SAIT INFORMATION HANDBOOK FOR MEMBERS PARTICIPATING IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (VET) STUDIES

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 DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT (BSB51107)

 CERTIFICATE IV IN FRONT LINE MANAGEMENT (BSB40812)

 CERTIFICATE III IN BUSINESS (BSB30112)

 CERTIFICATE II IN BUSINESS (BSB20112)

NAME: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

COURSE: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

SAIT INFORMATION HANDBOOK

FOR MEMBERS PARTICIPATING IN

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND

TRAINING (VET) STUDIES

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 2 of 12

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING (VET) - SAIT INFORMATION HANDBOOK

1. TABLE OF CONTENTS

2. INTRODUCTION ... 3

WELCOME... 3

THE ORGANISATION ... 3

PURPOSE OF THIS HANDBOOK ... 3

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE ... 3

3. STUDENT SELECTION, ENROLMENT AND INDUCTION/ORIENTATION PROCEDURES (SNR16) ... 3

4. COURSE INFORMATION, INCLUDING CONTENT AND VOCATIONAL OUTCOMES (SNR15) ... 3

5. MANAGEMENT TABLE ... 4

6. FEES AND CHARGES, INCLUDING REFUND POLICY (SNR 22) ... 6

7. PROVISIONS FOR LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND NUMERACY SUPPORT (SNR16) ... 6

8. STUDENT SUPPORT, WELFARE AND GUIDANCE SERVICES (SNR16) ... 6

9. LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES (SNR16) ... 6

COMPETENCY BASED ASSESSMENT ... 6

10. CODE OF PRACTICE ... 7

COMMITMENT ... 7

VALUES ... 7

COMPLIANCE ... 7

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS ... 7

11. APPEALS, COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES (SNR16) ... 7

GRIEVANCE POLICY ... 7

GRIEVANCE PROCESS... 7

12. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES (SNR16) ... 8

13. SAIT TAKES CHEATING VERY SERIOUSLY – IT GETS YOU A "NYC" (SNR16) ... 8

SPECIFIC EXAMPLES OF CHEATING ... 8

HELPING EACH OTHER ... 8

SOME DEFINITIONS ... 8

14. ACCESS AND EQUITY (SNR16) ... 8

ACCESS AND EQUITY GUIDELINES ... 8

ACCESS AND EQUITY POLICY ... 9

15. MARKETING (SNR24) ... 9

16. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (SNR15 & SNR17) ... 9

17. RECOGNITION OF QUALIFICATIONS ISSUED BY OTHER RTOS. (SNR15) ... 9

18. RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING POLICY (RPL) (SNR15) ... 9

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING POLICY ... 9

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING PROCESS ... 10

APPLYING FOR RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING ... 10

SECTION 1 - GENERAL INFORMATION ... 10

THE INTERVIEW ... 11

SECTION 2 - EXPERIENCE ... 11

19. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS ... 11

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2. INTRODUCTION

WELCOME

Congratulations on your decision to become a Leader within Scouts Australia – This enables you to complete a nationally recognised vocational course as part of your training in leadership.

THE ORGANISATION

Scouting is the leading international volunteer youth organisation with over 30 million members in more than 186 countries. It is recognised within the community for the impressive youth development programs it has offered for more than one hundred years. Supporting these exciting youth adventure programs is an adult training program known internationally as the Wood Badge Training Scheme. Scouts Australia delivers the internationally recognised Wood Badge Scout training scheme through a number of programs, many of which are accredited through the national register for Vocational Education & Training (VET) – www.training.gov.au operated by the Australian government.

Scouting in Australia is coordinated at a national level with each State and Territory operating a Branch that

independently manages Scouting. Each Branch has its own training facilities and equipment and delivers the Wood Badge Training Program. The content of this has been developed to meet the World Organisation of Scout Movement’s requirements as well as current contemporary national legislation and community requirements.

PURPOSE OF THIS HANDBOOK

This handbook has been written to provide members with important information about the Vocational Education and Training programs offered by Scouts Australia. The handbook outlines your rights and responsibilities as a VET learner.

The contents of this handbook represent the key points of various VET Policies and Procedures developed by Scouts Australia to meet the defined government legislation in relation to Vocational Education and Training.

