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Applications:

Features:

TGS 4160 -

for the detection of Carbon Dioxide

The figure below represents typical sensitivity characteristics of TGS4160. The Y-axis is indicated as ∆EMF which is defined as follows:

∆EMF=EMF1 - EMF2 where

EMF1=EMF in 350 ppm CO2

EMF2=EMF in listed gas concentration

The figure below shows typical humidity dependency for an energized sensor. Again, the Y-axis is indicated as ∆EMF which is defined as follows:

∆EMF=EMF1 - EMF2 where

EMF1=EMF in 350 ppm CO2 EMF2=EMF in 1000ppm CO2

* Air quality control

* Fermentation process control

The TGS4160 is a hybrid sensor unit composed of a carbon dioxide sensitive element and a thermistor. The CO2 sensitive element consists of a solid electrolyte formed between two electrodes, together with a printed heater (Pt) substrate. By monitoring the change in electromotive force (EMF) generated between the two electrodes, it is possible to measure CO2 gas concentration. Adsorbent (zeolite) is filled between the internal cover and the outer cover for the purpose of reducing the influence of interference gases.

TGS4160 displays good long term stability and shows excellent durability against the effects of high humidity through the application of innovative technology in the sensor's electrode design.

* High selectivity to CO2 * Compact size

* Low dependency on humidity * Long life Humidity Dependency: Sensitivity Characteristics: 0 20 40 60 80 100 1000 10000 CO2 CO EtOH ∆ EMF (mV) Gas Concentration (ppm) 220 250 280 310 340 370 400 430 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 20 40 60 80 100 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Relative Humidity (%) EMF (350ppm CO2)

∆EMF (350ppm CO2 - 1000ppm CO2)

IMPORTANT NOTE: OPERATING CONDITIONS IN WHICH FIGARO SENSORS ARE USED WILL VARY WITH EACH CUSTOMER’S SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS. FIGARO STRONGLY RECOMMENDS CONSULTING OUR TECHNICAL STAFF BEFORE DEPLOYING FIGARO SENSORS IN YOUR APPLICATION AND, IN PARTICULAR, WHEN CUSTOMER’S TARGET GASES ARE NOT LISTED HEREIN. FIGARO CANNOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY USE OF ITS SENSORS IN A PRODUCT OR APPLICATION FOR WHICH SENSOR HAS NOT BEEN

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Structure and Dimensions:

Basic Measuring Circuit:

REV: 10/00

The TGS4160 sensor requires heater voltage (VH) input. The heater voltage is applied to the integrated heater in order to maintain the sensing element at a specific temperature which is optimal for sensing. Electromotive force (EMF) of the sensor should be measured using a high impedance (> 100 GΩ) operation-al amplifier with bias current < 1pA (e.g. Texas Instruments' model #TLC271). Since the solid electrolyte type sensor

Specifications:

r e b m u n l e d o M TGS4160 e p y t t n e m e l e g n i s n e S Soildelectrolyte s e s a g t e g r a T Carbondioxide e g n a r n o i t c e t e d l a c i p y T 300~5000ppm l a c i r t c e l E s c i t s i r e t c a r a h c t s e t d r a d n a t s r e d n u s n o i t i d n o c e c n a t s i s e r r e t a e H RH 11.5±1.1Ωatroomtemp. t n e r r u c r e t a e H IH approx.250mA r e w o p r e t a e H n o i t p m u s n o c PH approx.1.25W e g a t l o v r e t a e H VH 5.0±0.2V(DC) e c r o f e v i t o m o r t c e l E EMF 220~490mvin350ppmCO2 y t i v i t i s n e S ∆EMF 44~72mV EMF350ppmCO2 O C m p p 0 0 5 3 F M E 2 s c i t s i r e t c a r a h c r o s n e S e m i t e s n o p s e R approx.2min.(to90%offinalvalue) y c a r u c c a t n e m e r u s a e M approx.±20%at1,000ppmCO2 s n o i t i d n o c g n i t a r e p O -10~50˚C,5~95%RH s n o i t i d n o c e g a r o r t S (storein-m2o0i~st6u0re˚Cpr,o5of~b9a0g%wiRthHsilicagel) t s e t d r a d n a t S s n o i t i d n o c s n o i t i d n o c s a g t s e T CO2inair 0 2 t a ±2˚C,65±5%RH s n o i t i d n o c t i u c r i C VH=5.0±0.05VDC d o i r e p g n i n o i t i d n o C t s e t e r o f e b 7days

functions as a kind of battery, the EMF value itself would drift using this basic measuring circuit. However, the change of EMF value (∆EMF) shows a stable relationship with the change of CO2 concentration. Therefore, in order to obtain an accurate measurement of CO2, a special microprocessor for signal processing should be used with TGS4160. Figaro can provide a special evaluation sensor module (AM-4) for TGS4160.

