Final Report from Northwest Community College Terrace, BC. Curriculum Development : Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program

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Development of Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program at NWCC - TH18DEC2009

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Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development

Aboriginal Special Projects Fund 2008/09

New Program Development

Final Report from

Northwest Community College

Terrace, BC

Curriculum Development : Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program

Diane Clements

NWCC Nursing Education Consultant

December 18, 2009

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Project Purpose 3 Learning Outcomes 4 Project Goals and Objectives 4

Achievements to Date 5

Financial Report 12

Appendices

A. Centre for Aboriginal Health Wellness Sport Recreation – Steering Committee 14

B. Northwest Region: Twenty-five (25) First Nations Communities 15

C. Market Survey for Projected Jobs in Aboriginal Health Wellness, Exercise Sport and Recreation 17 D. Survey Results - Employment on Graduation from Proposed Aboriginal Health Wellness, Sport and

Recreation Programs 21

E. Community Consultation Outline 23

F. Contracted Faculty for Curriculum Development 25

G. 2009 Engagement with First Nations – Lists and Correspondences 26

H. Canadian Literature – Courses with Aboriginal Focus on Health & Wellness, Sport Recreation, Health

and Addictions 31

I. Document List 35

J. Meeting/Correspondences with First Nations/Exercise & Wellness/Academic Experts 81

K. Course Outlines 88

L. Curriculum/Program Articulation Committee (Course Summary 118

M. Evaluation Plan 122

N. Financial Reports (as of December 2009) 124

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Project Purpose

Northwest Community College submitted their proposal May 15, 2008 to the Ministry of Advanced Education Aboriginal Special Project Fund to develop an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Certificate Program in

preparation of launching the Centre for Aboriginal Health, Wellness, Sport and Recreation Education (“the Centre”) in September 2008. The key deliverable was an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Certificate program for delivery in September 2009 and Diploma program for September 2010. Several political, economic and administrative factors have delayed the Centre and subsequent offering of the Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Certificate program. However, the intent for Aboriginal students to take part in culturally

appropriate Aboriginal Programs of Excellence to prepare them as leaders in fostering healthy lifestyles for people of all ages in their communities is still an educational goal of NWCC.

Basing this program on an Aboriginal reference point is judicious and the aptness of this approach has been documented in the literature; a culturally based framework ensures the exigencies of First Nations (FN) are the starting point for course content and teaching-learning experiences.1 To date Aboriginal students constitute close to 50 % of NWCC’s student body. Experience has shown that the more community support Aboriginal students have, the more likely they are to succeed in their programs. Hence, the Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program and other programs anticipated for delivery in the Centre will incorporate community involvement to support and retain students in the following ways:

1) The curriculum will include a community service learning component so that students can learn and work under faculty supervision while living in their home community.

2) The curriculum will be adapted to reflect the FN family values and beliefs system about health, wholeness and healing.

3) Elders will be integrated into the program for development, implementation and evaluation. Elders are integral and respected icons in FN communities and will be a main source of support, encouragement, and retention for students.

4) The FN Liaison will ensure that students have sufficient funding and are included in social and cultural aspects of student life.

5) FN Instructors will be hired from the communities, when possible.

6) Learning Pathways, a 15-hour study skills course, will be added to the program and will be offered at the start of the program with ongoing support throughout.

7) Study sessions will be integrated into the program and students will learn how, and be strongly encouraged, to use “Study Buddies.”

1 Emerging Priorities for the Health of First Nations and Inuit Children and Youth. www.hc-sc.gc/fnih-spni/pubs/develop/1999_prioriti-child-enfant/intro_e.html.

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8) The program will be built as a cohort system, which is a strongly supportive education environment. In developing the project proposal it was determined that an exercise and wellness program existed at Camosun College. Further discussions with the presidents of NWCC and Camosun led to a partnership whereby they generously agreed to provide curricula for its exercise and wellness program in exchange for receiving indigenized courses in these subjects from NWCC. On a larger scale the Centre at NWCC was envisioned as a satellite of the new Pacific Sport Institute at Camosun College. This collaboration provides an important interchange for not only Aboriginal students who may seek further education in the south but also non Aboriginal students from Camosun College who would have the opportunity to do practicums in rural First Nation communities or take courses at NWCC by distributed learning in the future.

Learning Outcomes:

Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students in this program will study physical activity and other healthy lifestyles as they contribute to optimal health and wellness throughout the lifespan that is needed in First Nation communities and within the urban Aboriginal population. The program will be designed to prepare professionals in exercise and physical activity leadership as well as in wellness education. The following student learning outcomes are anticipated:

 understand the historical events, impact of social determinants, pattern of health and illness, barriers and challenges and meaning of health from First Nations perspectives

 promote healthy lifestyles for Aboriginal people through development and implementation of healthy nutrition, smoking cessation, and/or stress management programs in rural and urban settings.  understand successful aging in rural First Nation communities and Aboriginal populations and utilize

exercise testing and prescription relevant to individuals of all ages.

 utilize knowledge from psychology, kinesiology and anatomy and physiology along with traditional cultural values and norms to foster healthy behaviours for daily living and prepare Aboriginal people for their roles in the community

 working with an Aboriginal, holistic and health promotion focus develop a partnered interprofessional approach to enhancing well being and exercise level of individuals, groups and communities

Project Goal and Objectives:

The goal of this project is to adapt the Exercise and Wellness Diploma Program from Camosun College to make it culturally appropriate and fit the learning needs for students from the First Nation communities in our region. The first year will be designed so that students can exit with a Certificate or carry on to complete the second year for a Diploma. The objectives for this project as outlined in the proposal are captured in Table 1.0

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Table 1.0: Objectives of the Project to develop an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness

Program at NWCC

Design and Planning  To create an opportunity for FN elders, leaders, and community members to build an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Diploma program to be delivered in the BC northwest

Community Development  To structure interaction with FN

Communities and non FN communities to determine interest, needs and commitment for participation in program

 To identify barriers to participation, strategies for retention, opportunities for student practicums and graduate employment

Curriculum Development  To identify current relevant curriculum to modify and secure partnership with institution

 To adapt and/or realign curriculum and courses to cultural competencies of NW First Nation communities

 To plan faculty orientation to program  To plan CSL opportunities for students

Evaluation  To establish a plan for formative and

summative evaluation

Achievements to Date

:

The degree to which the project has been successful and challenged will be described according to the objectives outlined in Table 1.0.

Design and Planning

The initial development of the Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program in the Summer of 2008 was managed by the Dean of Health and Human Services, Diane Clements as part of her role in planning for the Centre for Aboriginal Health Wellness Sport and Recreation. Sue Rothwell a health consultant with expertise in the area of health promotion, northern and remote Aboriginal health care was hired as program lead in May 2008. She

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had close to ten years of demonstrated ability to partner with FN communities both in BC and other Canadian jurisdictions in her positions with government ministries and as a consultant to non government organizations. The Steering Committee for the Centre was established in January 2008 with representatives from First Nation communities, local municipal government, Northern Health, and non government agencies involved with health and sport ( Appendix A).

