Updates for Updates for 2014, Grade 5 Page 1

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SCIENCE Assessment

Updates for 2014

Grade 5

       

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Washington State K‐12 Science Learning Standards ... 3  Adoption of Next Generation Science Standards ... 3  New Samples for 2014 ... 4  Student Sample Pages ... 5  Teacher Answer Pages ... 15  Appendix A: Measurements of Student Progress Information... 31  Test and Item Specifications ... 31  Item Types ... 31  Performance Level Descriptors ... 32  2014 Testing Windows ... 32  Online Testing ... 32  Appendix B: Resources for Educators ... 33  Lessons Learned from Scoring Student Work ... 33  Sample Item Templates ... 33  2012 Released Item Document (RID) and Item Analysis ... 33  Updates for 2011, 2012, and 2013 ... 33  Teacher Tool ... 33  Appendix C: Get involved and stay informed ... 34  Resources/Contact Information ... 34     

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Updates for 2014 contains pertinent information for Washington educators. This document includes a  summary of new information in science assessment, sample test items, and links to resources for  teachers. Updates for 2014 has been customized into grade levels:  Grade 5, Grade 8, and the Biology  End‐of‐Course Exam. The documents are available on  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/EducatorResources.aspx    

Washington

State

K

12

Science

Learning

Standards

In 2009, the K‐12 Science Learning Standards were formally adopted. Along with the standards, the  legislature provided direction for the redesign of the assessment system. The Measurements of Student  Progress (MSP) replaced the Washington Assessment of Student Learning (WASL) and assessed the new  science standards in grades 5 and 8 in the spring of 2011. The Biology End‐of‐Course (EOC) exam  replaced the High School Proficiency Exam (HSPE) in 2012.  View the Washington State K‐12 Science Learning Standards at:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/Standards.aspx   

Adoption

of

Next

Generation

Science

Standards

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were officially adopted as the Washington State science  learning standards on October 4, 2013. The adoption of the NGSS begins a transition process that will  take several years for awareness, professional development, and implementation in the classroom,  leading to a state‐wide assessment of those standards. The date/year for the first assessment of the  NGSS is unknown at this time.  Information about the adoption and transition to the NGSS can be found at:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/NGSS.aspx  

The 5th grade Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) in science will continue to assess the K12  Science Learning Standards adopted in 2009 until at least spring 2016 or later. See Appendix A for  more information about the MSP. 

 

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The scenario and items on pages 6‐13 are samples that align with the K‐12 Science Learning Standards.  The scenario and most of the items on these pages were piloted on the 2010 MSP. Other items have not  gone through the comprehensive review process that test items must pass before placement on a state  test. These items will be indicated in the Teacher Answer pages on the Scenario Map & Answer Key.  Teachers may still use these items as classroom exercises, or informal checks for understanding, as  teachers have the ability and choice to clarify any questions about these items as students are working  on them.  The Teacher Answer Pages (pages 15‐30) provide the keys, rubrics, and sample student responses.     Printing tip: Print the student pages back‐to‐back, beginning with the cover sheet on page 5, to preserve  pagination.       

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Student

 

Name:____________________________________________

 

 

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Directions: Answer questions 1 through 3 on pages 6 through 7. They are not connected to a scenario.

1

Where do cats get their eye color?

o

A

. From air the cats breathe

o

B

. From food the cats eat

o

C

. From the parent cats

2

Maya dissolved 20 grams of salt in 60 grams of water. What is the mass of the

mixed salt and water?

Write your answer in the box.

(7)

3

What does soil contain that trees need to live and grow?

o

A.

Food

o

B.

Rocks

(8)

Toy Truck

Directions: Use the following information to answer questions 4 through 10.

The toy truck with a key is a system. Damien and Bailey wondered if adding blocks

to the toy truck system would affect the distance traveled. They did the following

controlled experiment.

Question:

What is the effect of blocks with different mass (10 grams, 20 grams, and

30 grams) on the distance a toy truck system with the block will travel?

Prediction:

The toy truck system carrying the 10 gram block will travel the

farthest distance.

Materials:

toy truck system

3 blocks: 10 grams (g), 20 g, 30 g

tape

meterstick

(9)

Procedure:

1.