Successful completion of these qualifications will lead to the learner receiving a nationally recognised

Diploma/Certificate, and/or Statements of Attainment for those Units of Competency. Diploma / Certificate / Statement of Attainment are part of the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), and as such will be recognised in all states/territories in Australia.

Your Branch Training Department or Trainer will provide you with full information about the VET qualification/s you are aiming to complete. This will include an overview of the specific units of competency, assessment requirements and vocational outcomes, etc.

A National Training Team comprises authorised Trainers and Assessors. These are led by the National

Commissioner for Adult Training and Development through

the respective responsible Commissioner for Adult Training and Development in each Branch. The Trainers and Assessors have many years of Scouting experience and they conform to industry standards.

Scouts Australia has been a Registered Training Provider since 1994 and since then has delivered a number of registered training courses. In December 2013 Scouts Australia was re-accredited to provide Management Qualifications from within the Innovation & Business Skills Australia Training packages area. Four Management qualifications are available – three at the adult leader level and one at vocational entry-level, the latter being

specifically developed for the Venturer Scout age group.

PROGRAMS AVAILABLE

Diploma of Management(BSB51107) - Adults in Scouting who have completed and are experienced as Wood Badge Leaders.

Certificate IV in Front Line Management (BSB40812)

Adults in Scouting who are undertaking Advanced Wood Badge training.

Certificate III in Business(BSB30112) – Adults in Scouting who are undertaking Basic leadership Wood Badge training.

Certificate II in Business (BSB20112) - This qualification is available to all members in the 15 – 18 age group. It provides a nationally recognised Certificate II vocational qualification that can be completed based on involvement in a Venturer Scout Unit or similar youth group and completing two core Units of Competency from within the Innovation & Business Skills Australia Training packages area.

NOTE: You will be asked to sign that you have read this handbook, so please take the time to study it carefully and to ask your Personal Leader Advisor / mentor if you are unsure about anything. You should keep this handbook for reference throughout your enrolment.

3. STUDENT SELECTION, ENROLMENT

AND INDUCTION/ORIENTATION

PROCEDURES (SNR16)

Information is made available about the courses of study to all prospective learners as part of general information sessions and reinforced through the mentoring that occurs as part of the Scouting ethos.

4. COURSE INFORMATION, INCLUDING

CONTENT AND VOCATIONAL

OUTCOMES (SNR15)

The following tables indicate the qualification, course code and name, and units of competency that form individual qualifications.

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 4 of 12

5. MANAGEMENT TABLE

COURSE OVERVIEW – BSB07 – PENDING UPDATING OF EQUIVALENT / NEW UNITS FROM RELEASE 9.0 Course Code: Qualification Name:

BSB51107 Diploma of Management

BSB40812 Certificate IV in Frontline Management BSB30112 Certificate III in Business

BSB20112 Certificate II in Business

Diploma Certificate IV Certificate III Certificate II Core Units Management BSBMGT401A Show leadership in the workplace BSBMGT402A Implement operational plan Workplace Effectiveness BSBWOR402A Promote team effectiveness WH&S BSBWHS401A Implement and monitor WHS Policies, procedures and programs to meet legislative requirements BSBWHS302A Apply knowledge of WHS legislation in the workplace BSBWHS201A Contribute to health and safety of self and others Elective Units For Certificate II, 11 must be completed. For Certificate III 11 must be completed. For Certificate IV, 6 must be completed. For Diploma, any 8 must completed. WH&S BSBWHS501A Ensure a safe workplace BSBWHS301A Maintain workplace safety

Customer Service BSBCUS501C Manage quality customer service BSBCUS201B Deliver a service to customers Innovation BSBINN502A Build and sustain an innovative work environment BSBINN301A Promote innovation in a team environment BSBINN301A Promote innovation in a team environment BSBINN201A Contribute to workplace innovation Interpersonal Communication BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace BSBCMM201A Communicate in the workplace Learning & Development BSBLED501A Develop a workplace learning environment

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Diploma Certificate IV Certificate III Certificate II Management BSBMGT502B Manage people performance BSBMGT403A Implement continuous improvement BSBFLM303C Contribute to effective workplace relationships BSBMGT515A Manage operational plan BSBFLM305C Support operational plan BSBFLM312C Contribute to team effectiveness Relationship Management BSBREL401A Establish networks Workplace Effectiveness BSBWOR501B Manage personal work priorities and professional development BSBWOR401A Establish effective workplace relationships BSBWOR301B Organise personal work priorities and development