This committee seemed the most logical to recovene as a Program Advisory Committee (PAC) for the

Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program due to their awareness of the proposal, interest in Aboriginal health and wellness programs and commitment to strengthening education for FN people in the Northwest. To enable the work of the PAC as well as carry out research activities related to the project a FN research assistant was hired in May 2008 who understood FN protocol and local FN communities. Both the NWCC Board and FN Council were kept abreast about the progress of the project and members identified their FN community supports and contacts and verified the necessary protocal. Due to travel distances and seasonal cultural activities there was some difficulty in obtaining a consistent group of representatives from the FN communities. As a result at the June 2008 PAC meeting more attention was paid to laying the groundwork for a focused working group to assist in this program development. However, due to administrative changes and restructing along with limited faculty resources to complete this project the PAC has not been sustained. The FN Council has acted as a quasi PAC and was kept informed on a regular basis of community engagement and curriculum development.

Community Development

This objective involed two parts: a) engaging with our FN communities and non FN communities to determine their interest, need and participation in an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program and b) identifying barriers to participation, strategies for retention, opportunities for student practicums and graduate employment.

Concurrently NWCC needed to interact with the same audiences to gather identical information for two additional programs proposed for the Centre: Aboriginal Sport and Recreation and Aboriginal Mental Health Addictions . For efficiency and to avoid duplication the activities related to community development included all three programs proposed for the Centre.

The First Nations Council of NWCC provides a process of direct consultation with First Nations Communities in the college region and as such were the appropriate group to advise on methods of engaging Aboriginal people in the Northwest and providing direction on the project. Communication links have been implemented

through regular reports to the Board from the Chair of First Nations Council, who is a member of the College Board of Governors. Members serve as liaisons and are accountable to their Bands, the Métis Council or First Nations organization.

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Membership on First Nations Council consists of representatives from each of the First Nations villages within the College region; representation from each First Nations Bands in the Northwest region; the Tahltan Bands; Native Friendship Centres; the Northwest region of the Métis

Nation BC; and NWCC representatives. Appendix B outlines the twenty five FN communities that reside in the NWCC catchment area. These communities comprise the following seven Nations:

 Haida  Tsimshian  Nisga’a  Haisla  Tahltan  Gitxsan  Wet’suwet’en

Concise lists were developed of Heriditary and Elected Chiefs, health and education reps/committee chairs in eaach of the First Nation communities along with corresponding lists for non First Nation communities e.g. city councillors involved with Health committees and high schoolsl Metis and Aboriginal groups; for profit and non profit health, wellness and exercise organizations.

To facilitate interaction with First Nation communities a Terrace company, Cedarwood Consultating was hired in summer 2008 due to their recent expericence and direct links with several local FN villages. They worked with our program lead, research assistant and the FN Council and devised a mixed methodology to engage both Aboriginal and non Aboriginal groups. Population sampling decisions were also made, taking into consideration protocols and the issue of distance.

The consultants and our lead developed a marketing plan and phone survey tool for villages to distant to travel. Our research assistant sent the survey (Appendix C) out in advance then followed up by phone with over 60 individuals covering FN communities, high schools, municipal staff and both non and for profit exercise, sport organizations across our catchment region. The results were compiled and can be viewed in Appendix D. .

The Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program was intended to be the lead program in the proposed Centre which sits on Tsimshian territory, in particular on Kitsumkalum lands. For this reason, it was important to schedule a presentation to the Kitsumkalum Band Council for their approval. Distance was also a consideration for sampling. All of the nations in the college catchment area were targeted for contact. These contacts were expanded to include secondary schools in Terrace, and local First Nations and Métis service providers and community centres. This provided an important opportunity for feedback from the urban Aboriginal

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population. Coordinating these meetings between NWCC and the target communities was carried out with phone calls, through email contacts, and personal contact. Fifteen contacts were made with

communities/organizations to set up community consultations. The results of these initial contacts were varied with three of the contacts giving no response and thirteen responded.

An outline to guide community consultation through focus groups was developed ((Appendix E) Between June and early September the following five focus groups were organized:

 Terrace: Caledonia Sr Sec (cancelled);

 Kitsumkalum High School ( 15 students and teachers); Kitsumkalum Band Council (10 members);  Nisga Government Council (10 members)

 Kitselas Health Committee (cancelled);  Northwest Metis Associaiton (cancelled).

The cancellations were due to either the organization or the Dean of Health unable to attend. All organizations were offered lunch and in case of elders an honoriarium was also provided. Gathering

information on the educational needs of potential students to this program was limited to the one high school focus group . The focus sessions were to be rebooked for the Fall of 2008 but due to new administrators covering this project and other pressing priorities this did not take place in 2008.

To further engage with FN communities, our program lead was able to attend at the NWCC booth at Terrace National Aboriginal Day Celebration June 21, 2008 where 20 to 25 Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal yout sought course information on both the exercise and well and sport management programs. Later that week she attended the Northwest Aboriginal Health conference in Prince Rupert and surveyed approximately 50 health reps who attended. Several commented that they thought interest would be high, citing the intense

community spirit developed around the All Native Basketball Tournament as an indication of family and community based support for athletics and exercise and the awareness of a high incidence of diabetes and need for improved health.

On page 9 is the flat sheet that was developed for the Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program. It contains basic information and potential employment opportunities upon graduation . This sheet were used to market the community consultations as well as being distributed during meetings with the PAC, government

ministers, ministery staff, BC First Nations Health Council, and the NWCC faculty, board and FN Council. With retirement of the Dean in August 2008 the new VP Education for Health and Human Services and the Chair of Health Programs were unable to sustain the momentum of this project and unfortunately as noted above the focus groups did not continue nor did the the PAC meet again. The program lead Sue Rothwell

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received no further direction, her contract expired Dec 2008 and the project was on hold until January 2009. At that time Judy Thompson, a faculty person from NWCC was contracted only to indigenize the four first year certificate courses. Her biographical summary in Appendix F describes how her experience, education and Aboriginal ancestry is a benefit to this project.

In late January 2009 sudden administrative changes led to restructuring at NWCC and this project became the responsibility of the Dean of Health. While recruiting for this position, Diane Clements returned as interim Dean on a part time basis from March – June 2009. She developed a workplan with Judy to commence the curriculum development as contracted. However, the greatest challenge has been the lack of consistent oversight of this project which continued into the summer of 2009 and hindered this project . The very limited management resources and need for day to day supervison of current health programs continues to be the situation.

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In October 2009, Diane Clements returned as a part time consultant, re-instituted this project with Judy as lead, adding time for her to do consultation and focus groups with First Nation communities. Despite the delays and short period of time, Judy was able to gather high quality data from all First Nations in the

northwest. Through face-to-face meetings, phone conversations, and/or email correspondence she was able to connect with a wide range of Aboriginal and non Aboriginal people (Appendix G). Although the focus of community consultations was on the development of the Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness curriculum, the comments in this Appendix identify not only Aboriginal interests but information on barriers to participation, strategies for retention, and opportunities for student practicums in the northwest.

