Chapter 7: Safer Communities for All

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Chapter 7: Safer Communities for All

Long term Challenges

There are real signs that intensive action on youth offending is paying

off. Since 2008/09, the number of first-time entrants to the youth justice

system in Wales has fallen by more than half, despite the economic

situation. Reoffending rates for young people are declining more slowly,

but this is still positive given that the fall in the number of first time

entrants means that the youth offending system has a higher concentration

of young people with complex needs and more persistent patterns of

offending. More generally, the incidence of recorded crime continues to

decline, although perceptions of anti-social behaviour have risen slightly.

Although alcohol related deaths have risen for much of the decade they

have fallen since 2008. We are continuing to work closely with partner

agencies and service users to tackle the increase in drug deaths.

The incidence of fires attended by the fire service, and casualties from fires,

have declined for most of the last decade although this was not maintained this last year.

Road casualty rates have been on a declining trend.

Our Actions

Recruitment of additional Community Support Officers has begun ahead of time and 165 were either deployed or in training by April 2012. Recruitments of some part time officers mean that in total 545 officers will be deployed by September 2013.

Our Safer Communities Fund spent £4.5m in 2011/12 via Community Safety Partnerships, on projects aimed at diverting young people away from crime and anti-social behaviour.

Through the “Right to be Safe” Strategy, and

10,000 Safer Lives projectwe are joining up public services to help victims of domestic abuse and violence against women to reduce incidents and numbers of repeat victims. This will help inform the development of new legislation to tackle domestic abuse and violence against women.

The action we are taking on substance misuse is on track. People are getting faster access to assessment and treatment and in 2010/11 over 50% of those leaving treatment had a positive outcome profile.

Drug-related crime has continued to fall. The Welsh Government continues to invest over £50m a year to implement the actions within the 10 year substance misuse strategy for Wales ‘Working Together to Reduce Harm’.

We will continue to lobby the UK Government to take more robust approach to tackling the pricing, availability and advertising of alcohol. We know that these are important factors which influence alcohol consumption, particularly amongst young people. There have been improvements in outcomes since fire and rescue services were devolved in 2004. The number of fires stood at 676.6 (per 100,000 population) in 2010/2011, less than figures for Scotland, but greater than those for England. In recent years progress has levelled. The number of people injured in fires rose in both South and North Wales during 2010/11 and decreased in other areas. Deliberate fire setting remains a particular concern for South Wales. The recent publication of the Fire and Rescue National Framework sets out how we expect Fire and Rescue Authorities to work to achieve

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Reducing the level of crime and fear of crime

OU051 - Overall recorded crime rate

This indicator shows the level of recorded crime in Wales.

Overall recorded crime rate (per 1,000 of the population)

Source: Home Office police recorded crime

How are we doing?

Policing and crime are non devolved matters, but many factors that influence levels of offending and criminality are matters which have been devolved to the Welsh Government including health, education, fire and rescue. The continued fall in the figures is welcomed, in particular given the normal impact of recessions on offending. Our ambition, therefore, must be to use all of our levers to further bring down these figures.

We have acted to pursue that ambition by:

• Fulfilling a key Welsh Government commitment in the recruitment of additional 500 Community Support Officers, which has begun ahead of time. The first 20 recruits were trained in Gwent in November 2011 and deployed from February 2012. Overall, 165 CSOs were either deployed or in training by April 2012. Recruitments of some part time officers mean that in total 545 officers will be deployed by September 2013.

• Spending £4.5 million in 2011-12 via Community Safety Partnerships, on projects aimed at diverting young people away from crime and anti-social behaviour. Work has begun on the development of the consultation on the Prevention of Youth Offending (Wales) Bill, which will take place in Summer 2012.

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• Providing voluntary organisations and Community Safety Partnerships, who provide domestic abuse support services across Wales, £4.16 million of funding in 2012-13.

• Acting through the 10,000 Safer Lives project to join up public services to help victims of domestic abuse and violence against women. New legislation to tackle domestic abuse and violence against women was announced as part of the 2011-16 Legislative Programme. Formal consultation will take place in Autumn 2012.

Statistical footnote: In recent years there have been two significant changes in the rules for the recording

of crimes. The Home Office Counting Rules for Recorded Crime have been extended to include extra offences,

and it is now the number of victims that are counted rather than the number of offences. These changes

were introduced in 1998 and the National Crime Recording Standard (NCRS) was introduced in 2002.

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OU052 - Perceptions of anti-social behaviour

This indicator describes the percentage of respondents to the British Crime Survey who report a high level of perceived anti-social behaviour.

Perceptions of anti-social behaviour

Source: British Crime Survey

How are we doing?

Whilst the incidence of recorded crime continues to decline, there has been a slight increase in perceptions of

anti-social behaviour between 2010-11 and 2011-12.

We are commited to making our communities safer through reductions in anti-social behaviour, crime

(including the fear of crime), substance misuse and the incidence and impact of fires, as well as effective

co-ordination of emergencies. The key actions to deliver this are:

• Reducing the level of crime and fear of crime.

• Reducing the harm associated with substance misuse. • Reduction and prevention of young offending.

• Reducing rates of domestic abuse and violence against women. • Improving safety in communities.

• Improving the resilience of communities.

The additional 500 Police Community Support Officers in Wales will be highly visible in their communities, engaging with people, providing reassurance and tackling anti-social behaviour. They will play a pivotal role not only in making our communities safer, but in making them feel safer.

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Statistical footnote: These figures are based on results of the British Crime Survey (BCS), a face to face victimisation survey in which people resident in England and Wales are asked about their experience of a range of crimes in the 12 months prior to the interview, and about their attitudes towards different crime-related issues. The perception of anti-social behaviour is based on respondents reporting a ‘high’ level of perceived anti-social behaviour relating to:

• noisy neighbours or loud parties. • teenagers hanging around on streets. • rubbish or litter lying around.

• vandalism, graffiti and other deliberate damage to property. • people using or dealing drugs.