Sensing Element Structure:

Top view Bottom view (u/m = mm) F IGAR O T G S 4160 1 2 3 4 5 6 ø 17.7±1.0 ø 24.1±1.0 Green Dot 24.3 ±1.0 6.0 ± 0.5 6.0 ± 0.5 5.8 ± 0.3 White Dot 45˚ ± 1˚30' 45˚ ± 1˚30' ø1.0 ± 0.1 ø9.5 ± 0.2 1 2 3 4 5 6 VH Top View (TGS4160) RTh RH V EMF Vout -+ Thermistor Thermistor Operational Amplifier Input impedance > 100GΩ

Bias current < 1pA

D F C

A

Bottom View (Sensor Element)

A: Lead wires

Side view (Sensor Element) B : Pt Heater F : Sealing Glass E : Counter Electrode (Anode) C : Solid Electrolyte D : Sensing Electrode (Cathode)

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Revised 03/00 1

Technical Information for Carbon Dioxide Sensors

The Figaro TGS4160 is a new solid electrolyte type sensor which offers miniaturization and long life. The TGS4160 displays high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Also, the TGS4160 displays good long term stability and shows excellent durability against the effects of high humidity through the application of innovative technology in the sensor’s electrode design. Page Specifications Features...2 Applications...2 Structure...2 Operating Principle...2

Basic Measuring Circuit...2

Circuit & Operating Conditions...3

Specifications...3

Dimensions...4

Basic Sensitivity Characteristics Sensitivity to Various Gases...4

Temperature Dependency...4

Humidity Dependency...5

Heater Voltage Dependency...5

Gas Response...5

Initial Action...6

Long Term Characteristics...6

Life Expectancy...6

Reliability Gas Exposure Test...7

High Temperature/Humidity Test...7

Heat Cyle Test...8

Low Temperature Test...8

Heater On-Off Test...8

Ethanol Exposure Test...9

Effect of Exposure to High CO2 Concentration...9

Notes...9

an ISO9001 company

IMPORTANT NOTE: OPERATING CONDITIONS IN WHICH FIGARO SENSORS ARE USED WILL VARY WITH EACH CUSTOMER’S SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS. FIGARO STRONGLY RECOMMENDS CONSULTING OUR TECHNICAL STAFF BEFORE DEPLOYING FIGARO SENSORS IN YOUR APPLICATION AND, IN PARTICULAR, WHEN CUSTOMER’S TARGET GASES ARE NOT LISTED HEREIN. FIGARO CANNOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY USE OF ITS SENSORS IN A PRODUCT OR APPLICATION FOR WHICH SENSOR HAS NOT BEEN SPECIFICALLY TESTED BY FIGARO.

(4)

Revised 03/00 2

TECHNICAL INFORMATION FOR TGS4160

1. Specifications

1-1 Features

* High selectivity to carbon dioxide * Low humidity dependency * Small size

* Long life 1-2 Applications

* Air quality control

* Fermentation process control * CO2 gas control for incubators 1-3 Structure

Figure 1 shows the structure of TGS4160. The TGS4160 is a hybrid composed of a carbon dioxide sensing element and an internal thermistor. The CO2 sensing element consists of a cation (Na+) solid electrolyte formed between two electrodes together with a printed heater (Pt) substrate. The cathode (sensing element) consists of lithium carbonate and gold, while the anode (counter electrode) is made of gold. The anode is connected to sensor pin No.3 (“S(+)”) while the cathode is connected to pin No.4 (“S(-)”). A Pt heater connected to pins No.1 (“H”) and No.6 (“H”) heats the sensing element. An internal thermistor connected to pins No.2 and No.5 detects the environmental temperature in order to compen-sate for the sensor’s temperature dependency. Lead wires are made of Pt at 0.1mm diameter, and these wires are spot welded to nickel pins. The sensor base is made of polyethylene terephthalate reinforced with glass fiber. The internal cover is a double layer of 100 mesh stainless gauze (SUS316). The cover is fastened to the sensor base with a nickel plated brass ring. External housing material consists of reinforced polyamide resin. A layer of 60 Mesh stainless steel gauze (SUS 304) is used for the outside cover. The space between the internal and outer covers is filled with adsorbent (zeolite) for the purpose of reducing the influence of interference gases.