Curriculum Development

To further develop the concept of a Centre for Aboriginal Health Wellness Sport and Recreation and the proposed programs a background research paper was commissioned in March 2008 . The terms of reference were to identifythe following materials:

Related post-secondary education programs:  in Scandinavia

 Australia,

 Commonwealth countries,  USA,

 Related Aboriginal programs

 Act Now BC and similar programs across Canada  Projects by Dr. Peter R. Rehor (Camosun College)

 Montana-health Enhancement-Office of Public Education 1998

 Australia-Tasmania-H.E.A.R.T Health Enhancement A?-Rural Teachers-Lifestyle change program Appendix H lists courses in Canada related to Health, Wellness, Sport, Recreation and Mental

Health/Addictions with an Aboriginal focus and non Aboriginal focus. The document list in Appendix I provides short synopsis of related programs in countries listed above, relevant work by Aboriginal organizations and websites with further detailed information. The information from this literature review provided evidence that the Exercise and Wellness Program at Camosun College had the best fit with the mission and values that were developed for the Centre. The Centre steering committee then the PAC to the Aboriginal Exercise and

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The Presidents of both colleges then met and an informal partnership agreement was secured by email. During 2008 several meetings occurred between the Dean of Health at NWCC and Dr Peter Rehor, Dean, Sport and Exercise Education, Camosun College to identify a process for liaison and sharing curriculum. Although there was a hiatus of this project from September 2008 until March 2009, the relationship resumed very quickly after that time with Judy Thompson our curriculum developer and specific faculty at Camosun who were directly involved with the Exercise and Wellness program. Camosun faculty freely shared curriculum materials, resources and advice. A more specific review of Exercise and Wellness literature was achieved by Judy through interviews with practice experts and academics in this field. Her detailed notes (Appendix J) contain bibliography and resource materials that will be advantageous for faculty development. In addition her undergraduate education and experience in Kinesiology, her Aboriginal heritage, experience living in the northwest and teaching First Nations studies courses has been a key benefit in this project successfully meeting its objectives.

Table 2.0 outlines the Camosun courses for Year 1 and highlighted are the four courses that have been culturally adapted to northwest First Nation communities.

Table 2.0 Year 1 Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Certificate Program, NWCC

One area that has been a challenge is the absence of a curriculum task committee which would establish a work plan to determine curriculum components for this program such as leveled learning outcomes, alignment for complexity and themes, and best practice teaching strategies. This was due to the fact that the Centre is on hold and no foreseeable funding to deliver the program which lead to little impetuous for academic faculty and their Dean to become involved. However, we have been able to incorporate northwest First Nation cultural competencies into the four core courses for first year, and adapt course content to fit with the needs of First Nation communities in our region, the climate and terrain. For example, mountain biking has been

Year 1

Academic Term 1

SPEX 110 Fitness for Life

BIOL 141 Anatomy for Sport Education

BIOL 141A Anatomy Lab for Sport

EXW 120 Aboriginal Lifetime Sports 1

ENGL 150 English Composition

PSYC 160 Sport & Exercise Psychology

Academic Term 2

BIOL 142 Physiology for Sport Education

BIOL 142A Physiology Lab for Sport

EXW 121 Aboriginal Lifetime Sports 2

EXW 130 Aboriginal Life Cycle Fitness

HLTH 110 Aboriginal Health in Today’s World PHYS 160 Biomechanics of Sport

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replaced with snowshoeing (3 activities in this course: snowshoeing, hiking/backpacking, cross country skiing.) and canoeing has replaced both road cycling and ice skating (3 activities in this course: canoeing,

swimming/water fitness, kayaking.) Canoeing has 3 components: Lakewater, Canoe Poling, and Voyageur (Big Canoe). Detailed course outlines for three Aboriginal courses can be located in Appendix K.

Although there has not been a PAC to regularly review the curriculum drafts, Judy has ensured that First Nation community groups and First Nations Council have reviewed drafts for inclusion of cultural

competencies. In addition, an Outdoor Recreation advisor, with recent experience teaching Aboriginal youth provided an expert review of activities relevant to the northwest and First Nation culture. NWCC has

instituted a subcommittee “Cultural Knowledge in Practice” to vet new programs or changes to existing programs to ensure First Nation cultural competencies are included. The Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness program was on the agenda for the committee’s December 16, 2009 meeting. Following this the program will seek approval through the internal education council process in early January 2010. Appendix L contains the forms submitted to the Curriculum Program Advisory Committee for review.

Another aspect of curriculum development that was proposed was to plan for Community Service Learning (CSL) opportunities for students. This was achieved by discussing this approach with faculty at UBC who have been using CSL for several years in health programs. As the CSL practicums will take place near the end of second semester it was decided that further meetings with UBC faculty will take place when it is determined that the program will be offered at NWCC.

Evaluation

An evaluation plan was submitted with our proposal and has been recreated in Appendix M. Highlighted are the success indicators that have been achieved to date. Due to the delays in this project and the time

constraints further work on developing formative and summative evaluation tools for use by students, faculty and community agencies has not commenced. When the program is funded for delivery the remaining three activities will need to be completed.

Financial Report

NWCC received $97,286.00 from the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Mobility Development in 200809 to develop an Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program. A financial report showing revenue received and actual expenditures is detailed in Appendix N. A surplus amount of $17,986 has been identified and will be retained by NWCC for faculty workshops and seminars by Dr. Peter Rehor, Dean Sport and Exercise and faculty at Camosun College when the NWCC program is to known to be delivered. If that is not in the near future, this small surplus will be used for other Aboriginal programs at NWCC.

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Appendix A

Centre for Aboriginal Health Wellness Sport Recreation – Steering Committee

Pricilla Michell

Kyah Wiget Ed. Society

Debbie Bright

Gitwangak Education Society

Ron Poole

Administrator, City of Terrace

Irene Sagan

Chair, NWCC First Nations Council

Leona Wells

NWCC (Terrace) First Nations Access Coordinator

Carmen Didier

Director Recreation, City of Terrace

Darci Petuh

Recreation Program Coordinator City of Terrace

Daphne Gross

Director of Nursing Mills Memorial Hospital

Rene Therrien

Regional Director Northwest Metis Provincial Council of British Columba (MHRDA)

Julie Morrison

NWCC First Nations Access Coordinator - Hazelton

Florence Lockyer

Old Masset Village Council

Monica Simms

Gitanmaax Band

Lorna Morrison

Kitamaat Village

Gerald Wesley

Board of Governors

Kaarlene Lindsay

NWCC First Nations Access Coordinator, Prince Rupert

Roger LeClerc

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Appendix B

N

orthwest Region: Twenty-five (25) First Nations Communities

Dease River Band Council

Box 79

Good Hope, BC V0C 2Z0 Phone: (250) 239-3000 Fax: (250) 239-3003

Gingolx Village Government

607 Front Street Gingolx, BC V0V 1B0 Phone: (250) 326-4212 Fax: (250) 326-4208 Gitanmaax Band Box 440 Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0 Phone: (250) 842-5297 Fax: (250) 842-6364

