HRI 506 CURRENT ISSUES IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT June 7, 2015 August 7, 2015 Summer Credit

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IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF HUMAN SCIENCES

Apparel, Events, and Hospitality Management Department

HRI 506 – CURRENT ISSUES IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

June 7, 2015 – August 7, 2015

Summer 2015 1 Credit

CONTACT INFORMATION

Instructor: Dr. Eric D. Olson

Office: 6A MacKay Hall

Office Hours: By appointment

Phone: 515-294-0699

Email: olsoned@iastate.edu (response within 24 hours) COURSE SPECIFICS

Department Mission Statement: Create, share, and apply knowledge to develop leaders for the hospitality industry.

Catalog Description: Focus on current issues related to the hospitality industry.

AESHM Department Learning Outcomes: All graduates from the AHESM Department should be able to demonstrate:

1. Communication: Our students will utilize electronic, oral, verbal, and written communication skills to demonstrate their professionalism in hospitality and tourism environments.

2. Self-assessment/self-reflection: Our students will incorporate regular analysis of their knowledge, skills, and abilities in comparison to professional standards of the hospitality and tourism industry, and where appropriate, seek professional development opportunities.

3. Critical thinking: Our students will possess an understanding of the hospitality and tourism industry and operations and will apply creative and scientific decision making in problem solving situations; and 4. Ethics, diversity, & social responsibility: Our students will conduct themselves in an ethical manner at all times, and will demonstrate responsible behavior in the hospitality and tourism environment.

Class Learning Objectives: Furthermore, based upon these learning outcomes with regular class attendance, full class participation, successful completion of course readings, materials, activities, and assignments, by the end completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. After reading social science chapters in areas of history, sociology, psychology, economics, politics, anthropology, and environment (Holden, 2006), students will be able to integrate multidisciplinary social science theories to contemporary hospitality and tourism challenges and opportunities through online presentations and online discussions.

2. After reviewing 2-4 articles in each industry subject (services marketing, food and beverage

management, higher education, lodging management, and event management), students will be able to synthesize and apply theoretical underpinnings to contemporary hospitality and tourism events through online presentations and online discussions.

3. After reading social science chapters and industry subject articles, students will be able to complete a capstone industry-related project that requires them to choose appropriate survey methodologies.

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4. After reading social science chapters and industry subject articles, students will be able to contribute to online discussions by demonstrating their understanding of current hospitality management topics, interact with classmates and instructor, and actively participate in the course.

Course Activities and Design: Activities will vary by course content and may include the following: online lectures, class discussions, case studies, problems and discussion questions, and/or written projects.

TEXTBOOK

Holden, A. (2006) Tourism Studies and the Social Studies. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. ISBN: 0-415-28775-8

METHODS OF EVALUATION

Performance Evaluation: The final course grade is calculated from the combined course assessments:

Component Points Per Assessment

Assessment Number

Total Points Grade Percentage Individual Presentation 20 1 20 20.0% Team Presentation 20 1 20 20.0% Presentation Discussions 20 8 20 20.0% Industry Project 20 1 20 20.0% Mock Written Prelim 20 1 20 20.0%

Total Course Points 100

Grades will be distributed as follows:

A 93.00 – 100.00% C+ 77.00 – 79.99% A- 90.00 – 92.99% C 73.00 – 76.99% B+ 87.00 – 89.99% C- 70.00 – 72.99% B 83.00 – 86.99% D+ 67.00 – 69.99% B- 80.00 – 82.99% D 60.00 – 66.99% F 59.99% or less Note. Round-ups do not apply; no incompletes will be granted.

Individual Presentation – The individual presentation covers a multidisciplinary social science approach to tourism. You will be exposed to the major theoretical frameworks and underpinnings from areas of geography, history, sociology, psychology, economics, political, anthropology, and the environment.

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Each student will make a 15-minute presentation which will be uploaded to Blackboard for review by other students. Your presentation topic will be assigned and based on multi-disciplinary social sciences based off Holden (2006). You may use any method you desire to develop the presentation, but it must include your voice and some sort of visual. Possible delivery methods include: Voice-Over Power Point or recording yourself giving the actual presentation.

