NITTEC TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS. Integrated Corridor Management

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NITTEC

TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS

Integrated Corridor Management

Requirements Document

FINAL REPORT

January 29, 2010

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page i February 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 INTRODUCTION... 1 1.1 Background ... 1 1.2 Related Documents ... 2

2 NIAGARA FRONTIER CORRIDOR ICM OVERVIEW ... 4

2.1 Purpose ... 4

2.2 Scope ... 5

2.3 Corridor Boundaries... 5

2.4 Corridor Networks ... 7

2.5 Corridor Stakeholders ... 16

2.6 Current Corridor Conditions ... 17

2.7 Abbreviations and Acronyms ... 20

3 SYSTEM OVERVIEW ... 21

3.1 System Components... 21

3.2 Existing and Planned Systems ... 22

3.3 System Users ... 27

3.3.1 User Interfaces ... 35

3.4 System Operation ... 36

4 SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS OVERVIEW ... 39

4.1 System Requirements Organization ... 39

4.1.1 System Requirement Categories ... 39

4.1.2 System Requirement Critical Levels ... 39

4.1.3 System Requirement Table Headings ... 40

5 NON-FUNCTIONAL SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ... 41

5.1 Non-Functional Needs (NFN)... 41

5.2 Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) ... 42

6 FUNCTIONAL SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ... 45

6.1 Functional Needs (FN) ... 45

6.2 Functional Requirements (FR) ... 47

7 DATA SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS ... 50

7.1 Data Needs (DN) ... 50

7.2 Data Requirements (DR)... 51

8 SUMMARY ... 56

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page ii February 2010 EXHIBITS

Exhibit 2-1: The Niagara Frontier Corridor ...6

Exhibit 2-2: Niagara Frontier Corridor Highway Network (New York State) ...10

Exhibit 2-3: Niagara Frontier Corridor Highway Network (Province of Ontario) ...11

Exhibit 2-4: Niagara Frontier Corridor Highway Border Crossing Network ...12

Exhibit 2-5: Niagara Frontier Corridor Rail Network ...13

Exhibit 2-6: Niagara Frontier Corridor Bus Network ...14

Exhibit 2-7: Niagara Frontier Corridor Air Transportation Network ...15

Exhibit 3-1: Key Components of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICM Initiative ...22

Exhibit 3-2: Niagara Frontier Corridor Institutional Framework ...37

TABLES Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor ...7

Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ...17

Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor ...23

Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS User Categories ...28

Table 4-1: High-Level Requirement Categories ...39

Table 4-2: Requirements Critical Level Categories ...40

Table 5-1: Non-Functional Needs (NFN) ...41

Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) ...42

Table 6-1: Functional Needs (FN) ...45

Table 6-2: Functional Requirements (FR) ...47

Table 7-1: Data Needs (DN) ...50

Table 7-2: Data Requirements (DR) ...51

APPENDICES

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 1 of 56 February 2010

1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background

In 2007, the Niagara International Transportation Technology Coalition (NITTEC) completed Strategic Plan 2007, which provides a vision of the region’s transportation future, and recommended actions to guide NITTEC toward fostering a preferred long-term future of mobility and opportunity in the Niagara region. One of the recommendations was to develop a concept for transportation operations for the Niagara region.

In response to Strategic Plan 2007, NITTEC initiated a Transportation Operations Study. This study is divided into two parts: the development of a NITTEC Regional Concept for Transportation Operations (RCTO) and providing support to NITTEC in the development of an Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) initiative. This study project is taking the next step beyond the NITTEC Strategic Plan (2007).

An RCTO is a management tool to assist in planning and implementing management and operations strategies in a collaborative and sustained manner. The RCTO focuses partners on specific operations objectives and strategies within one or more management and operations functions of regional significance, such as traveler information, road weather management, or traffic incident management.1

An ICM initiative consists of the operational coordination of multiple transportation networks and cross-network connections comprising a corridor, and the coordination of institutions responsible for corridor mobility. The goal of ICM is to improve mobility, safety, and other transportation objectives for travelers and goods.2

The purpose of this memorandum is to summarize the development of system requirements for the Niagara Frontier Corridor. The formulation of requirements is essential because it outlines what the system is trying to achieve. The requirements should define what the system will do and not define how it will be done, and be in a format that others can read, review, and interpret. In addition to being technology independent, the system requirements include the following attributes:

Necessary: Important aspects of the system that if absent, other components of the system would be unable to compensate for.

1 FHWA, Regional Concept for Transportation Operations: The Blueprint for Action (2007)

2 FHWA, FTA, Integrated Corridor Management – Concept Development and Foundational Research, Task 2.3 – ICMS Concept of Operations for a Generic Corridor (2006).

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 2 of 56 February 2010Concise: Language used is clear and easy to read yet gets the point across.

Attainable: Have an achievable capability utilizing available time, resources, and funds.

Complete: Be a standalone document that won’t require additional resources. • Consistent: Be consistent throughout the entire document.

Unambiguous: Be clear-cut and explicit.

Verifiable: Be validated through four possible methods: inspection, analysis, demonstration, or test.

The requirements outlined in this document were formulated using information obtained from corridor stakeholders throughout the development of this ICM initiative and are divided into the following three categories:

Non-Functional Requirements – impose constraints on the design or

implementation of the system, such as performance requirements (how well it performs) or quality standards.

Functional Requirements – provide a complete description of the behavior of the ICM system (what the system will do).

Data Requirements – define the information needed to perform the desired functions.

This technical memorandum is a living document and will be reviewed periodically. Modifications to the requirements will be made to reflect desired changes in the ICM system as well as stakeholders' needs at the time.

1.2 Related Documents

Below is a list of documents that contain additional information pertaining to ICM systems as well as those documents that were used in the development of requirements for the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

References Specific to the Niagara Frontier Corridor

• Task B1 – System Overview and Operational Description (Existing Conditions) Technical Memorandum #2, April 17, 2009

• Task B2 – Integrated Corridor Management Vision, Goals, and Objectives Technical Memorandum #5, April 13, 2009

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 3 of 56 February 2010 • Task B3 – System Operational Concept Technical Memorandum #6, June 4,

2009

• Buffalo-Niagara Bi-National Regional ITS Architecture, http://www.consystec.com/buffalo/web/_regionhome.htm

• NITTEC 2008 Annual Report • NITTEC 2007 Strategic Plan

General References for Integrated Corridor Management

• ICM Implementation Guidance, USDOT, ITS Joint Program Office, April 2006

• ICMS Concept of Operations for a Generic Border, USDOT, ITS Joint Program Office, April 2006

• Integrated Corridor Management Systems, USDOT, RITA,

http://www.its.dot.gov/icms/index.htm

• Integrated Corridor Management Systems Program Plan, USDOT, FHWA, http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/crt/roadmaps/icmprgmplan.cfm

ITS, Operations, Architecture, Other

• Developing, Using, and Maintaining an ITS Architecture for Your Region: Regional ITS Architecture Guidance Document,” National ITS Architecture Team, October 2001.

