Prazosin for the Treatment of Combat Related Nightmares in Military Veterans with PTSD DISCLOSURES. Learning Objectives

Full text

(1)

Prazosin for the Treatment of

Combat‐Related Nightmares in

Military Veterans with PTSD

Jess Calohan, DNP, MN, PMHNP‐BC Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army

Program Chair, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program Daniel K. Inouye Graduate School of Nursing

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

DISCLOSURES

The opinions or assertions contained herein are the solely the 

views of the author and are not to be construed as official or 

reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the 

Department of Defense.

Discussion of use of medications include non‐FDA or “off‐label” 

indications; prescribers are advised to use their own clinical 

judgment in assessing risks, benefits, adverse effects and 

treatment alternatives when using medications “off‐label.” • The speaker has no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Learning Objectives

• Examine the impact of sleep disturbance on level of functioning in 

military veterans with Post‐Traumatic Stress Disorder.

• Describe the standardized titration protocol for Prazosin in treating 

military veterans with combat‐related nightmares.

• Identify standardized tools to evaluate outcomes in military veterans 

(2)

“Sleep that knits up the raveled sleeve of care, the death of each day's  life, sore labor's bath, balm of hurt minds, 

great nature's second course, chief nourisher in life's feast.”

~William Shakespeare, Macbeth

“A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor's  book.”

~Irish Proverb

"Some people talk in their sleep. Lecturers talk while other people  sleep.”

~Albert Camus

http://www.quotegarden.com/sleep.html

Combat‐Related Nightmares

• Sleep disturbance is a core symptom of PTSD

• A foundational component that significantly influences functional 

impairment 

• Reported by 50‐70% of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation 

Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF) combat veterans with PTSD1

Re ‐ ex periencing A voida nce H yp era ro u sa l Hyper vig ilance Mood  

PTSD

(3)

Stress and HPA Axis

• Hippocampus, Amygdala & HPA axis involved in stress circuits • Both may be sensitized in PTSD

• HPA axis normal response to stress: release of CRFACTH 

glucocorticoids negative feedback on CRF stop stress response

• Resulting neurotransmitter cascade: 

release of glutamate and norepinephrine “fight or flight”

response GABA attenuates Glutamate and Norepinephrine

“fight or flight” stops

Heim C. and Nemeroff, C. (2009).

Neurobiological Underpinnings

of PTSD

• Hypothalamic‐Pituitary‐Adrenal Axis 

•Negative feedback loop is dysregulated

•Hypercortisolism (near term) then, Hypocortisolism (chronic)

•Cortico‐Releasing Factor over activity in the brain leading to release of 

norepinephrine from the locus coeruleus

•Anatomical changes in the brain region that inhibits the HPA axis

• Neurotransmitters alterations

•Serotonin 

•Norepinephrine

•GABA

•Glutamate

Heim C. and Nemeroff, C. (2009).

Neurobiological Underpinnings of

Combat‐Related Nightmares

• The locus coeruleus “shuts down” during normal REM sleep

no norepinephrine release.

• In PTSD, locus coeruleus remains “active” norepinephrine 

is released during REM sleep, disrupting REM Amygdala Hippocampus

(4)

• Background

•One of the few lipid soluble alpha‐1 antagonist

•A non‐sedating generic that has been used for decades to treat hypertension 

and BPH

•Decreases/eliminates the effect of norepinephrine during REM sleep 

•Initially found effective for trauma nightmares in Vietnam veterans1

•reports of improved sleep quality and duration

•marked decrease in frequency intensity of nightmares

•well tolerated, improvement is dose related

•discontinuing medications after improvement associated with return of  nightmares

•potential to reduce co‐morbid alcohol abuse

1Raskind M. et al., (2003).

Prazosin

Evidence of Prazosin Efficacy for

Trauma Nightmares and Global

Function

• In Vietnam veterans, a crossover placebo‐controlled study (n = 10)1 and a parallel group placebo‐controlled study (n = 34)2positive 

improvement in  sleep duration and quality, reduction in nightmares

• In civilians, a crossover study (n = 13) positive and sleep duration 90 

minutes longer than with placebo3

1Raskind M., et al., (2003). 2Raskind M., et al., (2007). 3Taylor F. et al., (2008).

Evidence of Prazosin Efficacy for

Trauma Nightmares and Global

Function

• In OIF deployed in a combat zone, a prospective study (n = 13) positive 

improvement in sleep duration and quality, reduction in nightmares and 

improved overall level of functioning1

• In OIF/OEF combat veterans, a double‐blind placebo RCT (n = 56, 29 placebo   

and 27 prazosin) positive improvement in sleep duration and quality,     

(5)

Nightmare Reduction Initiative

• Stigma of seeking help for PTSD1

• Focus on sleep disturbance rather than PTSD

• Recruit for study participation

• Engage and coordinate care for Service Members

1Kim, C. et al., (2009) 

Prescribing Prazosin

• Prazosin (Minipress) 1mg‐20mg

•Dose initially at 1mg for two nights to assess for“first‐dose effect.” Has been 

associated with orthostatic hypotension with first dose. Also possibility of 

reflex tachycardia in the AM upon exertion

•If pt is tolerates medication and no improvement in nightmares, then 

increase dose to 2mg HS for four nights.  Continue titrating dose upwards by 

2mg q 4 days to effect

•Monitoring: initial orthostatic and ongoing BP monitoring

•Also can consider low‐dose during the day (mid‐AM) 2‐6mg to address residual hyperarousal symptoms