• people being drunk or rowdy in public places. • abandoned or burnt out cars.

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Reducing the harm associated with drug and alcohol misuse

OU053 - Prevalence of problematic drug misuse

This indicator shows the prevalence of problematic Class A drug misuse.

Prevalence of problematic drug misuse

Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales (ONS)

How are we doing?

The long term challenge of reducing the prevalence of problematic drug misuse is recognised within our Programme for Government. It is clearly difficult to gather absolutely accurate information about problematic

drug use, as so much is illicit in nature and this indicator excludes a range of examples such as legal highs,

psychoactive substances, steroids and other image enhancing drugs. However, we are considering other options to capture this data, and may report on these in future years.

Problematic drug use has not significantly improved over the period from 2006 to 2010.

We continue to invest over £50 million to implement the actions within the 10 year substance misuse strategy for Wales ‘Working Together to Reduce Harm’ and build upon achievements such as improving access,

availability and quality of children and young people’s services for tackling drug and alcohol misuse. Additional funding provided by the Welsh Government has created an extra 7,535 treatment places since 2005-06.

Statistical footnote: The data is collected in the Crime Survey for England and Wales (previously called the British Crime Survey). This will give a consistent measure over time and across England and Wales, as the methodology does not change year on year. The data relate to self-reported illicit drug use. This is not the same as problematic drug use and must be caveated because of inherent non-response issues.

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OU054(a) - Numbers of drug related deaths

This indicator shows the number of deaths that are related to drug misuse.

Numbers of drug related deaths

Source: Office for National Statistics

How are we doing?

The 2010 Welsh figure of 152 deaths represents an increase of 15 per cent from 2009.

In Wales, we have been actively engaged in taking a national approach to systematically reviewing drug related deaths and ensuring that there is an evidenced based approach to tackling the problem. A National Monitoring Group into drug related deaths oversees the work of four Regional Confidential Review Panels that

periodically analyse a sample of deaths where illicit and prescribed drugs were involved. This helps ensure that lessons learned are translated into changes at service planning and delivery levels.

We are supporting a number of key initiatives to respond to these circumstances, these include:

• Take home Naloxone - in May 2009 we introduced the ‘take home’ Naloxone rescue scheme. Naloxone

is an opiate antagonist that reduces the effects of opiates and is routinely administered by Accident & Emergency staff and ambulance paramedics in overdose situations. Since the initiative was launched,

Naloxone has been successfully used in over 100 occasions, potentially saving many lives.

• National learning - ‘Learning the Lessons’ themed bulletins have been regularly published which summarise the key findings and learning opportunities gained from reviewing individual cases.

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• Emergency care settings - Accident and Emergency Departments provide opportunities to refer those who

have suffered a near fatal poisoning to treatment services for their drug dependence.

• A number of harm reduction groups have been established. These local forums have also progressed other initiatives associated with Blood - Borne Virus’, Hepatitis services, Pharmacy interface, Naloxone and Needle Exchange. The Welsh Government is also supporting the development of a compendium of harm reduction

advice for substance misuse services.

Statistical footnote: Deaths are included if the underlying cause of death is regarded as drug-related, according to the National Statistics definition. More information on this definition can be found in ONS bulletins. The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes used to define these deaths are listed below:

F11-F16, F18-F19, X40-X44, X60-X64,Y10-Y14, X85 The figures exclude deaths of non-residents.

The latest data for Wales can be found at:

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OU054(b) - Numbers of alcohol related deaths

This indicator shows the number of deaths that are alcohol-related.

Numbers of alcohol related deaths

Source: Office for National Statistics

How are we doing?

Figures for 2009 and 2010 have effectively remained static (493 and 494 respectively), following a peak in 2008 (541 cases).

Whilst the factors that govern the level of alcohol misuse and the numbers of deaths it causes are varied,

and do no all reside within the control of the Welsh Government, we have taken a number of actions to help

reduce alcohol related deaths, these include:

• Issuing a number of alcohol related treatment frameworks for service commissioners and providers. The Chief Medical Officer has reissued advice regarding the importance of alcohol free days and we continue to promote this message strongly with a campaign Change 4 Life.

• Developing our work and health programme ‘Healthy Working Wales’ (HWW) which includes the Corporate Health Standard and the Small Workplace Health Award, with the aim to provide free support and advice to employers in developing health and well-being policies and initiatives in the workplace.

• Continuing to provide funding for ‘Alcohol Concern Cymru’ to raise awareness of alcohol misuse issues,

monitor and report on questionable alcohol labelling and promotions, lead on information campaigns,

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40p per unit. We do not believe that this goes far enough, as evidence suggests that a minimum unit price of between 40p and 50p could reduce the number of alcohol-related deaths in Wales by 20 to 25 per cent. This would equate to 200 to 250 fewer deaths, per year, after 10 years. We will continue to lobby the UK

Goverment for an increase in this minimum price.

We will also continue to lobby for an outright prohibition on television product placement of alcohol.

We will continue to monitor the existing voluntary code of practice for the alcohol industry as part of keeping our position under review and will seek devolution of powers in relation to alcohol licensing.

Statistical footnote: The National Statistics definition of alcohol-related deaths includes only those causes

regarded as being most directly due to alcohol consumption. It does not include other diseases where alcohol

has been shown to have some causal relationship (for example cancers of the mouth, oesophagus, and the liver). The definition includes all deaths from chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (excluding biliary cirrhosis),

even when alcohol is not specifically mentioned on the death certificate.

Apart from deaths due to poisoning with alcohol (accidental, intentional or undetermined), the definition

excludes any other external causes of death, such as road traffic and other accidents. This allows for consistent comparisons over time for those deaths most clearly associated with alcohol consumption. Excludes deaths of non-residents.

The latest data for Wales can be found at:

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Reduction and prevention of young offending

OU055 - First time entrants to the youth justice system

This indicator measures, on an annual basis, the number of juvenile first time entrants to the criminal justice

system.

Number of first time entrants to the youth justice system

Source: Youth Justice Board

How are we doing?