BSBWOR202A Organise and complete daily work activities BSBWOR502B Ensure team effectiveness BSBWOR404B Develop work priorities BSBWOR404B Develop work priorities

BSBWOR203B Work effectively with others BSBIND201A Work effectively in a Business Environment Frontline Management BSBFLM306C Provide workplace information and resourcing plans

BSBFLM312C Contribute to Team Effectiveness BSBFLM311C Support a workplace learning environment Information Management BSBINM401A Implement workplace information system BSBWRT301A Write simple documents BSBINM201A Process and maintain workplace information BSBITU201A Produce simple word-processed documents BSBITU203A Communicate Electronically Project Management BSBPMG522A Undertake project work Sustainability BSBSUS201A Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 6 of 12 Adults in Scouting will complete Core Units at each level.

The Elective Stream defines the adult leader’s role within the organisation. If a leader changes organisational role there may be a need to complete those additional elective units to gain Statements of Attainment additional to the qualification. Under no circumstances will a leader be required to

complete Units of Competency they have already successfully completed.

6. FEES AND CHARGES, INCLUDING

REFUND POLICY (SNR 22)

There are no lecture fees involved for members of the Scouts Australia involved in this course at the Basic or Advanced training level.

7. PROVISIONS FOR LANGUAGE,

LITERACY AND NUMERACY SUPPORT

(SNR16)

Personal Leader Advisor / mentor support is provided to every member of the organisation and where additional assistance (such as literacy and/or numeracy support) is required the member will be directed to the appropriate personnel for assistance.

8. STUDENT SUPPORT, WELFARE AND

GUIDANCE SERVICES (SNR16)

Scouts Australia recognises that many adult learners may have special needs in relation to re-engaging in study and as such, members of this organisation have access to a wide range of support to ensure these needs are fully met. Close contact with the learner will always be maintained by a Personal Leader Advisor / mentor /Trainer / Team helper.

Learners will be provided with assistance that is appropriate to their needs – such as further education and training and career information.

9. LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

PROCEDURES (SNR16)

The following represent the VET assessment principles of this organisation. They are designed to promote fairness and equity in assessment.

(i) All VET learners within Scouting will be fully informed of the assessment procedures and

requirements and have the right to appeal any decision. (ii) Information provided to learners will include:

 the criteria against which they will be assessed  advice about the assessment methods  assessment procedures

 space for comments and feedback

(iii) Learners are invited to sight their profile sheet of VET results at least annually.

(iv) The assessment approach chosen will cater for the language, literacy and numeracy needs of learners. (v) Any special geographic, financial or social needs of learners will be considered in the development and conduct of the assessment.

(vi) Reasonable adjustment will be made to the assessment strategy to ensure equity for all learners, while maintaining the integrity of the assessment outcomes.

(vii) Opportunities for feedback and review of all aspects of assessment will be provided to learners.

(viii) Clearly documented mechanisms for appeal against assessment processes and decisions will be available to learners.

COMPETENCY BASED ASSESSMENT

Studies offered to VET learners are accredited courses and/or recognised units of competency. In order to be successful in gaining recognition of each competency, learners must demonstrate they have the necessary underpinning knowledge and skills and can apply these in a practical way within Scouting / workplace setting at an acceptable industry standard.

Assessment will occur as agreed throughout the year. Results for each assessment item will be recorded on a subjectprofile sheet / database. This allows learners to monitor their assessment progress and achieve competency as their skills improve.

Assessment of competencies will be graded as either C

(Competent) or NYC (Not Yet Competent).

People are considered to be competent when they are able to apply their knowledge and skills to successfully complete similar activities in a range of situations and environments, in accordance with the standard of performance expected in the workplace. Those undertaking training and assessment in the context of Scouts Australia are able to apply and practice their skills within the organisation, within their paid employment or other volunteer/life-skills role.

There are four skill areas, which relate to being competent: (a) task skills (performing a specific workplace task). (b) task management skills (managing a number of different tasks to complete a whole activity).

(c) contingency management skills (responding to problems and irregularities when undertaking a work activity).

Examples could be: changes to routine, unexpected results, difficult or dissatisfied clients' etc.

(d) job / role environment skills (dealing with the

responsibilities and expectations of the work environment). Examples could be: working with others, interacting with clients or suppliers, complying with standard operating procedures etc.

This requires demonstration of a competency, not just in isolation but in a range of different circumstances.