1-4 Operation principle

When the sensor is exposed to CO2 gas , the following electrochemical reaction occurs:

Cathodic reaction: 2Li+ + CO2 + 1/2O2 + 2e- = Li2CO3

Anodic reaction: 2Na+ + 1/2O2 + 2e- = Na2O

Overall chemical reaction:

Li2CO3 + 2Na+ = Na2O + 2Li+ + CO2

Fig. 1 - Sensor structure

Fig. 2 - Basic measuring circuit A A B D F C A Internal Thermistor Sensor Element Lead Pins SUS316 100 mesh Zeolite Filter SUS304 60 mesh Top View

Bottom View (Sensor Element)

A: Lead wires

Side view (Sensor Element)

B : Pt Heater F : Sealing Glass E : Counter Electrode (Anode) C : Solid Electrolyte D : Sensing Electrode (Cathode) Non-woven Fabric 1 2 3 4 5 6 VH Top View (TGS4160) RTh RH VEMF Vout -+ Thermistor Thermistor Operational Amplifier Input impedance > 100GΩ Bias current < 1pA

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Revised 03/00 3

As a result of the electrochemical reaction, electro-motive force (EMF) would be generated according to Nernst’s equation:

EMF = Ec - (R x T) / (2F) ln (P(CO2)) where

P(CO2) : Partial pressure of CO2, Ec : Constant value R : Gas constant T : Temperature (K) F : Faraday constant By monitoring the electromotive force (EMF) generated between the two electrodes, it is possible to measure CO2.

1-5 Basic measuring circuit

Figure 2 shows the basic measuring circuit for TGS4160. The sensor requires that heater voltage (VH) be applied to the integrated heater in order to maintain the sensing element at the optimal temp-erature for sensing. The sensor’s EMF should be measured using an operational amplifier with high impedance (more than 100GΩ) and low bias current (less than 1 pA) such as Texas Instruments’ model No. TLC 271. Since the solid electrolyte type sensor functions as a kind of battery, its absolute EMF value would drift using this basic circuit. However, the change of EMF value (∆EMF) maintains a stable relationship with the changes in CO2 concentration. Therefore, in order to obtain an accurate measure-ment of CO2, a special microprocessor for signal processing should be used with TGS4160. A special evaluation sensor module which performs the requir-ed signal processing (AM-4) is available from Figaro. See Technical Information of AM-4 for further details. 1-6 Circuit &␣ operating conditions

The ratings shown below should be maintained at all times to insure stable sensor performance:

Fig. 3 - Sensor dimensions F IGAR O T G S 4160 1 2 3 4 5 6 ø 17.7±1.0 ø 24.1±1.0 Green Dot 24.3 ±1.0 6.0 ± 0.5 6.0 ± 0.5 5.8 ± 0.3 White Dot 45˚ ± 1˚30' 45˚ ± 1˚30' ø1.0 ± 0.1 ø9.5 ± 0.2 Top view Side view Bottom view m e t I Specification V ( e g a t l o v r e t a e H H) 5.0V±0.2VDC R ( e c n a t s i s e r r e t a e H H)-roomtemp. 11.5±1.1Ω t n e r r u c r e t a e H approx.250mA n o i t p m u s n o c r e w o p r e t a e H approx.1.25W r o t s i m r e h t l a n r e t n i f o e c n a t s i s e R 100kΩ ±5% r o t s i m r e h t l a n r e t n i f o t n a t s n o c B 3450±2% s n o i t i d n o c g n i t a r e p O -10˚C~+50˚C,5~95%RH s n o i t i d n o c e g a r o t S -20˚C~+60˚C,5~90%RH n o i t a r t n e c n o c n o i t c e t e d l a m i t p O 300~5,000ppm m e t I Specification O C f o m p p 0 5 3 n i F M E 2 220~490mV ∆EMF EMF(350ppmCO2) -) 2 O C m p p 0 0 5 3 ( F M E 44~72mV

NOTE 1: Sensitivity characteristics are obtained under the following standard test conditions:

(Standard test conditions)

Temperature and humidity: 20 ± 2˚C, 65 ± 5% RH Circuit conditions: VH = 5.0±0.05V DC

Preheating period: 7 days or more under standard circuit conditions

NOTE: When the sensor is powered, the typical resistance value of the internal thermistor is around 8.0kΩ due to heat radiated from the heater. Therefore, the change ratio of thermistor resistance (RT/RTo) should be used for compensating the temperature dependency of TGS4160 instead of using the absolute resistance value of the internal thermistor.