• National ITS Architecture, Version 5.1, U.S. Federal Highway Administration, http://www.iteris.com/itsarch/

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 4 of 56 February 2010

2 NIAGARA FRONTIER CORRIDOR ICM OVERVIEW

2.1 Purpose

The overall purpose of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICM (ICM) is to achieve the goals and objectives that have been set forth to ensure the combined stakeholder vision of having transportation operations within the corridor operate efficiently. The ICM is intended to provide improved integration of operational procedures and facilitate improved emergency response and dissemination of traveler information. The primary purpose of the system is to support the ICM stakeholders in fulfilling the vision of the Niagara Frontier Corridor:

“Improved mobility through integrated management of transportation assets - freeways, arterials, transit, managed lanes - in the Niagara Frontier corridor.” For the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICM to be successful, it is imperative that its development and operation be driven by the following ICM objectives developed during Task B2 – Vision, Goals and Objectives of this project:

• Improve center-to-center communications

• Improve accuracy of congestion (travel time) information reliability • Enable intermodal choices through improved traveler information

• Improve integration of weather information/data for traveler information, and for maintenance operations

• Improve integrated operations based on real-time data • Maximize the free flow of traffic and reduce congestion • Provide transit alternative and park-and-ride facilities • Enhance border crossing clearance

• Facilitate ITS and operational improvements that will facilitate ICM mobility • Enhance alternative route management capabilities

• Establish incident classifications and severity guidelines • Improve and coordinate incident management

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 5 of 56 February 2010 2.2 Scope

The system to be developed under the NITTEC Integrated Corridor Management Initiative is the Niagara Frontier Corridor Integrated Corridor Management System (abbreviated as Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS or ICMS as referenced throughout this document). The Niagara Frontier ICMS is intended to help the existing highway, border crossing, rail, bus, and air transportation networks (outlined in Section 2.4 of this document) along the corridor operated by separate agencies to function as an integrated transportation system by enhancing efficiency and mobility for all travelers (people and goods).

2.3 Corridor Boundaries

The Niagara Frontier, the border region that encompasses the Niagara River border crossings, is a strategic international gateway for the flow of trade and tourism between the United States and Canada. The Niagara River, flowing from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, forms the Niagara Frontier border with the United States and Canada.

On the Canadian side, the Niagara Region covers approximately two-thirds of the Niagara Peninsula and consists of twelve local municipalities. The cities of St. Catharines and Niagara Falls are the largest urban centers on the Canadian side of the Niagara Frontier. Further west is the City of Hamilton and beyond that the Greater Toronto Area (GTA).

On the United States side, the Buffalo-Niagara Frontier region forms the western border of New York State with the province of Ontario. The region consists of Erie and Niagara Counties, 64 local municipalities, and Native American lands. The City of Buffalo is located at the easternmost end of Lake Erie. The City of Niagara Falls, New York is located in Niagara County opposite Niagara Falls, Ontario.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 6 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-1: The Niagara Frontier Corridor

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 7 of 56 February 2010 2.4 Corridor Networks

The Niagara Frontier Corridor is composed of five main transportation networks: highways, border crossings, rail, bus, and air.

Highway Network – The existing highway network in the Niagara Frontier

Corridor includes a number of controlled access highways that serve the Niagara Frontier and border area. The existing highway network within New York State is shown in Exhibit 2-2 and the existing highway network within the Province of Ontario is shown in Exhibit 2-3.

Border Crossings Network – The existing border crossings network in the Niagara Frontier Corridor includes four international border crossing bridges spanning the Niagara River that marks the international border. All four bridges are tolled one-way in the Canada-bound direction. There locations are shown in

Exhibit 2-4.

Rail Network – The existing rail network in the Niagara Frontier Corridor includes passenger and freight rail service that is provided to and within the Niagara Frontier by several major rail carriers. The existing passenger and freight rail network is shown in Exhibit 2-5.

Bus Network – The existing bus network in the Niagara Frontier Corridor includes inter-urban transit and municipal transit service. There locations are shown in Exhibit 2-6.

Air Transportation Network – The existing air transportation network within the corridor includes international and regional airports. There locations are shown in Exhibit 2-7.

A summary of the networks within the corridor is given in Table 2-1.

Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor

Network Network Description

Highway Network Province of Ontario

o Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) o Highway 405

o Highway 420 o Highway 3

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 8 of 56 February 2010 Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Network Network Description

Highway Network (continued)

Province of Ontario (cont.)

o Highway 406 o Highway 24 o Highway 58

New York State

o Route I-190 o Route I-290

o Route I-90 (New York State Thruway) o Route 198 (Scajaquada Expressway) o Route 33 (Kensington Expressway) o Route I-990 (Lockport Expressway) o NY Route 400 (Aurora Expressway) o NY Route 219 (Southern Expressway)

Border Crossings Network Peace Bridge

Rainbow Bridge

Whirlpool Rapids Bridge

Queenston-Lewiston Bridge

Rail Network Niagara River Rail Crossings

o International Railway Bridge

o Whirlpool Rapids Bridge (upper deck) o Michigan Central Railway Bridge

(Not in use, Tracks removed)

Passenger Rail

o Amtrak o VIA Rail

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 9 of 56 February 2010 Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Network Network Description

Rail Network (continued)

Freight Rail

o Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) o Canadian Nation (CN) Railway

Bus Network Inter-Urban Transit

o Intercity bus companies o Greyhound Lines Canada o Greyhound Lines Inc

o Trentway-Wagar/Coach Canada, o Adirondack Trailways

o Pine Hill Trailways o New York Trailways

Municipal Transit

o Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority (NFTA)

o City of Niagara Falls o City of St. Catharines o City of Welland • City of Fort Erie

Air Transportation Network International Airports

o The Buffalo Niagara International Airport (BNIA)

o The Niagara Falls International Airport (NFIA)

o John C. Munro International Airport (Hamilton)

