• No results found

Online Marketing Ethics: Optimizing the Ethical Value of Affiliate Marketing

N/A
N/A
Protected

Academic year: 2021

Share "Online Marketing Ethics: Optimizing the Ethical Value of Affiliate Marketing"

Copied!
56
0
0

Loading.... (view fulltext now)

Full text

(1)

University of Amsterdam – FEB 

Online

 

Marketing

 

Ethics:

 

Optimizing

 

the

 

Ethical

 

Value

 

of

 

Affiliate

 

Marketing

 

Master

 

Thesis

 

Business

 

Studies

 

 

 

juni 17, 201   Bas Jansen      Supervised by: drs. ing. A.C.J. Meulemans    0         Second reviewer: Prof. Dr. J. Tettero   0407976      Faculty of Economics and Business 

(2)

 

Executive

 

Summary

 

This research tries to investigate the optimization of the ethical value of affiliate marketing by  looking at the effect of the ethical behavior of merchants on the commission received by  affiliates.   By presenting an extensive literature review on affiliate marketing, this study aims to add to the  current available academic coverage of affiliate marketing. However the main goal of this  research is to perform pioneering research on the subject of affiliate marketing ethics and how  content providers are influenced.   Results indicated that affiliate managers that disapprove four out of five constructs measuring  ethical behavior, are more likely to report lower affiliate’s commission. Suggestions for further  research are presented.  

(3)

 

“In 

 

reality clicks are people. 

And conversions are people filling 

 

out a form or buying a product.”

       

Ola Edvardsson

 

(4)

   

Table of Contents 

 

Introduction... 5 

1.1  Marketing ethics and the emergence of online marketing ethics ... 5 

1.2  Affiliate marketing from the perspective of the content provider ... 6 

1.3  Problem discussion... 7 

1.4  Research purpose ... 7 

1.5  Research Questions ... 7 

1.6  How the thesis is organized... 8 

Literature Review... 9 

2.1  Ethics in marketing ... 9 

2.2  Affiliate marketing... 11 

Methodology... 25 

3.1  Research Strategy and presentation of Conceptual Model ... 25 

3.2  Research Method ... 27 

3.3  Operalization ... 30 

3.4  Data Analysis ... 32 

3.4  Validity and Reliability ... 36 

Results and discussion... 38 

4.1  Data presentation... 38 

4.2  Findings and discussion ... 42 

Conclusion and suggestions for further research... 44 

5.1  Conclusion ... 44 

5.2  Suggestions for further research... 44 

References... 46 

APPENDICES... 51 

Questionnaire Business Ethics (by Harris (1990)... 51 

  GLOSSARY ... 56   

(5)

   

Introduction

 

 

1.1

 

Marketing

 

ethics

 

and

 

the

 

emergence

 

of

 

online

 

marketing

 

ethics

  

Business ethics, and in particular marketing ethics, has been a topic of much academic debate.  According to Fritzsche & Tsalikis (1989, p.695) “business ethics literature has exploded in both  volume and importance”. These authors wrote an extensive literature review, using over three  hundred sources and quoting several other authors on ethics. For instance Beauchamp & Bowie,  (2004, p3), who define ethics as “inquiry into theories of what is good and evil and into what is  right and wrong, and thus inquiry into what we ought and ought not to do”. An important  definition of marketing ethics is provided by Hunt & Vitell (1986): “an inquiry into the nature  and grounds of moral judgments, standards, and rules of conduct relating to marketing decisions  and marketing situations”.  Fritzsche & Tsalikis (1989, p.695) conclude that is important to  istinguish the definition of ethics from that of morals, and state that “the terms ethics and  d ethical refer to the study of moral conduct or to the code one follows”.      However, marketing ethics is more than just a topic that is being discussed by academics.  According to Kotler (2003, p.700) “business practices are often under attack because business  situations routinely pose tough ethical dilemmas”. This means that marketers in real life are  constantly being confronted with ethics. This confrontation with ethics surfaces when making  choices, for instance the choice which markets to target. When targeting vulnerable or  disadvantaged groups (e.g. children) the public  can be concerned. Just recently, the Dutch  consumer organization (Consumentenbond) has launched an attack against fast food chains,  complaining that these fast food chains still focus their commercials and marketing activities too  much on children1. Very much depends on the way a group is targeted and for what reason.  Social responsible marketing calls for targeting that serves not only the company’s interests but  also the interests of those targeted (Kotler,2003, p.301).    Literature on affiliate marketing ethics is scarcely available and exists mainly of online weblogs  and online forums. For instance, the blog of Edvardsson (2008) contains an interesting entry on  he ethics of affiliate marketing t   2.          1  FD.nl (http://www.fd.nl/artikel/12754606/consumentenbond‐valt‐fastfoodketens)  2 http://partnermarketer.com/affiliate‐marketing‐ethics‐do‐you‐care‐about‐what‐you‐promote/ 

(6)

 

1.2

 

Affiliate

 

marketing

 

from

 

the

 

perspective

 

of

 

the

 

content

 

provider

  

Gallaugher et al.(2001) specify affiliate marketing amongst online advertising, in which  merchants share percentage of sales turnover generated by each customer who arrived to the  merchant’s website via a content provider. This last party, from now on called ‘affiliate’, places  an online advertisement (this can be written text, but also a graphical banner) at its website and  when a potential customer visits the site and clicks at the ad, this visitor is then redirected to the  merchant’s site. The merchant knows the visitor is coming from that specific affiliate, because a  cookie is stored on the visitor’s computer, telling the merchant’s website that this visitor is  coming from this specific affiliate ( Gallaugher et al., 2001). The merchant then compensates the  ffiliate, by paying a certain amount of the sales (called commission) to the affiliate (see fig 1.1).  a    