• Outcome Evaluation Tools

•Clinician Administered Post‐Traumatic Stress Scale

•Clinical Global Impression of Change

CAPS Sleep Items (B2)

Frequency Have you had any problems falling or staying asleep?   How often in the past week?   When did you first start having problems sleeping?        (After the [EVENT]?) 0 Never 1 One a week 2 Two a week 3 Several times a week (3 or 4) 4 Daily or almost every day (5 to 7) Sleep onset problems? Y     N Mid‐sleep awakening? Y     N Early a.m. awakening? Y     N Total # hrs sleep/night _____ Desired # hrs sleep/night _____ Intensity How much of a problem did you have with your sleep?  (How  long did it take you to fall asleep?  How often did you wake up  in the night?  Did you often wake up earlier than you wanted  to?  How many total hours did you sleep each night?) 0 No sleep problems 1 Mild, slightly longer latency, or minimal difficulty staying  asleep (up to 30 minutes loss of sleep) 2 Moderate, definite sleep disturbance, clearly longer  latency, or clear difficulty staying asleep (30‐90 minutes  loss of sleep) 3 Severe, much longer latency, or marked difficulty staying  asleep (90 min to 3 hrs loss of sleep)  4 Extreme, very long latency, or profound difficulty staying  asleep (> 3 hrs loss of sleep)

(6)

CAPS Nightmare Items (D2)

Frequency Have you ever had unpleasant dreams about (EVENT)?   Describe a typical dream.  (What happens in them?)  How  often have you had these dreams in the past month? 0 Never 1 One a week 2 Two a week 3 Several times a week (3 or 4) 4 Daily or almost every day (5 to 7) Description/Examples Intensity How much distress or discomfort did these dreams cause  you?  Did they ever wake you up?  [IF YES:]  (What happened  when you woke up?   How long did it take you to get back to sleep?)  [LISTEN FOR  REPORT OF ANXIOUS AROUSAL, YELLING, ACTING OUT THE  NIGHTMARE] (Did your dreams ever affect anyone else?   How so?) 0 None 1 Mild, minimal distress, may not have awoken 2 Moderate, awoke in distress but readily returned to  sleep (< 30 minutes) 3 Severe, considerable distress, difficulty returning to  sleep (> 30 minutes or got up) 4 Extreme, incapacitating distress, did not return to sleep

Clinical Global Impression of

Change

Summary

• Prazosin is effective for treating combat‐related nightmares, 

improving not only sleep, but overall quality of life and functioning • Can also be used during the day for residual hypervigilance 

symptoms

• Potential secondary effects of reducing ETOH cravings and drinking 

days in patients with PTSD

• Easy to use clinician‐rated assessment and outcome tools

•CAPS Sleep and Nightmare Items

(7)

Questions?

Jess Calohan, DNP, MN, PMHNP‐BC

Lieutenant Colonel, United States Army

Program Chair, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program

Daniel K. Inouye Graduate School of Nursing

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

jess.calohan@usuhs.edu

References

Calohan, J., Raskind, M., Peskind, E. & Peterson, K., (2010). Prazosin Treatment 

of Trauma Nightmares Soldiers Deployed in Iraq. Journal of traumatic 

stress, 23(5), 645‐648.

Kim, P., Thomas, J., Wilk, J., Castro, C., & Hoge, C. (2010). Stigma, barriers to 

care, and use of mental health services among active duty and 

National Guard soldiers after combat. Psychiatric Services, 61(6), 

582‐588.

Heim, C. & Nemeroff, C. Neurobiology of posttraumatic stress disorder. CNS 

Spectrum.2009 Jan;14(1 Suppl 1):13‐24. 

Levin, R., & Nielsen, T. (2007). Disturbed dreaming, posttraumatic stress 

disorder, and affect distress: a review and neurocognitive model. 

Psychological bulletin, 133(3), 482.

Lydiard, R. & Hamner, M. (2009). Clinical importance of sleep disturbance as a 

treatment target in PTSD. FOCUS: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in 

Psychiatry, 7(2), 176‐183.

References (Cont.)

Raskind, M., Peterson, K., Williams, T., Hoff, D., Hart, K., Holmes, H., Homas, 

D., Hill, J., Daniels, C., Calohan, J.,…& Peskind, E. (2013). A Trial of 

Prazosin for Combat Trauma PTSD With Nightmares in Active‐Duty 

Soldiers Returned From Iraq and Afghanistan. American Journal of 

Psychiatry, 170(9), 1003‐1010.

Raskind, M., Peskind, E., Kanter, E., Petrie, E., Radant, A., Thompson, C., ... & 

McFall, M. (2003). Reduction of nightmares and other PTSD 

symptoms in combat veterans by prazosin: a placebo‐controlled 

study. American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(2), 371‐373. Taylor, F., Martin, P., Thompson, C., Williams, J., Mellman, T., Gross, C., ... & 

Raskind, M.  (2008). Prazosin effects on objective sleep measures and 

clinical symptoms in civilian trauma posttraumatic stress disorder: a 

placebo‐controlled study. Biological psychiatry, 63(6), 629‐632. Writer, B., Meyer, E., & Schillerstrom, J. (2014). Prazosin for Military Combat‐

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :