of greater or lesser severity must reflect the context in which they appear. IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager introduces two concepts in managing this problem: correlated priorities and alert ownership.

Correlated priorities is a mechanism in selecting an object priority such that it will affect the alert status of a resource that is on a higher hierarchy. Taking

ownership of an alert changes the tagged object icon from alert to Ownership status. Taking ownership also acts as a contract of problem acceptance. The username is automatically recorded in a note, which allows narrative action information to be recorded, viewed, and played back for reviews. Because all clients are updated instantly when ownership is taken, other members of the command center team and department users with special Business System Views (BSVs) can see that someone is responding to an alert. Integration with the Tivoli Framework products enable the state changes in products such as TEC to reflect a coherent view of the enterprise.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 11

Filtering is a powerful feature for building a BSV by providing ad-hoc selection criteria, such as object type, name, and alert state. This enables the command center staff to quickly create a custom view to closely monitor a collection of objects showing recent trouble conditions. Filtering also allows representations of the same object contained in different BSVs to filter events differently, therefore allowing you to be notified only on events that pertain to you.

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager monitors resources for state changes and the performance characteristics that reflect their availability. These resources are represented by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager objects in the SQL database. Actions on an object, such as an alert notification and the propagation of that alert up and down a view, result from events. Events may be exceptions associated with an object or a state change of that object. Exceptions occur when the counters that measure performance thresholds are exceeded. An example of an exception could be unacceptable response time associated with a CICS transaction. Another example of an event could be the receipt of a console message that a batch job terminated abnormally. This would cause a state change to occur and would result in an event. As events occur within the monitored environment, they are collected and recorded by IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager, and are displayed by tagging an alert icon on the offending object’s icon.

Propagation leverages the object-orientated implementation inherent within the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager environment and continuously

disseminates events throughout the object hierarchy. Propagation escalates alerts up the hierarchy based on the severity of events and the volume and rate at which they occur. Exceptions, console messages, and other events are assigned priorities for each object. When an object receives an event, the events priority is examined and compared against tolerance rates set for that object. If a threshold is exceeded, an alert occurs on that object and sends an event to its parent object on the hierarchy. This, in turn, can cause another event to occur and another alert to be sent further up the hierarchy. In addition to controls that adjust rates for incoming performance exceptions, each object on the hierarchy includes controls for events arriving from the child objects below it.

Figure 1-3 on page 12 shows an alert occurring on the DB2 subsystem D7Q2 object under the SC69 system. The event is propagated up the hierarchy to the Enterprise level. The propagation also takes place on the Business System View of the object that affects the ITSO RESOURCES object.

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Figure 1-3 TBSM console: propagation path

Propagation is the technical component that enables IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager to progress from a physical to a logical model. As events are propagated to the physical parents of an object, they also are propagated to all Business System Views containing those objects.

1.3.4 Views

IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager enables you to manage resources in a way that best reflects your current organization. Your IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager implementation can reflect a decentralized or a centralized control structure. The resources either can be defined to IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager or can be discovered using various methods (for example, components, modules, or programs) to detect the configuration of the resources. Once the resources are defined or discovered, they are registered in the IBM

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 13

Tivoli Business Systems Manager database; that is, information about the resources is stored in the database and is available for monitoring and viewing. The IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager console and the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager Web console display your enterprise’s resources in various views. When notifications that trigger alerts are received from the various collection agents within the enterprise, the alerts are displayed as graphic overlays on the resources, indicating the different status of your resources. A resource view displays all the resources registered in the IBM Tivoli Business Systems Manager database. Business System Views can be created from the console or automatically from incoming discovery and event data. A BSV is a logical view that includes any subset of the registered resources that are of interest for monitoring. Each resource is represented as an icon within the view. You can create, save, and later access BSVs. Opening several windows, each containing a different BSV, enables you to monitor different resources and their various relationships from a single workstation. BSVs can be based on an actual business system or on:

򐂰 An application or set of applications

򐂰 A department

򐂰 A vertical area of responsibility

򐂰 A geographic region

Some examples of Business System Views are:

򐂰 Real estate (business system)

򐂰 Inventory, software distribution (applications)

򐂰 Human Resources (department)

򐂰 Email gateway (vertical area of responsibility)

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BSVs enable you to organize logically the resources that you want to monitor and display them in the resource system views and Business System Views using these methods:

򐂰 Tree view, which shows the hierarchy of the resources. Branches in the tree can be expanded or collapsed to show or hide resources. We can see this in Example 1-4.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 15 򐂰 Hyperview, which graphically displays a large number of resources at one

time as shown in Figure 1-5.

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򐂰 Table view, which shows resources in a table format. Information for any column can be sorted and filtered as shown in Figure 1-6.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 17 򐂰 Business impact view, which is displayed as a hyperview, shows resources

that are affected or act as parents to a specific resource, as shown in Figure 1-7.

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򐂰 Event view, which examines the events that were responsible for the state change, as shown in Figure 1-8.

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Chapter 1. Introduction to business systems management 19

Property sheets for each of the resources, such as the one shown in Figure 1-9, enable viewing and updating of:

򐂰 Attributes, such as the resource name and current status

򐂰 Alert information, such as currently posted events and notes

򐂰 Thresholds for propagation and filtering

򐂰 Scheduling information

Figure

Updating...

References

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