Figure 1.1  Affiliate Marketing and the Most Important Related Concepts 

                The same authors define the concept of ‘merchants’ in context of affiliate marketing. According  to Gallaugher et al. (2001), merchants are called advertisers and they pay only for the services of  content providers if a visitor that comes from the content provider’s website performs a certain  specified action. This can be purchasing some product, but also filling in a form or subscribing to  Source: Presentation by(Aben, 2009) a newsletter or becoming a member.   The other party in the process, namely the affiliate, is being defined by Duffy (2005), who states  that affiliates take the whole risk by connecting to products of the merchant. Affiliate marketing  works only for the affiliate if it’s marketing efforts have the desired effect, i.e. the specified action  is undertaken (as described above). If not, then the affiliate is not making any money and the  merchant is not losing any money. However, the affiliate is paying the opportunity costs (Duffy,  2005).   According to Kımıloğlu (2004, p. 11), affiliate marketing can increase online visibility, but also  add valuable traffic to a merchant. Papatla & Bhatnagar (2002) discuss how to select the best  affiliate partners, but do not focus on the nature of the ‘content provider’. The fact that no  distinction is being made between different content providers is one of the clearest 

(7)

shortcomings in present days understanding of affiliate marketing as identified by Benediktová  and Nevosád (2008, p. 81)

 

1.3

 

Problem

 

discussion

 

What makes this present study unique is the fact that to the author’s knowledge, no earlier  research has used the research design by Harris (1990) in order to investigate ethical behavior  of firms making use of online marketing strategies. The fact that affiliate marketing is a relatively  new phenomenon and there is no strict governmental regulation but only self regulation, puts  extra pressure on the need of ethical behavior of all parties involved in affiliate marketing.   Although the need of regulation and establishment of an official body have been recognized by  many (e.g. Cumbrowski, 2006), initiatives to establish an official Affiliate Marketing Organization  have failed up to now, although some governmental regulation is beginning to emerge in the  Web 2.0 landscape that will very likely changes the rules of the game (Baer, 2009).  However,  without the existence of an official body and governmental regulation, behavior of all parties  involved in affiliate marketing has only ethical boundaries.  

1.4

 

Research

 

purpose

 

Since there is currently a lack of a broad academic coverage of affiliate marketing, as indicated  by several authors ( (Janssen, 2007, p.2) and (Benediktova & Nevosad, 2008, p.3), one of the  purposes of this research is to add to the academic body covering affiliate marketing. However,  with the coverage of affiliate marketing ethics almost completely missing and only being  available on weblogs and online forums, the main goal of this research is to perform pioneering  research on the subject of affiliate marketing ethics and how content providers are influenced. A  etter understanding of the possible effect that ethical behavior  has on the relationship  b between a merchant and a content provider can lead to many insights for both parties.     Content providers can engage blindly in affiliate marketing and focus only on conversions, click‐ through ratios and commission percentages – or they can stop and consider their practices, only  to realize that clicks in reality are people and conversions are those people buying something  (Edvardsson, 2008). In the much larger debate of corporate social responsibility, ethical  behavior by any company – whether online or in real life ‐  plays a key role in how this company  is regarded by society. In this effect, both merchants as much as content providers in their  affiliate role, can be held accountable by society for unethical behavior by merchants. This study  hopes to provide insights in the current ethical behavior by merchants. 

1.5

 

Research

 

Questions

 

From the discussion above, it is clear that research on ethical marketing has focused more on  regular marketing ethics than on online marketing ethics. Also, it is clear that affiliate marketing  is  a fairly new method of online advertising that has not been discussed extensively in the  academic literature, while the potential consequences of affiliate marketing can be huge. Online  advertising has however built up a dubious reputation, with negative forms including pop‐up  and flashing banners and unwanted e‐mail, spam. With the high‐potential of affiliate marketing,  it is crucial that a clear examination of the ethical value of affiliate marketing is undertaken. In  this way, more insight can be gained to what extend affiliate marketing can be used without  crossing ethical boundaries.   Following this discussion, the following research problem has been formulated:  

(8)

“How can the ethical value of affiliate marketing be optimized?”  However, due to the scope of this thesis the research problem needs to be delimited. Therefore,  a research question needs to be formulated that reasonably can be answered within the scope of  this thesis. Although narrowing down a research problem can cause the research problem to be  hollowed out, still it is very important to narrow down a research problem far enough in order  to make sure the problem can be tackled with the time and sources available.   Since marketers in real life are constantly being confronted with ethics, the research question  will focus on the ethical behavior of affiliate marketers, or affiliate (marketing) managers. These  affiliate managers represent the merchant in the affiliate marketing process (see figure 1.1). And   since the literature on affiliate marketing is written from the perspective of content providers,  the research question will focus on the reward the content providers (affiliates) receive in the  affiliate marketing process – the so called commission. Therefore, the research question is  ulated as follows:   form

Q1: What is the effect of the ethical behavior of merchants on the commission received by affiliates?   

This study however, treats ethics not as a single construct but instead it measures ethics by  multilayered constructs (see also section 3.1). Therefore, the research question is further  divided into five sub‐questions: 

Q1A: What is the effect of the disapproval of fraud by  merchants on the commission  ed by affiliates? 

receiv

Q1B: What is the effect of the disapproval of coercion by  merchants on the commission  ed by affiliates? 

receiv

Q1C: What is the effect of the disapproval of influence dealing by  merchants on the  ission received by affiliates? 

comm

Q1D: What is the effect of the disapproval of self interest by  merchants on the commission  ed by affiliates? 

receiv

Q1E: What is the effect of the disapproval of deceit by  merchants on the commission  received by affiliates? 

 

 

1.6

 

How

 

the

 

thesis

 

is

 

organized.

  

This thesis is organized as follows. The second chapter covers the literature review, which  consist of two parts. The first part focuses on ethics in marketing, while the second part focuses  on affiliate marketing. The latter is more comprehensive than the first, due the current lesser  extensive academic coverage of affiliate marketing as discussed earlier. The third chapter covers  the methodology, including research strategy, presentation of the conceptual model,  operalization of the used variables, data analysis and validity. The fourth chapter then presents  the data and discusses the findings, while the fifth chapter concludes and presents suggestions  for further research. 

(9)

Literature Review 

 

The goal of this literature review is to provide an overview of the available models and theories  that will be used for answering the research questions. This literature review will focus more on  adding knowledge to and providing an overview of the current academic body covering affiliate  marketing instead of marketing ethics. The reason for this is the lack of a current broad  academic coverage of affiliate marketing, as indicated by several authors ( (Janssen, 2007) and  (Benediktova & Nevosad, 2008). 