Use the tape to mark a starting line on the floor.

2.

Set the toy truck system at the starting line.

3.

Put the 10-g block into the back of the toy truck system.

4.

Turn the key on the toy truck 15 times and let go.

5.

Measure and record the distance the toy truck system and block travel

as Trial 1.

6.

Repeat steps 2 through 5 two more times as Trials 2 and 3.

7.

Repeat steps 2 through 6 for the 20-g block and the 30-g block.

8.

Find and record the average distance the toy truck system traveled carrying

each block mass.

Data:

Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled

Block Mass

(grams)

Distance Traveled

(centimeters)

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Average

10

421 426 428 425

20

402 401 397 400

(10)

4

Which variable was kept the same (controlled) in the experiment?

o

A

. Mass of blocks

o

B

. Time to travel

o

C

. Type of toy truck

 

 

 

5

What variable was the measured (responding) variable in the experiment?

o

A

. Surface

material

o

B

. Distance

traveled

o

C

. Block

mass

 

 

6

What form of energy causes Damien and Bailey to hear the toy truck?

o

A

. Electrical

o

B

. Sound

o

C

. Light

 

(11)

7

Write a conclusion for this controlled experiment.

In your conclusion, be sure to:

Answer the experimental question.

Include

supporting

data from the Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled

table.

Explain how these data

support

your conclusion.

Question: What is the effect of blocks with different mass (10 grams,

20 grams, and 30 grams) on the distance a toy truck system with the

block will travel?

(12)

8

Which of the following is an output of the toy truck system?

o

A

. The motion of the toy truck system

o

B

. The floor under the toy truck system

o

C

. The number of wheels on the toy truck system

9

 

Damien and Bailey designed a cart to carry their heavy school books. Which is a

way Damien and Bailey could know their solution was successful?

o

A.

Their teacher asked questions about the cart.

o

B.

All their books fit in the cart.

(13)

10

Plan a controlled experiment to answer the

question in the box. You may use any

materials in your procedure.

Be sure your procedure includes

:

 logical steps to do the experiment

 one changed (manipulated) variable  one measured (responding) variable how often measurements should be taken and recorded

Question:

What is the effect of different surfaces (smooth, grassy, and

rocky) on the time for a toy truck to travel two meters?

(14)

 

Glossary

 

of

 

Non

Science

 

Terms

 

for

 

Updates

 

2014

 

Document

 

Science Grade 5 – Published Fall 2013  Students are permitted to use this Glossary sheet as a reference. 

 

beaker

A glass container used for science experiments.

graduated cylinder

A container used for measuring.

stopwatch

A watch used to time events like a car race.

variable

All the parts of a system that could be changed are called variables. In an experiment one variable is changed and another variable is measured. The rest of the variables are kept the same.

 

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Teacher

Answer

Pages

The following pages provide:    An Answer Key Table for standalone items and a Scenario Map & Answer Key Table for the  scenario with:  o Item Specification text  o Item Specification code   For example: LS2A(2) is the second item specification for content standard LS2A.  o Correct answers for the multiple choice questions  o Typical results for each item have been determined based on pilot results and  operational results for items assessing the same item specification.   Rubrics for completion and short‐answer items (student words are in italics)   Annotated (scored) student responses for each of the short‐answer items (student words are in  italics)         

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Stand

 

Alone

 

Items

 

Answer

 

Key

 

Table

 

Title: Stand Alone items 

Grade: 5 

These are new items written for this Updates document. They  did not go through the full development cycle. 

Description: Items not attached to a scenario. 

Item Description  Item Specification Code  Answers & Typical Results

        Domains of Science       

Item Specification Text 

Systems   Inquir y   Application   Physical   Scien ce   Earth /spa ce   Scien ce    Life    Scien ce   A  B  C  **1 

Describe that many characteristics of an 

organism are inherited from the organism’s 

parents.        LS3B  (1)      ~40%  correct **2 

Describe or predict that the weight of a 

sample of a substance remains the same 

when the sample is dissolved into another 

substance, is added to a mixture, or 

undergoes a change of state. 