Since 2008-09, the number of first time entrants to the youth justice system in Wales has been falling. Whilst the Police, the Courts and the Prison Service are not devolved to Wales, the reduction shows that

the needs of young people (that can lead them to offend) are being better addressed by devolved services.

For example, mental health and substance misuse needs, exclusion from education, and other vulnerabilities. The Welsh Government is committed to preventing children and young people entering the youth justice system. This is a key aim of the consultation on the proposed Youth Offending (Wales) Bill. Officials are currently engaging with key stakeholders with a view to consulting on proposals which aim to:

• Reduce the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system by improving support from devolved services for pre-court diversion.

• Provide better support from devolved services for children and young people in the youth justice system. • Strengthen the accountability and co-operation of local and regional partnerships in their support for young

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• Provide better support, aftercare and re-integration services for children and young people after a

community or custodial sentence.

We will be considering how we can create an environment that enables restorative alternatives to police charging to be considered for all first time and less serious offences. The Welsh Government already supports

a number of restorative justice projects as part of the Safer Communities Fund.

Safer Communities Funding continues to support projects that will prevent young people from offending. Safer Communities Funding is used to fund Community Safety Partnerships in Wales and schemes aimed at diverting young people away from crime and anti-social behaviour. This includes projects relating to education, training, leisure, arts, sports, restorative justice, and initiatives to combat substance misuse. The Safer

Communities Fund has distributed £4.5 million to Community Safety Partnerships in 2011-12.

Statistical footnote: The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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OU056 - Rate of proven re-offending for young people

This indicator shows the rate at which young people who had previously been convicted of an offence commit another offence within one year.

Rate of proven re-offending for young people

Source: Ministry of Justice, Offending History Tables

How are we doing?

The data shows reoffending rates have remained fairly static. In Wales, these results should be understood in

the context of a significant fall in the number of first time entrants into the system, which has resulted in a higher concentration of young people with complex needs and more persistent patterns of offending. Safer Communities Funding continues to support projects that prevent young people from offending and we continue to see a reduction in the number of first time entrants into the youth justice system. Safer Communities Funding is used to fund Community Safety Partnerships in Wales and schemes aimed at diverting young people away from crime and anti-social behaviour. This includes projects relating to education, training, leisure, arts, sports, restorative justice, and initiatives to combat substance misuse. The Safer

Communities Fund has distributed £4.5 million to Community Safety Partnerships in 2011-12.

Statistical footnote: Proven re-offending is defined as any offence commited in a one year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand, or warning. A further six months is allowed for

cases to progress through the courts.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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Reducing rates of domestic abuse and violence against women

OU057 - Percentage of successful prosecutions and convictions in cases

of violence against women

This indicator shows the percentage of prosecutions in cases of violence against women that result in conviction.

Percentage of successful prosecutions and convictions in cases of violence against women

Source: Welsh Government Departmental Management Information

How are we doing?

Tacking domestic abuse and all forms of violence against women is a key priority for the Welsh Government.

As the chart shows, the percentage of successful prosecutions and convictions in cases of violence against

women has increased in Wales; and while there has been a slight decline in the rate since a peak in 2009, the latest data from 2011 still shows a 6.5 percentage point increase on the 2007 figure.

To improve the reporting of domestic abuse, and increase conviction rates, the Welsh Government is:

• giving a share of £4.16 million to voluntary organisations and Community Safety Partnerships to help

provide domestic abuse support services across Wales.

• joining up public services to help victims of domestic abuse and violence against women through the 10,000 Safer Lives Project.

These programmes, and other Welsh Government initiatives, will help inform the development of new

legislation to tackle domestic abuse and violence against women, announced as part of the 2011-16 Legislative Programme.

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Statistical footnote: A data collection sharing protocol has been agreed between the Crown Prosecution Service and the Welsh Government. Data in relation to successful prosecutions and convictions in cases of violence against women and domestic abuse will be reported in the second Right to be Safe Annual Report

and any subsequent annual reports.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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Improving safety in communities

OU058 - Number of fires attended

This indicator measures the number of fires attended by the Fire and Rescue Service per 100,000 of the

population.

Number of fires attended (per 100,000 population)

Source: Number of Fires - Statistics Wales and IRS, Department for Communities and Local Government. Population - Mid Year Estimates, Office of National Statistics

How are we doing?

The Welsh Government aims to make our communities safer by reducing the incidence of fires and impact of fires where they do occur, as well as effective co-ordination of emergencies. We contribute to this by effective

community fire safety education and advice. Where dwelling fires do occur, we aim to reduce the impact as a

result of fire safety equipment activation (e.g. smoke alarms) and safety advice provided to the most vulnerable and at risk. We are working with Fire and Rescue Authorities (FRAs) to ensure that they prioritise community

fire safety services for vulnerable citizens. Impact is also reduced by appropriate emergency response from

highly skilled fire-fighters.

There have been improvements in outcomes for the citizen since fire and rescue services were devolved

in 2004. The number of fires stood at 676.6 (per 100,000 population) in 2010-2011, less than figures for

Scotland but greater than those for England. In recent years progress has levelled and a continued focus will be required to ensure that progress is maintained.

The recent publication of the Fire and Rescue National Framework sets out how we expect FRAs to achieve

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The Welsh Government will be monitoring FRAs delivery of the Framework through the Fire and Rescue Consultative Forum and will be supporting the work of the FRSs through the provision of grant funding and the delivery of various strategies, including the Wales Arson Reduction Strategy and the FRS Children and

Young Peoples Strategy.

The Welsh Government provides grant funding of £3.739 million to support FRA community safety activity, including arson reduction and the provision of Home Fire Safety Checks which includes the provision of smoke alarms.

Statistical footnote: This indicator provides data for Wales, Scotland and England. It does not include false alarms attended.

The data for this indicator are sourced from the Incident Recording System (IRS), and the rates (per 100,000

population) have not been published as official statistics. The numbers of fires are available on StatsWales. The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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OU059 - Number of fatal and non-fatal casualties from fires

This indicator provides data on the number of deaths and non-fatal casualties (including those given first aid and sent for precautionary checks) caused by fires in Wales.