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 10 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-2: Highway Network (New York State)

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 11 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-3: Highway Network (Province of Ontario)

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 12 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-4: Highway Border Crossing Bridge Network

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 13 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-5: Rail Network

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 14 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-6: Bus Network

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 15 of 56 February 2010 Exhibit 2-7: Air Transportation Network

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 16 of 56 February 2010 2.5 Corridor Stakeholders

The stakeholders in the corridor include the following NITTEC member agencies and related agencies/organizations listed below:

• NITTEC Member agencies

o Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority (PBA) o City of Buffalo

o City of Niagara Falls, New York o City of Niagara Falls, Ontario o Erie County

o Ministry of Transportation, Ontario (MTO)

o New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT) o New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA)

o Niagara County

o Niagara Falls Bridge Commission (NFBC)

o Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority (NFTA) o Niagara Parks Commission

o Niagara Region o Town of Fort Erie

• Other related agencies/organizations

o Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) o Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)

o Greater Buffalo-Niagara Regional Transportation Council (GBNRTC) o New York State Police (NYSP)

o Ontario Provincial Police (OPP)

o United States Customs and Border Protection (USCBP)

o Other local and regional police and emergency services agencies o Recovery companies

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 17 of 56 February 2010 2.6 Current Corridor Conditions

In determining the scope of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS, it is important to consider the current conditions and needs of the corridor. The requirements outlined in Section 5 of this document help address the current conditions that travelers face on a daily basis and the overall needs of the corridor. Table 2-2 summarizes the current conditions and needs of the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor

Condition # Description of Condition

1) The QEW is subject to heavy commercial and intercity traffic volumes during weekday travel to and from the United States and during weekends from high tourist traffic. The QEW is currently the primary truck route linking the Niagara Bridge crossings to the Greater Toronto area and the central part of southern Ontario.

2) A large number of local residents use the QEW through St. Catharines due to the difficulty in moving east-west on city streets. This situation contributes to high peak hour volumes and congestion in the area.

3) Highway 420 experiences high summer traffic volumes, primarily from recreational traffic destined for the Rainbow Bridge and the tourist attractions of the Niagara Falls area.

4) As a result of high traffic volumes as well as operational and processing constraints at the border, the Peace Bridge, Rainbow Bridge, and the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge can be subject to significant border delays. Generally, the existing delays at the border and approach roads are related to congestion and operational matters at the enforcement /processing plazas. These delays are often caused by large peaks in traffic volumes, such as mid-week truck traffic peaks, holiday passenger vehicle peaks, or by additional security measures that may be undertaken from time to time.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 18 of 56 February 2010 Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Condition Description of Condition

5) The Whirlpool Rapids Bridge has been operating as a NEXUS3-only bridge for frequent cross-border travelers since March 2004. Daily traffic volumes are approximately 500 vehicles. However, the use of NEXUS is anticipated to grow significantly in the corridor over the next decade.

6) Truck queue problems on Highway 405 approaching the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge have generally been addressed by the provision of a fully automated queue warning system and the widening of Highway 405 eastbound lanes to provide a truck queue lane / truck express lane.

7) The major components of Peace Bridge traffic are non-commuter related passenger cars as well as trucks. Due to the influence of tourist travel patterns, passenger car volumes are highest on Fridays and weekends (heaviest in July and August), which is when truck traffic is the lowest. Significantly higher truck activity occurs during the weekdays, especially on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

8) None of the municipal transit operations (City of Niagara Falls, Town of Fort Erie, and Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority) offers a cross-border service.

9) There are approximately 36 agencies in Erie and Niagara Counties, both public and private, which have responsibility for operation and maintenance of traffic signals. Aside from NYSDOT, the City of Buffalo, and the City of Niagara Falls, there are few coordinated traffic signals in the corridor. There is no other emergency vehicle pre-emption or transit signal priority systems operating. A recommendation would be to establish priority corridors and to establish timing plans for those corridors that can be implemented from one central location. The focus should be on facilitating the movement of Police, Fire, Emergency Medical Services, and Towing operators.

Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

3 The NEXUS program allows pre-screened travelers expedited processing by United States and Canadian officials at dedicated processing lanes at designated northern border ports of entry, at NEXUS kiosks at Canadian

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 19 of 56 February 2010

Condition Description of Condition

10) On the Canadian side of the border, traffic signal coordination is provided on Niagara Region’s 17 arterial networks. These networks are mainly located in the City of Niagara Falls, the City of St. Catharines, and the City of Welland. The older networks have failing communication systems, but the Niagara Region is in the process of replacing them. Although there are fewer traffic signals in the Region of Niagara compared to Erie and Niagara Counties, as well as fewer local municipalities, opportunities exist for coordination to establish priority corridors, timing plans, etc.

The Niagara Region installs and maintains emergency vehicle pre-emption equipment based on requests from the local municipality. The City of Niagara Falls has approximately 40 intersections equipped for emergency vehicle pre-emption, which covers most response routes. The City of St. Catharines has about five intersections that are equipped for emergency vehicle pre-emption, however no specific corridors. Equipped signals are located near fire halls.

11) NYSTA maintains 12 RWIS sites within the Buffalo Division of their facilities. Of these 12 sites, six are within the Niagara Frontier Corridor. On the Canadian side, both the MTO and Niagara Region maintain RWIS sites, for a total of 10 operational sites. Two sites operated by Niagara Region are located outside of the corridor. The sites belonging to the MTO and Niagara Region are both polled by the Weather Network.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 20 of 56 February 2010 2.7 Abbreviations and Acronyms

Below is a list of acronyms referenced in this document.