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Revised 03/00 4

TECHNICAL INFORMATION FOR TGS4160

1-8 Dimensions (see Fig. 3)

2. Basic Sensitivity Characteristics 2-1 Sensitivity to various gases

Figure 4 represents typical sensitivity characteristics of TGS4160. The Y-axis is indicated as ∆EMF which is defined as follows:

∆EMF=EMF1 - EMF2

where

EMF1=EMF in 350 ppm of CO2 EMF2=EMF in listed gas concentration

As shown by Figure 4, TGS4160 exhibits a very good linear relationship between ∆EMF and CO2 gas concentration on a logarithmic scale. The sensitivity curve to CO2 shows a sharp increase in ∆EMF as CO2 concentration increases. In comparison, sensitivity to CO and ethanol (C2H5OH) are very low as evidenced by the relatively flat slope and low ∆EMF values of the sensitivity curves for these gases.

2-2 Temperature dependency

Figure 5 shows the temperature dependency of TGS4160. These charts demonstrate that while the absolute EMF value increases as the ambient temperature increases, the ∆EMF remains constant regardless of temperature change (actually, ∆EMF changes according to Nernst’s law, but the degree of change would be negligible in the operating temperature range of -10~+50˚C). As a result, an inexpensive method for compensation of temperature dependency would be to incorporate an internal thermistor in the detection circuit.

Fig. 4 - Sensitivity to various gases

(∆EMF = EMF in 350ppm CO2 - EMF in listed concentration)

Fig. 5 - Temperature dependency (Absolute humidity=7.4g H2O/kg of air) Mechanical Strength:

The sensor shall have no abnormal findings in its structure and shall satisfy the above electrical specifications after the following performance tests: withstand force > 5kg in each direction

frequency-10~55Hz, amplitude-1.5mm, repeating 1 min. sweep, duration-two hours, x-y-z direction

acceleration-100G, repeated 3 times, x-y-z direction

Withdrawal Force Vibration Shock -0 20 40 60 80 100 1000 10000 CO2 CO EtOH ∆ EMF (mV) Gas Concentration (ppm) 190 220 250 280 310 340 370 400 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 -20 -10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Temperature (˚C) EMF (350ppm CO2)

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Revised 03/00 5

2-3 Humidity dependency

Figure 6 shows the humidity dependency of TGS4160. As this figure illustrates, the sensor shows very small dependency on humidity for both absolute EMF and ∆EMF values.

2-4 Heater voltage dependency

Figure 7 shows the change in EMF at 350 ppm of CO2 according to variations in heater voltage (VH). Note that 5.0±0.2 V as a heater voltage must be maintained because variation in applied heater voltage will cause the sensor’s characteristics to be greatly changed from those shown as typical in this brochure.

2-5 Gas response

Figure 8 shows the change pattern of absolute EMF values when the sensor is placed into 1,000 and 2,000 ppm of CO2 for 10 minutes before being returned to normal air. The response time to 90% of the saturated signal level is around two minutes while recovery to 90% of the base level is within 4 minutes.

Fig. 6 - Humidity dependency (20˚C)

Fig. 7 - Heater voltage dependency 250 275 300 325 350 0 25 50 75 100 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 EMF (mV) Relative Humidity (%) EMF (350ppm CO2)

∆EMF (350ppm CO2 - 1000ppm CO2)

300 320 340 360 380 400 4.7 4.8 4.9 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 EMF (mV) Heater Voltage (V) 350ppm CO2 300 310 320 330 340 350 360 0 10 20 30 40 50 EMF (mV) Time (min.) 1000ppm CO2 2000ppm CO2

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Revised 03/00 6

TECHNICAL INFORMATION FOR TGS4160

2-6 Initial action

Figure 9 shows typical initial action of the sensor’s EMF. For purposes of this test, the sensor was stored unenergized in normal air for two months after which it was energized in clean air.