Team Presentation – After reviewing 2-4 articles in each industry subject (services marketing, food and beverage management, higher education, lodging management, and event management), students will synthesize and apply theoretical underpinnings to contemporary hospitality and tourism events through a 15-minute presentation posted to Blackboard.

You may use any method you desire to develop the presentation, but it must include your voice and some sort of visual. Possible delivery methods include: Voice-Over Power Point or recording yourself giving the actual presentation.

Your job is to synthesize the chapter material, critique the material, apply the material to current hospitality challenges/opportunities, enhance with industry-related support to your presentation, and integrate other students’ questions/comments into the presentation. How you present the material in a team environment is completely up to your team.

Presentation Discussions – Students not assigned a presentation for the week need to read the material in advance and submit 3 questions to the presenters in advance. The presenter(s) should incorporate the questions into the presentation. Additionally, the presenter(s) will lead an online discussion after the posting of the presentation. Non-presentation students will engage in meaningful online discussions with the presenters.

Industry Project – Please see attached document pertaining to the semester industry project with Iowa State University Extension

Mock Written Prelim – During the last week of class, you will participate in a mock two-hour written preliminary based on the class. The purpose of this assessment is to prepare you for the real written prelim that you will take after your coursework. You will be emailed the question(s) at a mutually agreed

day/time, and you will have two hours to complete the prelim. You must email your answers back to the instructor within the allocated day/time.

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DEPARTMENT & CLASS OBJECTIVES & MEASUREMENTS

AESHM Department Learning Outcomes

Com m u n icat ion S elf -Asse ssme n t/ S elf -Re fle ction Cr itic al T h in k in g E thics, Dive rsity, & S oc ial Re sp on sib il ity

Assessment Element Time Where Obtained

Individual Presentation

1x Blackboard X X X

Team Presentations 2x Blackboard X X X

Online Discussions 8x Blackboard X X X

Industry Project 1x Blackboard X X

Mock Prelim 1x Email X X X X

Course Evaluation 1x Class Climate Used to re-confirm above data

Course Learning Outcomes

Class L ear n in g Ob je ctive #1 Class L ear n in g Ob je ctive #2 Class L ear n in g Ob je ctive #3 Class L ear n in g Ob je ctive #4

Assessment Element Time Where Obtained

Individual Presentation

1x Blackboard X X

Team Presentation 2x Blackboard X X

Online Discussions 8x Blackboard X X X

Industry Project 1x Blackboard X

Mock Prelim 1x Email X X X

Course Evaluation 1x Class Climate

Used to re-confirm above data

ASSESSMENT DEADLINES

All assessments must be submitted via Blackboard by the due date and time as announced. There will be absolutely no late assessments accepted. In our industry, late assessments and deadlines are not

acceptable. For example, if you need to submit a proposal to a client by a specific day/time, it is

imperative that you do so; if not, the client has then gone to your competitor. Thus, no late assessments for this class will be acceptable. Please plan accordingly by ensuring proper time management.

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 Please be courteous and keep a respectful attitude and behavior toward the professor and your fellow students both in and out of class.

 It is your responsibility to provide the record of emails to verify errors.

 Please keep your meeting appointments. If you must, please notify any cancelations within 24 hours.

Academic Dishonesty

This class will follow Iowa State University’s policy on academic dishonesty. Anyone suspected of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Dean of Students Office. The link below will take you to the university’s policy: http://www.dso.iastate.edu/ja/academic/misconduct.html.

Disability Accommodation

Please address any special needs or special accommodations with me at the beginning of the semester or as soon as you become aware of your needs. Those seeking accommodations based on disabilities must obtain a Student Academic Accommodation Request (SAAR) form from the Disability Resources (DR) office (515-294-7220). DR is located on the main floor of the Students Services Building, Room 1076.

Dead Week

For academic programs, the last week of classes is considered to be a normal week in the semester.

