College Degrees for the Student with ADHD and Learning Differences. Stephanie Knight Director of Admissions Beacon College

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(1)

College  Degrees    

for  the  Student  with  

ADHD  and    

Learning  Differences

Stephanie Knight

Director of Admissions

Beacon College

(2)

Overall College Completion Rates…!

Ins:tu:onal  Type  

4-­‐year  Gradua:on   6-­‐year  Gradua:on  

All  4-­‐year  

Ins-tu-ons  

39  %  

58.7  %  

Nonprofit  

Ins-tu-ons    

52.9  %  

65.1  %  

(3)

College Completion Rates…!

For students with Learning Disabilities!

Study  

4-­‐year  Gradua:on   6-­‐year  Gradua:on  

Na-onal  Longitudinal  

Transi-on  Study  2009  

6  %  

16%  

Na-onal  Longitudinal  

Transi-on  Study  2011  

N/A  

27  %  

Ins-tute  for  Higher  

Educa-on  Policy  

No  $meframe  indicated  

28  %    

(4)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

(5)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

1.  Strength  in  at  least  ONE  academic  area  

1.  Reading  (specifically  Reading  Comprehension  

2.  WriBng    

(6)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

1.  Strength  in  at  least  ONE  academic  area  

1.  Reading  (specifically  Reading  Comprehension  

2.  Wri-ng    

3.  Mathema-cs  

(7)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

1.  Strength  in  at  least  ONE  academic  area  

1.  Reading  (specifically  Reading  Comprehension  

2.  Wri-ng    

3.  Mathema-cs  

2.  Mo-va-on  for  college-­‐level  academics  

3.  Self-­‐Advocacy  

(8)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

(9)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

4.  Understanding  of  Personal  Strengths  and  Weaknesses  

(10)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

4.  Understanding  of  Personal  Strengths  and  Weaknesses  

5.  Understanding  and  can  ar-culate  the  learning  differences  

6.  Knowing  how  they  learn  “BEST”  

(11)

Characteris:cs  of  successful  

students  with  LD  !

4.  Understanding  of  Personal  Strengths  and  Weaknesses  

5.  Understanding  and  can  ar-culate  the  learning  differences  

6.  Knowing  how  they  learn  “BEST”  

7.  Can  Manage  Themselves:    Laundry,  MedicaBons,  Waking  Up  

on  Time,  Money  

(12)

Case  Studies  Highligh:ng  

Successes  and  Challenges  for  

LD/ADHD  College  Students!

(13)

Student  A  

Age  at  Entry:    18  

In/Out  of  State:    Out-­‐of-­‐State  (MD)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    ADHD  

Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (135)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (139),  Reasoning  (125)   Average  Achievement  in  Reading,  Wri-ng,  Math  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  At  risk  for  behavior  difficul-es;  displays  characteris-cs  of  ODD   and  Anxiety  

High  School  GPA:    2.3  

First  Year/Transfer:    First  Year  

Parent/Family  Support:  Married  parents  both  with  Masters  level  educa-on  

Outcome:      ?????  

(14)

Student  A  

Age  at  Entry:    18  

In/Out  of  State:    Out-­‐of-­‐State  (MD)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    ADHD  

Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (135)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (139),  Reasoning  (125)   Average  Achievement  in  Reading,  Wri-ng,  Math  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  At  risk  for  behavior  difficul-es;  displays  characteris-cs  of  ODD   and  Anxiety  

High  School  GPA:    2.3  

First  Year/Transfer:    First  Year  

Parent/Family  Support:  Married  parents  both  with  Masters  level  educa-on  

Outcome:    Withdrawn  from  college  a[er  Freshman  year  

(15)

Student  B  

Age  at  Entry:    25  

In/Out  of  State:    In-­‐State  (FL)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    ADHD   Secondary  Diagnosis:    Aspergers   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (100)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (112),  Reasoning  (104)   Achievement  Levels:    N/A  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  Currently  on  meds  for  exis-ng  anxiety  disorder   High  School  GPA:    3.6  

First  Year/Transfer:    Transfer    (Beacon  was  third  college)       College  GPAs:    2.33  and  2.27  

Parent/Family  Support:  Married  parents  both  with  Masters  level  educa-on  

Outcome:    ?????  