2.1

 

Ethics

 

in

 

marketing

 

This paragraph will provide an overview of the most important theoretical perspectives on  marketing ethics. This section will be largely based on the extensive work of Fritzsche & Tsalikis  (1989) in categorizing the literature on marketing ethics; however several other authors will be  quoted as well to provide a multi‐dimensional approach in order to present an overview that is  as complete as possible.  Due to the scope of this literature review, only the most relevant  heories will be discussed in depth, while some sub‐theories will be mentioned or referred to  t only.     According to Fritzsche & Tsalikis (1989, p.696), “The ethical theories are usually divided into  three groups: (1) consequential theories (..); (2) single‐rule nonconsequential theories (..); and  (3) multiple‐rule nonconsequential(..)”.  The consequential theories are also referred to as  teleological theorist, as is the case with the H‐V model by Hunt & Vitell, (2006). Similarly, these  authors refer to single‐rule nonconsequential theories as deontological theories. The  consequential theories incorporate two trends of thinking: egoism and utilitarianism, with the  latter again being comprised of several sub‐theories. In general, consequential theorist look at  the consequences of an action and determine from this whether the action was ethical (if the  consequence was good) or unethical (if the consequence was bad) (Tsalikis & Fritzscher, 1989,  p.697). The utilitarian theory is based on the same principle (Beauchamp & Bowie, 2004, p.17),  and can be classified further into act and rule utilitarianism. The first group takes in every  situation that action that leads to the greatest good for the greatest number, thereby  nterpreting the rules as guidelines only, whereas the second group strictly abides by the rules  i and takes action according to them.     The single‐rule nonconsequential, or deontological theorists argue that consequences are less, or  even not at all important when considering the morality of an action (Tsalikis & Fritzscher, 1989,  p.698). According to Kant’s theory, persons should be treated with respect for the individual  human being, and not as a means to reach one’s end. Furthermore, motives for actions are of the  highest importance (Beauchamp & Bowie, 2004, p.22). This means that taking a certain action  because it takes you the less effort, and that happens to be the most ethical choice, does not  ean you are acting ethical. According to Kant, it is the motivation behind the action that  m decides whether behavior is moral.    The multiple‐rule nonconsequential theorist finally, argue that there are several other factors  than consequences in determining the morality of an action. Again, this theoretical view has  several sub‐theories, which fall outside the scope of this literature review.  

The viewpoint  of Tsalikis & Fritzscher (1989) on the ethical theories in general was important  since it introduced the two concepts of teleologicalism and deontologicalism. These concepts 

(10)

play a key role in the general theory of marketing ethics,  by Hunt & Vitell (2006). These authors  meant to provide a general theory of ethical decision making and represented this theory in a  process model, the so‐called H‐V model. This model “addresses the situation in which an  individual confronts a problem perceived as having ethical content. This perception then  triggers the process depicted by the model” (Hunt & Vitell, 2006, p.145), see figure 2.1 below.                                 According to the model, once the individual perceives the possible alternatives, both a  deontological and a teleological evaluation take place. During deontological evaluation (DE), “the  individual evaluates the inherent rightness or wrongness of the behaviors implied by each  alternative” (Hunt & Vitell, 2006, p.145). This means that each individual compares the behavior  of each alternative with a set of predetermined deontological norms, which represent personal  values or rules of moral behavior. The teleological evaluation (TE) process focuses on four  onstructs, and the overall result of TE will be beliefs about the relative goodness versus  Figure 2.1:   Hunt‐Vitell Theory of Ethics 

 SOURCE: Hunt and Vitell (1986, 1993). Copyright © 1991 by Shelby D. Hunt and Scott J. Vitell. 

c badness brought about by each alternative, as perceived by the decision maker.     The core of the H‐V model states that “an individual’s ethical judgments (..) are a function of the  individual’s deontological evaluation (..)and the individual’s teleological evaluation. That is, EJ =  f(DE,TE).” (Hunt and Vitell, 2006,p.145).  The ethical judgments of an individual form the basis  for the individual’s intentions, which in turn lead to the observed ethical behavior.  

(11)

2.2

 

Affiliate

 

marketing

 

This part of the literature review focuses on the academic body that currently covers the topic of  affiliate marketing. Being a relative new sector, affiliate marketing is not enjoying as much  academic research as would be preferred for such a sophisticated subject. According to Janssen,  this is probably due to the fact that the concept is new and that commercial interests – at least  until recently – have been relatively small. (Janssen, 2007). The goal of this section therefore is  to provide the reader with more insight on the definition and positioning of affiliate marketing in  academic terms. This is done as follows: first affiliate marketing will be positioned within the  scope of marketing, in order to provide the reader a clearer image on the positioning of affiliate  marketing. Here, different forms of online advertising will be discussed, as well as various  compensation methods. The second part provides a vision on affiliate marketing from the  perspective of the content providers – thereby providing a somewhat different‐than‐traditional  vision on affiliate marketing.  

2.2.1  Positioning affiliate marketing within the scope of marketing: the four Ps   

Kotler ( 003) quotes the American Marketing Association who defines marketing as follows:  2

Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and 

distribution of ideas, goods, and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and 

organizational objectives.”  According to Kotler (2003), marketing is “a societal process by which individuals and groups  obtain what they need and want trough creating, offering, and freely exchanging products and  services of value with others.” Clearly, when a large part of the society is currently engaging  more and more time of their lives in online activities, it becomes clear that Kotler’s definition of  marketing still stands true for online marketing.   ager (2008) has tried to position marketing within the traditional known marketing mix (see  .   J figure 2.2): Product, Price, Promotion, Place  (Jager, 2008, p.17‐19)  

If an advertiser is considering employing affiliate marketing for its products, the advertiser has  to decide for each product category (or sometimes even each individual product) which  websites are appropriate. Jager (2008) distinguishes three groups: (1) portals and news  websites; (2) commercial websites focused on specific target groups or price comparison sites;  and (3) niche websites from amateurs. In general, products who appeal to a large and broad  target group are best connected to portals and large commercial websites; whereas niche  products need further investigation in order to find websites with a good fit in content and  target audience (Jager, 2008, p.19). Finding partners who have products that have a good fit with  he visiting audience is of even more importance for the content provider – the importance will   the n t become clearer when the compensation models are discussed in ext section.     