Number of fatal and non-fatal casualties from fires in Wales

Source: 2001-02 to 2008-09 from FDR1 paper forms. 2009-10 onwards from Incident Recording System

How are we doing?

This indicator tells us whether Fire and Rescue Authorities (FRAs) are being successful in reducing the incidents of deaths and injuries resulting from fires in Wales through their community safety activity and emergency response. The Welsh Government provides grant funding to support FRA community safety activity, including arson reduction and the provision of Home Fire Safety Checks (HFSCs) which includes the provision of smoke alarms.

Although there is an increase in the number of fire deaths in 2010-11, the general trend for fire deaths and injuries across Wales in last 6 years is down. Although this paints a generally positive picture, there are variations between FRAs.

For the FRAs, the Programme for Government sets out the Welsh Government’s aim to help make our

communities safer by reducing the incidence of fires and impact of fires where they do occur, as well as

effective co-ordination of emergencies. We are seeking to achieve a reduction in the number of deliberate

fires and accidental dwelling fires as a result of effective delivery of community fire safety education and advice. Where dwelling fires occur, we are aiming for a reduction in the impact of these fires as a result of fire

safety equipment activation (eg smoke alarms) and safety advice provided to the most vulnerable and at risk. Impact is also reduced by appropriate emergency response from highly skilled fire-fighters.

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The Welsh Government provides grant funding of £3.739 million to support FRA community safety activity, including arson reduction and the provision of Home Fire Safety Checks which includes the provision of smoke alarms.

Statistical footnote: Fatalities and non-fatal casualties are shown in the StatsWales table linked below:

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OU060 - Road Casualty rates

This indicator measures road casualty rates in Wales, in terms of the numbers killed or seriously injured in road

traffic accidents.

Road casualty rates - number of people killed or seriously injured

Source: Stats19: Road accidents and casualties

How are we doing?

There have been significant reductions in the number of people being killed or seriously injured on the roads in the last decade. Targets set for 2010 were exceeded and 1,087 deaths and serious injuries, whilst individually tragic, must be seen as a significant improvement on the 1,871 incidences recorded in 1999. There has been a rise in the number of killed and seriously injured road casualties in 2011, but this increase is within the parameters you would expect for a small country like Wales and we remain confident that the general trend

is downwards.

This data allows us to analyse where collisions occur and the causes of them, so we can target specific locations and groups to reduce the number and severity of collisions.

We have set interim targets for further casualty reductions to be achieved by the end of 2012, ahead of targets for 2020 that will form part of a Road Safety Delivery Plan. The Plan will set out our strategic approach

to road safety and target specific vulnerable groups (e.g. motorcyclists, young people). We also continue to

provide funding for road safety through the Regional Transport Consortia, Wales Road Casualty Reductions Partnership and the Fire and Rescue Service.

Statistical footnote: This indicator is based on ‘Police reported road casualties in Wales’. The statistics refer to casualties resulting from personal injury accidents on public roads reported to the police. The police compile

statistical data about road traffic accidents and casualties (called Stats19 data) for the Welsh Government and

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A casualty is defined as a person killed or injured in an accident. One accident may give rise to several casualties. Broadly, a casualty is seriously injured if the injuries sustained mean they are admitted to hospital. Casualties reported as killed include only those cases where death occurs in less than 30 days as a result of

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Reducing the level of crime and fear of crime

TR103 - Progress towards recruitment and deployment of

additional 500

This indicator provides us with data on the number of additional Police and Community Support Officers (PCSOs) recruited and deployed in Wales.

Progress towards recruitment and deployment of additional 500 PCSOs

Source: Project timetable and recruitment figures.

How are we doing?

Recruitment and training timetables are on course to deliver this commitment by September 2013, as planned. Single points of contact have been identified in each Police Force and regular communications are maintained with the Welsh Government to ensure recruitment and training is on track.

Current indications are that the recruitment scheme is oversubscribed. The Police Forces’ recruitment plans indicate that through the recruitment of some part time officers, they will deliver an additional 45 CSOs. This means that 545 CSOs will be in place as a result of the commitment by September 2013. We will be

establishing evaluation mechanisms to consider the difference these officers have made for communities on their crime rate and their fear of crime.

Statistical footnote: This indicator tells us about the progress being made by the Welsh Government

and the Police Forces in Wales towards the recruitment of an additional 500 PCSOs. This is one of the Government’s ‘5 for a fairer Future’ priority manifesto commitments.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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TR104 - Level of Welsh Government enhancement to support PCSOs

actively employed by British Transport Police

This indicator measures the progress being made by the Welsh Government and Police Forces in Wales towards the recruitment of 18 British Transport Police Community Support Officers.

How are we doing?

The training of all 18 British Transport Police (BTP) CSOs commenced on 21 May 2012. Recruitment and training timetables are on course to deliver this commitment by September 2013, as planned. Single points of contact have been identified in each Police Force and regular communications are maintained with the Welsh Government to ensure recruitment and training is on track. Current indications are that the recruitment

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TR105 - Progress on CCTV programme at rail stations

This indicator measures the number of CCTV cameras at stations across Wales.

Progress on CCTV programme at rail stations

Source: Arriva Trains Wales

How are we doing?

Over the course of this administration, we will continue our major programme of investment in station improvements - a key aim of which is to improve safety and security.

The most recent data from 2011 shows that we now have 881 cameras in operation at stations across Wales. This is in addition to the provision of CCTV on all Arriva Trains Wales trains funded by the Welsh Government. Information gathered by the British Transport Police has shown that improved CCTV coverage is playing a vital

role in crime detection and prosecution.

To help drive performance, the major upgrade of Swansea High Street Station is approaching completion and it - coupled with the scheme to start shortly at Llandudno - will significantly improve CCTV coverage.

Other upgrades are also in the pipeline and further improvements will be made.