Acronym Description

ATIS Advanced Traveler Information System

ATMS Advanced Transportation Management System

AVL Automatic Vehicle Location

CAD Computer Aided Dispatch

CBSA Canada Border Services Agency

CCTV Closed Circuit Television

DMS Dynamic Message Signs

EMS Emergency Medical Services

FHWA Federal Highway Administration

GBNRTC Greater Buffalo-Niagara Regional Transportation Council

HAR Highway Advisory Radio

ICM Integrated Corridor Management

ICMS Integrated Corridor Management System

ISP Information Service Provider

IT Information Technology

ITS Intelligent Transportation System MTO Ministry of Transportation, Ontario

NFBC Niagara Falls Bridge Commission

NFTA Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority

NITTEC Niagara International Transportation Technology Coalition

NR Niagara Region

NYSDOT New York State Department of Transportation

NYSP New York State Police

NYSTA New York State Thruway Authority

OPP Ontario Provincial Police

QEW Queen Elizabeth Way

RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration

RWIS Roadway Weather Information System

TOC Transportation Operations Center

TMC Transportation Management Center

USCBP United States Customs and Border Protection USDOT United States Department of Transportation

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 21 of 56 February 2010

3 SYSTEM OVERVIEW

3.1 System Components

The Niagara Frontier ICM Initiative is comprised of the following four key components:

Existing Systems and Field Devices – Includes existing control systems and field devices that are already in place in the corridor. These are considered external requirements to the ICMS because the ICMS requirements were created assuming that these elements exist and will continue to exist in the future. If for any reason these elements cease to exist or change in any way, this may impact the ICMS.

Planned Systems and Field Devices – Includes planned control systems and field devices that will be developed and implemented in the future. These are considered external requirements and include those elements and enhancements to existing elements that are planned for deployment by state, city, or county agencies.

ICM System (ICMS) – Includes the ICM software and field devices used to implement the ICMS. These include new systems as well as enhancements to existing systems.

Collaboration – Includes the partnerships, agreements, and actions among stakeholders needed to complement the deployment of systems in support of the ICMS. These partnerships and agreements are defined to ensure that each agency understands its role and responsibilities, as well as the roles and responsibilities of other partnering agencies.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 22 of 56 February 2010

Niagara

Frontier

ICM

Concept

Existing

Systems & Field

Devices

Planned

Systems & Field

Devices

ICM System

itself

Collaboration

in support of

ICM

Exhibit 3-1: Key Components of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICM Initiative

3.2 Existing and Planned Systems

There are currently a number of existing and planned ITS systems within the Niagara Frontier Corridor that could be key components to the overall ICMS. The Buffalo-Niagara Bi-National Regional ITS Architecture4 was used in determining the status of these systems, so for more information please refer to this document. Table 3-1

describes these existing and planned systems and indicates the owning agency that is committed to maintaining these systems.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 23 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor

Existing or Planned System Owning Agency

Bridge Border Crossing Systems (existing) – Represents the electronic border crossing systems for pre-clearance credentials and information at the border crossings. The commercial traffic will electronically transmit the documentation prior to arrival to the border crossing so that an instantaneous clearance can be made. Includes The Niagara Falls Intelligent Transportation Border Crossing System (ITBCS) and the similar system at the Peace Bridge.

CBSA/USCBP

Canadian Border Inspection Sensor Systems (planned) Sensor systems (e.g. radiation portal monitors) used to sense threats in freight, vehicles, or travelers.

CBSA

Canadian Border Inspection Systems (existing)

Represents systems used by Canadian Customs at the border.

CBSA

City of Buffalo Coordinated Traffic Signal System

(planned) – Planned closed loop traffic signal control

system for the City of Buffalo.

City of Buffalo

City of Buffalo Parking Management System (existing) – Parking lots and facilities operated by City of Buffalo.

City of Buffalo

Managed Reversible Lane System (existing)This system manages the three reversible lanes on the Peace Bridge. One lane can be reversed in the direction of rush hour flow with the possibility of all lanes flowing in the same direction based on traffic needs.

PBA

MPO Data Collection and Reporting System (existing) A multimodal transportation data archive operated by the MPO for the Greater Buffalo metropolitan area.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 24 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Existing or Planned System Owning Agency

Local Traffic Signal Control Systems (planned) - This element represents the traffic signal control systems for the municipalities within the Niagara Region (including both US and Canadian systems).

Local DPW

MTO Asset Management System (planned) – Intended

to represent the MTO’s asset management systems (e.g. pavement management system, asset inventory, sign inventory, etc.).

MTO

MTO TRIP (Traveler Road Information Project)

(existing) – This system is a road information service for

easy access to road information for provincially maintained highways. Road closures and restrictions, winter road conditions, construction, traffic flow, traffic cameras, car pool lots and high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes information is provided and updated regularly.

MTO

MTO TRIS (Traveler Roadway Information System)

(existing)This system is an automated Fax/Email

system designed to provide provincial highways traffic reports to a large subscriber list, primarily the radio media.

MTO

COMPASS System (existing )– This system is a Freeway Traffic Management System developed by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) to respond to traffic congestion problems on urban freeways. The system consists of ITS field equipment including detectors, arterial advisory signs, VMS, and CCTV cameras.

MTO

MTO Road Weather Information System (RWIS)

(existing) – A system of environmental sensors deployed

by the MTO that are connected together to provide real-time, accurate and site specific pavement surface conditions and weather data. Individual RWIS sites are often referred to as remote processing units (RPU’s), consisting of several atmospheric sensors mounted to a tower, and sensors embedded within and below the pavement surface.

MTO/Niagara Region

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 25 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Existing or Planned System Owning Agency

Queue End Warning System (existing)This system includes an installation of queue-end monitoring and warning systems on the QEW and Highway 405 for approaches to the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge and Peace Bridge.

MTO

Managed Reversible Lane System (existing)This system manages the five reversible lanes on the Queenston-Lewiston Bridge. Lanes 1 to 4 are marked daily in the same direction depending on traffic needs. In addition to the directional signals, special signals are also fitted to specify what type of vehicle may use the lane.

NFBC

NITTEC TOC Archive Management System

Communications Log (existing) – The archive

management system for NITTEC that collects regional traffic and incident data over a regional network.

NITTEC

TRANSMIT (TRANSCOM's System for Managing

Incidents & Traffic) (existing) – This system uses vehicles equipped with electronic toll-collection tags (E-ZPass) as anonymous probes for transportation management and traveler information. The transponder readers installed along roadways are used to detect vehicles with the E-ZPass tags. As tags are detected by successive readers, the TRANSMIT system compiles aggregate data on average speeds, travel times, and the number of non-arriving vehicles (vehicles expected but not yet detected by the next reader downstream).

NITTEC

CROSSROADS (NITTEC’s Advanced Traffic

Management System) (existing)This system uses CCTV and traffic monitoring equipment to detect problems, and then deploys VMS, flasher control, and automated faxing, emailing and the NITTEC Website to inform the public. The Skyway closing system is located along the elevated portion of NY Route 5 near Lake Erie through downtown Buffalo. The system includes sensors that aide in protecting drivers from severe weather conditions, and the Skyway is closed by an electronic system of fixed message signs and flashers.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 26 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Existing or Planned System Owning Agency

NYSDOT Asset Management System (existing)

Intended to represent the NYSDOT's asset management systems (e.g. pavement management system, asset inventory, sign inventory, etc.).