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10. CODE OF PRACTICE

COMMITMENT

SAIT is dedicated to developing the skills of Adults involved in the delivery of the Scouting Program. In addition, it supports the development of young Adults (i.e. aged 15 < 18years) through various Certificate II qualifications. Our staff are people who, through work experience, professional training and Scouting education, have the requisite values, attitudes, knowledge and skills to assist students in their quest to participate fully in the Scouting Program.

Through a combination of e-Learning, face to face course delivery and one on one coaching we seek to deliver on the aim of Scouts Australia, namely:

“… to encourage the physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual and character development of young people so that they take a constructive place in society as a member of their local, national and international community.” As current members of Scouting we recognise the

importance of contributing to the education of young people, through a value system based on the Promise and Law, to help build a better world, where people are self-fulfilled as individuals and play a constructive role in society.

VALUES

 SAIT actively seeks to live by the values of Scouts Australia, namely:

 The importance of individuals developing a sense of personal identity and self-worth which leads to responsibility for oneself and one’s actions as a citizen.

 The belief that young people are able and willing to take responsibility and contribute to society.  The belief in the right and responsibility of

individuals to regulate their own health.

 The importance of adults in providing suitable role models for young people.

 The importance of not exposing young people to harm or exploitation.

 The importance of individuals and the community adopting a lifestyle that allows ecologically sustainable development through preventing environmental overload, environmental degradation and resource depletion.

 The importance of respect for and equity in dealings with all people, irrespective of culture, gender, religion or impairment.

 The importance of mutual support and help between members of a community to maximise the quality of life for all.

 The importance of the development of

understanding between individuals as a contribution to peace between nations.

 The importance of gainful employment in

contributing to the sense of dignity and self-worth of the individual.

COMPLIANCE

SAIT is bound by, and complies with the conditions described within the National Vocational Education and Training Regulator (NVR) Act 2012, the VET Quality Framework and those imposed by Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) on the registration of a particular RTO. Also, SAIT abides by relevant State and Commonwealth legislation. Access and Equity policies are incorporated into operational procedures. SAIT prohibits discrimination toward any group or individual in any form.

CULTURAL CONSIDERATIONS

We acknowledge the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the First Australians, whose lands, winds and waters we all now share, and pay respect to their unique values, and their continuing and enduring cultures which deepen and enrich the life of our nation and communities.

11. APPEALS, COMPLAINTS AND

GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES (SNR16)

GRIEVANCE POLICY

All learners have the right to request reconsideration of the results of assessment of an element of competency / learning outcome which has been assessed as Not Yet Competent. It is the learner’s responsibility to use the processes set up for this purpose within two (2) weeks of results being received. The policy of Scouts Australia is a maximum of three attempts at achieving competency. Further instruction and adequate practice time will be provided.

All process steps are to be completed within a period of six (6) weeks from date of lodgement of appeal.

GRIEVANCE PROCESS

Learner completes form.

1. Form given to team leader within two (2) weeks of receipt of results. Team leader forwards to responsible Commissioner, Adult Training and Development in each Branch (BCAT&D) for consideration. 2. Trainer / Assessor reconsiders the assessment

outcome and reaches a decision.

3. If not satisfactory to learner, the Trainer / Assessor takes all information to BCAT&D for reconsideration. 4. BCAT&D considers as necessary and reaches

decision, interviews learner, advises final decision. 5. Final decision is conveyed in writing to student. 6. All information is documented and archived as required

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 8 of 12

12. DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES (SNR16)

Learners are expected to abide by the Policy and Rules of Scouts Australia. Where it is necessary to take any action, this will be done in consultation with the BCAT&D.

13. SAIT TAKES CHEATING VERY

SERIOUSLY – IT GETS YOU A "NYC"

(SNR16)

The goal of enforcing a “no cheating policy” is to ensure that you learn the material presented during the training and earn the outcomes you achieve. All forms of cheating defeat the goal of learning, which should be that you are prepared to put into practice what you have learnt during your training. If you have been found to have cheated, you will get a "Not Yet Competent (NYC)" for the training or course. If an assessor believes a more severe penalty is warranted, they can refer the case to the BCAT&D for further action.