      PS2C

(2)      CP rubric 

**3 

Describe that an organism(s) depends on one 

or more non‐living resources in a given 

ecosystem for survival (e.g., plants and 

animals need water). 

      LS2A 

(3)     

̴

55%  correct

Stand Alone Point Total = 3  0

0%  0 0%  0 0%  3 100%  MC/CP= 3pts 

Actual Science MSP = 34 points  20%  30%  20%  30%  MC/CP= 26pts, SA=8pts 

**These items were not part of an Operational or Pilot MSP. Typical results have been determined based on 

pilot results and operational results for items assessing the same item specification. 

 

(17)

Scoring Rubric for Item 2: Maya’s Salt and Water Performance Description Typical results: Mean= ̴0.7 pts

A 1-point response demonstrates the student understands the Content Standard PS2C: The

total amount of matter is conserved (stays the same) when it undergoes a physical change such as when an object is broken into tiny pieces, when a solid is dissolved in a liquid, or when matter changes state (solid, liquid, gas). Item Specification 2: Describe or predict that the weight of a sample of a substance remains the same when the sample is dissolved into another substance or undergoes a change of state.

The response gives the mass of the sugar and water mixture by stating one of the following: ̴ 70%

80

20 + 60

20 + 60= 80

20 plus 60

eighty

A 0-point response demonstrates the student has little or no understanding of the Content

Standard. ̴ 29% 20 60 Range of 0-79 Range of 81-500 ̴ 1% blank

 

   

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Toy

 

Truck

 

Scenario

 

Map

 

&

 

Answer

 

Key

 

Title: Toy Truck  Grade: 5 

Piloted in 2010 unless noted ** 

Description: Students investigate the effect of mass on the distance a toy truck travels. 

Item Description  Item Specification Code  Answers & Typical Results

        Domains of Science       

Item Specification Text 

Systems   Inquir y   Application   Physical   Scien ce   Earth /spa ce   Scien ce    Life    Scien ce  

A

 

B

 

C

 

Identify a variable kept the same 

(controlled) in a given description of a 

scientific investigation.    INQC (1)        ~80%  correct 

Identify the measured (responding) variable 

in a given description of a scientific 

investigation. 

  INQC

(3)       

~75%  correct    6** Describe an energy transfer in a given 

system.        PS3A (1)        ~85%  correct   

Generate a conclusion for a scientific 

investigation, including supporting data, 

given a description of and results from the 

investigation. 

  INQG

(1)      SA Rubric  8** Describe one or more inputs and/or outputs 

of a given system.  SYSC (1)        ~40%  correct      9** 

Describe one or more criteria for a 

successful solution, given a problem that 

can be solved using a technological design 

process. 

    APPC

(1)         

~65%  correct   

10  Describe a plan to answer a given question 

for a controlled experiment.   

INQB

(1)      SA Rubric  Scenario Point Total = 9 

11%  6  67%  1  11%  1  11%  MC/CP= 5pts, SA=4pts 

Actual Science MSP = 34 points  20%  30%  20%  30%  MC/CP= 26pts, SA=8pts 

(19)

Scoring Rubric for Item 7: Toy Truck Conclusion (page 1 of 3)

Performance Description Attributes

Typical results:

Mean= ̴0.79 pts

A 2-point response demonstrates the student understands the Content Standard

INQG: Scientific explanations emphasize evidence, have logically consistent arguments, and use known scientific principles, models, and theories. Item Specification 1: Generate a conclusion for a scientific investigation, including supporting data, given a description of and results from the investigation. Example: The lower the mass, the greater the distance the toy truck system traveled. With 10 grams the truck traveled 425 centimeters. With 30 grams the truck traveled 360 centimeters. The truck with the highest mass went the shortest distance.

3-4 ̴35%

A 1-point response demonstrates the student has partial understanding of the

Content Standard. 2 ̴9%

A 0-point response demonstrates the student has little or no understanding of the

Content Standard. 0–1

̴

54%

̴

2% blank

Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled

Block Mass

(grams)

Distance Traveled

(centimeters)

Trial 1

Trial 2

Trial 3

Average

10

421 426 428 425

20

402 401 397 400

30

358 363 359 360

(20)

Scoring Rubric for Item 7: Toy Truck Conclusion (page 2 of 3) Attributes of a Conclusion

Note: The italicized print is the part of the “Example” credited for the attribute.