Gitanyow Band Council

Box 340, 1st Avenue Kitwanga, BC V0J 2A0 Phone: (250) 849-5222 Fax: (250) 849-5787

Gitsegukla Indian Band

RR #36, Cascade Avenue South Hazelton, BC V0J 2R0 Phone: (250) 849-5490 Fax: (250) 849-5492

Gitwangak Band Council

Box 400

Kitwanga, BC V0J 2A0 Phone: (250) 849-5591 Fax: (250) 849-5353

Gitxaala Nation (Kitkatla)

Box 150 Kitkatla, BC V0V 1C0 Phone: (250) 848-2214 Fax: (250) 848-2238 Gitwinksihlkw Village Government Box 1 Gitwinksihlkw, BC V0J 3T0 Phone: (250) 633-2294 Fax: (250) 633-2539 Sik-e-dakh Village (Glen Vowell Band)

Site J, Comp 43 Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0 Phone: (250) 842-5241 Fax: (250) 842-5601

Hartley Bay Village Council

445 Hayimiisaxaa Way Hartley Bay, BC V0V 1A0 Phone: (250) 841-2525 Fax: (250) 841-2581

Iskut First Nation

Box 90

Iskut, BC V0J 1K0 Phone: (250) 234-3331 Fax: (250) 234-3200

Kispiox Band Council

RR 1, Site K, Comp 25 Hazelton, BC V0J 1Y0 Phone: (250) 842-5248 Fax: (250) 842-5604

Kitamaat Village Council

Box 1101 260 Kitlope Street Kitamaat Village, BC V0T 2B0 Phone: (250) 639-9361 Fax: (250) 639-2840

Kitselas Band Council

4562 Queensway Drive Terrace, BC V8G 3X6 Phone: (250) 635-5084 Fax: (250) 635-5335

Kitsumkalum Band Council

Box 544

Terrace, BC V8G 3X6 Phone: (250) 635-6177 Fax: (250) 635-4622

Hagwilget Village Council

Box 460

New Hazelton, BC V0J 2J0 Phone: (250) 842-6258 Fax: (250) 842-6924

Laxgalts'ap Village Government

Box 200

Greenville, BC V0J 1X0 Phone: (250) 621-3212 Fax: (250) 621-3320

Lax Kw'alaams Band

206 Shashaak Street Port Simpson, BC V0V 1H0

Phone: (250) 625-3293 Fax: (250) 625-3246

Metlakatla Band Council

Box 459

Prince Rupert, BC V8J 3R2 Phone: (250) 628-3234 Fax: (250) 628-9205

Moricetown Band Administration

3 - 205 Beaver Road Moricetown, BC V0J 2N1 Phone: (250) 847-2133 Fax: (250) 847-9291 New Aiyansh Village Government Box 233

New Aiyansh, BC V0J 1A0 Phone: (250) 633-3100 Fax: (250) 633-2271

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Office of the Wet'suwet'en

Box 56, Site 15, RR #1 Moricetown, BC V0J 2N0 Phone: (250) 877-5090 Fax: (250) 877-5091 Old Massett Village Council Box 176 Old Massett, BC V0V 1M0 Phone: (250) 626-3911 Fax: (250) 626-3357

Skidegate Band Council

Box 1301, Hwy 16, Commercial Center

Skidegate, BC V0T 1S1 Phone: (250) 559-4496 Fax: (250) 559-8247

Taku River

Tlingit First Nation

Box 132

Atlin, BC V0W 1A0 Phone: (250) 651-7900 Fax: (250) 651-7909

Towns and Cities within the Northwest HSDA:

Atlin Dease Lake Hazelton

Houston Kitimat Massett

Prince Rupert Smithers Stewart

Terrace Queen Charlotte City

Updated January 2009 NH Website

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APPENDIX C

Market Survey for Projected Jobs in Aboriginal Health Wellness, Exercise Sport and Recreation - June 2008

Introduction

Hello I am calling from Northwest Community College in Terrace. My name

is_____________________________ and I am a research assistant to the Dean of Health.

We are doing a phone survey to gather information on the needs in your community for

Aboriginal education programs related to health wellness exercise, sport and recreation.

Would you have 10 or 15 minutes right now to answer a few questions?

Yes…..Carry on

No….. When would be the best time to talk with you in the next day or

two?_____________________

Or maybe is there someone else that I can talk to that can provide information for your

community?

Northwest Community college is preparing to launch a unique centre for Aboriginal Health,

wellness, Sport and Recreation in Spring 2009. The graduates from our planned programs

will be trained to provide your community

with leadership for mental health and Addictions

Prevention, Exercise and Wellness, Leisure and sport Management.

Your answers to the following questions will help us provide high quality programs for

Aboriginal learners.

Part A: Band managers and Elders

Person’s Name and title_________________________________

The Name of your Band ________________________________

Approximate number of band members and other residents in your

community.___________________________________________

How many under the age of 30? __________________________

Recreation

Do you have a recreation centre? _________________________

If yes do you have people capable of operating it within your community? Yes_____/No____

Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

Job description:

Starting Wage:

Vacancies now or expected in next 3 years?:

If no recreation centre, do you have plans to open one? _____________-When?

_________________________________

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Do you have a Swimming Pool? Yes______/No______

If yes do you have people capable of operating it within your community? Yes_____/No____ Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

Job description: Starting Wage: Vacancies:

If No, What kind of skilled employee do you need? Do you have an ice rink in your community?

If Yes, do you have people capable of operating it within your community? Yes____/No____ Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

Job description: Starting Wage: Vacancies

What other sports or recreation do you have?

Do you have sports teams in your community? Yes_____/No____

Do you have people capable of training athletes and coaching teams within your community? Yes____/No_____

Do they Have certificates? ________Diploma________ None______

Job description:

Starting Wage: Vacancies:

Are there plans to develop sports teams? Yes_____/No______ Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______ Job description:

Starting Wage: Vacancies

Is your community planning to develop health, exercise, leisure or ecotourism services? Yes___/No____

What Type? ______________________________________________________

Note: Do you offer exercise health or recreation programs for adults and seniors in your community? Yes____/No_____(aquatic exercise, walking programs, lawn bowling, exercise on stationary bikes, treadmills or blood pressure clinics.

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Mental Health and Addictions

Do you have mental health worker? Yes No

Do you have an addiction worker?

Do they Have certificates? ________Diploma________

None______

Job description:

Starting Wage:

Vacancies

Do you have an alcohol or drug rehab centre?

If no, are you planning one in the next 3 years?