SPECIFIC EXAMPLES OF CHEATING

The following constitute forms of cheating (some but not all forms):

 getting or giving your attachments or workbooks to/from another person.

 using attachments previously submitted by another Leader

 having someone do your attachments in part / or in whole for you

 doing someone else's attachments for them.

 submitting work that is not completely created by you  telling someone, in detail, what answers to enter on

their attachments, or

 knowing that someone has cheated and NOT informing the assessor about it. We know this may be difficult for some to comply with but we expect that if you know you will encourage those involved to either redo the work legitimately or to advise the assessor that they cheated. Withholding this information is aiding and abetting cheating and thus you too are cheating.

The persons giving the information and those using it are BOTH cheating and will BOTH receive an "NYC" in the course.

In Scouting we continue to encourage collaboration and working together. This collaboration can include the following:

 discussing attachments with trainers, other students or other Leaders (Personal Leader Advisers) to

understand what is being asked for

 handing in work done alone or with the help of Personal Leader Advisor

 getting help to correct minor errors in spelling, grammar or syntax (sentence construction)

 discussing attachment requirements and course materials so that you can better understand the material and the outcomes (this is, in fact, encouraged)  using other people’s ideas where they are

acknowledged in the appropriate way, using a system of referencing, such as APA.

HELPING EACH OTHER

You are encouraged to help each other to learn but NOT to give the answers. One way to help is to discuss the problem but not give the other person YOUR solution. Mentoring means guiding learners to find the solution themselves NOT giving them the answers.

SOME DEFINITIONS

Cheating means the breach of rules or dishonest practice in examinations, tests or other assessments. Examples include the use of prohibited material or equipment for unfair advantage, and consultation with other persons during the course of the assessment where this is prohibited. (ANU Code of Practice for Student Academic Integrity 2013)

Collusion: All parties who collude (get together) and copy an assessment item(s) for the purpose of deception will fail. A result of "not yet competent" will be issued. This failure will extend to the author of the original assessment item(s).

Plagiarism: is the act of taking and using another person’s work as their own, without due acknowledgement. Any of the following acts constitutes plagiarism unless the work is appropriately acknowledged:

 Copying the work of another learner  Directly copying any part of another's work  Summarising the work of another

 Using an idea derived from another person's work. Both plagiarism and cheating constitute major infringements of the SAIT’s values. As such, any plagiarism or cheating will result in an automatic fail and suspension from further courses or Scout training.

14. ACCESS AND EQUITY (SNR16)

ACCESS AND EQUITY GUIDELINES

The following access and equity guidelines are designed to remove barriers and obstacles so that all students have the opportunity to gain skills, knowledge and experience through access to VET subjects. These guidelines should be applied in conjunction with Scouts Australia VET admissions policy. Access and equity guidelines will be implemented through the following strategies:

 Having regard for the available human and physical resources, the organisation will provide a limited range of free VET qualifications and/or outcomes for

members.

 Links with other providers, such as TAFE institutes will be considered where additional resources are required.  Where possible, learners will be provided with the

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 For learners with special needs, access to additional assistance will be provided.

 Access to VET programs will be available to all learners regardless of gender or race.

 Where poor literacy and/or numeracy skills may present a barrier to participation, additional support will be provided to the learners within the capacity of the organisation’s resources to provide such support and/or external assistance will be accessed as required.

ACCESS AND EQUITY POLICY

As a Registered Training Organisation, Scouts Australia has agreed to operate within the regulations of the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA). This includes a commitment to recognise the training qualifications issued by other Registered Training Organisations.

Scouts Australia will meet all legislative requirements of the State and Federal Government - in particular Work Health and Safety and Workplace Relations.

The Access and Equity Policy will inform decisions in regard to access to VET subjects complying with equal opportunity legislation.

Scouts Australia has a commitment to providing a quality service and a focus on continuous improvement. Its

members value feedback from the community, business and employers for incorporation into future programs.

Scouts Australia has sound management practices to ensure effective learner service. In particular it has service

standards to ensure timely issue of student assessment results and qualifications. These will be appropriate to competence achieved and issued in accordance with national guidelines.

Scouts Australia’s quality focus includes:  A Recognition of Prior Learning Policy  A Grievance and Appeal Policy  Access and Equity Policy

 Student Welfare and Guidance Services. The qualification overview explains course content, assessment procedures and vocational outcomes and pathways.

Scouts Australia has agreed to participate in external monitoring and audit processes as required by the Australian Skills Quality Authority. This may include random

compliance audit, audit following complaint and audits for the purposes of re-registration.