Description Attributes Typical

results

Conclusive statement correctly answers the experimental question (or correctly

states whether the prediction was correct): The lower the mass, the greater the distance the toy truck system traveled.

Attribute Notes:

1. A vague conclusive statement (e.g., the mass change did affect the distance) cannot be

credited for this attribute, but other attributes can be credited.

2. A response with an incorrect conclusive statement or no conclusive statement may not

be credited any attributes.

3. A response with both a correct and an incorrect conclusive statement (e.g., as mass

increased distance decreased … as mass got smaller so did distance)cannot be credited

for this attribute but other attributes can be credited, if separate from any contradictory statements.

1

̴

48%

Supporting data should at least be over the entire range of the conditions investigated. Thus the minimum reported data are the lowest and highest conditions of the manipulated variable for quantitative data (responding variable when the manipulated variable information is descriptive). Supporting data for 10 g block: With 10 grams the truck traveled 425

centimeters. 1 ̴39%

Supporting data for 30 g block: With 30 grams the truck traveled 360

centimeters. 1 ̴39%

Explanatory language, separate from the conclusive statement, is used to connect

or compare the supporting data to the conclusive statement: The truck with the highest mass went the shortest distance.

Attribute Notes:

1. This attribute can only be credited when at least one numeric value (or the text from a

descriptive data table) for the manipulated or responding variable is included in the response.

2. A copy of the conclusive statement cannot be credited for explanatory language.

However, a re-phrased credited conclusive statement can be credited.

3. Explanatory language comparing the range of the manipulated and/or responding

variables may be credited (e.g., with the 30g block the truck only went 360 centimeters.)

4. If a response misquotes trend data between the highest and lowest conditions, this

attribute cannot be credited (e.g., the 20g block went 399 centimeters).

5. Transitional words (e.g., however, therefore, because, so, then, clearly, but) cannot be

credited as explanatory language even when added to a conclusive statement.

6. A compound sentence as a conclusive statement may be read as two separate sentences.

1 ̴23%

(21)

Scoring Rubric for Item 7: Toy Truck Conclusion (page 3 of 3) General Notes:

1. Copying the Data Table: Responses copying the whole data table verbatim may not be credited the

supporting data attribute even with a correct conclusive statement and explanatory language. a) For grades 4-5, a translation of the whole data table into sentences is acceptable.

b) For grades 6-8 and high school, a discussion of the whole data table may be acceptable when the data

table is minimal with a very small number of data cells.

2. Supporting Data: Responses must give the precise numerical values or precise descriptive language from

the data table for both the manipulated and responding variables.

a) Average data (if given) or data from the end of the investigation, must be included for grades 6-8 and

high school.

b) For grades 4-5, consistent trial data, or data before the completion of the investigation when

measuring a responding variable over time, can be credited.

c) Rounded numerical values cannot be credited (e.g., about 400 cannot be credited for 425). However,

a zero after a decimal point may be omitted (e.g., NA).

d) Units are not necessary for credit (e.g., 425 is creditable for 425 centimeters).

e) Minor language differences in descriptive data may be acceptable as decided in rangefinding

(e.g., NA).

f) For grades 4-5, the manipulated variable may be implied (e.g., smallest/lightest block for 10 g block,

largest/heaviest block for 30 g block).

3. Derived Data: Responses giving their own derived data between conditions can be credited for

supporting data and explanatory language (e.g., increasing the mass by 20 grams caused the distance to

decrease by 65 centimeters).

a) When the derived data uses the lowest and/or highest conditions, one or both supporting data

attributes can be credited.

b) Minor arithmetic errors in derived values can be acceptable as decided in rangefinding

(e.g., NA).

(22)

Annotated example of a 2‐point response to item 7. 

7

Write a conclusion for this controlled experiment.

In your conclusion, be sure to:

Answer the experimental question.

Include

supporting

data from the Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled table.

Explain how these data

support

your conclusion.