NYSDOT

NYSDOT Conditions Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) (existing) – Conditions Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) provides a multi-state database of travel events, such as accidents and roadwork. CARS software allows authorized staff to input construction, accident, delay, and other roadway, weather and tourism event information into statewide databases. The CARS server also supports routine DOT dispatch, press release and emergency response activities.

NYSDOT

NYSDOT Public Information Office System (planned)

This system provides filtered traveler information to ISPs and the media for NYSDOT.

NYSDOT

NYSDOT Road Weather Information System

(planned) – A system of sensors connected together to

provide real-time, accurate and site specific pavement surface conditions and weather data. Individual RWIS sites are often referred to as remote processing units (RPU’s), consisting of several atmospheric sensors mounted to a tower, and sensors embedded within and below the pavement surface.

NYSDOT

NYSDOT Traffic Signal Inventory System and Maintenance System (existing) – Inventories each traffic signal intersection, including equipment at that intersection as well as maintenance and dispatch history. The maintenance and dispatch data will be collected in the future.

NYSDOT

NYSDOT 511 System (existing) – This multimodal trip

planning system provides traffic conditions, transit conditions, transit trip planner, ride share, and travel links to the public.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 27 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Existing or Planned System Owning Agency

Queue End Warning System (planned) - This system includes an installation of queue-end monitoring and warning systems approaching the Queenston-Lewiston border crossing.

NYSDOT

NYSTA Lane Closure Reporting System (existing) -

This system makes lane closure information available to travelers via the world wide web, the media, and kiosks.

NYSTA

NYSTA Maintenance Management System (MMS)

(existing) – This database includes maintenance schedule

information and facilities information.

NYSTA

NYSTA Statewide Operations Center Archive Management System (existing) – This is the archive management system for the Thruway Authority. Functionally located within the statewide operations center.

NYSTA

NR Asset Management System (planned) – Intended to represent the RMN's asset management systems (e.g. pavement management system, asset inventory, sign inventory, etc.).

Niagara Region

ITS Field Elements – These elements encompass a broad range of wireless and wireless electronic technologies that include HAR, VMS, PVMS, and CCTV.

NYSDOT/NFBC/ NYSTA/MTO/ PBA

3.3 System Users

The users of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS are important to understand and document in order for the system to be developed and designed to support the needs of its users. Table 3-2 provides a detailed summary of the user classes for the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICM. Each user category includes associated user classes and position levels within that class, and a brief description of how the respective user class could function within the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 28 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS User Categories

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Operations Personnel TMC/TOC operators (traffic and transit) • NITTEC operations and maintenance personnel

• Traffic operation and system maintenance personnel • Transit operations and system maintenance personnel • Traffic operator supervisors • Transit operator supervisors

• Monitor roadway and transit facility conditions in the corridor

• Assess incidents occurring throughout the corridor to determine how

incidents will affect traffic and/or transit operations in the area

• Monitor and interpret data from ICMS for potential response

• Based on ICMS information, notify other staff, supervisors, internal and external departments, and appropriate authorities of adverse conditions requiring a response

• Monitor and operate agency systems and input/initiate ICMS

communications

• Use ICMS information to inform drivers and passengers of incidents affecting transit operations

• Assess need for rerouting buses; determine best alternative route • Use ICMS information to determine

need to adjust signal operations • Based on ICMS information, request

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 29 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Operations Personnel (continued)

TMC/TOC

managers • NITTEC TOC manager • Traffic control center

manager • Transit control/dispatch center manager • City engineers • County engineers • Provincial engineers • State engineers

• Monitor systems using ICMS information

• Use ICMS to coordinate with other agency functions

• Use ICMS to monitor and evaluate multi-modal corridor system performance

• Maintain traffic signals

Service patrols (HELP)

• Patrol men/women and supervisors

• Monitor events in service area • Perform motorist aid duties in the

assigned service area

• Evaluate events with potential impact on the service area

• Provide information about incidents and roadway conditions to TMC operators

• Evaluate performance of service patrol activities

Transit vehicle operators

• Bus and rail operators

• Receive ICMS incident information from transit operations center

• Inform transit riders of disruptions or delay of service

• Operate regional bus vehicles and monitor roadway conditions on their assigned routes

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 30 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Operations Personnel (continued) Management personnel for operations and maintenance of equipment and devices

• Operations Managers • Use ICMS information for decision making, coordinating resources, and directing staff for incident response • Supervise operations staff who enter

or access ICMS-accessible information

• Use ICMS to coordinate programs such as maintenance, construction, and special events with state and local jurisdictions

• Use ICMS to monitor and evaluate multi-modal corridor system performance

• Use ICMS performance information to review/update operational

multimodal operational response policies and/or procedures Public Safety Public safety

operators and dispatchers

• Call takers and dispatchers • Police dispatchers • Fire dispatchers

• Receive calls for assistance from the traveling public via mobile or landline phones and initiate incident records within a CAD system

• Log call and dispatch information into CAD, to be shared through the ICMS • Dispatch and track public safety units

using CAD systems and update incident records based on officer field reports Emergency Responders Law enforcement agencies

• Police officers • Provide information and updates to ICMS through CAD interfaces • Monitor traffic conditions to provide

input for incident response coordination

• Monitor events outside their service areas and evaluate the impacts of these events on activities in their area

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 31 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Emergency Responders (continued)

Fire

departments

• Fire personnel • Share CAD data through interface with the ICMS

Emergency medical services

• EMS personnel • Share CAD data through interface with the ICMS

Tow truck operators

• Tow truck personnel • Reach out to NITTEC prior to using CCTV images to determine needed equipment

• Reach out to NITTEC prior to check desired route for delays prior to dispatching

• Review incident information before dispatching Travelers Corridor travelers – private vehicle, commercial vehicle, and transit users

• Passenger car drivers • Transit passengers

• Receive multi-modal traffic and transit incident alerts via web, television, radio, telephone, new technologies, etc.)

• Receive information via ICMS about roadway and transit facility conditions (bus operations, rail operations, parking), events, transit schedules, fares, etc.