Statistical footnote: The data for this indicator is sourced from departmental management information and has not been published as official statistics

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TR106 - Coverage of no cold calling zones

This indicator will provide us with data on the number of no cold calling zones in Wales.

How are we doing?

No cold calling zones can help to combat the problem of doorstep crime. There is evidence to suggest that

they can help to deter unscrupulous cold callers from approaching people living in the zones. They can also be useful in giving people the confidence to deal with any unwelcome cold callers.

The Welsh Government is committed to protecting communities from doorstep crime, and whilst most

‘cold callers’ will not have any criminal intent, we are very clear that communities should be able to make clear their desire not to be subject to cold calling. ‘No cold calling zones’ already exist in a number of areas in Wales, and it is very important that we work with Trading Standards to build on what is already in place. The extension of no cold caller zones to other areas of Wales is a key objective for us and one we have timetabled for action over the course of 2012-2013.

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Reducing the harm associated with drug and alcohol misuse

TR107 - Percentage of referrals to substance misuse treatment

providers who are assessed within 10 working days

This indicator provides us with data on the percentage of referrals relating to clients who are referred for

substance misuse treatment that are assessed within 10 working days.

Percentage of referrals to substance misuse treatment providers who are assessed within

10 working days

Source: Welsh National Database for Substance Misuse

How are we doing?

This indicator helps us to understand how well we are doing in our work to reduce the harm associated with substance misuse. Since 2007-08 the percentage of clients that are assessed within 10 working days of being

referred for substance misuse treatment has been increasing.

Together with data on the percentage of clients treated within 10 working days of assessment, and data on the percentage of individuals exiting structured substance misuse treatment with an improved quality of life,

these indicators tells us:

(i) how promptly we are assessing people who are referred for substance misuse treatment;

(ii) how quickly they start to receive treatment after assessment; and

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A range of different initiatives and programmes are being taken forward to support delivery, this includes: • The Substance Misuse Action Fund (SMAF) has been allocated to Area Planning Boards (APBs) from

April 2012 to allow more commissioning of services regionally, enable economies of scale, and help to

ensure value for money.

• A stronger focus on recovery and taking a holistic approach to treatment: To reduce the number of clients who re-enter the treatment system and to maximise the number of clients who remain in recovery following

treatment.

We are also seeking a continuation of the Drug Intervention Programme (DIP) post April 2013, when the responsibility is transferred to the new Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

Statistical footnote: Currently the Welsh Government benchmarks activity in respect of referral and

assessment times across the Welsh regions. The latest data for Wales can be found at:

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TR108 - Percentage of referrals to substance misuse treatment

providers who are treated within 10 working days of assessment

This indicator provides us with data on the number of clients who are referred for substance misuse treatment

who are treated within 10 working days of assessment.

Percentage of referrals to substance misuse treatment providers who are treated within 10

working days of assessment

Source: Welsh National Database for Substance Misuse

How are we doing?

This indicator helps us to understand how well we are doing in our work to reduce the harm associated with substance misuse. Since 2007-08, the percentage of clients that are treated within 10 working days of

assessment (when referred for substance misuse treatment) has been increasing.

Together with the indicator on the percentage of individuals exiting structured substance misuse treatment

with an improved quality of life we can see:

(i) how promptly we are assessing people who are referred for substance misuse treatment;

(ii) how quickly they start to receive treatment after assessment; and

(iii) for those who start structured treatment, how many experience an improvement in their quality of life. A range of different initiatives and programmes are being taken forward to support delivery, this includes: • The Substance Misuse Action Fund (SMAF) has been allocated to Area Planning Boards (APBs) from

April 2012 to allow more commissioning of services regionally, enable economies of scale, and help to

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• A stronger focus on recovery and taking a holistic approach to treatment: To reduce the number of clients who re-enter the treatment system and to maximise the number of clients who remain in recovery following

treatment.

We are also seeking a continuation of the Drug Intervention Programme (DIP) post April 2013, when the responsibility is transferred to the new Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

Statistical footnote: Currently the Welsh Government benchmarks activity in respect of referral and

assessment times across the Welsh regions. The latest data can be found here:

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TR109(a) - Percentage of individuals with positive treatment outcome

profile (TOP) during the treatment process

This indicator shows the percentage of clients - who are in receipt of structured treatment - that experience

an improvement in their quality of life during the treatment process.

Percentage of individuals whose treatment outcome profile (TOP) showed an improvement

in quality of life during the treatment process

Source: Welsh National Database for Substance Misuse, NHS Wales Informatics Service

How are we doing?

People who misuse drugs, alcohol or other substances cause considerable harm to themselves and to society.

They may harm their families’ lives by damaging the health and well-being of their children and place a

burden of care on other relatives. There is also harm to the communities in which they live through the crime,

disorder and anti-social behaviour associated with substance misuse. It is for these reasons that reducing the harm associated with substance misuse and supporting rehabilitation is a key priority for social services

in Wales.

The above chart provides a baseline from which we can assess how well we are doing in our work to reduce

the harm associated with substance misuse; as individuals whose treatment outcome profile (TOP) showed an

improvement in quality of life are more likely to retain employment, show reductions in their substance misuse

and improvements in their family lives.

Looking ahead, there are a range of different initiatives and programmes being taken forward to improve

delivery in this area, including:

• Allocating the Substance Misuse Action Fund (SMAF) funding to Area Planning Boards (APBs) from April 2012 - to allow more commissioning of services regionally, enable economies of scale, and to assist in

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• A stronger focus on recovery - To reduce the number of clients who re-enter the treatment system and to maximise the number of clients who remain in recovery following treatment.

• Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) - Which will secure consistency and parity of approach across Wales,

ensuring clients are regularly reviewed and receiving treatment that best fits their needs.

Statistical footnote: To make the assessment, treatment outcome profile is used. This covers 4

distinct areas:

• Substance use.

• Injecting risk behaviour. • Crime.

• Health and social functioning.