Scouts Australia markets its vocational education programs with integrity, accuracy and professionalism, avoiding vague and ambiguous statements. In the provision of information, no false or misleading comparisons are drawn with any other Registered Training Organisation or training product. Scouts Australia has personnel throughout Australia with appropriate qualifications and experience to deliver the training and facilitate assessment relevant to the training product offered. Assessment will meet current assessment

resources will ensure the learning environment is conducive to successful outcomes.

Scouts Australia will honour all requirements outlined in the Standards for NVR Registered Training Organisations. It agrees that if it does not meet the obligations of the Standards or supporting regulatory requirements of the Registered Training Organisation, status may be withdrawn.

15. MARKETING (SNR24)

At this time, Scouts Australia does not market its training courses to the general public.

16. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT (SNR15 &

SNR17)

The Scouts Australia policy of Continuous Improvement ensures that all training and assessment materials, methods and resources meet or exceed the current vocational requirements of their nationally accredited products.

17. RECOGNITION OF QUALIFICATIONS

ISSUED BY OTHER RTOS. (SNR15)

SAIT recognises qualifications and statements of attainment issued by any other RTO. Similarly, the Institute also will assist each client with credit transfer from other RTOs. If a learner presents a qualification (obtained from another registered training organisation) to the Trainer/Assessor, the Trainer/Assessor will take a copy and bring it to the attention of the respective BCATD.

The course manager or equivalent will verify the authenticity of the qualification. The verified copy of the qualification is placed in the learner’s file.

Once the qualification is verified, the learner is exempt the unit/s of competency identified in the qualification and the learner’s records will be updated accordingly. At all times, however, the learner is required to maintain the necessary Scouting ‘content’ knowledge as part of considered ‘competence’.

18. RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING

POLICY (RPL) (SNR15)

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING POLICY

All learners have the right to request Recognition of Prior Learning in respect of an element/s of competency which has been learned previously and that is not already covered by provision within the Unit of Competency for such recognition. (e.g. - a portion of a competency that needs to be signed off within a practical vocational setting – perhaps a campsite or by a workplace Trainer elsewhere).

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 10 of 12

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING PROCESS

On commencing any Nationally Accredited Course the learner will be provided with a copy of the Units of

Competency. If considered past training and/or experience in any of those units exists, the learner is encouraged to apply for Recognition of Prior Learning.

If the learner has completed any of the actual Units of Competency and has been using those skills regularly since –DO NOT COMPLETE a Recognition of Prior Learning form, instead request a Mutual Recognition process occur and provide certified copies of Statements of Attainment to obtain Credit.

It is the learner’s responsibility to use the processes set up for gaining RPL.

STEPS TO FOLLOW:

1. Learner to complete RPL Application Form.

2. The Form, together with full supporting documentation and references, if appropriate, are given to the mentor/Trainer/Assessor.

3. Trainer/Assessor reaches decision in consultation with BCATD.

4. Trainer/Assessor advises decision.

5. If not satisfactory to learner, learner has the right to appeal.

6. Appeals must be lodged (using the RPL Appeals Form) by learner with full supporting documentation within two (2) weeks of initial decision.

(See RPL Appeal Form and Grievance Policy and Procedures – available from your Branch or PLA)

APPLYING FOR RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING

The learner should carefully read the information supplied before completing the form and discuss it with support person/PLA. The form asks for information about the learner and their knowledge and skills that are the basis of the application for RPL.

After completing the form, check all relevant information is provided – people underestimate their skills and personal achievements.

It is not a difficult process, but can be quite onerous if records have not been kept of past achievements. The learner may ask for a ‘challenge test’ to prove his/her currency and competency – this may require the completion of the unit assessment (for a whole competency) or a simple demonstration of portions of the competency where

substantial evidence cannot be provided.