Are you (or do you think you will be) interested in employing

Addictions prevention counselors? Yes____/No_____ When_________

Exercise and wellness counselors? Yes_____/ No____ When__________

Recreation Leisure and sports managers? Yes____/No _____When_____

Do you know if there are youth or adults in your community who would be interested in

pursuing education in the following areas?

Mental Health and Addictions Prevention? If Yes, how many? ____________

Exercise and Wellness? If Yes, How many? ______________________________

Leisure and Sports Management? If Yes how many_____________

Also we need to know if you could provide us with a detailed support letter on the items we

have just talked about, if we email you a template letter regarding this support?

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Part B: For City Managers

For Recreation Directors

The name of you city or town___________________

Approximate population? _____________________

Do you have a Recreation centre? ______________

Are you planning to build one?? Yes____/No_____

If yes, when will it open? ______________________

Do you have a swimming Pool? _________________

If Yes, do you have people capable of operating it within your community? Yes____/No_____

Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

If No, What kind of skilled employees do you need?

Job description:

Starting Wage:

Vacancies:

Do you have an ice rink in your community? Yes_______/ No______

If yes do you people capable of operating it within your community? Yes____/No____

Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

Job description:

Starting Wage:

Vacancies

What other Sports Facilities do you have?

________________________________________________________________________Do

you have sports teams in your community? Yes____/ No____

What Sports?

________________________________________________________________________

Do you have people capable of training athletes and coaching teams within your community?

Yes____/ No___

Do they have a certificate or diploma? Yes_____/No______

Are there any plans to develop sports teams? Yes____ /No____

Also we need to know if you could provide us with a detailed support letter on the items we

have just talked about, if we email you a template letter regarding this support?

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APPENDIX D

Survey Results - Employment on Graduation from Proposed Aboriginal

Health Wellness, Sport and Recreation Programs

Aboriginal Support Number of Employment Possibilities

Name of Band Contact Person Title Addictions

Prevention Counselors Exercise and Wellness Counselors Recreation Leisure and Sports Managers

Gitsegukla Keith Morgan Band Manager 4 4

Nisga'a Society Carol Doolan Programs Coordinator 2

Nisga’a Valley Health

Julia Adams Director of Programs 2 2 2

Hagwilget Village Vernon Joseph Band Manager 2 2 2

Kwanlin Dun Health Centre

Donna Rowland Manager 1 1 1

Gitmaxmak’ay Carol Doolan Programs Coordinator 2

Kitamaat Village Lorna Morrison Operations Manager

Serkirk First Nation Darcie Marcotte Program Coordinator 2 2

Glen Vowell Linda Hillback Band Manager

Kitwanga Darlene

Hockman

Manager WilpSi'Satx 4 2 4

Kispoix William Starr Band Manager

Gitanmaax Village Pauline Rubinato Band Manager

Hartley Bay David Benton Band Manager 1 2 1

Upper Skeena Alice Smith Manager 1 5 5

Development Centre

Old Masset Village Jason Major Band Manager 1 1 1

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Haida Gwaii Karen Mcmurray Recreation

Coordinator

16 24 12

Laxgalts'ap Willard Martin Chief Councilor 2 6 6

Totals 42 52 36

City Managers and Recreational Directors Number of Employment Possibilities Employment Possibilities

Community Contact Person Title Addictions

Prevention Counselors Exercise and Wellness Counselors Recreation Leisure and Sports Managers

Prince Rupert Michael Curnes Recreational Director

Stewart Heather

Petersen

Lead to Primary Care Services

1 1 1

Terrace Carmen Didier Leisure Services 2 2 2

Hazelton Wrinch Sharon Robertson

Chief Operating Officer 4 5 4

Memorial Hospital Director

Bulkley Valley 1 2 4

Totals Cities 8 10 11

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Appendix E

Community Consultation Outline

For Focus Groups on Proposed Centre and Aboriginal Exercise and Wellness Program

 To gain insight into barriers to participation, strategies for retention and interest in ladder programs for use in planning, structuring and implementing the program

Are You Interested In Participating In The Program?

Do you think youth/young adults in your community would be interested in obtaining a certificate in Exercise and Wellness?

Would your community value people with this preparation?

Would your community like to participate in helping students in the program learn? How can you participate?

Can your community support learning activities such as assessment of physical fitness of children or student development of exercise, nutrition, health assessment programs?

Are there programs you need help starting or running now? Community Needs for Graduates

If you could change one thing in your community to make it a healthier place for everyone, what would that be?

What sports, exercise, nutrition, and healthy living programs does your community have? What resources do these programs need now?

What programs would you like to develop in the future? Thoughts for Cultural Competence

What do you see as the most important factors to make your programs fit with the culture and beliefs in your community?

How can programs be more community focused? How can programs be more family focused?

What is the best time of the year to get participation in programs? Purpose:

 To structure interaction with Aboriginal Communities to determine interest, needs and commitment to participation in the Northwest Community College’s Center for Aboriginal Wellness, Sport and Recreation Education

 To gain insight into barriers to participation, strategies for retention and interest in ladder programs for use in planning, structuring and implementing the program

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Determining Demand/ Planning To Prepare A Supply Of Qualified Graduates

Would your community value individuals prepared in sport and activity? In health promotion for children? For youth?

For elders?

Reducing Barriers To Aboriginal Students’ Participation

In your experience, what would entice students from your community into the program? Retention of Aboriginal Students

What should we do to ensure students are able to complete the program? What student supports are most important

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Appendix F

Contracted Faculty for Curriculum Development

Judy Thompson Biographical Summary

I was selected to work on this project because I have a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology (SFU). I also have a Master of Science in Environmental Studies (UVic) and I am a PhD candidate (ABD) at UVic. I am of Aboriginal descent (Tahltan/Gitxsan) and was born and raised on Tsimshian territory in Prince Rupert, BC. I have worked closely with Aboriginal communities for over 20 years and for the 12 years that I have worked at Northwest Community College in my roles as an instructor, First Nations Access Coordinator and curriculum developer. As a First Nations Access Coordinator, I was a member of First Nations Council. I developed the college's First Nations Studies Associate of Arts Degree Program and have taught and/or am developing 6 new First Nations Studies courses. I am the coordinator of the Aboriginal Language Conversation Program at NWCC and I represent my Tahltan Nation at the First Peoples' Heritage, Language and Culture Council Advisory Committee and First Nations Education Steering Committee Aboriginal Languages Subcommittee. For 5 years, I have been working to implement Indigenous Ethnobotanical gardens at our college campuses that can be used to build community relationships and to teach and honour the knowledge and wisdom our Aboriginal People have about plants.

I was an athlete in the 2002 North American Indigenous Games (cross-country, track) and was also a board member of the Aboriginal Sports and Recreation Association of BC (ASRA) in 2002/2003. I am currently on the board of directors for the Canadian Aboriginal Science & Technology Society (since 2003).