The traditional marketing mix usually defines one single selling price to a certain product 

(unless price discrimination is applied). Affiliate marketing provides the possibility to work with  different price levels, for instance with different affiliates (Jager, 2008, p.19). An example can be  discount coupons that are offered to specific niche websites – or something more common:  discount coupons valid for visitors from best performing affiliates.  

(12)

 

Traditionally, promotion was seen as the communication of a company with the goal to stimulate  sales, existing of branding and product specific promotion. Affiliate marketing is less appropriate  for branding purposes, since content providers using affiliate marketing tend to focus less on  anners and advertisements that display a large company logo but focus on better performing  orms b f  of advertisements.     Place traditionally includes the location the product is acquired, as well as the distribution  channel. Online, place is the web shop of the selling party and this is where affiliate marketing  comes in. It offers the advertiser the possibility to offer it’s assortment outside its own web  shop(s). So instead of displaying its wares only in its own store, the advertiser offers (part of its)  assortment via third‐party websites: the websites of its affiliates. In that aspect, a partner  programme can be compared to a traditional network of resellers.      

Figure 2.2  Four P Components of the Marketing Mix – Traditional and for Affiliate Marketing (in red) 

  Marketing Mix  Product  Place  Target  Market  Product variety  Quality  Design  Features  Brand name  Packaging  Sizes  Service  Warranties  Returns  Partner websites  Channels  Coverage  Assortments  Locations  Inventory  Transport  Affiliates’ websites  Price  Promotion  List price  Discounts  Allowances  Payment period  Sales promotion  Advertising  Sales force  Public relations  Credit terms  Discrimination  Coupons  Direct marketing  Performance 

(13)

2.2.2  Positioning affiliate marketing within the scope of marketing: Online advertising  Next to the traditional definition of marketing, several other authors however have tried to come  up with a definition for marketing that is specifically tailored for online marketing (also called  internet marketing). Referring again to the American Marketing Association, who defines online  marketing as follows3:  

“Term referring to the Internet and e­mail based aspects of a marketing campaign. Can  incorporate banner ads, e­mail marketing, search engine optimization, e­commerce and  other tools.”  This definition shows that banner ads, e‐mail marketing and search engine optimization are  considered to be part of online marketing. All mentioned terms are forms of online advertising,  which will be discussed more in depth in the next section.  There are many different forms of online advertising possible for content providers. Zeff (1999,  p.26) was one of the first to divide the possibilities to advertise online in two broad segments:  advertising via E‐Mail and advertising via the Web.  Later on, with the increasing adoption of  search engines, search engine marketing was added. The figure below shows an overview of  different forms of online advertising from which a content provider can choose from. The green  colored fields indicate those forms of advertising at which affiliate marketing is applicable. Each  orm of online advertising will be discussed below, with a deeper focus on the advertising via the  eb possibilities.  f W                                3 http://www.marketingpower.com/_layouts/Dictionary.aspx?dLetter=O 

Source: Benediktová & Nevosád (2008)

(14)

Advertising via E­mail  E‐mail advertisement comes in different forms, but usually includes some sort of general  newsletter that is send to everyone in a mailing list on the one side,  and a more direct  personalized e‐mail intended for specific recipients on the other side. E‐mail is used by  practically everyone with an Internet connection (in 2007 that was 71% of all Americans4),  since sending and receiving e‐mail is usually free. E‐mail can be web‐based accounts, such as  Yahoo! and Google’s services which are free and usually intended for personal use. E‐mail can  also be used on a professional basis: in almost any business organization provides e‐mail  accounts to its employees. And with the up rise of smart phones such as the iPhone and  Blackberries, e‐mail is becoming a medium that can reach users even when they are on the go.  Unfortunately, e‐mail advertisement has a somewhat negative tone due to the excessive amount  of spam (unsolicited e‐mail messages sent in bulk that usually contain advertisements) that is  eing sent nowadays. Estimates on the amount of spam being sent every day differ, averaging  b around almost 4 out of 5 e‐mail messages being spam5.       According to Zeff & Aronson (1999, p. 27), sending out newsletters is one way to make use of e‐ mail as advertising media. Newsletters are created by the sender, which can be either a  merchant or a content provider, and are sent out periodically. Visitors of the websites have to  opt‐in and provide their e‐mail address in order to receive the newsletter (although this is often  done during the progress of becoming a registered member). An example of a (personalized)  newsletter that is being sent by a merchant is a message containing weekly offers. An example of  a newsletter that is being sent by a content provider is an overview of the most visited section,  e.g. the most popular news headlines. The best advantage from a newsletter is that receivers  once signed up, meaning they were and maybe still are interested in the subject. This is often  reflected by the much higher than average click‐through rates of newsletter readers: subscribers  o newsletters are more interested and therefore are more likely to read the newsletter and click  t on links in the newsletters to read more.     This last example clearly shows where affiliate marketing comes in, since the links in the  newsletter can refer to merchants’  products/services. If subscribers to newsletters leave behind  additional information, such as age, gender and subjects of interest, more personalized  ewsletters can be created which allow for better targeting, which in turn often leads to higher  n conversion rates.     Direct e‐mail messages can be used too, even next to the use of newsletters. Direct e‐mail  advertisements are e‐mail messages containing advertisement of a third‐party that is being send  to subscribers on behalf of the subscribers’ party. For example, website A allows members to  register and sends out weekly newsletters – but on top of that sends its members a single  commercial message (= direct e‐mail advertisement) every 2 months containing advertisements  of store B. Important with this form of advertisement, is that the receiver always is given the  option to opt‐out. Again, links in the direct e‐mail message can refer to products/services from  the merchant, although this time the merchant is usually charged already a fixed fee for sending  out the message to such a number of recipients. This fee can be seen as compensation for the  branding effect – with the affiliate link material in the e‐mail taking care of the sales effect.         

4

 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Current Population Survey, November 2007. 