(16)

Student  B  

Age  at  Entry:    25  

In/Out  of  State:    In-­‐State  (FL)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    ADHD   Secondary  Diagnosis:    Aspergers   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (100)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (112),  Reasoning  (104)   Achievement  Levels:    N/A  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  Currently  on  meds  for  exis-ng  anxiety  disorder   High  School  GPA:    3.6  

First  Year/Transfer:    Transfer    (Beacon  was  third  college)       College  GPAs:    2.33  and  2.27  

Parent/Family  Support:  Married  parents  both  with  Masters  level  educa-on  

Outcome:    3.59  GPA  

Currently:  2

nd

 semester  senior,  slated  to  graduate  Dec.  2014  w/  

Bachelors  degree  in  CIS  

(17)

Student  A   Student  B  

Age  at  Entry   18   25  

In/Out-­‐of  State   Out-­‐of-­‐State  (MD)   In-­‐State  (FL)  

Sex   Male   Male  

Primary  Diagnosis   ADHD   ADHD  

Aspergers  

Cogni-ve  Data   Full  Scale  IQ  (135)   Full  Scale  IQ  (100)  

Achievement  Data   Average   N/A  

Emo-onal  Data   At  risk  behavior  difficul-es,  

ODD  and  Anxiety   Anxiety  

High  School  GPA   2.3   3.6  

FY  /  Transfer  Status   First  Year   Transfer    

College  GPAs:    2.33  and  2.27   Family   Married  parents  both  with  

Masters  level  educa-on   Married  parents  both  with  Masters  level  educa-on   Outcome   Withdrawn  aier  Freshman  

year  (2.14  GPA)   3.59  GPA  slated  to  graduate  Dec.  2014  

(18)

Student  C  

Age  at  Entry:    19  

In/Out  of  State:    Out-­‐of-­‐State  (NY)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    Auditory/Visual  Processing;  Reading,  Mathema-cs   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (103)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (116),  Reasoning  (119)  

Low-­‐Average  to  Borderline  in  Reading,  Wri-ng,  and  Mathema-cs   Emo-onal  Func-oning:  N/A  

High  School  GPA:    N/A  

First  Year/Transfer:    First  Year  

Parent/Family  Support:  Divorced;  posi-ve  family  supports;  both  parents  Bachelor   level  educa-on  

Outcome:    ?????  

(19)

Student  C  

Age  at  Entry:    19  

In/Out  of  State:    Out-­‐of-­‐State  (NY)   Sex:    Male  

Primary  Diagnosis:    Auditory/Visual  Processing;  Reading,  Mathema-cs   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (103)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (116),  Reasoning  (119)  

Low-­‐Average  to  Borderline  in  Reading,  Wri-ng,  and  Mathema-cs   Emo-onal  Func-oning:  N/A  

High  School  GPA:    N/A  

First  Year/Transfer:    First  Year  

Parent/Family  Support:  Divorced;  posi-ve  family  supports;  both  parents  Bachelor   level  educa-on  

Outcome:    College  graduate,  3.17  GPA  

(20)

Student  D  

Age  at  Entry:    24  

In/Out  of  State:    In-­‐State  (FL)   Sex:    Female  

Primary  Diagnosis:    Working  memory;  visual-­‐perceptual-­‐motor  skill  deficits   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (105)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (106),  Reasoning  (103)  

Achievement  Levels:    Borderline  in  Reading,  Math;  Wri-ng  N/A  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  Moderate  difficulty  in  social,  occupa-onal,  or  school   func-oning  

High  School  GPA:    GED   First  Year/Transfer:    Transfer     College  GPA:    1.70  

Parent/Family  Support:  Divorced  parents,  living  w/mom   Mom=Associate  level  educa-on  

Outcome:    ?????  

(21)

Student  D  

Age  at  Entry:    24  

In/Out  of  State:    In-­‐State  (FL)   Sex:    Female  

Primary  Diagnosis:    Working  memory;  visual-­‐perceptual-­‐motor  skill  deficits   Cogni-ve  Data:    Full  Scale  IQ  (105)  

Verbal/Comprehension  (106),  Reasoning  (103)  

Achievement  Levels:    Borderline  in  Reading,  Math;  Wri-ng  N/A  

Emo-onal  Func-oning:  Moderate  difficulty  in  social,  occupa-onal,  or  school   func-oning  

High  School  GPA:    GED   First  Year/Transfer:    Transfer     College  GPA:    1.70  

Parent/Family  Support:  Divorced  parents,  living  w/mom   Mom=Associate  level  educa-on  

Outcome:    Withdrew  a[er  1-­‐month  of  classes/mid-­‐semester    

Profile  of  SLD  Student  Entering  College  

(22)

Student  C   Student  D  

Age  at  Entry   19   24  

In/Out-­‐of  State   Out-­‐of-­‐State  (NY)   In-­‐State  (FL)  

Sex   Male   Female  

Primary  Diagnosis   Auditory/Visual  Processing;  

Reading,  Mathema-cs   Working  memory;  visual-­‐perceptual-­‐motor  skill  deficits   Cogni-ve  Data   Full  Scale  IQ  (103)   Full  Scale  IQ  (105)  

Achievement  Data   Low-­‐Average  to  Borderline   Borderline  

Emo-onal  Data   N/A   Moderate  difficulty  

High  School  GPA   N/A   GED  

FY  /  Transfer  Status   First  Year   Transfer;  College  GPA:    1.70   Family   Divorced;  posi-ve  family  

supports;  both  parents   Bachelor  level  educa-on  

Divorced  parents,  living  w/ mom;  Mom=Associate  level   educa-on  

Outcome   College  graduate  with  3.17  

GPA   Withdrew  aier  1-­‐month  of  classes/mid-­‐semester    

(23)

College  support  program  

levels…What  to  look  for.!