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Appendix G

Meetings/Correspondence with First Nations Communities

Community/Nation People

Prince Rupert Friendship House Elders (Urban First Nations Elders group) -16 Elders (representing the Tsimshian, Haida, Nisga’a, Tahltan Nations)

Tsimshian Lax Kw’alaams Health Center -Kelley Williams, Health Director -Leanne Alexcee, CHR

-Ray Hawks, Director of Recreation & Leisure Metlakatla Health Station

-Susan Nelson, CHR

Hartley Bay Nursing Station -Angela Clifton, Health Director -Robert Robinson, CHR

Kitkatla Nursing Station -Linda Innes, Health Director -Dora Moody, CHR

Kitsum Kalum Health Station

-Brandi-Lainne Trudell, Health Director

-Fran Christiansen, Community Health Coordinator Kitselas Health Station

-Susan Bevan, Health Coordinator

-Jada Seymour, Community Fitness Leader

Nisga’a Nisga’a Valley Health Board

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Community/Nation People

Gitxsan Gitanmaax Health Station, Hazelton, BC -Stephanie Howard, LPN

-Dorothy Lattie, CHN

Gitxsan Health Society, Hazelton, BC -Hertha Holland, Executive Health Director Hagwilget Health Station, New Hazelton, BC -Carol Eichsteadt, Health Coordinator

Haisla Kitimaat Village Health Centre

-Lucille Harms, CHN -Elaine Ross, CHR

-Marilyn Furlan, Elders Coordinator

Haida Haida Health Centre, Old Massett, BC

-Goldie Swanson, CHR

Skidegate Health Centre, Xaaynangaa Naay -Lauren Brown, Health Director

-Mary-ann Wilson, CHR Wet’suwet’en Moricetown Health Station

-Charmayne Gagnon, CHR

Tahltan Iskut Valley Health Services, Iskut, BC -Feddie Louie, Health Program Manager -Shawna Bourdreau, CHN

-Terri Nole, Home Care Worker -Jodie Nole, Fitness & Health -Connie Nole, Finance Clerk -Danielle Nole, Home Care Worker -8 Tahltan Elders

Tahltan Health & Social Services Authority, Telegraph Creek, BC -Christine Ball, Health Director

-Nancy Norby, CHN -Sheila Frank, CHR

-Geraldine Quock, Home Support Worker -Gayleen Day, Diabetes Education

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Comments

Elders  Seasonal activities

o Fall  Canoeing  Collecting wood o Winter  Snowshoeing o Spring

 Hiking trails to get medicine, how to make it and what it’s used for (Medicine season)

 Elders need to pass on information/stories, lessons (safety) can be learnt from them “no good to take to the grave”

o i.e. Moons/tides, when is the best time to dig for clams

o Right way to pick seaweed (younger generations do not have enough experience)

 Doing traditional activities for survival (preparing for winter) exercise comes along with it

o Gardening o Picking seaweed

o Hiking trails to gather food/medicine o Hunting (deer, moose, caribou) o Digging for clams

o Roe & kelp

o Canning Salmon (catching, cleaning, gathering wood, jarring)  Getting Elders involved in activities with the youth to keep them active

o Basketball (Elder’s are in the changing rooms, at the practices or on the benches for words of wisdom)

 Walk everyday

 Work everyday; “means more for life – brain tougher than body”

 Younger generation needs to learn from their Elders, especially in regards to living on the land (hunting, gathering food, gathering medicines, fishing, etc.)  Elders need to be active doing traditional activities; “You’re not going to get

us on a treadmill!”

 The importance of learning their languages while partaking in traditional activities

 The focus should be more on “Wellness” than on “Exercise” as wellness encompasses all areas of health (physical, mental, spiritual, psychological, emotional, social, etc.) and is in keeping with Aboriginal ways of knowing

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Community

Health Workers

 Eliminate barriers to participation

o May need to have upgrading term/year for students that don’t have pre-requisites

o Present program to students at a younger age (elementary/high school) so that they can prepare for program (take pre-requisites) o Have high school students do work experience with health centres

and working with Elders  Resurrect old traditional trails

o Have Elders telling stories to younger generations while walking trails (learn stories associated with places, learn Aboriginal languages) o Being on the land, can “feel” presence of Ancestors

o Winter camping

o Can tie in to hiking/backpacking module

o Have snowshoeing as a lifetime activity; include the making of snowshoes

o Have trips that incorporate traditional use study (TUS) maps

o Dog teams; Elders teach students how to make sleighs for dog teams and how to use them

 Have canoeing as a lifetime activity (“Canoe Journey Life's Journey: A Life Skills Manual for Native Adolescents” book was mentioned)

 River Rafting as a lifetime activity  Bring back traditional arts and activities

o Sewing (making regalia), birch bark, making of snowshoes

 Traditional games

o Dene Games, North American Indigenous Games, Arctic Winter Games o Stick gambling

 Opportunities for Student Practica

o “Brighter Futures Program” and “Building Healthy Communities Program” o students can work in youth centres/recreational facilities/health centres

 Focus on Elder Wellness o Exercise for Elders o Nutrition for Elders

o Have Elders teaching students how to harvest and use traditional plants for foods/medicines/materials

o Have Elders doing traditional activities; “I want my hands to remember” is what an Elder told a community health worker in regards to cutting fish

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o Importance of intergenerational transmission of knowledge

o Pain management/relaxation techniques for generational stress and ailments (e.g. arthritis)

o Understanding cycle between stress and exercise

 Language

o Preserving and revitalizing Aboriginal languages is a health issue o Language is a connection to who we are as Aboriginal People o Language and Culture are intertwined

o Language connects us to the Land

 Focus on community and family o Family exercise and activities

o Increase physical activity in the community (community mobilization) o Gardening

o Walking o Picking berries

o Elders say that we need balanced relationships in life: work/play/social interactions

o Elders: we are responsible not only for our families, but need to take care of ourselves (there is under care with respect to ourselves)

 Effects of Poverty o Cost of equipment

o Need fitness initiatives that don’t require expensive equipment o Nutritional aspect: increase energy and nutrition of food while

decreasing cost

o Nutritional foods cost more than “junk” foods

 Funding for programs

o Need long term plans for recreation centres; funding for workers not in FN & Inuit Health budget

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APPENDIX H

Two tables on Canadian Literature Search for Courses with an Aboriginal focus on Health Wellness Sport Recreation Mental Health Addiction and Related non Aboriginal Courses, March 2008