Harassment and Discrimination

Iowa State University strives to maintain our campus as a place of work and study for faculty, staff, and students that is free of all forms of prohibited discrimination, and harassment based upon race, ethnicity, sex (including sexual assault), pregnancy, color, religion, national origin, physical or mental disability, age, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, or status as a U.S. veteran. Any student who has concerns about such behavior should contact the instructor, Student Assistance at 515-294-1020, or the Office of Equal Opportunity and Compliance at 515-294-7612.

Religious Accommodation

If an academic or work requirement conflicts with your religious practices and/or observances, you may request reasonable accommodations. Your request must be in writing, and the instructor will review the request. Accommodations for a change in due date must be made at least 7 days in advance.

Communication

In this class, the official mode of communication is through email. All communication between student and instructor should be respectful and professional. Students are responsible for checking their email regularly.

Schedule

The class scheduled may be modified at any time. All changes and notifications will be made through Blackboard and announced in class.

Violence Free University

At ISU, violence, threats or implied threats of violence, and intimidation (verbal or physical acts intended to frighten or coerce) impede the goal of providing a safe environment and will not be tolerated. For more information, refer tohttp://www.policy.iastate.edu/policy/violence.

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Global Citizenship

Global citizenship involves positive interaction with and respect for other cultures and the diversity of individuals in and out of the classroom. A good global citizen will make an effort to appreciate

differences in language, culture, customs, behaviors and means of doing business, accept diversity and seek to build new relationships. Global citizens treat everyone with respect and courtesy in and out of the classroom. International faculty and teaching assistants are to be accorded the same attention and courtesy as given to other faculty and TAs.

Standards for Student Work

All student work must adhere to the minimum standards listed below and in the course syllabus.

General: Use correct terminology; list citations for all references (use appropriate style such as APA, MLA, or the Chicago Style Manual), including Internet sources, and quotations (class materials will identify specific citation format to be used); apply appropriate mathematical and industry/business concepts, and use standard English grammar and punctuation.

Teamwork: Communicate effectively with team members (attend group meetings, exchange critical contact information (email address and phone number(s)), share written communication – including email), work cooperatively with members, and contribute equally to project development and

written/visual materials. Students failing minimum teamwork expectations may be removed from the team. See the syllabus for individual course policies.

Presentations, projects, assignments, and papers: These graded dimensions of a course must be presented in the format identified in the syllabus or project/assignment description handout.

Course Assignments

Students should follow instructor’s policies on assignment submission for projects that are specific to certain classes. Excuses for late submissions will only be accepted when the student has provided proper documentation and has contacted the instructor prior to the deadline for submission.

Accommodation of Special Needs

A request for accommodation should be presented to the instructor at least 10 business days before the date of the accommodation needed. Those seeking accommodations based on disabilities should obtain a Student Academic Accommodation Request (SAAR) from the Disability Resources office

http://www.dso.iastate.edu/dr/ (515-294-7220), which is located in Room 1076 of the Student Services Building.

Classroom or Grade Problems

If a student has a course related problem, she or he should discuss it with the course instructor first. If the student is not satisfied, she or he should contact his/her advisor to address the situation. The advisor will suggest possible course of actions. For more information refer to

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SCHEDULE

Week Week Ending

Topic Readings Assignment

1 6/13 Welcome

History/Geography of Tourism

Chapter 1 (Dr. Olson) Biography Presentations 2 6/20 Sociology/Psychology Economic/Political Chapters 2-3 (Lilly) Chapters 4-5 (Janet) 3 6/27 Anthropology/Environment Emerging Themes Chapters 6-7 (Narda) Chapter 8 (Bruce) 4 7/4 Select Topic 1 – Services

Marketing

Articles (Dr. Olson)

5 7/11 Select Topic 2 – Food & Beverage Management

Articles (Janet & Lilly) Industry Project due

6 7/18 Select Topic 3 – Higher Education

Articles (Bruce & Narda)

7 7/25 Select Topic 4 – Lodging Management

Articles (Janet & Bruce)