(15)

Advertising via Search Marketing 

According to Fain & Pedersen (2005, p.1) web search “is a fundamental technology for 

navigating the Internet”. Web search means searching for something on the Internet by using a  search engine, and is sometimes even referred to as googleling – a reference to one of the largest  and most used search engines in the world. Although many internet users utilize web search,  98.8% (iProspect, 2004), using search engines is totally free to consumers. Search engines don’t  charge the users for searching, but make money in a different way: by sponsored search.  Sponsored search is the delivery of targeted text advertisements as part of the search  experience. It has evolved to satisfy on the one hand the visitors’ desire for relevant search  results, and on the other hand the advertisers’ desire for qualified traffic (Fain and Pedersen,  2004, p.1). The latter is also known as search engine marketing which, according to Duffy  (2005), is a very special form of online advertising where a website uses search engines for  marketing purposes. According to research by Clickfusion, search marketing in 2008 had a 45%  share of revenue of total online advertising costs (Lillig, 2009, p.12).   So when a user of a search engines hits the search button, a so called query is sent, at which in  response the search engine employs information retrieval algorithms to display links to web  pages that are considered relevant to the search phrase of the user. These pages may represent  anything from firms selling goods to information websites, social media forums and other: this is  called the organic search result. Next to this is the sponsored links section, which are related to  specific search queries and sold to advertisers on a pay‐per‐click basis. This means that  advertisers only actually pay for the text advertisements when visitors click on the displayed  advertisement and therefore visit their website. The figure below displays sponsored search in 

range and organic search in blue.   o

   

Figure2.4   ORGANIC SEARCH VS SPONSORED SEARCH RESULTS 

                    In order to rank high on sponsored search, the advertiser has to be prepared to pay a higher  price‐per‐click. This means that the sponsored links of the advertisers that is prepared to pay 

(16)

the highest CPC price will appear on top of the list (Janssen, 2007). Normally, for this ranking  process an automated online auction is used (such as Google Adwords6). Some web search  engines also account for the click‐through‐ratio (CTR) of sponsored links in order to rank  sponsored links. This means that advertisements with higher CTRs can rank higher than same  priced advertisements with lower CTRs – the goal being to provide relevant information to the  visitors.   The ranking of organic search is home of a complete different profession, known as Search  Engine Optimization (SEO). The idea behind SEO is to utilize different techniques in order to  optimize any webpage in such a way that it will rank as high as possible in search engines’  organic results – making it easier to be found and thereby generating a lot of (free) traffic.  According to Duffy (2005), content providers using SEO rely on traffic generated by natural  search, which is a slower approach but does not require funding to build cash flow (as opposed  to search engine marketing) and therefore is less risky. The downside of SEO is that the  algorithms used by search engines undergo constant improvement and changes, with even the  smallest of changes having the possibility of enormous impacts. Therefore, professional content  providers usually employ or team up with SEO specialists who continuously monitor and  improve organic search ranking.  

Advertising via the Web 

Janoschka sees a Web ad as a rectangular area, located either on a page or in between pages,  which displays text and graphics based advertising (Janoschka, 2004). According to Benediktova  & Nevosad (2008) Web advertisements, or Web ads, include but are not limited to banners,  buttons, interstitials. These two definitions show that that Web advertisements may come in  many different forms. The most important web advertisements are discussed next.   Banners  Banners are defined by Kotler(2003, p.50) as: “Small boxes containing text and perhaps a  picture, are the most extensively used Internet advertising tool. Companies pay to place their  banner ads on relevant websites, and the larger the audience reached, the more the placement  will cost.” This viewpoint is primarily based on the principle of offline (not internet‐based)  advertising, which states that the more people are expected to see the advertisement, the higher  the price will be. For example, an advertisement displaced at a very busy train station will cost  more than an ad displayed on a billboard in a small village. However, up to this day banner ads  are still being displayed on practically every commercial website. The ‘audience reached’ can be  determined very accurately for banners, thanks to advanced technological measurement  systems. More on this will covered in the section on compensation models later this chapter.   Being the oldest form of online advertisements, banners have experienced mixed reception by  the audience. Especially in the early years before the Internet bubble, various websites deployed  so many (flashing) banner advertisements that readers suffered from so called banner blindness  (Benway, 1998). Further research on this subject reported mixed results, although flashing and  moving banners are nowadays used with much more reluctance, as was recommended by Burke  e.a. (2005).          6  www.google.com/adwords   

(17)

Banner sizes can be very different and are often custom made, although some standardization  does exist. This standardization is particularly convenient when advertisement placements are  continuously and rapidly being changed, which is often the case at high‐traffic websites.  Standard formats help minimize costs and efforts associated with switching the banner of one  company for another one. Affiliate networks often offer merchants the possibilities to upload  their own banners in the specified formats. These banners are in turn offered as possibility to  affiliates, who can choose to display one of these banners on their website as advertisement. If  the banner underperforms (i.e. the banner has low CTRs and/or low EPC7), which can be  measured accurately, the affiliate can easily swap the banner for a different one. If the goal of the  advertising company is to generate sales, the banner needs to have an EPC that is as high as  possible. Should the goal be to create awareness, the banner needs to have a high CTR‐rating,   and if the advertisement was placed for branding purposes, a high amount of views would be  sufficient.   Text advertisements  A text link advertisement is nothing more than exactly what it says: a line of text stating an  advertisement and containing a hyperlink that takes the one who clicks on the link to the  destination page of the company for which the advertisement is placed. According to  Benediktova & Nevosad (2008), text links belong to the media that is most effective in online  advertising. Most commonly used by search engines (e.g. Google), text advertisements are  generally accepted and are a widely used way of advertising online (see also figure 2.4, the  orange rectangles for examples of text ads). Text advertisements are of course suitable for  affiliate marketing purposes, as the technology behind the hyperlink allows for advanced  tracking capabilities – making it possible for the advertising party to see which of its affiliates  (who are showing online advertisements) refers customers and reward only those who are  referring customers that perform a certain action.   An example of affiliate marketing where text advertisements are being used is an online forum  that highlights specific words and thereby refers customers to websites where they make  transactions. For instance, Club MyCE8 has made the word eBay clickable. If a visitor clicks on  the word eBay, he is directed to the general eBay website. If he or she then purchases something  at the eBay website (within a specified time span), MyCE is rewarded a (fixed) percentage of the  otal sale amount generated by that referred visitor.   t                      7 Earnings per click 

8 Club MyCE is the discussion forum of an Online Consumer Electronics Community (www.myce.com) Source: MyCE.com

(18)