After energizing, the sensor’s EMF increases regardless of the presence of gas, reaching to 99% of its final value in less than 10 minutes. Since the sensor’s EMF value is less than 99% of its final value during the first 10 minutes, a special signal processing method (such as that described in Technical Information for AM-4) should be incorporated into applications using TGS4160 in order to prevent faulty function of the user’s device during this period.

2-7 Long-term characteristics

Figure 10a shows long-term stability data for TGS4160. The test samples were energized in normal air and under standard circuit conditions.␣ These charts illustrate that while the absolute EMF values displayed a slight decrease over time, ∆EMF values show stable characteristics for more than 800 days. Figure 10b shows the influence of unenergized storage on the sensor’s long term stability. Test samples were stored unpowered in room air for more than 300 days. Sensors were intermittently measured under standard test conditions (20˚C/65%RH) during the test. This chart also demonstrates that while absolute EMF values slightly decrease over time, ∆EMF shows stability for over 300 days. As the charts presented in this section illustrate, ∆EMF shows stable long term characteristics. 2-8 Life expectancy

The end of life for TGS4160 occurs when:

a. Absolute EMF value in clean air drops to 100mV after energizing in clean air for 24 hours.

b. ∆EMF (350ppm vs 3500ppm of CO2) drops to less than 30mV regardless of absolute EMF in clean air. The life expectancy of TGS4160 strongly depends on circuit and environmental conditions. By extrapolating the data in Figure 10a, the life expectancy of TGS4160 is approximately 2,000 days with continuous energizing at room temperature.

Fig. 9 - Initial action

Fig. 10a - Long term stability -100 0 100 200 300 400 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 EMF (mV) Time (sec.) 350ppm of CO2 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 200 400 600 800 1000 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Time (days) EMF (350ppm CO2)

∆EMF (350ppm CO2 - 2000ppm CO2)

∆EMF (350ppm CO2 - 700ppm CO2) ∆EMF (350ppm CO2 -1000ppm CO2)

50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Time (days) EMF (350ppm CO2)

∆EMF (350ppm CO2 - 3500ppm CO2)

Fig. 10b - Effects of unpowered storage on long term stability

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Revised 03/00 7

3. Reliability 3-1 Gas exposure test

Figure 11 shows the effect on sensor characteristics of various gases. Sensors were energized and the ∆EMF value (air vs 1000ppm of CO2) prior to gas exposure was measured. After the exposure in gases in 100 ppm of the test gas for 24 hours, the sensor was removed from the test gas and energized in normal air. After one hour elapsed, the CO2 characteristics was again measured.

As these tests demonstrate, care should be taken to minimize exposure to some kinds of gases (such as chlorine compounds) which lower the sensor’s sensitivity.

3-2 High temperature/humidity test

To show the ability of TGS4160 to withstand the effects of high temperature and humidity, the sensor was subjected to a test condition of 40˚C/80%RH. Unenergized test samples were subjected this condition for 1000 hours and then samples were measured under standard test conditions (20˚C/ 65%RH).

Figure 12 shows that the TGS4160 maintains stable characteristics even if the sensor is used in high temperature and humidity conditions.

Fig. 11 - Effect on ∆EMF of exposure to other gases (∆EMF = EMF (air - 1000ppm CO2))

Fig. 12 - High temperature and humidity test

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Reference CFC 12 HFC 134a Trichloro ethylene Chloroform Tetrachloro ethylene CCl4 1,1,1-trichloroethane Chlorodibromomethane p-dichloro benzene Hexamethyldisiloxane Methanol Ethanol 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene n-nonane Ethyl acetate Limonene IPA n-propyl alcohol Ethylene glycohol Hexane Chloromethylene Butyl acetate Acetone 4-methyl, 2-pentanone Xylene Toluene Cyclohexane n-pentane Hydrogen Methane Propane Carbon monoxide Ammonia 2-butanone Formaldehyde Benzene Ethylbenzene Decane ∆EMF (mV) 300 320 340 360 380 400 0 10 20 30 40 50 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Time (hours)

∆EMF (EMF 350ppm CO2 - EMF 1000ppm CO2) EMF 350ppm CO2

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Revised 03/00 8

TECHNICAL INFORMATION FOR TGS4160

3-3 Heat cycle test

Figure 13 shows the effect of subjecting the TGS4160 to a heat cycle test. Unenergized sensors were subjected to a cycle of -25˚C for 30 minutes followed by 85˚C for 30 minutes, with this cycle being repeated more than 100 times. The sensors were intermittently measured under standard test conditions (20˚C/ 65%RH) during the test.