• Use ICMS multimodal trip planning tool for travelers to make informed decisions about their trips

• Use ICMS information for travelers via third-party information service providers, such as real-time multi-modal trip updates using in-vehicle navigation devices, cell phones, etc.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 32 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Information Service Providers Public traveler information service providers • Control center operators • IT staff

• Receive ICMS traveler information and provide to travelers within operational jurisdiction via agency system traveler information

mechanisms (web, HAR, VMS, etc.) Private traveler information service providers • Private center operations • IT staff

• Information from ICMS to supplement private traveler

information distribution mechanisms • Information from ICMS to private

ISP’s for developing business relationships for innovative traveler information distribution services and devices

Media • Reporters • Receive and use ICMS traveler information to supplement existing information sources

• Gather information on planned and unplanned corridor events and inform the public and agency operations Public affairs

offices • Public affairs personnel

• Monitor ICMS for pertinent information and notifications from other agencies

• Receive ICMs alerts Archived Data

Users

Archived data

users • Research personnel Public sector transportation planners and engineers

• Operations managers

• Assess mobility trends to help

understand congestion, safety, growth, etc.

• Monitor system performance in accordance with adopted ICMS performance measures

• Provide support for decision makers in preparation of transportation plans and programs

• Conduct after-action incident response reviews

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 33 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Program/System Administration Oversight committee • ICM Stakeholders • MPO (GBNTRC)

• Provide overall guidance, strategic management, system enhancement, operations planning and funding functions for ICMS

System managers

• Corridor and regional transportation

managers

• ICMS development and implementation oversight • Multi-modal corridor operations

management, with a working knowledge of freeway, arterial, transit, and public safety operations Information Technology IT developers • IT managers • Computer programmers and systems engineers

• Develop IT hardware and software concepts / design and deploy IT equipment and applications

• Integration/development services for ICMS related subsystems and data interfaces System maintenance personnel • Computer programmers and systems engineers • IT maintenance staff

• Manage ICMS related subsystems and data archive

• Operate and maintain ICMS IT equipment

• Diagnose and fix system operational problems

• Maintain a record of system maintenance and upgrades • Maintain test system

• Fix bugs in test system; implement changes in production system

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 34 of 56 February 2010 Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

User Category User Class Position Niagara Frontier ICMS Function

Information Technology (continued) User support personnel • Computer programmers and systems engineers

• Update training materials • Train users

• Refer unresolved problems to maintenance staff

• Maintain log of all user support responses and activities

System administrators

• Systems personnel • Maintain data sources and links • Backup data regularly

• Maintain a uniform, consistent interface to data for maintenance personnel

• Maintain system and database system security

• Maintain user accounts • Maintain log of use statistics

• Maintain computer systems, database servers, and web servers

• Ensure integrity of system Information technology staff • Agency/Organization IT system development and maintenance personnel

• Maintain communications network to ensure data and information flows from agency data system to ICMS • Develop, repair, and maintain agency

software, equipment, databases, etc. • Maintain interfaces between ICMS

and agency databases and systems, including system security

Other Commercial freight dispatchers

• Dispatchers • Monitor incidents in order to notify drivers of incidents and recommend alternate routes

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 35 of 56 February 2010

3.3.1 User Interfaces

The Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS will include a variety of user interfaces for stakeholder agency users, travelers, and ICM system administration staff. The users of the ICM system are categorized into the following three interfaces: an ICMS administration interface, an ICMS agency interface, and a public interface. The ideal platform that would enable all users access to information related to the ICMS may be a website. A separate website could be created for each user category, and information relevant to that user could be posted on the website.

The following is a description of each user interface category:

ICMS Administration User Interface – This interface will provide

capabilities for ICM System Administrators to manage user accounts and permissions on all ICM websites, monitor the performance of the system, and modify system configuration parameters. Only authorized system administration staff will have access to this website.

ICMS Agency Use Interface – This interface will be accessible only to authorized stakeholder agency users. It will include functionality to create/modify agency contact data, perform data analysis and reporting, and view tables and map-based displays of corridor transportation data, such as incidents and recommended response plans and actions, work zones, and surveillance video.

Public Use Interface – This interface will allow the traveling public to create/modify information dissemination subscriptions (e.g., e-mail/fax/pager), and view tables and map-based displays of corridor transportation data.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 36 of 56 February 2010 3.4 System Operation

The operating agencies and users within the Niagara Frontier Corridor include multiple jurisdictions and disciplines. This is why the management and operations of the corridor and the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS will be a joint effort involving all stakeholders. For the effective operation and management of the ICMS, the proposed institutional framework developed in Task B3 – System Operational Concept of this project should be implemented. The three key roles of the institutional framework included the following:

Institutional Oversight – This role will be a collaborative effort among the NITTEC member agencies through the Executive Council, and the Regional Transportation Coordination and Management Council (RTCMC). They will be responsible for the overall management of the ICMS, including the commitments of member agencies, and providing direction and policy development for the corridor.

Niagara Frontier Corridor Coordination – This role will be a collaborative effort among the NITTEC committees including: the Border Crossing Committee, Construction Coordination Committee, Incident Management – Ontario Committee, Incident Management – WNY Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, Technology & Systems Committee, and the Traffic Operations Center Committee. They will be responsible for the distribution of responsibilities, the sharing of control, and related functions among the corridor agencies. The committees will also be responsible for recommending the necessary inter-agency and service agreements, budget development, project initiation and selection, corridor operations policies/procedures, and overall administration for the corridor. • Day-to-Day Operations – This role will be a collaborative effort among the

NITTEC Traffic Operations Center and Systems Operations and Maintenance. They will be responsible for handling daily operations of the Niagara Frontier Corridor at the local level.

Exhibit 3-2 illustrates the institutional framework for the ICM concept.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 38 of 56 February 2010 The framework of the ICMS will require that many elements be addressed in order to ensure smooth and continuous operations. The ongoing measurement of data quality is very important as well as staff training and documentation in order to disseminate and ensure consistency in procedures.

As system elements are installed, the following information should also be developed: • Documentation of user procedures and standard operating procedures (SOPs) • Training materials

• Documentation of equipment inventory

• Documentation of maintenance procedures ( including routine and non-routine maintenance)

Staff training is a major element of any new system operation. Detailed training should be developed and implemented so that ICMS staff is aware not only of their responsibilities as a user of the system, but also that procedures and protocols are followed.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 39 of 56 February 2010

4 SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS OVERVIEW

4.1 System Requirements Organization

4.1.1 System Requirement Categories

The Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS requirements are organized into three high-level categories in order to group similar requirements together. These categories are: Non-Functional Requirements, Functional Requirements, and Data Requirements.