Question: What is the effect of blocks with different mass (10 grams,

20 grams, and 30 grams) on the distance a toy truck system with the

block will travel?

Conclusion:

The more the mass the shorter the truck will travel. The truck with 10 grams went an average of 425 cm. With the 30 g weight the truck only traveled 360 cm. That’s 65 cm less than the 10 g weight.

 

 

 

 

Annotations Attributes

Conclusive statement: The more the mass the shorter the truck will travel. 1

Supporting data for 10 g block: …10 grams went an average of 425 cm. 1

Supporting data for 30 g block: …30 g…traveled 360 cm. 1

Explanatory language: That’s (360 cm traveled by 30g) 65cm less than the 10g

weight. OR With the 30g weight the car only traveled 360cm. Attribute Note 3. 1

Total Attributes & Score Points 4

2

(23)

Annotated example of a 1‐point response to item 7. 

7

Write a conclusion for this controlled experiment.

In your conclusion, be sure to:

Answer the experimental question.

Include

supporting

data from the Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled table.

Explain how these data

support

your conclusion.

Question: What is the effect of blocks with different mass (10 grams,

20 grams, and 30 grams) on the distance a toy truck system with the

block will travel?

Conclusion:

The effect of different amounts of mass will make the truck go farther or closer because with 10 grams the average was 425 centemeters and with 20 grams the average was 400 centemeters so the less weight the farther it moves.

 

 

 

Annotations Attributes Conclusive statement: ...different amounts of mass will make the truck go farther or

closer… Vague. Attribute Note 1 0

Supporting data for 10 g block: …with 10 grams the average was 425 centemeters… 1

Supporting data for 30 g block: None. 0

Explanatory language: …so the less weight the farther it (the truck) moves. 1

Total Attributes & Score Points 2

1

(24)

Annotated example of a 0‐point response to item 7. 

7

Write a conclusion for this controlled experiment.

In your conclusion, be sure to:

Answer the experimental question.

Include

supporting

data from the Block Mass vs. Distance Traveled table.

Explain how these data

support

your conclusion.

Question: What is the effect of blocks with different mass (10 grams,

20 grams, and 30 grams) on the distance a toy truck system with the

block will travel?

Conclusion:

I conclude that the truck slows down with more weight on it and that it speeds up with less weight on it.         Annotations Attributes

Conclusive statement: the truck slows down with more weight on it (the truck) and it

(the truck) speeds up with less weight on it (the truck). Attribute Note 2 Incorrect Conclusive Statement—speed is commented about instead of distance traveled.

0

Supporting data for 10 g block: None 0

Supporting data for 30 g block: None 0

Explanatory language: None 0

Total Attributes & Score Points 0

0

(25)

Scoring Rubric for Item 10: Toy Truck New Procedure (page 1 of 2)

Performance Description Attributes

Typical results:

Mean= 0.56 pts

A 2-point response demonstrates the student understands the Content Standard

INQB: Scientists plan and conduct different kinds of investigations, depending on the questions they are trying to answer. Types of investigations include systematic observations and descriptions, field studies, models, and open-ended explorations as well as controlled experiments. Item Specification 1: Describe a plan to answer a given question for a controlled experiment.

4–5 ̴24%

A 1-point response demonstrates the student has partial understanding of the

Content Standard. 2–3 ̴8%

A 0-point response demonstrates the student has little or no understanding of

the Content Standard. 0–1

̴66% ̴ 2% blank

Attributes of a Procedure Procedure

Attributes Description of Attribute Attributes

Typical results: Manipulated

Variable

Only one changed (manipulated) variable (surface type) is identified or implied in the procedure or data table (if given).

1 ̴32%

Responding Variable

The measured (responding) variable (time to travel 2 meters) is identified or implied in the procedure or data table (if given).

1 ̴29%

Record Measurements

The procedure states or implies measurements are recorded periodically or gives a data table. Attribute Notes:

1. If artificial data for the responding variable is given, this

attribute cannot be credited.

2. The phrase take measurement cannot be used to mean

record.

1 ̴26%

Trials are Repeated

More than one trial for all conditions is planned, or implied in a data table, to measure the measured (responding) variable.