The data includes individuals recorded between 2009-10 and 2010-11 who received structured treatment

for whom there is a record of treatment outcome profile (TOP) at both the start and at the first review of

treatment. Structured treatments include inpatient detoxification, community detoxification, residential detoxification, substitute opioid prescribing and psychological interventions. Improvement in quality of life is measured according to an increase in the client’s rating of the TOP quality of life indicator.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information for 2009 to 2011

and have not been published as official statistics.

For further information on Treatment Outcome Profiles and the quality of life indicator please see the Substance Misuse in Wales 2010-11 at:

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TR109(b) - Percentage of individuals with positive treatment outcome

profile (TOP) when exiting the treatment process

This indicator shows the percentage of clients - who are in receipt of structured treatment - that experience an improvement in their quality of life when exiting the treatment process.

Percentage of individuals whose treatment outcome profile (TOP) showed an improvement

in quality of life when exiting the treatment process

Source: Welsh National Database for Substance Misuse, NHS Wales Informatics Service

How are we doing?

People who misuse drugs, alcohol or other substances cause considerable harm to themselves and to society.

They may harm their families’ lives by damaging the health and well-being of their children and place a burden

of care on other relatives. There is also harm to the communities in which they live through the crime, disorder

and anti-social behaviour associated with substance misuse. It is for these reasons that reducing the harm associated with substance misuse and supporting rehabilitation is a key priority for social services in Wales. The above chart provides a baseline from which we can assess how well we are doing in our work to reduce

the harm associated with substance misuse; as individuals whose treatment outcome profile (TOP) showed an

improvement in quality of life are more likely to retain employment, show reductions in their substance misuse

and improvements in their family lives.

Looking ahead, there are a range of different initiatives and programmes being taken forward to improve

delivery in this area, including:

• Allocating the Substance Misuse Action Fund (SMAF) funding to Area Planning Boards (APBs) from April 2012 - to allow more commissioning of services regionally, enable economies of scale, and to assist

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• A stronger focus on recovery - To reduce the number of clients who re-enter the treatment system and to maximise the number of clients who remain in recovery following treatment.

• Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs): Which will secure consistency and parity of approach across Wales,

ensuring clients are regularly reviewed and receiving treatment that best fits their needs.

Statistical footnote: To make the assessment, treatment outcome profile is used. This covers 4

distinct areas:

• Substance use.

• Injecting risk behaviour. • Crime.

• Health and social functioning.

The data includes individuals recorded between 2009-10 and 2010-11 who received structured treatment

for whom there is a record of treatment outcome profile (TOP) at both the start and at the first review of

treatment. Structured treatments include inpatient detoxification, community detoxification, residential detoxification, substitute opioid prescribing and psychological interventions. Improvement in quality of life is measured according to an increase in client’s rating of the TOP quality of life indicator.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information for 2009 to 2011 and

have not been published as official statistics.

For further information on Treatment Outcome Profiles and the quality of life indicator please see the Substance Misuse in Wales 2010-11 at:

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TR110 - Number of Peer Mentors recruited and appointed as part of

the European Social Fund Peer Mentoring Scheme to help substance

dependent beneficiaries

This indicator provides us with information on the number of peer mentors recruited and appointed as part of

the European Social Fund Peer Mentoring Scheme.

Number of Peer Mentors recruited and appointed as part of the European Social Fund Peer

Mentoring Scheme to help substance dependent beneficiaries

How are we doing?

The indicator tells us how many paid and volunteer Peer Mentors are available to support substance misuse

service users at the end of their treatment - to help make positive changes to their lives. Support provided by

Peer Mentors includes helping service users access training and development opportunities, gain qualifications, enter volunteering, and find paid employment. There is evidence to suggest that becoming a Peer Mentor, and

engaging in pro-social activity, can be a pathway into long-term employment.

As at November 2011, 208 Peer Mentors were operational and delivering services (of whom 58 were paid). It is anticipated that the project will achieve (and may even exceed) the target of establishing 240 paid

Peer Mentors, given that:

• 407 Peer Mentors have been trained;

• 56 have moved into employment or training; and • 143 have chosen to leave or have been de-selected. This leaves 208 in operation.

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In terms of project outcomes, as at December 2011 the data showed that 4,084 service users have received support from the Peer Mentor project. Of these, 405 have entered employment and 553 have achieved

accredited qualifications.

Statistical footnote: This indicator provides data on the number of Peer Mentors recruited and appointed

as part of the European Social Fund Peer Mentoring Scheme to help substance dependent beneficiaries.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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Reduction and prevention of young offending

TR111 - Access to suitable accommodation for young people in the

Youth Justice System in Wales

This indicator tells us whether young people are getting access to suitable accommodation when leaving a custodial sentence.

Access to suitable accommodation for young people in the Youth Justice System in Wales

Source: Youth Justice Board: Youth Justice Management Information System (MIS)

How are we doing?

Access to suitable accommodation, when leaving a community or custodial sentence, has a known impact on the likelyhood of reoffending.

The Welsh Government continues to engage with internal and external colleagues to ensure that young people in the youth justice system have access to suitable accommodation. The Welsh Government also intends to consult on a Prevention of Youth Offending (Wales) Bill later in 2012. This will take forward our commitment to strengthen the delivery of services to children and young people entering or leaving the youth justice system in Wales. Officials are currently engaging with key stakeholders with a view to consulting on proposals which

aim to:

• Reduce the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system by improving support from devolved services for pre-court diversion.

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Statistical footnote: The data shows the percentage improvement in the number of young offenders being in suitable accommodation before and after a community sentence and before and after a custodial sentence.

Data are collected by the Youth Justice Board (YJB) from Youth Offending Teams (YOTs), but these are not independently validated. The YOT Data Summary (YDS) for Wales is produced each quarter to serve as a

standard set of Wales Youth Justice Indicator (WYJI) and other data for YOTs and the YJB.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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TR112 - Average hours education, training or employment received by

young people starting a community sentence in Wales

This indicator shows the percentage change in the hours in suitable education, training or employment -

comparing before and after a young persons community or custodial sentence.