8 8/1 Select Topic 5 – Event Management

Articles (Lilly & Narda)

9 8/7 Mini-Written Prelim Mini-Written

Prelim

Week Ending 6/13-History/Geography of Tourism – Dr. Olson

6/9-Presentation posted

6/10-6/13-Online discussions moderated by presenter

Week Ending 6/20-Sociology/Psychology (Lilly) & Economic/Political (Janet)

6/12-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 6/16-Presentations posted

6/17-6/20-Online discussions moderated by presenters

*Note – Dr. Olson in Shanghai, China for a conference 6/16 – 6/21

Week Ending 6/27-Anthropology/Environment (Narda) & Emerging (Bruce)

6/19-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 6/23-Presentations posted

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Week Ending 7/4-Current Issues in Services Marketing (Dr. Olson) Articles

1. Rosenbaum, M. S., Corus, C., Osxtrom, A. L., Anderson, L., Fisk, R. P., Gallan, A. S., Giraldo, M., Mende, M., Mulder, M., Rayburn, S. W., Shirahada, K., & Williams, J. D. (2011). Conceptualization and aspirations of transformative service research. Journal of Research for Consumers, 19.

2. Kandampully, J., Keating, B. W., Beom, Cheol, K., Mattila, A. S., & Solnet, D. (2014). Service research in the hospitality literature: Insights from a systematic review. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 55(3), 287-299.

Timeline

6/26-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 6/30-Presentation posted

7/1-7/2-Online discussions moderated by presenter *Note Discussions end on 7/2 due to holiday

Week Ending 7/11-Current Issues in Food and Beverage (Janet & Lilly) Articles

1. Yepes, M. F. (2015). Mobile tablet menus: Attractiveness and impact of nutrition labeling formats on millennials’ food choices. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 56(1), 58-67.

2. Parsa, H. G., Van der Rest, J-P, I., Smith, S. R., Parsa, R. A., & Bujisic, M. (2015). Why restaurants fail? Part IV: The relationship between restaurant failures and demographic factors. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 56(1), 80-90.

3. Lynn, M., & Brewster, Z. W. (2015). Racial and ethnic differences in tipping: The role of perceived descriptive and injunction tipping norms. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 56(1), 68-79.

Timeline

7/3-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 7/7-Presentation posted

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Week Ending 7/18-Current Issues in Higher Education (Bruce & Narda) Articles

1. Michaelsen, L. K., & Sweet, M. (2008). The essential elements of team-based learning. New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 116, 7-27.

2. Warren, A. E., Achambault, L. M., & Foley, R. W. (2014). Sustainability education framework for teachers: Developing sustainability literacy through futures, values, systems, and strategic thinking. Journal of Sustainability Education, 6.

3. Gronnenberg, J., & Johnston, S. (2015). 7 Things you should know about Universal Design for

Learning: http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/7-things-you-should-know-about-universal-design-learning

Timeline

7/10-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 7/14-Presentation posted

7/15-7/18-Online discussions moderated by presenters

Week Ending 7/25-Current Issues in Lodging Management (Janet & Bruce) Articles

1. Wang, Y., & Chung, Y. (2015). Hotel brand portfolio strategy. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 27(4), 561-584.

2. Blose, J. E., Mack, R. W., & Pitts, R. E. (2015). The influence of message framing on hotel guests’ linen-reuse intentions. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 56(2), 145-154.

Timeline

7/17-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 7/21-Presentations posted

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Week Ending 8/1-Current Issues in Event Management (Lilly & Narda) Articles

1. Han, H. S., & Verma, R. (2014). Why attend tradeshows? A comparison of exhibitor and attendee’s preferences. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 55(3), 239-251.

2. Pegg, S., & Patterson, I. (2010). Rethinking music festivals as a staged event: Gaining insights form understanding visitor motivations and the experiences they seek. Journal of Convention & Event Tourism, 11(2), 2010.

Timeline

7/24-Questions from non-presenters to presenters 7/28-Presentation posted

7/29-8/1-Online discussions moderated by presenters

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