‘Substantial evidence’ - in Vocational terms is being able to confidently and competently complete a task over a range of different contexts… i.e. make and receive telephone calls for a number of different reasons and/or organisations…what evidence of this would you require? The following points provide aspects of `evidence’ that will support your

application. You must include several different aspects that show your ability to function competently over a range of activities:

a) Letter/s from a supervisor in your workplace explaining that part of your job role was to take incoming calls from clients and make outgoing calls/appointments for sales staff.

b) Letter from your Leader confirming that you had been part of a group that set up the travel schedules for a Jamboree etc. and that you were required to make a number of calls to set this up

c) A copy of your diary for this activity – organisation names, contact persons, dates and reason for contact d) Letter/s from your school detailing the telephone

applications you had made as part of gaining employment

e) Letter from your parents if they operate a business and you are involved with telephone answering for it f) Letter/s from another organisation whose telephone

system you have operated and that you have volunteered with or been employed by.

g) Audio/Video tape/s of a Role Play scenario you have developed where you are seeking specific information by using the telephone

h) Video tape/s of you in a workplace using a multi-line system under normal working conditions

The form requires the learner to provide the following information:

Section 1:

General information about yourself and your experience.

Section 2:

The relationship between your experience and the unit for which you are seeking RPL

SECTION 1 - GENERAL INFORMATION

After completing the form you may be asked to attend an interview. Please take to the interview anything you believe could assist your claim, for example:

(a) copies of reports, certificates or statements about your education and training (bring originals of official documents for the interviewer to view and/or photocopy, but make sure you take them home with you)

(b) outlines of any courses you have undertaken (c) copies of non-confidential memos, letters, minutes of

meetings from other organisations where you have participated in a similar role

(d) letters of recommendation from employers,

Trainers/Assessors, other organisations that you have assisted

(e) photographs, video/audio tapes, scrap books (f) any other information you feel might may aid the

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THE INTERVIEW

If you are asked to attend an interview - the interview will gather further information about how your experience etc., related to the course units described in Section 2. The purpose of the interview will be to confirm and clarify your request for RPL and to make sure that all relevant learning experiences have been identified.

Be prepared to answer questions and/or demonstrate to the Assessor your abilities.

You may ask a person who knows you to come to the interview with you. This person would normally work closely with you. Their role will be to help you in the interview and verify your claims.

Most people underestimate their skills and abilities so it is really good to have someone with you who knows your capabilities.

SECTION 2 - EXPERIENCE

When completing Section 2 of the RPL Application Form, applicants should consider carefully whether they meet each learning outcome/required competency and its associated assessment criteria before ticking the box provided.

19. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS

Overview of the Employability Skills Framework The Employability Skills Framework incorporates the following personal attributes that contribute to overall employability. They are:

 Loyalty  Commitment

 Honesty and integrity  Enthusiasm

 Reliability

 Personal presentation  Common sense  Sense of humour

 Balance attitude to work and home life  Ability to deal with pr4essure

 Motivation  Adaptability  Positive self esteem

Enterprises saw the inclusion of these attributes as a new and essential component of employability skills.

The key skills identified in conjunction with the personal attributes to make up the Employability Skills Framework are:

Communication skills that contribute to productive and harmonious relations between employees and customers;

Team work skills that contribute to productive working relationships and outcomes;

Problem-solving skills that contribute to productive outcomes;

Initiative and enterprise skills that contribute to innovative outcomes;

Planning and organising skills that contribute to long-term and short-term strategic planning;

Self-management skills that contribute to employee satisfaction and growth;

Learning skills that contribute to employee satisfaction and growth;

Technology skills that contribute to effective execution of tasks.

A full explanation of the Employability Skills is available upon request.

20. LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK (SNR20)

It is essential that Scouts Australia confirms with all relevant Federal and State legislation. Specifically this includes:  Work Health and Safety Act 2011 and Workplace

Health and Safety Regulation 2008, which details the requirements for safe work practices and the responsibilities and all people in these areas.  Queensland Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 which

includes obligations for equal opportunity, racial vilification, victim’s action, equal employment and opportunity. See also related information at www.antidiscrimination.gov.au

Disability Services Act, 1992 which covers the rights and accommodations for people with disabilities, and the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

Training and Employment Act, 2000, which governs the provision of training and related services.

National Vocational Education and Training Regulator Act 2011 which outlines the rules related to RTO governance and student management

Child Protection Act 1999 and the Child Protection Regulation 2011 which expand on methods of appropriate adult interactions with children to ensure safety of both child and adult carers. Your respective State and Territory has related legislation which can be accessed via the web.

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Information Handbook V19 June 2014 Page 12 of 12

DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT (BSB51107)

CERTIFICATE IV IN FRONT LINE MANAGEMENT (BSB40812)

CERTIFICATE III IN BUSINESS (BSB30112)

CERTIFICATE II IN BUSINESS (BSB20112)

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