Table 1 Aboriginal Focus

Organization

Pre-Second Health Welln Sport Rec. MH&A Camosun College

First Nations Health and Education Access

Certificate

X X

Canadore College

Indigenous Wellness & Addictions Prevention

x X

Curtin

Indigenous Community Health Program

x x

Curtin

Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Health

Promotion

x x

Fleming College

Drug and Alcohol Counsellor

x x X

First Nations University of Canada

Northern Health Sciences Access Program

x x First Nations University of Canada

Nursing Education Program of

Saskatchewan x

FNTI

Indigenous Community Health Approaches Program Enionkwatakariteke

x X

FNTI

Diabetes Prevention Specialist X x

Georgian College

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Organization

Pre-Second Health Welln Sport Rec. MH&A Keyano College

Community Wellness Certificate Program

x x

Lakehead

Native Nurses Entry Program

x

Malaspina University College

Aboriginal Sports Management Certificate

x x

Malaspina University College

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Community Practitioner Certificate Program

x

Melbourne University

Certificate II in Sport (Career Oriented Participation)

x

Melbourne University

Certificate III in Sport (Career Oriented Participation)

x

Melbourne University

Certificate IV in Community Recreation

x

Melbourne University

Sports Development Programs

x

Nechi Institute

Aboriginal Addiction Services

x

NorQuest College

Prep for Practical Nurse Program

x

NorQuest College

Essentials for Health Careers

x

Nunavut Arctic College Adult Basic Education

x

Nunavut Arctic College Adult Basic Education

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Organization

Pre-Second Health Welln Sport Rec. MH&A Nunavut Arctic College

Community Support Worker

x x

Nunavut Arctic College Health Careers Access

x x

Nunavut Arctic College Nursing

x

Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technology Community Health Representative

x x X

Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technology Community Services Addictions Certificate

x x X

Seven Generations Educational Institute & Canadore Indigenous Wellness and Addictions Prevention Program

x x X

Thompson Rivers University

Aboriginal Pre-Health and Access Programs

x x

U of Manitoba

Aboriginal Community Wellness Diploma

x

UBC

Aboriginal Health Care Administration

x

UBC

Aboriginal Health and Community Administration Program (AHCAP)

x

UNBC

Aboriginal Health Sciences

x

University College of the North Aboriginal Midwifery

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Organization

Pre-Second Health Welln Sport Rec. MH&A United Tribes Technical College

Health Information Technology

x

United Tribes Technology College Injury Prevention

x

United Tribes Technology College Nutrition and Food Service

Table 2 – Related courses: no specific aboriginal focus

Organization

Pre-Second Health Welln Sport Rec. MH&A Camosun College

1. Diploma – Exercise and Wellness 2. Sport Management

3. Athletic and Exercise Therapy

x x x x

University of Regina Bachelor of Health Studies

x

UNBC

Major in Outdoor Recreation and Conservation

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Appendix I

Center for Aboriginal Health, Wellness, Sport and Recreation DOCUMENT LIST

Dr. Peter R. Rehor

1. Montana Health Enhancement K-12 Content and Performance Standards With Benchmarks at 4th, 8th and 12th Grades

Office of Public Instruction and Montana Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 1999 http://www.opi.state.mt.us/PDF/health/healthstds.pdf 2. Connecting to Purpose Rehor, P.R. University of Tasmania http://catalogue.ausport.gov.au/fulltext/2002/achper/Rehor.pdf 3. Health Enhancement Learner Goals and General Learning Outcomes

Montana Model Curriculum for Health Enhancement

http://opi.mt.gov/pdf/health/HealthLessons/HealthLearnerGoals.pdf

Additional references:

Rehor, Peter R. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT FOR EXERCISE BEHAVIORAL CHANGE, 1991. Ph.D., University of Georgia (Ann E. Jewett). (175pp 2 f $8.00) PSY 1644

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CANADA

NATIONAL

Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre

Ottawa, April 5, 2006 – The Canadian Council on Learning (CCL) has selected two organizations, the First Nations Adult and Higher Education Consortium and the Aboriginal Education Research Centre, to co-lead its Aboriginal Learning Knowledge Centre.

The new knowledge centre is based in the region encompassing the Prairie provinces, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut. It is composed of a consortium with more than 50 members from across the country. The centre will have access to up to $1.5 million per year to develop a collaborative and comprehensive network of shared knowledge and expertise to make a difference in Aboriginal learning. A full list of the consortium members is available on CCL’s website, www.ccl-cca.ca.

http://www.ccl-cca.ca/CCL/AboutCCL/KnowledgeCentres/AboriginalLearning/index.htm?Language=EN ALBERTA

Blue Quills First Nations College Reserve near St. Paul

http://www.bluequills.ca/

Located approximately 200 kilometers northeast of Edmonton, Blue Quills occupies 240 acres of designated Reserve land near the town of St. Paul, Alberta. Originally built in the early 1930's and formerly a federally sponsored church operated residential school, the College now houses upgrading, college and university programs for area residents.

Management and control was assumed by Native people in the region in 1971 after peacefully protesting the recommended closure of the school by the Department of Indian Affairs. As one of the first Native-controlled education centres in Canada, we celebrated our 30th year of Native ownership in 2001!

We have offered a wide variety of programs at Blue Quills dating back to 1975 when we pioneered the Morning Star Bachelor of Education Program. Blue Quills as the first ever post-secondary program designed to train Native teachers provided a foundation for a total of approximately 1,000 students who are either pursuing graduate studies, doctoral degrees or working as professionals in their communities. Although the majority of programs and courses are developed and delivered by Blue Quills First Nations College, many of our courses are accredited by the partner institutions which include Athabasca

University, the University of Alberta and the University of Regina.

Program Calendar and Handbook - http://www.bluequills.ca/

1. Aboriginal Social Work Diploma

Courses in health appearing in the diploma: SWK 206 Community Healing

SWK 133 Traditional Healing Practices SWK 207 Abuse Theories

2. Business Applications/Data Management/Office Readiness 3. Cree Language Program

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5. Indigenous Artists Program

6. Information Technology Support Program 7. Leadership and Management

8. Office Worker Training 9. Teacher Assistant

10. University Diploma in arts 11. Bachelor of Arts

12. Bachelor of Education 13. Bachelor of General Studies

Maskwachees Cultural College Four Nations Hobbema

http://www.maskwachees.ca/

Maskwachees Cultural College is a private community college located within the Four Nations of Hobbema, Alberta, Canada. We offer programs from Basic Adult Literacy, two year College Diplomas, to University Transfer programs.

Maskwachees Cultural College offers many different streams of study. To find out more about the area you're looking to get into, click any of the links below.

University Studies

Bachelor of Education Bachelor of Arts

First Nations Management Aboriginal Social Work Diploma College Program

Criminal Justice Certificate New Office Technologies

Early Childhood Development (ECD) Levels 2 & 3 Cree Language Instructor Training program (CLITP)

Petroleum Industry Certification Training (PICT) and Pre-PICT Teaching Assistant Training

University/College Entrance Preparation Program Adult High School

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Nechi Training, Research and Health Promotions Institute St. Albert

http://www.nechi.com/

We are located in the city of St. Albert in the province of Alberta. Nechi Institute is housed with Poundmaker's Lodge, a leader in the addictions healing movement. Poundmaker's Lodge, known as Canada's first addictions treatment centre specifically for Aboriginal clients, is now more than 30 years in operation.