Of course, also the text links that are displayed as sponsored search results (see figure 2.4) are  suitable for affiliate marketing purposes. The same principle holds true as described above, only  this time the search engine charges the highest bidder (who placed the advertisement) for the  click‐trough. The site who receives the visitor then tracks if the visitor performs the desired  action (e.g. filling out a form or buying a good/service). If the action is not undertaken, then the  referring party does not receive any financial compensation but only makes costs. The process  (called Search Engine Advertising) is displayed below in figure 2.6. Affiliate A places an  advertisement at Google(1), and get’s charged by Google (red arrow) as soon as visitor X clicks  on the advertisement (2). Because the visitor clicked on the advertisement, he/she is directed to  the website of eBay (3). If a purchase is made(4), affiliate A gets rewarded by eBay’s affiliate  rogram (green arrow).   p      

Figure 2.6  SEARCH ENGINE ADVERTISING AND AFFILIATE MARKETING 

                      Gets rewarded  by eBay  Sponsorships  According to Kotler (2003, p.50), sponsorships “are best placed in well‐targeted sites where they  can offer relevant information or service”. Sponsors pay for their content to be displayed, and  the website that is sponsored makes clear to its visitors that a particular section or service is  sponsored. This is in line with the statement of Benediktova & Nevosad (2008), who state that  sponsorships are usually aimed at brand image rather than just to attract visitors. Sponsorships  can affect both brands, as well as the advertiser’s as the website’s brand – so usually a good fit  etween the brands is necessary before any sponsorship deals are closed.  Sponsorships can  ake on many different forms and go beyond just placing a banner or any simple advertisement.  

Source:Author’s own source 

b t  

(19)

 

Advertorial 

An advertorial is becoming something more and more common these days, and it can  be found  not only on the web but also in ordinary newspapers and magazines. Actually, it has been  translated from the offline world to the Internet – given the definition of Kotler (2003, p.601)  “advertorials are print ads that offer editorial content and are difficult to distinguish from  newspaper or magazine contents…”. Of course, when used online at websites, the idea is to offer  editorial content with an advertising purpose that is difficult to distinguish from editorial  content placed by the website itself. However, it still has to be made clear that the contents of the  advertorial is not published by the editor of the website but by an advertising party, else brand  image can be hurt if readers find themselves deceived. If used properly however, advertorials  tend to receive higher response rates since visitors tend to trust editorials (Benediktova &  Nevosad, 2008, p.17)  Micro site  Micro sites are a special form of advertising. Sometimes also called site‐in‐a‐site, micro sites are  websites that run entirely inside another website. This means that the visitor of the micro site  does not leave the main website it was visiting. According to Kotler (2003), a micro site is “a  limited area on the web managed and paid for by an external advertiser/company”. For a  content provider, setting up a micro site with an advertising partner usually requires a sound  relationship with that provider. For the visitors of the website, it has to make sense that  particular advertiser has its own section on the website – so there has to be a certain fit between  both parties. If used properly, micro sites offer advantages for the advertiser as well as for the  content provider. The former can receive a lot of quality traffic that was otherwise hard to  ealize by itself, while the latter receives advertising funds without the visitors need to leave the  ebsite at all.   r w   Interstitials  According to Kotler (2003, p.50), interstitials are “advertisements that pop‐up between changes  on a Web site”. Benediktova & Nevosad give a more detailed definition of interstitials, who state  that interstitials are a common name for pop‐ups, e‐mercials, over‐the‐page, expandable and  more multimedia advertisement forms (Benediktova & Nevosad, 2008, p.17). So almost any  banner that is not a static and ‘silent’ banner can be placed amongst interstitials. Although  interstitials have the advantage of capturing the attention of the visitors, visitors tend to find  these forms of advertising intrusive and disturbing, quickly losing patience and leaving the  website –  potentially damaging the brand image.     2.2.3  Compensation models  Benediktova & Nevosad (2008, p.20) categorize the various compensation models for  advertising on the Internet and distinguish three groups: (1) Per Time Period; (2) Per  Exposure/View; (3) Result Based.      The first group is based on the same idea as hiring: the advertisement is bought and runs for an  in advance agreed amount of time. Compensation per time period is rarely used any more as a  single compensation method for online advertisements, as observed by (Hoffman & Novak, 

(20)

2000). Instead, compensation per time is often used as a secondary condition for setting out the  advertisement on a website.     For the second group compensation models, advertisements are paid on a so called Cost Per  Mille (CPM) basis. This is the cost of displaying a certain ad a thousand times. So for instance, if a  certain advertisement has a CPM of €15, this means the advertiser has to pay fifteen Euros for  each thousand times the advertisement is displayed. Another method is Cost Per Impression  CPI), where the advertiser is charged for each impression of the advertisement. The CPM model  ( is more common however (Jager, 2008, p.65).     Result Based compensation models can be further divided into (1) Response (or Click) Based;  (2) Action (or Lead) Based.  Compensation based on response is nothing more than to measure  the amount of clicks that a certain advertisement has generated, and then the advertiser pays  the website where the advertisement was run based on the amount of clicks. So the more clicks a  certain advertisement generates, the more money the advertisement generates for the website  owner, or the more money it costs the advertiser. The advantage that this model has over the  CPM model is that with costs that are based on clicks, the advertiser only pays for the amount of  times that an advertisement is clicked on. It can be argued that this is better than paying for the  mount of time that an advertisement is displayed, because then it is unsure whether the  a visitors to which that advertisement was displayed actually noticed the advertisement.     Compensation based on Action goes even a step further. Although paying for clicks rather than  for impressions was a step forward from the advertiser’s point of view, still those clicks did not  necessarily need to lead the desired action undertaken. For many merchants, the desired action  would be a sale, but for some other businesses creating a profile or downloading a trial version  can also be the desired action. Usually, each company can decide for its own the profits of a  single action, so the commission percentage can be based on that. Of course, rewarding affiliates  with higher commission percentages can result in higher amounts of action – this comes all  down to basic economics of supply and demand. Not only commission percentage is key to  becoming an attractive partner to run affiliate marketing advertisements with though, often  cookie time (the period within the referred visitor has to perform the action, often measured in  days) is also very important. Possible disadvantage from the content providers’ point of view is  the inability to track if the referred clicks actually did lead to desired action, i.e. if the conversion  ratio is high. This especially is the case if a content provider undertakes direct business with a  merchant, without a third independent party. If an affiliate network is used as an in between  party, the risk of the merchant not reporting sales (and the content provider hereby missing out  potential and rightfully earned commission) is becoming less, although an affiliate network also  charges a commission amount.    