Percentage change in the average number of hours in suitable education, training or

employment young people have once they commence a community or custodial sentence

Source: Youth Justice Board

How are we doing?

This indicator is important because young people in the youth justice system often become disengaged from

mainstream education.

We continue to engage with internal and external colleagues to ensure that young people starting a

community sentence in Wales receive education, training and opportunities. We will also consult on a proposed

Prevention of Youth Offending (Wales) Bill later in 2012. This will take forward our commitment to strengthen the delivery of services to children and young people entering the youth justice system. We are currently engaging with key stakeholders around proposals which aim to:

• Reduce the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system by improving support

diversion services before court action is necessary.

• Provide better support, from all our services, for children and young people in the youth justice system. • Strengthen the accountability and co-operation of local and regional partnerships.

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The youth justice system is one of the few areas of policy relating to children and young people which

is not devolved in Wales. As responsibility for so many relevant policy areas, such as education, housing,

substance misuse, health, social services, and the needs of looked after children are all devolved,

strengthening our approach will ensure accountability amongst all partners for children and young people in

the youth justice system, so that they can access a range of welfare, educational and other services.

Statistical footnote: Data are collected by the Youth Justice Board from Youth Offending Teams, but these data are not validated. The YOT Data Summary (YDS) for Wales is produced each quarter to serve as a standard

set of Wales Youth Justice Indicator (WYJI) and other data for YOTs and the YJB. It is published on the Youth

Justice Management Information System (MIS), in the Reporting area, in the ‘YOT Data Summary and Toolkits’

folder.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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TR113 - Percentage of children and young people in the Youth Justice

System in Wales, with identified substance misuse needs, who have

access to appropriate specialist assessment and treatment services

This indicator measures the percentage of children and young people in the Youth Justice System who have access to appropriate specialist assessment and treatment services for substance misuse.

Percentage of children and young people in the Youth Justice System in Wales, with

identified substance misuse needs, who have access to appropriate specialist assessment

and treatment services

Source: Youth Justice Board.

How are we doing?

Given the known link between substance misuse and offending, rapid access to treatment is important. 95 per cent of young people with an identified need accessing assessment and treatment within ten days is

a high baseline to build from. However, the Welsh Government intends to consult on a proposed Prevention

of Youth Offending (Wales) Bill later in 2012. This will take forward our commitment to strengthen the delivery of services to children and young people entering the youth justice system.

The youth justice system itself is one of the few areas of policy relating to children and young people which is not devolved in Wales. Responsibility for policies in relation to education, housing, substance misuse, health, social services, and the needs of looked after children are all devolved to Welsh Ministers. Strengthening these

arrangements would ensure great accountability amongst all partners for children and young people in the

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Officials are currently engaging with key stakeholders with a view to consulting on proposals which aim to: • Reduce the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system by improving support

from devolved services for pre-court diversion.

• Provide better support from devolved services for children and young people in the youth justice system. • Strengthen the accountability and co-operation of local and regional partnerships in their support for young

people while they are in the youth justice system.

• Provide better support, aftercare and re-integration services for children and young people after a

community or custodial sentence

Statistical footnote: The data for this indicator show how quickly young people get assessment and

treatment. It does not indicate the outcome of the treatment.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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TR114 - Proportion of young people sentenced to custody

This indicator measures the percentage of young people in the general population sentenced to custody.

Proportion of young people sentenced to custody

Source: Youth Justice Board: Youth Justice Management Information System (YJMIS)

How are we doing?

The custody rate in Wales has remained relatively constant at around 5.6 per cent in 2010-11 (down from 5.8 per cent in 2009-10), despite a significant reduction (13.0 per cent) in the total number of sentences, and the number of custodial sentences in Wales reducing by 16.6 per cent for the same period.

The Welsh Government intends to consult on a proposed Prevention of Youth Offending (Wales) Bill later in

2012. This will take forward our commitment to strengthen the delivery of services to children and young people entering the youth justice system. Officials are currently engaging with key stakeholders with a view to

consulting on proposals which aim to:

• Reduce the number of children and young people entering the youth justice system by improving support from devolved services for pre-court diversion.

• Provide better support from devolved services for children and young people in the youth justice system. • Strengthen the accountability and co-operation of local and regional partnerships in their support for young

people while they are in the youth justice system.

• Provide better support, aftercare and re-integration services for children and young people after a

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The youth justice system is one of the few areas of policy relating to children and young people which is not devolved in Wales. Responsibility for policies in relation to education, housing, substance misuse, health, social services, and the needs of looked after children are all devolved to Welsh Ministers. Strengthening these

arrangements would ensure great accountability amongst all partners for children and young people in the

youth justice system, so that they can access a range of welfare, educational and other services.

Statistical footnote: The new use of custody indicator came into effect on the 1 April 2011. The indicator uses case level data from the Youth justice Board (YJB) and is the number of custodial sentences given in court to young people aged 17 years or younger, presented as a rate per 1,000 young people in the 10 to 17 local general populations. At this stage, the latest general population figures are for the calendar year 2010.

The data for this indicator are sourced from departmental management information and have not been published as official statistics.

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Improving safety in communities

TR115 - Fire and Rescue Authorities’ performance against statutory and

local performance indicators

This indicator is intended to provide a summary of the success of Fire and Rescue Authorities performance against a key set of indicators of their performance. The Programme for Government also reports on the the number of fires attended and the number of fatalities and casualties from fires as well as the Auditor General’s

assessments of the authorities

How are we doing?

Data on Fire and Rescue Authorities’ performance against statutory and local performance indicators are published on an annual basis on the Statistics Wales website (link below). These data provide us with a detailed breakdown of fires, deaths and injuries in Wales, as well as other supporting information such as

fire alarm activation. The data provide further detail and support to the outcome indicators we use in the

Programme for Government - on the number of fires attended (PG058), and the number of fatal and non-fatal causalities from fires (PG059).

Key priorities for FRAs set out in the new National Framework, include planning the delivery of services based on risk and ensuring that the range of services provided are understood.