Training Programs & Paths to Post Secondary Credit Transfer & Post-Diploma Articulation Agreements: http://www.nechi.com/pdf/tpptps.pdf

The Health Promotions & Publications division of the Nechi Institute is a division known across the country for developing and coordinating a variety of culturally sensitive promotional programs, materials and campaigns including an Aboriginal Smoking Prevention Initiative promoting smoke-free lifestyles in Aboriginal communities; healthy babies resources; and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome education materials.

Old Sun Community College Siksika

http://www.oldsuncollege.net/ No usable information

Red Crow Community College Cardston

http://www.redcrowcollege.com/

Mission Statement: The mission of Mi’Kai’sto Red Crow Community College is to meet the Cultural, Educational and Training needs for Kainai and beyond. The college will provide leadership through its programs and Services to achieve Self-Realization and Self-Determination based on Kainayssinni.

There are a total of 28 departments at Red Crow Community College which are headed by one President and 3 Vice Presidents. The Executive is presided over by a Board of Governors and ultimately Chief and Council and the people of Kainai.

Available Courses:

Basic Education Skills: This program teaches the basic educational skills of reading, writing and mathematics in preparation for students to continue on to the Adult High School upgrading program.

 English 16/26  Social Studies 16/26  Mathematics 16/26

 (Program will be offered based on number of applicants)

High School Upgrading: This program provides for the academic upgrading of adults looking for further vocational training or college education. Programs and courses are designed to fit the needs of the learner based on their career goals.

 English 10-2  English 20-2  English 30-2  Social Studies 13  Social Studies 23  Social Studies 33

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 Math 10 Preparation  Math 10 Applied  Math 20 Applied  Math 30 Applied  Math 10 Pure  Math 20 Pure  Math 30 Pure  Science 10  Biology 20  Biology 30

Trades: (TBA) This program will prepare those wishing to increase their understanding of the trades and enter the Alberta Apprenticeship Program.

Life Skills: (TBA) A program that will help people be successful in living a productive and satisfying life while pursuing their educational goals.

Other Courses as Required

Calendar of courses http://www.redcrowcollege.com/course.htm Piikani Adult and Career Education Centre

No site located

Tsuu T’ina Adult Education Centre Tsuu Tina Reserve

http://www.tsuutina.ca/page.aspx?pageID=7-4-1 Limited information

Yellowhead Tribal Council Education Centre Edmonton

http://www.ytced.ab.ca/

The Yellowhead Tribal College will be offering the following programs for the 2007/2008 academic year beginning in September 2007:

 UNIVERSITY STUDIES DIPLOMA (USD)

 UNIVERSITY & COLLEGE PREPARATION (UCEPP) http://www.ytced.ab.ca/programs_01.php http://www.ytced.ab.ca/programs_09.php  MANAGEMENT STUDIES DIPLOMA (MSD)

http://www.ytced.ab.ca/programs_03.php  ADULT BASIC EDUCATION (ABE)

http://www.ytced.ab.ca/programs_10.php  EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT (ECD)

 MICRO COMPUTER/OFFICE PROFESSIONAL (MOP)  HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CERTIFICATE (HMC)  PRACTICAL NURSE

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 OFF CAMPUS STUDENT SUPPORT

 ACADEMIC UPGRADING

http://www.ytced.ab.ca/programs_08.php BRITISH COLUMBIA

Camosun College First Nations Education

http://camosun.ca/services/fnes/

Chemainus Native College - Chemainus

http://www.chemainusnativecollege.com/ Adult Dogwood Program

Our Adult Dogwood Program (Grade 12 equivalency) provides adult learners with the opportunity to complete their secondary school graduation requirements in order to enter the workforce or post-secondary studies. To complete the Adult Graduation Program, students (19 or older) must earn at least 20 credits in the secondary system. These include a Language Arts 12 course, a Mathematics 11 or 12 course, and either three Grade 12 Ministry-authorized courses (4 credits each) or Social Studies 11 (4 credits), or BC First Nations Studies 12 and two Grade 12 Ministry-Authorized courses (4 credits each). The Foundation Skills for Language Teacher Development Program at Chemainus Native College was designed to preserve and maintain the Hul'qumi'num Language and Coast Salish Culture. It is a ten-month program designed to help Hul'qumi'num speakers develop Foundation Skills to assist them in continuing to revive their language in a variety of environments. This may include language instruction in schools, daycares and community programs. This is a transfer credit program

College of New Caledonia Prince George and others

http://www.cnc.bc.ca/tools/programs/

Aboriginal Forest Resource Technology Diploma Access Program  One year

 Prince George campus  Starts: August

 Full-time

Aboriginal Teacher Assistant Certificate

 CNC’s Lakes District Campus (Burns Lake)  September - June

Figure

Updating...

References

  1. http://www.northernhealth.ca/Your_Health/Programs/Aboriginal_Health/AboutUs.asp
  2. e, www.ccl-cca.ca
  3. http://www.coqualeetza.com/page2.html
  4. http://www.enowkincentre.ca/home.html
  5. http://www.nvsd44.bc.ca/NV/Prog_Page.asp?RID=588&Section=Eslha7an
  6. http://www.jibc.bc.ca/aboriginal/QuickLinks/CertificatesDiplomas.html
  7. http://www.langara.bc.ca/aboriginalstudies/ABST/ABST-21.html
  8. http://www.necvancouver.org/about_us_overview.shtml
  9. http://www.sisb.bc.ca/saec/
  10. http://www.abcentre.org/literacy.html
  11. http://discover.brandonu.ca/newhandbook/education.asp
  12. http://www.umanitoba.ca/coned/access/info/spsp.shtml
  13. https://www.ucn.ca/ics
  14. http://mamawi.com/files/Community_Training_Package2.pdf
  15. http://www.yellowquill.org/
  16. http://www.gdins.org/AboutGDI.shtml
  17. http://www.ktei.ca/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1
  18. http://aboriginalsportcircle.ca/en/aboriginal_coaching_manual
  19. http://www.aboriginalactnow.ca/downloads/aboriginalsport2.pdf
  20. (http://aboriginalhealth.vch.ca/docs/healing_ways.pdf
  21. http://fnsp.arts.ubc.ca/practicum/information.html
  22. http://www.fnhc.ca/
  23. http://www.fnhc.ca/pdf/Sports_Recreation_and_Physical_Activity_BC__Aboriginal_Youth.pdf
  24. (http://www.aboriginalactnow.ca/m_5.asp
  25. a) (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fniah-spnia/index-eng.php
  26. (http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/marketsoc/camp/adi-ida-eng.php
  27. http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ahc-asc/activit/marketsoc/camp/adi-ida-eng.php
  28. (http://www.caaws.ca/e/index.cfm
  29. , (http://www.avivacommunityfund.org/
  30. http://www.douglas.bc.ca/__shared/assets/Fitness_Leader_Accreditation49353.pdf
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