Affiliate Marketing specific compensation models 

According to Fiore (2001), particularly for affiliate marketing there are three options commonly  used by advertisers (or merchants) to pay out content providers (affiliates). The three options  are: (1) Pay Per Click (PPC); (2) Pay Per Lead (PPL) and (3) Pay Per Sale (PPS) (Fiore, 2001, p. 

(21)

125). Several reports indicate that PPS is the most commonly used pay‐out method, with  advertisers no longer relying on clicks only, instead compensating per realized sale9.   Of course, combinations of the three above mentioned compensation methods are possible. For  instance, when a considerable amount of clicks is delivered from a content provider to a  merchant, often the content provider is rewarded for the delivery of those clicks in a custom  way. As soon as a relationship between a content provider and a merchant is established,  optimization of the generated traffic will be beneficial for both parties. There are several  indicators which offer insights for optimization purposes. The figure below provides an  verview of the relationship between views, click through rates and conversion ratio.  o                 If compensation occurs on CPL/CPS basis, both parties would benefit from increased conversion  ratios: increased conversion ratios mean more sales delivered, meaning more turnover for the  merchant and more commission for the affiliate. Same goes for CPC‐based compensation,  although in this scenario it is unsure (although it can be assumed) whether a higher CTR will  lead to more turnover for the merchant. Either way, both parties will always try to increase both  CTRs and CRs in the best possible ways. For instance, the merchant can come with a unique  custom made landing page, which tends to generate higher conversion rates. The content  provider on the other hand, can target specially selected visitors (for instance, via personalized  mailing lists), sending high‐quality traffic only (i.e. those people who are interested) and thereby  increasing both CTR and CR. According to Jager (2009, p.35) there are several other, more  general guidelines for merchants that help increasing conversion ratios: 

 Make sure the appearance of the website is clear and simple   Minimize ancillary matters that can distract the customer and minimize the steps  between promotion and conversion   Provide clear and short descriptions with multiple images and logical navigation   Make sure each order page has a ‘order now’ button and make the order process as short  as possible   Make use of clear communication: illustrate each step in the process clearly and send  confirmation after the order is received, processed and sent.        9 See (Lillig, 2009), September 2009 (http://www.clickfusion.com/stateofcpa.pdf   Affiliate   website    Merchant  website    Lead/Sale 

Views  Click‐Through 

rate Conversionratio   

FIGURE 2.5   VIEWS, CTR AND CR 

Source: Adapted from Jager (2008, p.28)

(22)

 

2.2.4  Advantages and disadvantages of affiliate marketing 

Both merchants (advertisers) as well as affiliates (content providers) have several advantages  and disadvantages when it comes to preferring affiliate marketing over other forms of online  advertising. The figure below shows an overview of the various advantages and disadvantages  or both parties involved in affiliate marketing.   f                            

FIGURE 2.6   ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF AFFILIATE MARKETING

Advantages for merchants 

Jager (2008, p. 21) lists several advantages that are offered to a merchant when participating in  affiliate programs.  Enhancing reach and exposure, as well as generating awareness by  displaying many advertisements are advantages for the merchant according to Jager (2008).  Also, hard‐to‐reach customers can be won, since niche groups can be targeted cost‐efficiently  which would be hard using other advertising models. Both most importantly, the advertising  costs are directly linked to the advertising related revenue. This means that the merchant only  bears advertising costs if a certain action that resulted in increasing revenue has taken place.  This can have huge impact on effectiveness of advertising for a company, since every advertising  cost can be accounted for: the costs of generating one sale are directly accompanied by the  revenue of the same sale. No longer a merchant has to pay high prices for advertising, being  nsure if the clicks paid for generated enough sales to cover the costs, or even worse: being  Source:Adapted from multiple sources

u unsure whether the views paid for generated enough clicks, let alone sales.     Another important advantage for merchants is the fact that affiliate marketing is relatively quick  to implement, having low start up costs and low entry barriers. So minimal effort is required to  implement affiliate marketing in the online marketing mix, and also minimal effort is required to 

(23)

terminate, making affiliate marketing  a low cost easy‐to‐try option. Finally and also very  important, is the fact that merchants who join affiliate marketing programs will rank higher in  search engine rankings (Jager, 2008, p. 21). This finding is also supported by Janssen, who found  that “[…] affiliate networks effectively improve the rankings of advertising web sites in search  engine results” (Janssen, 2007, p.44‐45). Ranking higher in search engines means the merchant  is easier to find, which has as primary benefit more traffic being driven to the merchant’s  website.    

Advantages for Affiliates 

The most important advantages for affiliates include the possibility to work with a lot of new  partners, providing a huge opportunity. This also means reducing on sales costs, since less  money needs to be spend on recruiting and maintaining a sales force consisting of sales agents  doing direct sales. Having access to so many different potential advertising partners, the best  mix of advertising partners can be picked without being dependent on advertising parties.  Moreover, the advertising partners being used can be changed and adapted constantly and  nstantly, ensuring best fit with the visitor audience of an affiliate website. This can be particular  blogs).   i interesting if the topics covered on an affiliate website change rapidly, (e.g. popular news    Another big advantage for affiliates using affiliate marketing is the fact that some affiliate  programs offer (perceived) value to the visiting audience of the affiliate’s website. For instance,  visitors of a large online community that covers all topics related to electronics would be  interested in a price‐comparison section where electronic products can be compared and lowest  prices can be found. If this community does not already offer such a section, it possibly can be  generated without many efforts using affiliate programs. Merchants would benefit greatly from  such a section, especially merchants selling electronics since the audience of the affiliate is  highly interested in their wares. So for the affiliate, the access to such affiliate programs is really  value‐adding and cost saving, since valued information can be retrieved via affiliate programs.  This information, for instance product specifications, descriptions and images, can then be  laced in the context website of the affiliate – thereby increasing consumer trust (for the     p merchant) and simultaneously increasing the content quality of the affiliate’s website.   Of course the easy registration and termination together with minimal effort and low  administrative costs are huge advantages for affiliates also. Some specialized partners run their  own affiliate programs, but most professional parties already have joined professional affiliate  networks. These networks provide a huge benefit for affiliates, not only providing access to  many different merchants but also independently tracking sales and collecting revenue for each  merchant. Joining an affiliate network is practically cost‐free, and with the number of large  networks being very limited, the potential reach of partners is quickly maximized after  registration at the biggest networks. However, new developments are constant and new  networks have emerged that make it more easy still to collect revenue as a content provider  from outgoing links on your website.  Parties like Skimlinks 10 track all outgoing links  automatically, with no action required from the content provider. This as opposed to traditional  affiliate marketing via networks, where the content provider/ affiliate is required to add a  certain code or make use of special links in order to track the referred visitors. Skimlinks  currently provide access to 7666 merchants across 22 networks (December 2009).           10 http://skimlinks.com/ 