The services provided by the Fire and Rescue Service should continually improve as citizens and communities hold the Fire and Rescue Authorities to account.

FRAs should work in collaboration with key stakeholders to improve fire safety outcomes by reducing the incidence and impact of fires as well as effective co-ordination of emergencies to ensure safer communities for

citizens.

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TR116 - Auditor General for Wales’ audit and assessment reports of Fire

and Rescue Authorities

This indicator summarises the findings of the audit and assessment reports of Fire and Rescue Authorities made by the Auditor General for Wales.

How are we doing?

In their Annual Improvement Reports for Fire and Rescue Authorities (FRAs), the Welsh Audit Office (WAO) made no formal recommendations but have identified proposals for improvement at all three FRAs. All three have put in place arrangements to deliver improvement, but overall planning, evaluation and reporting of performance is not sufficiently balanced or outcome based. FRAs are currently reviewing planning frameworks to reflect Results Based Accountability principles for the coming year and WAO will be reviewing this as part of this year’s work.

Most of the improvement actions planned by the FRAs for 2010-2011 were delivered but WAO noted it was difficult to fully assess progress in some cases; mainly due to a lack of clarity about planned activity and the outcomes expected.

WAO concluded that information management was supporting improvement in FRAs although areas for improvement were identified in all three FRAs. The Annual Improvement Report suggests urgent action is needed at Mid and West Wales FRA in respect of information management, where ‘a number of significant weaknesses’ were identified.

WAO concluded that arrangements for developing, using and supporting technology are likely to support improvement in two FRAs but the third, Mid and West FRA, are unlikely to support improvement without significant changes which the Authority is beginning to make.

Other findings were as follows:

• All three FRAs are meeting statutory obligations under the Welsh Language Act. • All three FRAs saw a reduction in RTC attendance in 2010/2011.

• Both South and North Wales FRA saw a reduction in the number of fires attended, and although Mid and

West FRA saw an increase in fires attended, fatalities across Wales remain low.

• The number of people injured in fires rose in both South and North Wales’ areas during 2010-2011 and

decreased in Mid and West FRA.

Deliberate fire setting remains a particular concern for South Wales, where the percentage of deliberate fires is

very high at 81 per cent.

All FRAs are actively developing more innovative and efficient ways to respond to a wide range of incidents.

All FRAs have more work to do in respect of the self assessment requirements placed on them by the Local

Government Measure enacted by the Welsh Government.

Evaluations need to be more balanced and reporting mechanisms need to focus more on improvement

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Improving the resillience of communities

TR117 - Number of simulation exercises and emergency situations

tested, and review of lessons learned

This indicator measures the number of simulation exercises and emergency situations tested, and also provides

a review of the lessons learned.

Welsh Government participation in Tier 1 (UK Cross Government) and pan-Wales exercises

Source: Welsh Government Departmental Management Information

How are we doing?

Simulation exercises are used to test emergency response plans and to train individuals in their roles within these plans. These exercises form part of an ongoing process to develop plans, test and validate the plans through simulated exercises, and to use the lessons learnt to further improve or refine the plans.

The Wales Resiliance Partnership team (WRPT) has introduced a process using the National Resilience

Extranet to capture recommendations from all exercises and events which responder agencies feel need to be

implemented in Wales.

The Wales Civil Contingencies Conference on 28 February 2012 examined the lessons learnt from Gleision, Chevron, Fforestfach and Brynglas with a senior audience and involving specific clinics on areas identified

for review, such as scientific advice during emergencies, enviromental sampling, dealing with the media and

hazardous area response from the ambulance service. The key actions recommended from the clinics will be considered by the multi-agency Wales Resilience Partnership Team (WRPT) and addressed by sub-groups, task and finish groups, or Local Resilience Forums. Work is already being undertaken by the Welsh Government to review scientific and technical advice arrangements in Wales in light of the Fforestfach Fire and Exercise Cambria Guard.

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The Welsh Government, in partnership with the Joint Emergencies Services Group (JESG), has run a series

of national courses to further develop the skills of responders in dealing with the media, which was a key

issue from all emergencies that have occurred in Wales over the past year. Again, in collaboration with JESG,

the Welsh Government has continued with a rolling programme of Multi-Agency Gold Incident Control courses for senior officers who would act as the ‘Gold’ Group for such incidents.

The ‘Gold Group’ or ‘Strategic Co-ordinating Group’ is a multi-agency response group comprising

representatives from all relevant agencies, at the most senior level, to provide strategic management when responding to an emergency.

Statistical footnote: The following exercises were conducted over the period from April 2008 to April 2012:

2008-9

Ex Bardic Surge - Mass Casualties / Fatalities Ex Amber Glass - Fuel Shortage

2009-10

Ex Taliesin - Pandemic Flu Ex Kingfisher - Water

2010-11

Ex Watermark - Flooding Ex Silver Birch - Animal Disease Ex Avogadro - Energy Supply Ex White Noise - Telecomms Failure

2011-12

Ex Cambria Guard - Counter-Terrorism Olympic Command Post exercise series

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TR118 - Effectiveness of co-ordinated response to emergency situations

How are we doing?

Over the reporting period, the LGC Resilience team contributed to multi-agency debriefs of the emergency response to four major incidents in Wales: the Chevron Refinery explosion; the Brynglas Tunnel Fire; the Fforestfach Industrial Estate Fire; and the Tarren Gleision Colliery collapse. The four reports formed the programme for a one-day Wales Civil Contingencies conference held 28 February 2012 with LGC Resilience working as part of a multi-agency project team to deliver. The conference presentations and lessons identified will be shared further across the resilience community by a DVD of the presentations.

The lessons identified from the reports, along with lessons identified from other sources, have been developed into a Wales level summary and associated management process. The summary is maintained by the

Wales Learning and Development Group and reports will be provided to the Wales Resilience Partnership

Team. The summary provides a mechanism by which lessons identified can be reviewed and shared across

Figure

Updating...

References

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