1 ̴22%

Logical Steps

The steps of the procedure are detailed enough to repeat the procedure effectively (examples of illogical steps: no ending time indicated; states Set up as diagrammed, but diagram is inadequate; recording vague data or results).

1 ̴20%

(26)

Scoring Rubric for Item 10: Toy Truck New Procedure (page 2 of 2) General Notes:

1. Inappropriate Procedures: If the response does not plan an appropriate procedure for the given

question, the response may not earn any of the possible procedure attributes. Examples:

a) Repeats the procedure from the scenario

b) Measures only one condition (therefore cannot establish the controlled or manipulated variables)

c) Purposefully changes more than one variable simultaneously

d) Writes a procedure that is too vague to possibly be appropriate

e) Writes a prediction instead of a procedure

2. Naming Attributes: If the response names a bulleted attribute listed after “Be sure your procedure

includes:” without including that attribute in the procedure, the attribute cannot be credited. When a bulleted attribute is named and implied in the response, both must be correct to be credited.

3. Clarifying Vagueness in Procedures:

a) Vague materials or processes used in the procedure (e.g., NA) may be credited if the vagueness is

clarified in a materials list (e.g. NA) if given.

b) Measuring a vague parameter (e.g., measure the movement instead of time) may be credited as a

manipulated or responding variable. However, a vague parameter is difficult to repeatedly measure, so the logical steps attribute cannot be credited.

c) The term “repeat” at the end of a step refers to that step only.

d) The term “repeat” as a separate step (or in a new paragraph) refers to the whole procedure.

e) The term “repeat,” when qualified, cannot be credited for multiple trials (e.g., repeat if necessary, repeat as desired).

f) A vague action that calls for the manipulated variable to be changed (e.g., change the surface)

without indicating how many times, gives no end to the investigation so the logical steps attribute cannot be credited.

g) NA

h) When a procedure conflicts with a given labeled diagram, the procedure is too illogical to be

effectively repeated. Therefore, the logical steps attribute cannot be credited, but the procedure can be scored for attributes that are not in conflict.

 

(27)

Annotated example of a 2‐point response to item 10. 

10

Plan a controlled experiment to answer the question in the box. You may use

any materials in your procedure.

In your procedure, be sure to include:

 logical steps to do the experiment  one changed (manipulated) variable

 one measured (responding) variable

 how often measurements should be

taken and recorded

Question: What is the effect of different surfaces (smooth, grassy, and

rocky) on the time for a toy truck to travel two meters?

Procedure:

1. Get a smoth surface a grassy surface and a rocky surface. 2. Get three toy trucks.

3. Have a measuring sticks to measure the 2 meters. 4. Time how long it took for each toy truck to get there. 5. Do each surface 3 times.

6. Record your data.

7. Put the data on a data table.

 

Attribute Name Credit Annotations

Manipulated

Variable 1 1. Get a smoth surface a grassy surface and a rocky surface.

Responding

Variable 1

3. … measure the 2 meters.

4. Time how long it (time) took for each toy truck to get there. Record

Measurements 1

6. Record your data. OR

7. Put the data on a data table. Trials are

Repeated 1 5. Do each surface 3 times.

Logical Steps 1 The steps of the procedure are detailed enough to repeat the procedure

effectively.

Total Attributes 5

2

Score Points

(28)

Annotated example of a 2‐point response to item 10. 

10

Plan a controlled experiment to answer the question in the box. You may use

any materials in your procedure.

In your procedure, be sure to include:

 logical steps to do the experiment  one changed (manipulated) variable

 one measured (responding) variable

 how often measurements should be

taken and recorded

Question: What is the effect of different surfaces (smooth, grassy, and

rocky) on the time for a toy truck to travel two meters?

Procedure:

1. Have 3 toy trucks (one on a smooth surface, one on a grassy surface, and one on a rocky surface)

2. Two meter sticks (to measure the distance)

3. 3 stop watches (for each truck and to time how long it takes to finish.) 4. Wind up the toy trucks.