(24)

 

Disadvantages for Affiliates 

The most direct disadvantage for affiliates who use affiliate marketing is the fact that due to the  nature of the affiliate marketing process, the affiliate bears to total associated with marketing  products of the merchant. In other words, the affiliate is the party who pays the opportunity  costs if no sales occur. This means that if the affiliate places an advertisement of a merchant on  its website, that advertising space is now filled and cannot be used to display other  advertisements. So if the advertisement of a merchant, called advertisement X, does not generate  sales then advertisement X does not generate any revenue. However, in the time that  advertisement X was displayed, the affiliate could not display any other advertisement, for  instance advertisement Y that always results in (very low) revenue. If advertisement Y would  ad yield any revenue, this is the opportunity cost paid by the affiliate: the cost of the next best  h alternative that could have been used.     Another disadvantage is that the affiliates have no say in the landing pages of the merchant, even  though conversion ratios associated with the landing is very important for affiliates (since they  are the ones who pay the opportunity costs). Solutions are contacting the merchant party  directly in order to discuss customized landing pages. Some affiliate networks even allow  affiliates to customize and test landing pages of merchants, giving affiliates more control with  the aim of increasing conversion ratios. 

(25)

 

 

Methodology

 

3

 

3

  Earlier studies on ethics treat the range of ethical values as one single construct  (e.g. Arlow &  Ulrich, 1980; Stevens, 1984).  This means these studies see and report ethics as one single score.  This study however, takes a different approach: it measures ethics by multilayered constructs.  One of the first to suggest such an approach was Byron (1977), and the same approach was used  by Harris (1990). By using this approach, the ethical values of respondents are measured across  five ethical constructs: Fraud, Coercive Power, Influence Dealing, Self­Interest and Deceit.  

.1

 

Research

 

Strategy

 

and

 

presentation

 

of

 

Conceptual

 

Model

 

   

Figure3.1 7  SINGLE CONSTRUCT APPROACH VS MULTILAYERED APPROACH 

                        The main advantage of this multilayered approach is that it allows the researcher to identify the  specific areas of ethics in which values of the respondents are similar or different. This opposed  to  the single construct approach, which only allows determination of statistical significant  differences in the ethical values of respondents. So the multilayered approach does the same as  the single construct approach, only better since it allows for a more detailed analysis per sub‐          Ethics 

Source:Author’s own source 

construct.  According to Yin (1994, p.3) there are many different strategies that can be employed when  carrying out research in the field of business. Yin defines case study, experiment, survey, history  and archival records. This thesis makes use of a survey, since due to the scope of this thesis  experiment, history and archival records were not feasible research strategies. A survey was  preferred over case‐study research, since it enables the research of a larger sample size .  According to Yin (1994, p.6) the formulation of the research question influences the choice of  research strategy – with survey being relevant for research questions starting with “who”,  “what”, “where”, “how many”, and “how much”.  Since the research questions in this thesis start  with “what”, the choice of a survey as research strategy in favor of case‐study approach is  supported. 

(26)

  Based on the literature review (chapter 2), a conceptual model was composed (see the figure  below). The lower part of this conceptual model (the blue section) is based on the process of  affiliate marketing (see figure 1.1). Here, the customer enters the affiliate’s website, and is  redirected towards the merchant’s website (black solid arrow). If the customer makes a  successful (trans)action, the merchant rewards the affiliate a commission (dashed blue arrow),  which comprises a percentage of the order amount.   The upper part of the conceptual model is based on the multi‐layered approach on ethical  behavior (see also figure 3.1 above). This approach measures ethical values of respondents  across five constructs, and allows the researcher to identify the specific areas of ethics in which  values of the respondents are similar or different. 

Figure 3.2  CONCEPTUAL MODEL 

Figure

Figure 2.6  SEARCH ENGINE ADVERTISING AND AFFILIATE MARKETING 
TABLE 4.1: Construct means and standard deviations of respondents by industry Construct  Automotive  (N=4)  Clothing and  Fashion  (N=5)  Computer Hardware (N=3)  Computer Software (N=3)  Consumer  Electronics (N=4)  Dating (N=3)  Games (N=2)  Living (N=2)

References

Related documents

Bairrada, Lousã and Fátima 66.7 Lack of a regional strategy for the development of nautical tourism (yachting) 57.6 Potential and emerging tourist markets 63.6 Absence

• Piling mulch against the trunk or stems of plants can rot the stem bark and wood tissue and may lead to insect and disease problems. • Mulch piled against the tree can

The European countries (France, Italy, Hungary etc.), USA, Cruises, Wine tours, Amusement parks of France,

So to be a self is a task of becoming (Søltoft 2009) and as a relation that relates to itself through consciousness the task is to assure balance between the elements of the

However the underlying combinatorics be- yond the two classes of algebras is different: roughly speaking, Kac-Moody algebras correspond to (symmetrizable) Cartan matrices, while

In the first example, the GAN is trained to turn a low-quality migrated image into a high-quality one, as if the acquisition geometry were much more dense than in the input.. In

SAE J2196 — Service Hoses for Mobile Air Conditioning Systems SAE J2197 — Service Hose Fittings for Automotive Air-Conditioning SAE J2210 — Refrigerant Recycling Equipment for

Cannot be a second or articles association contain the customised articles of shares sold to make vary how do lawyers make vary all general meetings shall be the agm Execution by