Table 4-1 summarizes the description of eachrequirement category.

Table 4-1: High-Level Requirement Categories

4.1.2 System Requirement Critical Levels

All system requirements may not have the same priority and therefore the following critical levels were established: Low, Medium, and High. Table 4-2 provides a description for each critical level.

Abbreviation Category Category Description

NFR Non-Functional Requirements Requirements that may include non-testable requirements, such as documentation and training. Also includes requirements that define the performance of the system.

FR Functional Requirements Requirements that define what the system will do.

DR Data Requirements Requirements that define the data in the system, such as data elements and data structures

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 40 of 56 February 2010 Table 4-2: Requirements Critical Level Categories

Critical Level Category Category Description

Low (L) • Requirement adds benefit to the

operation of the ICMS, but the ICMS will function without it. • Nice-to-have features that provide

marginal system benefits

Medium (M) • Requirement adds significant

benefit to the operation of the ICMS

• Desired requirements that will improve the usability and effectiveness of the system

High (H) • Requirement is critical for the

successful operation of the ICMS • Essential, critical requirements

that are needed in order to achieve the system’s primary goals and objectives

4.1.3 System Requirement Table Headings

The System Requirements provided in Sections 5, 6, and 7 are presented in table format with the following headings:

Requirement ID – A unique identifier for each requirement.

Requirement Description – A concise description of the requirement.

Traceability – An identifier referring to a need used to create the requirements. • Critical Level – A one-letter abbreviation representing the priority of the

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 41 of 56 February 2010

5 NON-FUNCTIONAL SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

5.1 Non-Functional Needs (NFN)

The Non-Functional, Functional, and Data Needs outlined in Sections 5, 6, and 7 respectively, were derived from the current Niagara Frontier Corridor conditions described in Table 2-2 of Section 2.6. These needs represent improvements that are necessary within the corridor and tie into the requirements that are needed for the system to function optimally. Table 5-1 provides a description of Non-Functional Needs identified for the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

Table 5-1: Non-Functional Needs (NFN)

Need # Description

NFN-1 Need for interagency cooperation, communication and coordination among corridor stakeholders.

NFN-2 Need for a durable and modifiable system.

NFN-3 Need for a reliable system.

NFN-4 Need for a maintainable system.

NFN-5 Need for policies and procedures to address route/modal shifts within the corridor.

NFN-6 Need for tools and procedures to assist stakeholder agencies with operational decision-making for improved transportation management within the corridor.

NFN-7 Need for security including operations center firewall and authorized access to data and system.

NFN-8 Need for documentation including maintenance documentation, operator manuals, and administration manuals.

NFN-9 Need for maintenance and operator training.

NFN-10 Need corridor-level performance measures to determine the

effectiveness of the Niagara Frontier ICM strategies and operation in comparison to corridor goals and objectives.

NFN-11 Need standard operating procedures to improve communications

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 42 of 56 February 2010 5.2 Non-Functional Requirements (NFR)

Based on the needs described in Section 5.1, a set of Non-Functional Requirements for the ICMS were developed to address these needs. The Non-Functional Requirements outlined in this section include performance and quality requirements for the systems.

Table 5-2 provides a summary of Non-Functional Requirements identified for the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) Requirement

ID

Requirement Description Traceability Critical

Level

NFR-1 The ICMS shall be available 24 hours a day,

7 days a week.

NFN-3 H

NFR-2 The ICMS shall have routine maintenance

every month. NFN-4 H

NFR-3 The software components of ICMS shall be

maintainable with minimum downtime. Typical maintenance down time shall not exceed 30 minutes.

NFN-3 NFN-4

H

NFR-4 The ICMS shall function 99% of the time. NFN-2

NFN-3

H

NFR-5 The ICMS operations center shall have

firewall(s) for security purposes.

NFN-7 H

NFR-6 The ICMS operations center shall require

authentication of users.

NFN-7 H

NFR-7 The ICMS subsystems shall follow security

requirements of the host ITS system. NFN-7

H

NFR-8 The ICMS shall have documentation for

maintenance.

NFN-8 H

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 43 of 56 February 2010 Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.)

Requirement ID

Requirement Description Traceability Critical

Level

NFR-10 The ICMS shall have administration

manuals. NFN-8 M

NFR-11 The ICMS shall have features allowing

on-line training for maintenance personnel. NFN-9 L

NFR-12 The ICMS shall have features allowing

on-line training for system operators. NFN-9 L

NFR-13 Communication protocols shall be

developed for ICMS allowing effective communication among operators from various agencies.

NFN-1 NFN-11

M

NFR-14 The institutional framework for operating

ICMS shall be defined by a partnership agreement among all transportation agencies along the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

NFN-1 NFN-6

M

NFR-15 The ICMS shall include documented

policies and procedures for coordinated traffic management and incident management within the corridor.

NFN-6 NFN-11

H

NFR-16 The ICMS shall include documented

policies for implementing demand/capacity management strategies in the corridor.

NFN-5 M

NFR-17 The ICMS shall include documented

procedures and protocols for identifying route/modal shifts when spare capacity exists on multiple transportation networks in the corridor.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 44 of 56 February 2010 Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.)

Requirement ID

Requirement Description Traceability Critical

Level

NFR-18 The ICMS shall include documented

procedures and protocols for implementing route/modal shifts when sufficient spare capacity is not available within the corridor.

NFN-5 M

NFR-19 The ICMS shall include documented

common policies for incident response and reporting in the corridor.

NFN-11 H

NFR-20 The ICMS shall include documented

performance measures to determine effectiveness of corridor goals and objectives

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 45 of 56 February 2010

6 FUNCTIONAL SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

6.1 Functional Needs (FN)

Functional Needs identify the high-level needs of the ICMS and are developed to focus on the operational aspects of the ICMS and help to define the Functional Requirements of the proposed ICMS. These needs were derived from the ICM goals and objectives that were developed as part of Task B2 – Vision, Goals, and Objectives, and through general input from stakeholders throughout the completion of the ICM project. Table 6-1 summarizes the identified needs of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

Table 6-1: Functional Needs (FN)

Need # Description

FN-1 Need to expand corridor-wide information sharing to help disseminate reliable and real-time traveler information to commuters.

FN-2 Need for traffic signals to be able to respond to changing conditions on affected arterials and adjacent roadways, in the Niagara Frontier Corridor, to maintain optimal traffic flow.

FN-3 Need for VMS to be modified based on changing conditions within the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

FN-4 Need for HAR to be activated / modified based on changing conditions within the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

FN-5 Need for a corridor/region-based multimodal traveler information system.

FN-6 Need for coordination between freeway and arterial operations.

FN-7 Need for coordination between highway and transit operations.

FN-8 Need for coordination between transit systems.

FN-9 Need for coordination between highway and freight operations.

FN-10 Need for coordination between transportation management systems and

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 46 of 56 February 2010 Table 6-1: Functional Needs (FN) (cont.)

Need # Description

FN-11 Need for coordination for incident response.

FN-12 Need to provide traveler information for construction and maintenance.

FN-13 Need to provide travelers with reliable information in getting from one location to another location within the corridor.

FN-14 Need to coordinate with corridor stakeholder agencies in

broadcasting/displaying appropriate and consistent corridor transportation messages when utilizing appropriate traveler information devices (VMS, HAR, 511).

FN-15 Need to provide travel conditions at decision points to provide motorists with decision-making information, particularly travel times using one or another travel mode choice.

FN-16 Need to provide travelers access to accurate, reliable, and multi-modal travel information, both pre-trip and en-route, to enable travelers to make better informed travel decisions.

FN-17 Need to provide ICMS users the ability to remotely control ITS devices within the Niagara Frontier Corridor.

FN-18 Need to provide ICMS backup and restore capabilities to minimize

system downtime.

FN-19 Need to utilize applicable ITS standards and other pertinent standards to achieve consistency among corridor stakeholder systems and improve overall corridor operations and maintenance efforts.

FN-20 Need for a cross-border service among the municipal transit operations (City of Niagara Falls, Town of Fort Erie, and Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority).

FN-21 Need for feedback from corridor travelers on corridor performance.

FN-22 Need for ICMS to interface with member and stakeholders existing

systems.

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Technical Memorandum #7 Page 47 of 56 February 2010 6.2 Functional Requirements (FR)

The Functional Requirements described in this section were formulated using the needs from Section 6.1 as a basis. These requirements detail what the Niagara Frontier ICMS is supposed to accomplish, which may include a service or task. Each requirement listed provides a key function (component) of the ICMS that is needed for the ICMS to be successful as a whole.

Table 6-2 provides a summary of the functional requirements of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

Table 6-2: Functional Requirements (FR) Requirement

ID

Requirement Description Traceability Critical

Level

FR-1 The ICMS shall have inter-agency

operating agreements regarding the control of regional motorist information (VMS, HAR) assets by approved ICMS users.

FN-14 FN-19

M

FR-2 The ICMS shall provide an interface for an ICMS agency to remotely control any Niagara Frontier corridor motorist information device (VMS, HAR) regardless of the owning agency.

FN-17 M

FR-3 The ICMS shall forecast network

(freeway, arterial, transit) demand.

FN-16 M

FR-4 The ICMS shall disseminate designated data to travelers via the following:

• a publicly accessible website • mobile device notification

subscriptions

• e-mail notification subscriptions

FN-1 FN-16

H

FR-5 The ICMS shall include a multi-modal trip planner.

FN-5 FN-15

Figure

Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 2-1:

Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.11
Table 2-1: Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 2-1:

Transportation Networks within the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.12
Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor

Table 2-2:

Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor p.20
Table 2-2: Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) Condition   Description of Condition

Table 2-2:

Current Conditions of the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) Condition Description of Condition p.21
Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor

Table 3-1:

Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor p.26
Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 3-1:

Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.27
Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 3-1:

Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.28
Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 3-1:

Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.29
Table 3-1: Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.)

Table 3-1:

Existing and Planned Systems in the Niagara Frontier Corridor (cont.) p.30
Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS User Categories

Table 3-2:

Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS User Categories p.31
Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

Table 3-2:

Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.) p.36
Table 3-2: Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.)

Table 3-2:

Niagara Frontier ICMS User Categories (cont.) p.37
Table 4-1 summarizes the description of each requirement category.

Table 4-1

summarizes the description of each requirement category. p.42
Table 4-2: Requirements Critical Level Categories  Critical Level Category  Category Description  Low (L)  •  Requirement adds benefit to the

Table 4-2:

Requirements Critical Level Categories Critical Level Category Category Description Low (L) • Requirement adds benefit to the p.43
Table 5-1: Non-Functional Needs (NFN)

Table 5-1:

Non-Functional Needs (NFN) p.44
Table 5-2 provides a summary of Non-Functional Requirements identified for the  Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS

Table 5-2

provides a summary of Non-Functional Requirements identified for the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS p.45
Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.)

Table 5-2:

Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.) p.46
Table 5-2: Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.)

Table 5-2:

Non-Functional Requirements (NFR) (cont.) p.47
Table 6-1: Functional Needs (FN)

Table 6-1:

Functional Needs (FN) p.48
Table 6-1: Functional Needs (FN) (cont.)

Table 6-1:

Functional Needs (FN) (cont.) p.49
Table 6-2 provides a summary of the functional requirements of the Niagara Frontier  Corridor ICMS

Table 6-2

provides a summary of the functional requirements of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS p.50
Table 6-2: Functional Requirements (FR) (cont.)

Table 6-2:

Functional Requirements (FR) (cont.) p.51
Table 6-2: Functional Requirements (FR) (cont.)

Table 6-2:

Functional Requirements (FR) (cont.) p.52
Table 7-1 summarizes the data needs of the Niagara Frontier ICMS.

Table 7-1

summarizes the data needs of the Niagara Frontier ICMS. p.53
Table 7-1: Data Needs (DN) (cont.)

Table 7-1:

Data Needs (DN) (cont.) p.54
Table 7-2 summarizes the Data Requirements of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS.

Table 7-2

summarizes the Data Requirements of the Niagara Frontier Corridor ICMS. p.54
Table 7-2: Data Requirements (DR) (cont.)

Table 7-2:

Data Requirements (DR) (cont.) p.55
Table 7-2: Data Requirements (DR) (cont.)

Table 7-2:

Data Requirements (DR) (cont.) p.56
Table 7-2: Data Requirements (DR) (cont.)

Table 7-2:

Data Requirements (DR) (cont.) p.57
Table 7-2: Data Requirements (DR) (cont.)

Table 7-2:

Data Requirements (DR) (cont.) p.58

References

Updating...