5. Start the stopwatches.

6. When the truck reach two meters, stop the watches. 7. And repeat 1-6 for Trials 2-3.

 

Attribute Name Credit Annotations

Manipulated

Variable 1 1. …(one on a smooth surface, one on a grassy surface, and one on a rocky surface)

Responding

Variable 1

2. Two meter sticks (to measure the distance)…

3. …stopwatches (for each truck and to time how long it (the truck) takes to finish).

Record

Measurements 0 None

Trials are

Repeated 1 7. And repeat 1-6 for Trials 2-3.

Logical Steps 1 The steps of the procedure are detailed enough to repeat the procedure

(29)

Annotated example of a 1‐point response to item 10. 

10

Plan a controlled experiment to answer the question in the box. You may use

any materials in your procedure.

In your procedure, be sure to include:

 logical steps to do the experiment  one changed (manipulated) variable

 one measured (responding) variable

 how often measurements should be

taken and recorded

Question: What is the effect of different surfaces (smooth, grassy, and

rocky) on the time for a toy truck to travel two meters?

Procedure:

use three Different surfaces Smooth, Grassy and rocky 2. Place the toy truck on the Surfaces..3. measure two meters and put a start line and a finish line 4. Tim how long it takes for the toy truck to go two meters.

 

Attribute Name Credit Annotations

Manipulated

Variable 1 use three Different surfaces Smooth, Grassy and rocky

Responding

Variable 1 4. Tim how long it (time) takes for the toy truck to go two meters.

Record

Measurements 0 None

Trials are

Repeated 0 None

Logical Steps 1 The steps of the procedure are detailed enough to repeat the procedure

effectively.

Total Attributes 3

1

Score Points

(30)

Annotated example of a 0‐point response to item 10. 

10

Plan a controlled experiment to answer the question in the box. You may use

any materials in your procedure.

In your procedure, be sure to include:

 logical steps to do the experiment  one changed (manipulated) variable

 one measured (responding) variable

 how often measurements should be

taken and recorded

Question: What is the effect of different surfaces (smooth, grassy, and

rocky) on the time for a toy truck to travel two meters?

Procedure:

1. push toy truck

2. after done moveing mesure how far the truck went 3. compare rocky road to regular road

4. Reapeat trial 3 times over.

 

Attribute Name Credit Annotations

General Note 1: Does not answer the given question, measures distance instead of time.

Manipulated Variable 0 Responding Variable 0 Record Measurements 0 Trials are Repeated 0 Logical Steps 0

(31)

Appendix

A:

Measurements

of

Student

Progress

Information

Test

and

Item

Specifications

The Test and Item Specifications provide guidelines for developing large‐scale assessments based on the  Washington State K‐12 Science Learning Standards. The science test includes systems, inquiry, and  application scenarios which reflect the cross‐cutting concepts and abilities in the standards. Most items  are connected to a scenario. Some stand‐alone items also appear in the test. Stand‐alone items are  clearly marked for students on the assessment.  The test specifications provide a grade‐level or course test map that delineates the type and number of  items. The document also provides a list of science vocabulary words that are necessary for the  purposes of the assessment.  The Test and Item Specifications are updated annually. Included with each updated version of the Test  and Item Specifications will be a summary of the changes made since the previous version. The Test and  Item Specifications documents can be accessed through the following link:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/TestItemSpec.aspx

.

Item

Types

Item Types on the grade 5 Science Measurements of Student Progress (MSP) 

Item Type  Point 

Value 

Items per 

operational test  Distinguishing Feature(s) 

Multiple  choice  1  20‐25   Each multiple choice item has three answer choices, the  correct answer and two distractors.  Completion  1  1‐6   Each completion item requires the student to write a number,  word or short phrase.  Short answer  2  4   Each short answer item requires a response in the form of  phrases or sentences.   Short answer items may ask students to do things like write a  conclusion or procedure, solve a technological design problem,   or explain how a human activity impacts the ecosystem.  Five additional pilot items will be embedded in the MSP. These items are not included in student scores.  

(32)

Performance

Level

Descriptors

Performance Level Descriptors (PLDs) give teachers, parents/guardians, and students information about  the typical skills and knowledge a student demonstrates on state assessments at each performance  level. Committees of Washington state teachers, parents, and community members developed the  Performance Level Descriptors during the standard setting process.  PLDs are broken down by the score levels students can earn:   Basic (Level 2)   Proficient (Level 3)   Advanced (Level 4)  NOTE: There is no PLD for Below Basic (Level 1).    PLD documents can be downloaded at  http://www.k12.wa.us/assessment/StateTesting/PLD/default.aspx .  

2014

Testing

Windows

Online: 

April

 

23—May

 

30,

 

2014

 

Paper

 

and

 

pencil: 

April

 

23—May

 

15,

 

2014

 

Online

Testing

Online testing for science began in spring 2011. Two resources are available to help students become  familiar with the online testing environment:   Tutorial videos are posted on the state’s online‐testing website. The tutorial video allows  students to view a demonstration of the testing software and explains how to use the various  tools and how to enter responses to questions. The tutorial video can also be shared with  parents and other interested community members.   An interactive practice tool, known as the Online Tools Training (OTT), is also available. The OTT  allows students to practice with the testing software, including navigating through the test and  typing responses to completion and short‐answer questions. Student responses are not saved or  recorded in the OTT. An updated version will be posted early in 2014. An OTT Lesson Plan was  also developed to help teachers as they guide 5th grade students through the OTT, ensuring that  students practice all the tools and functionality available.  Visit the online testing website for more information about online testing in Washington:   http://www.k12.wa.us/assessment/StateTesting/OnlineTesting.aspx  

 

 

(33)

Appendix

B:

Resources

for

Educators

Visit http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/EducatorResources.aspx for links to the documents listed in this  section. Check regularly for new resources. 

Lessons

Learned

from

Scoring

Student

Work

The Science Assessment Team shares annual observations about student responses on the Science MSP  in Lessons Learned from Scoring Student Work. The purpose of this document is to provide teachers with  insight into common misconceptions and errors that may keep students from earning full credit on state  assessment items.  Lessons Learned from Scoring Student Work can be downloaded at:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/EducatorResources.aspx.  

Sample

Item

Templates

Templates of questions and the scoring rubrics for common short‐answer items used on the Science  MSP are available in the form of Word documents. The templates can be edited for use in classroom  practice by incorporating content from any science curriculum. If a grade level is marked “N/A” for an  item type, this indicates that the item type is not assessed at that grade level. 

The templates can be downloaded at: http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/ItemTemplates.aspx 

2012

Released

Item

Document

(RID)

and

Item

Analysis

Released scenarios and items from the 2012 Science MSP are available with all item information.  Item  Analysis with performance data at the state, district, and school level is also available. All the items in  the RID are also included in the Updates for 2013 document. There are no released scenarios and items  available from the 2013 Science MSP.   The 2012 Released Item Document is located at:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/ReleasedScenarios.aspx  

Updates

for

2011,

2012,

and

2013

The 2011 through 2013 versions of this Updates document contain scenarios and items aligned to the   K‐12 Science Learning Standards and can be used for classroom practice. The items on the Updates for  2011 document are on the Online Tools Training (OTT) for science Practice A. The items on the Updates  for 2013 document are also used on the OTT Practice B.  The documents can be downloaded at:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Science/EducatorResources.aspx  

Teacher

Tool

The Teacher Tool provides information about all operational items on the previous year’s MSP. A brief  description of each item on the MSP is provided as well as state‐level performance data.   The Teacher Tool is located at http://www.k12.wa.us/TeacherResourceTool/default.aspx.

(34)

Appendix

C:

Get

involved

and

stay

informed

 

PEPPER (PreSALTers Enthusiastically Providing Powerful Educational Resources) 

Washington educators who want to receive periodic science assessment information and updates, and  notifications about meeting and workshop opportunities are invited to join the PEPPERs email 

distribution list. To join, please send a request to science@k12.wa.us. 

Resources/Contact

Information

Science Assessment Webpage: 

http://www.k12.wa.us/science/    Contact Information:  Elementary  Kara Monroe  OSPI Science Assessment Specialist  kara.monroe@k12.wa.us  (360) 725‐4979    Secondary  Dawn Cope  OSPI Science Assessment Specialist  dawn.cope@k12.wa.us  (360) 725‐4989   

Figure

Updating...

References

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Related subjects :