Minimum  Support  Programs    

ADA  Compliant    

Remember:  No  more  IDEA  for  college  students  

No  separate  SLD/ADHD  program  

“Everything”  through  Office  for  Students  with  Disabili$es  

Self-­‐Directed  Programs  

Targeted  support  programs,  staff,  and  some$mes  offices  

Addi$onal  supports  in  place  for  students  with  SLD/ADHD  

Extra  fee$  for  services  

Students  s$ll  take  “regular”  classes  

Comprehensive  Support  Programs  

Colleges  with  EXCLUSIVE  mission  for  students  with  SLD/ADHD  

Only  two  in  the  U.S.  at  this  $me:    

Beacon  College  (Florida)      and      Landmark  College  (Vermont)  

(24)

Strategies  that  can  help  

During  high  school!

Knowledge  of  tes-ng  results  and/or  IEP/504  

 

Understanding  of  strengths  and  weaknesses  

 

Providing  leadership  opportuni-es  that  concur  with  strengths  

 

Experimen-ng  with  assis-ve  technology  

 

(25)

Strategies  that  can  help  

Beyond  high  school!

Courses:    

• 

Learning  Essen-als  &  Self-­‐Discovery  

• 

College  Success  

 

Freshman  Orienta-on  &  First  Year  Experiences  

 

Counseling  Services  

 

Life  Coaching  

 

(26)

When  College  Isn’t  the  

“Best”  Next  Step!

Transi-on  Programs  

• 

Programs  offer  more  services  OUTSIDE  the  college  classroom  

• 

Many  “partner”  with  nearby  colleges,  universi-es,  and  

technical  programs  to  offer  the  academic  components  

• 

Primarily  bases  are  life-­‐skill  development,  money  

management,  counseling,  life-­‐coaching,  occupa-onal  

therapies,  etc.  

 

GAP  Year  –  Construc-ve  “breaks”  from  academics:    

 

• 

Travel    

• 

Volunteer  or  Missions  

(27)

The  hardest  challenge  for  all  

colleges  and  universi$es  

when  serving  students  with  

disabili$es,  is  to  overcome  

areas  those  that  are  OUTSIDE  

the  classroom.  

(28)

Factors  that  can  derail  

(29)

What  some:mes  happens?  

 

• 

Anendance  and  Self-­‐Monitoring  

• 

Lacking  Execu-ve  Func-oning  and  Time  Management  

Skills  

• 

Aliena-on  (Students  don’t  iden-fy  with  campus)  

• 

Poor  social  decisions  and  choices  

• 

Mental  Illness  

• 

Disability  support  doesn’t  =  Needs  of  student  

• 

Minimum  

• 

Self-­‐Directed  

• 

Comprehensive  

• 

Advocacy  and  Self-­‐Disclosure  

• 

Colleges  won’t  seek  out  student  

• 

Timeframes  for  accommoda-ons  and  support  

services  vary  from  college-­‐to-­‐college  

(30)
(31)

If  it  all  goes  south…  

 

• 

Students  don’t  always  make  the  “best”  choice  first  (same  

goes  for  parents  –  SHHH!)  

• 

College  programs  for  currently  enrolled  students  experiencing  

academic  and/or  emo-onal  “bumps”  

 

• 

Make  the  most  of  intellectual  talents  

• 

Iden-fy  Personal  Learning  style  and  strengths  

• 

Ac-vate  and  reinforce  core  academic  skills  and  habits  

• 

Forge  a  course  of  ac-on  for  future  college  success  

• 

Reset  academic  and  career  trajectory  

• 

Build  basic  academic  skill  

• 

Offer  a  COMPREHENSIVE  op-on  for  “trigger”  courses  

(e.g.  College  Algebra)  

(32)

Ques:ons  for  the  Group  to  

Brainstorm:  

 

1.  What  issues  are  Florida  Guidance-­‐College  Counselors  

facing  when  advising  for  students  with  specific  

learning  disabili-es,  ADHD,  and  other  learning  

differences?  

2.  What  sorts  of  programs  do  you  recommend  currently  

for  students  with…  

1.  Academic  Difficul-es  

2.  Social/Independence  Difficul-es  

(33)

More  QuesBons:  

 

Stephanie  Knight  

Ph:  855-­‐220-­‐5376  

sknight@beaconcollege.edu

 

www.beaconcollege.edu

 

 

…Or  stop  by  our  table  on  the  first  floor  

Exhibit  Hall!  

 

America’s  first  four-­‐year  college  exclusively  for  students  with  

learning  disabiliBes,  ADHD,  and  other  learning  differences    

 

76%  Four-­‐Year  GraduaBon  Rate  s  83%  Employment/Graduate  

School  Rates  s  100%  Four-­‐Year  Career  Development  Model  

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