As these test results show, TGS4160 has sufficient durability against the severity of heat cycle conditions.

3-4 Low temperature test

Figure 14 shows the results of exposing TGS4160 to severe low temperature. Unenergized sensors were subjected to conditions of -20˚C for 1,000 hours. Sensors were intermittently measured under standard test conditions (20˚C/65%RH) during the test.

As these test results show that there is almost no influence by low temperatures on the sensitivity characteristics of TGS4160.

3-5 Heater on-off cycle test

If the TGS4160 would be used for indoor air quality monitoring or a portable CO2 monitor, the sensor would be powered on and off frequently. To simulate such conditions, the sensor was subjected to a heater on-off cycle by applying the specified heater voltage (5.0V) to the sensor for 1 hour, then being powered off for 1 hour. Samples were subjected to this cycle 1500 times. Sensors were intermittently measured under standard test conditions (20˚C/65%RH) during the test.

As Figure 15 shows, cycling the heater on and off demonstrates that heater on-off does not result in any appreciable change in the sensor’s sensitivity characteristics.

Fig. 13 - Effect of heat cycle testing

Fig. 14 - Effect of low temperature exposure 220 240 260 280 300 320 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) # of cycles

∆EMF (EMF 350ppm CO2 - EMF 1000ppm CO2) EMF 350ppm CO2 240 260 280 300 320 340 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Time (hours)

∆EMF (EMF 350ppm CO2 - EMF 1000ppm CO2) EMF 350ppm CO2 240 260 280 300 320 340 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 EMF (mV) ∆ EMF (mV) Time (hours)

∆EMF (EMF 350ppm CO2 - EMF 1000ppm CO2) EMF 350ppm CO2

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Revised 03/00 9

3-6 Ethanol exposure test

To eliminate the influence of interference gases such as an ethanol vapor, a zeolite filter is installed in the cap of TGS4160. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the zeolite filter, the sensor was exposed in 3% of ethanol gas for a period of 600 days. During this test, ∆EMF values of ethanol were measured. ∆EMF is defined as follows:

∆EMF=EMF1 - EMF2

where

EMF1=EMF in 350ppm CO2

EMF2=EMF in 350 ppm CO2 and 300ppm EtOH

The results of the above test are shown in Figure 16. As the stable ∆EMF values show, the zeolite filter has sufficient ability to eliminate the influence of interference gases over an extended period of time.

3-7 Effect of exposure to high CO2 concentration

Figure 17 shows the sensor characteristics of TGS4160 in high concentrations of CO2. This data suggests that TGS4160 can detect CO2 in excess of 100000ppm. However, it should be noted that the ∆EMF values would likely devitae from their initial values after exposure to high concentrations of CO2. This would occur due to a shift in the chemical equilibrium between the sensing electrode and CO2 gas.

4. Notes

The following cautions regarding storage and installation of TGS4160 should be observed to prevent permanent damage to the sensor:

1) Install/store indoors, avoiding dew condensation, silicone vapor, and exposure to alkaline metals (Na, Li, etc.).

2) Avoid places where vibration or mechanical shock may occur.

3) The sensor should not be stored in high humidity or temperature conditions. Sensors should be stored in an aluminum-coated sealing bag together with desiccant.

4) The sensor should be mounted on circuit board using manual soldering.

Fig. 16 -Effect of ethanol exposure

Fig. 17 - Effect of exposure to high CO2 concentrations -40 -20 0 20 40 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 ∆ EMF (mV) Time (days) 150 200 250 300 350 400 100 1000 10000 100000 ∆ EMF (mV) CO2 concentration (ppm)

Figure

Fig. 1 - Sensor structure
Figure 2 shows the basic measuring circuit for TGS4160. The sensor requires that heater voltage (V H ) be applied to the integrated heater in order to maintain the sensing element at the optimal  temp-erature for sensing
Figure 4 represents typical sensitivity characteristics of TGS4160. The Y-axis is indicated as ∆EMF which is defined as follows:
Figure 7 shows the change in EMF at 350 ppm of CO 2
+5

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