DRAWING THE LINE ONLINE: PROFESSIONAL VS. PERSONAL USE A WEBINAR FOR COMPANIES IN REGULATED INDUSTRIES

16 

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(1)

D

RAWING THE

L

INE

O

NLINE

:

P

ROFESSIONAL VS

. P

ERSONAL

U

SE A WEBINAR FOR COMPANIES IN REGULATED INDUSTRIES

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T

ODAY

S

A

GENDA

 Overview & Introduction

 What is Online Marketing?

 The Empowered Consumer

 The Social Media Adoption Lifecycle – Doing it Right

 Alphabet Soup: Compliance Overview

 What do the rules REALLY say?

 Which rules apply, and where?

 A glimpse of the future?

 Why Bother: The High Cost of Waiting  Practical Solutions

 Online Marketing & Social Media Guidelines

 Structuring a Compliant Online Marketing Program

 Empowering Producers & Local Marketing

 Managing the Social Media Process

 Recap: 7 Take-Aways from This Session

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T

ODAY

S

P

ANELISTS

 Edgar built and sold a compliance software company, and heads the strategic team for Distribion, a leading provider of distributed marketing technology for

insurance and financial services companies.

 , CEO,

 Chad brings 11+ years of enterprise software and social networking experience from companies such as

Bazaarvoice, BetweenMarkets and Trilogy to his role of CEO at Socialware.

 Stephen is part of LIMRA’s Regulatory Services Strategy Center. The Center is responsible for

assessing both global and domestic trends, regulations, and issues which impact our members’ businesses.

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W

HAT IS

O

NLINE

M

ARKETING

?

 Online marketing includes everything

digital, from email and websites to social media sites like YouTube, Facebook,

LinkedIn and Twitter.

 Social media began as a place where people expressed their individuality – and evolved into a marketplace.

 Most employees have a personal social media presence – many have blended personal and professional “networks”.

 Regulators may (or may not) recognize a

dividing line between personal & professional speech online.

 Many employees believe the line is clear.

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T

HE

E

MPOWERED

C

USTOMER

 Communication between companies and consumers is

no longer a one-way street

 Empowered customers will have their say

 Echoes become distorted -- problems are amplified

 Every market is a buyer’s market

 Prospects can (and do) filter out marketing messages

 Prospects can (and do) initiate and research purchases

 Social search and Twitter can affect your reputation in

seconds – and Google never forgets

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M

ARKETING IN A

R

EGULATED

E

NVIRONMENT

 Understanding the

Alphabet Soup

 How many laws & regulations affect your marketing communications?  Corporate marketing needs control to meet compliance standards

 Field sales & local

agents need

flexibility to meet sales goals

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F

IVE

K

EY

C

OMPLIANCE

F

ACTS 1. Regulators define things differently

 Publicly available site posts (Twitter, LinkedIn) are advertising

 Comments may be advertising or public appearances

 Privacy settings determine whether content will be advertising

 Chat room discussions are public appearances

 Posts to a group discussion are public appearances

2. eDiscovery & archiving rules apply to ALL

messages

3. CAN-SPAM applies to all social content – opt-in &

disclosure vs. opt out

4. Linking to third-party content implies endorsement 5. Firm is liable for all employee & producers posts

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A L

OOK

I

NTO THE

F

UTURE

?

 Two bills might change the rules

 More regulations WILL come

 France, Germany, Massachusetts indicate where laws are going

 Regulation by enforcement action  Marketing WILL get more complex

 Technology to manage compliance IS essential

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W

HY

B

OTHER

? T

HE

H

IGH

C

OST OF

W

AITING

 Early adopter phase is over  Your brand, products, and

COMPANY ARE online

 Customers expect a response

at Internet speed

 If you aren’t part of the

conversation, you have no

input, no chance to shape the dialogue

 Social media drives revenue

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O

NLINE

M

ARKETING

& S

OCIAL

M

EDIA

G

UIDELINES

 Opt-in, Opt-out

 Up-front disclosure is key

 Social media isn’t private – or casual

 Good social media policies protect your brand, limit liability  Bad social media policies increase regulatory and

reputation risks

 Technology can automate, streamline compliance

 People must be trained & persuaded to comply

10

Data source: nCircle 2011 Social Media Security Trends Survey, June 27, 2011 What percentage of employees comply with existing social media policies?

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T

HE

D

IGITAL

& S

OCIAL

M

EDIA

P

ROCESS

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E

MPOWERING

P

RODUCERS

& L

OCAL

M

ARKETING

 Local = credible, powerful  Compliant empowerment

 Set a policy

 Monitor - train - remind (often)

 Automate where possible

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R

ECAP

& T

AKE

-A

WAYS

1. Consumers drive social media  Your mother was right

 You’re already being discussed – opting out is not an option 2. Everything is measureable – done right online pays 3. Even restrictive regulations aren’t a social media ban 4. Your industry defines whether there is a line between

personal and professional speech

 Understand how regulators define content to comply

5. Learn the social media lifecycle and process for easier

compliance

6. Policies should be clear and must evolve over time 7. Technology can automate and track compliance

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M

EET THE

S

PEAKERS IN

P

ERSON

Mark Your Calendar for Our Next Webinar:

Reaching Your Audience Effectively

The 5Ws of Online Marketing

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A

FTER THE

W

EBINAR

 Download this presentation and share the recording  Connect with the panelists

 Join us on Twitter to continue the discussion: #socialmediawebinar

 @Edgar_Rodriguez or @DistribionDM

 @LIMRA_CRS,

 Keep up with the latest news on multi-channel marketing in a

distributed environment wit

 Att event.

 Look in your in-box for the Q&A with answers to any questions we didn’t get to today!

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