2015 YOU CAN AFFORD COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID WORKSHOPS

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2015

YOU CAN

AFFORD

COLLEGE

FINANCIAL AID

WORKSHOPS

W W W.YOUCANAFFORDCOLLEGE.ORG W W W . E D U C A C I O N A T U A L C A N C E . O R G

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I.    OVERVIEW  &  KEY  INFORMATION

 

 

Welcome!  

 

Welcome  to  the  annual  Dallas  County  FAFSA/TASFA  Workshops!  We  are  thrilled  you’re  here!  This  packet  is   meant  to  serve  as  a  resource  for  you  both  during  today’s  workshop,  as  well  as  after  the  workshop  is  done  –  so   that  you  can  refer  back  to  answer  any  future  questions  you  may  have.  The  goal  for  today  is  that  you  complete  

as  much  of  your  financial  aid  application  as  possible  with  the  support  of  trained  volunteers.  Whether  you  

are  filing  a  FAFSA  (Free  Application  for  Federal  Student  Aid)  or  TASFA  (Texas  Application  for  State  Financial   Aid),  we  are  all  here  to  help  make  sure  that  You  Can  Afford  College.    

 

What  is  the  FAFSA?    What  is  the  TASFA?    Do  I  file  both?

 

Most  colleges  and  universities  use  the  information  you  provide  to  determine  how  much  financial  aid  you  can   receive  to  help  you  pay  for  college  expenses.  It  does  not  obligate  you  to  taking  out  loans.    

• FAFSA  =  Free  Application  for  Federal  Student  Aid   • TASFA  =  Texas  Application  for  State  Financial  Aid    

You  will  need  to  file  EITHER  the  FAFSA  OR  the  TASFA.  You  must  file  your  financial  aid  application  every  year  

you  are  attending  school.  In  the  case  of  undocumented  students,  you  may  need  to  file  both  a  paper  FAFSA  for  

DCCCD,  and  a  TASFA  for  other  schools  that  accept  that  as  your  financial  aid  application.  The  chart  below  will   help  you  determine  if  you  need  to  file  the  FAFSA  or  TASFA  based  on  your  residency  status.  

 

Who  files  the  FAFSA?    Who  files  the  TASFA?    

Residency  Status  (Student)   Free  Application  for   Federal  Student  Aid  

(FAFSA)  

TX  Application  for   State  Financial  Aid  

(TASFA)  

Paper   FAFSA  

U.S.  Citizen  

✔  

 

 

Permanent  resident  w/  Alien  Reg.  Card  (I-­‐551)  

✔  

 

 

Conditional  permanent  resident  w/  visa  type  I-­‐551C  

✔  

 

 

Eligible  non-­‐citizen  w/  Arrival/Departure  Record  (I-­‐94)  showing   one  of  the  following:  

• Refugee   • Asylum  granted   • Parolee    (1  year)   • Cuban-­‐Haitian  entrant  

✔  

 

 

I  do  not  meet  one  of  the  statuses  above,  but  I’ve  been   classified  as  a  TX  resident  &  therefore  am  eligible  to  pay  TX  in-­‐

state  tuition  rate.  

 

✔  

 

I  also  do  not  meet  one  of  the  statuses  above,  but  I’ve  been   classified  as  a  TX  resident  &  therefore  am  eligible  to  pay  TX  in-­‐ state  tuition  –  AND  I  am  applying  to  a  Dallas  County  

Community  College  campus.  

 

 

   

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FAFSA/TASFA  Deadlines  

Priority   deadlines   vary   by   college   and   can   be   as   early   as   February   15.   The   Texas   Priority   Deadline   and  

deadline  for  the  top  10  percent  scholarship  and  TEXAS  Grant  is  March  15.  Here  are  the  priority  deadlines  for  

local  universities  as  listed  on  their  websites:  

College/University   FAFSA  Priority  Deadline   Forms  Accepted  

Dallas  County  Community  Colleges   May  1     FAFSA/Paper  FAFSA      

Paul  Quinn  College   No  Priority  Deadline   FAFSA/TASFA  

SMU   February  15  (first-­‐year  students)  

April  15  (returning  students)   FAFSA/TASFA/CSS  Profile  

Texas  A&M  University  -­‐  Commerce   March  15   FAFSA/TASFA  

University  of  Dallas   March  1   FAFSA/TASFA/CSS  Profile  

UNT  Dallas   March  15   FAFSA/TASFA  

UT  Arlington   April  1   FAFSA/TASFA  

UT  Dallas   March  31   FAFSA/TASFA  

 

Why  should  I  file  my  financial  aid  application?  

Many  students  have  reservations  about  filing  financial  aid  applications,  including  some  of  the  following:    

“My  parents  may  make  too  much  money,  so  I  won’t  qualify  for  financial  aid.”  

-­‐ There  is  no  income  cut-­‐off  to  qualify  for  student  aid.  Many  factors  besides  income—for  example,  the   size  of  your  family—are  taken  into  account.  Remember,  when  you  file  your  FAFSA  or  TASFA,  you’re   applying  for  funds  from  your  colleges  and  state,  in  addition  to  the  federal  government.  Some  schools   won’t  consider  you  for  scholarships  until  you’ve  submitted  your  FAFSA/TASFA—so  fill  it  out!  

 

“Only  students  with  good  grades  receive  financial  aid.”  

-­‐ A   high   grade   point   average   may   help   a   student   be   accepted   to   a   good   school   and   may   help   with   academic   scholarships,   but   most   federal   student   aid   programs   do   not   take   a   student’s   grades   into   account.  As  long  as  you  keep  your  grades  up,  financial  aid  will  help  you  complete  your  education.1  

 

“The  FAFSA/TASFA  is  too  hard  to  fill  out.”  

-­‐ If   you   are   struggling   after   today   to   finish   your   financial   aid   application,   you   can   visit   your   college   counselor  or  school’s  college  and  career  center  to  make  sure  you  feel  confident  submitting  your  FAFSA   or  TASFA.  You  can  also  call  the  Federal  Student  Aid  Information  Center:  1-­‐800-­‐4-­‐FED-­‐AID  (1-­‐800-­‐433-­‐ 3243).   The   hotline   is   open   every   day,   including   weekends   and   evenings.   Lastly,   you   can   also   visit  

www.studentaid.ed.gov   for   more   resources   to   help   you   understand   and   complete   your   FAFSA,   or  

www.tgslc.org/tasfa/resources.cfm  for  help  on  the  TASFA.    

“My  parents  don’t  want  the  government  or  colleges  to  have  access  to  all  of  our  family’s  financial  information.”   -­‐ The   FAFSA   and   TASFA   require   specific   information   about   your   parents’   taxes   so   that   colleges   can   determine   how   much   aid   would   be   most   helpful   given   your   financial   situation.   Neither   the   federal   government  (for  the  FAFSA)  nor  the  state  government  (TASFA)  or  colleges  share  your  information  with   anyone,  so  you  can  trust  they  are  keeping  tax  information  confidential.  For  that  reason,  it  is  better  to   share  this  tax  information  so  that  you  can  receive  the  maximum  financial  aid;  otherwise,  institutions   will  not  be  able  to  determine  a  helpful  financial  aid  package  for  you.  

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“My  parents  are  concerned  about  providing  their  information  because  of  their  citizenship  status.”   -­‐ Your  parents’  citizenship  status  does  not  affect  your  eligibility  for  federal  student  aid.  In  fact,  the  

FAFSA  doesn’t  even  ask  about  your  parents’  status.  Note:  If  your  parent  does  not  have  a  Social   Security  number,  you  may  enter  all  zeroes  (000-­‐00-­‐0000)  for  him  or  her  on  the  FAFSA  where  it  asks   for  that  information.  At  the  end  of  the  FAFSA  online,  you  will  need  to  print  out  the  parent  signature  

page,  have  your  parent  sign  the  page  and  mail  the  form  to  the  FAFSA  processor  via  regular  first-­‐ class  mail  (Federal  Student  Aid  Programs,  P.O.  Box  7006,  Mt.  Vernon,  IL  62864-­‐0076).

 

II.    FOCUS  ON  TODAY:    TIPS  FOR  WORKING  ON  YOUR  FAFSA/TASFA  DURING  THE  

WORKSHOP  

 

Key  Vocabulary  

 

Personal  Identification  Number  (PIN)  

-­‐ Your  electronic  PIN  for  the  FAFSA  serves  as  your  identifier  to  allow  access  to  personal  information  in   various  U.S.  Department  of  Education  systems  and  acts  as  your  digital  signature  on  some  forms.    Both   you,  the  student,  and  your  parent  apply  for  and  receive  a  PIN,  which  you’ll  use  every  year  you  file  your   FAFSA.  Your  PIN  is  an  essential  piece  of  information,  which  you  do  not  want  to  lose.      

-­‐ For  students  filing  the  FAFSA  online  with  undocumented  parent(s),  a  reminder  that  your  parent(s)  will   not  apply  for  a  PIN  since  they  do  not  have  a  Social  Security  Number.    You  will  need  to  print  the  parent   signature  page  at  the  end,  and  mail  the  page  signed  to:  Federal  Student  Aid  Programs,  P.O.  Box  7006,   Mt.  Vernon,  IL  62864-­‐0076  

 

Estimated  Family  Contribution  (EFC)  

-­‐ This  is  the  number  used  to  determine  your  eligibility  for  student  financial  aid.    This  number  results  from   the  financial  information  you  provide  in  your  FAFSA  or  TASFA.  Your  EFC  is  reported  in  your  Student  Aid   Report  (SAR)  for  the  FAFSA,  and  in  a  financial  aid  award  letter  from  your  colleges  for  the  TASFA.  

 

Student  Aid  Report  (SAR)  

-­‐ A  summary  of  the  information  you  submitted  on  your  FAFSA.    You  receive  this  report  (often  called  the   SAR)   via   e-­‐mail   a   few   days   after   your   FAFSA   has   been   processed.   If   you   did   not   provide   an   e-­‐mail   address,   you   will   receive   it   by   mail   within   7-­‐10   days.   If   there   are   no   corrections   or   additional   information  you  must  provide,  the  SAR  will  contain  your  EFC,  which  is  the  number  used  to  determine   your  eligibility  for  financial  aid.  

 

Verification  

-­‐ The  process  your  schools  use  to  confirm  that  the  data  reported  on  your  FAFSA  or  TASFA  is  accurate.   Your   schools   have   the   authority   to   contact   you   for   documentation   that   supports   income   and   other   information  that  you  reported.  They  may  request  different  documentation,  so  be  prepared.  

-­‐ In  order  to  minimize  the  likelihood  of  verification,  use  the  IRS  Data  Retrieval  Tool  to  download  your  tax   information  into  your  FAFSA.    

   

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Work-­‐Study  

-­‐ Work-­‐study   jobs   are   part-­‐time   employment   opportunities   that   help   students   earn   money   to   pay   for   their   education.   When   evaluating   your   financial   aid   award   letter,   know   that   this   is   not   money   you   receive  up  front.  It  is  paid  out  to  you  over  the  course  of  the  semester  as  paychecks  for  hours  you  work.  

 

How  the  FAFSA  and  TASFA  Work  

 

Where  does  my  FAFSA  information  go  once  I  submit  it?    

Your   FAFSA   information   is   shared   with   the   colleges   and/or   career   schools   you   list   on   the   application.   The   financial   aid   office   at   a   school   uses   your   information   to   figure   out   how   much   federal   student   aid   you   may   receive   at   that   school.   If   the   school   has   its   own   funds   to   use   for   financial   aid,   it   might   use   your   FAFSA   information  to  determine  your  eligibility  for  that  aid  as  well.  (The  school  might  also  have  other  forms  it  wants   you  to  fill  out  to  get  school  aid,  so  check  with  the  financial  aid  office  to  be  sure.)  

 

Your  information  also  goes  to  your  state  higher  education  agency,  as  well  as  to  agencies  of  the  states  where   your   chosen   schools   are   located.   Many   states   have   financial   aid   funds   that   they   give   out   based   on   FAFSA   information.  

 

How  can  I  check  to  see  whether  my  FAFSA  has  been  processed?    

You  can  check  the  status  of  your  FAFSA  immediately  after  submitting  it  online.  You  can  check  the  status  of  a   paper  FAFSA  after  it  has  been  processed  (roughly  7–10  days  from  the  date  mailed).  Here’s  how:  

• Option  1:  Go  to  www.fafsa.gov  and  click  Start  Here  to  log  in.  

• Option  2:  Contact  the  Federal  Student  Aid  Information  Center  at  1-­‐800-­‐4-­‐FED-­‐AID  (1-­‐800-­‐433-­‐3243).  

If  your  FAFSA  is  still  being  processed,  we  recommend  you  wait  a  few  days  before  checking  the  status  again.    

What  kinds  of  changes  can  I  make  to  my  FAFSA  once  it’s  been  processed?  

 

Corrections:  If  You  Made  a  Mistake    If  you  made  a  mistake  in  what  you  reported  on  the  FAFSA,  you’ll  need  to  make  a   correction.  Note:    FAFSA  on  the  Web  doesn’t  allow  you  to  change  your  Social  Security  Number  (SSN).  If  you  made  a   mistake  in  reporting  your  SSN,  ask  the  financial  aid  office  at  the  school  you  plan  to  attend  whether  you  should  start  over   again  and  submit  a  new  FAFSA.  

 

Updates:  If  Your  Situation  Has  Changed  Most  information  cannot  be  updated  because  it  must  be  accurate  as  of  the   day  you  originally  signed  your  FAFSA.  For  example,  if  you  spent  some  of  your  savings  after  filing  the  FAFSA,  you  may  not   update   your   information   to   show   a   change   in   that   amount.   Talk   to   the   financial   aid   office   at   the   school   you   plan   to   attend  if  there  will  be  a  significant  change  in  your  or  your  parent’s  income  or  if  your  family  has  other  circumstances  that   cannot  be  reported  on  the  FAFSA.  You  may  update  your  mailing  address,  e-­‐mail,  or  other  contact  info  if  it  changed.  

 

There  are  certain  items  that  you  must  update:  

You  must  update  anything  that  changes  your  dependency  status  (for  instance,  you  are  now  pregnant  or  are  now  

in  legal  guardianship)  except  a  change  in  your  marital  status.  If  your  marital  status  changes,  you  must  speak  to   the  financial  aid  office  to  determine  whether  you  may  update  the  FAFSA.  

If  (and  only  if)  you  are  selected  for  verification,  you  must  update  your  FAFSA  if  there  is  a  change  in  the  number  

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• If  (and  only  if)  you  are  selected  for  verification,  you  must  update  your  FAFSA  if  there  is  a  change  in  the  number  

of  people  in  your  parents’  household  who  are  in  college  or  the  number  of  people  in  your  household  who  are  in   college.  If  the  number  of  people  in  college  changes  as  a  result  of  a  change  in  your  (the  student’s)  marital  status,   you   must   speak   to   the   financial   aid   office   at   the   school   you   plan   to   attend   to   determine   whether   you   may   update  the  FAFSA.  

 

Changes  to  Federal  School  Codes:    If  You  Want  to  Add  or  Delete  a  School  

If  you  want  to  make  your  FAFSA  information  available  to  an  additional  school  after  filing  the  FAFSA,  you  may   add  that  school’s  Federal  School  Code.  Note:  No  more  than  10  schools  may  be  listed  on  your  FAFSA  at  one   time.  (The  paper  and  PDF  FAFSAs  have  space  for  only  four  schools,  while  FAFSA  on  the  Web  allows  10  to  be   listed.)  If  you  add  an  eleventh  school,  the  new  school  code  overwrites  a  previous  school  code.  You  may  choose   which  school  to  replace  with  the  new  school.  The  school  removed  from  the  list  will  not  have  automatic  access   to  any  new  information  you  provide  after  you’ve  removed  that  school.  

 

Correcting  or  Making  Changes  to  Your  FAFSA  

Check  with  the  financial  aid  office  at  the  school  you  plan  to  attend;  the  school  might  be  able  to  make  changes   for  you  electronically.    

 

Make  changes  at  www.fafsa.gov:   1. Click  “Start  Here”  to  log  in.   2. Click  “Make  FAFSA  Corrections.”   3. Enter  your  Federal  Student  Aid  PIN.   4. Change  your  information.  

5. Submit  your  new  information.  Write  in  the  corrections  or  updates  on  your  paper  Student  Aid  Report   (SAR),  sign  it,  and  mail  it  to  the  address  provided  on  the  SAR.  

 

Common  Mistakes  –  Watch  out!  

-­‐ Forgetting  (or  losing)  your  FAFSA  PIN   -­‐ Entering  Social  Security  Number  incorrectly  

-­‐ Paying  to  file  (The  FAFSA  is  free!  Make  sure  you  use  www.fafsa.gov)   -­‐ Not  entering  first  and  last  name  as  it  appears  on  Social  Security  Card  

-­‐ Parents  entering  their  information  on  the  FAFSA  student  section  (or  vice  versa)   -­‐ Parents  not  “signing”  the  FAFSA  (even  electronically—PIN  signature  required)   -­‐ Incorrectly  reporting  the  number  of  people  in  the  household  

-­‐ Parents  reporting  unemployment  earnings  as  wages,  salaries,  and  tips  on  FAFSA  

 

III.    KEEP  UP  THE  HARD  WORK:    AFTER  THE  WORKSHOP—AM  I  DONE?    NOW  

WHAT?

 

 

What  to  Do  If  You  Finished  Your  FAFSA/TASFA

   

If  you  submitted  your  FAFSA  online  today,  the  Department  of  Education  will  send  you  a  Student  Aid  Report  

(SAR),  which  is  a  summary  of  the  FAFSA  data  you  submitted.  You’ll  get  your  SAR  within  three  days  to  three   weeks   after   you   submit   your   FAFSA.   Look   over   your   SAR   to   make   sure   you   didn’t   make   a   mistake.   Pay   attention  to  communication  (either  e-­‐mail  or  snail  mail)  from  the  colleges  to  which  you’ve  applied  –  they  may   request   additional   information   regarding   your   income   or   other   aspects   of   your   identity,   to   complete   the   process  called  verification.  See  below  for  more  information  on  how  to  proceed  with  this.  

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If  you  are  an  undocumented  student  and  finished  filling  out  the  TASFA  or  the  paper  version  of  the  FAFSA,  

your  next  step  is  putting  the  paperwork  in  individual  envelopes  addressed  to  the  schools  to  which  you  are   applying.  Be  sure  to  reach  out  to  each  school  and  find  out  that  they’ve  received  all  your  materials  within  the   next  week.  Colleges  will  likely  request  additional  information  from  you  to  verify  your  income,  so  make  sure   you  are  paying  attention  to  your  mail  and  e-­‐mail.  

 

What  to  Do  If  You  Need  to  Finish  Your  FAFSA/TASFA

   

If   you   haven’t   finished   your   online   FAFSA,   make   sure   you   save   the   last   page   on   which   you   were   working.  

You’ll  be  able  to  return  to  keep  working  on  your  FAFSA  via  www.fafsa.gov,  but  you’ll  need  to  sign  in  with  your   PIN  and  Social  Security  Number  –  this  is  why  it’s  so  important  to  hold  on  to  that  information.  

 

If  you  haven’t  finished  your  paper  FAFSA  or  TASFA,  make  sure  you  keep  your  paperwork  in  a  safe  place  and  

complete  it  as  soon  as  possible.  Because  this  is  a  paper  form,  it  will  take  colleges  longer  to  process,  and  so  you   want  to  be  sure  to  send  it  to  the  colleges  as  quickly  as  you  can.  

 

Follow-­‐up  Items:    What  to  Expect

   

I’m  receiving  letters  or  e-­‐mail  messages  from  my  colleges  that  say  they  need  more  financial  information,  in   addition  to  my  FAFSA  or  TASFA.  What  do  I  do?  

If   colleges   are   telling   you   they   need   more   information   from   you   about   your   income   or   family,   you   have   probably  been  selected  for  the  process  of  verification.  Remember  that  most  universities  use  this  process  to   confirm   that   the   information   you   reported   about   your   financial   situation   is   true.   To   potentially   avoid   verification,   you   can   utilize   the   IRS   Data   Retrieval   Tool   to   transfer   your   parents’   tax   information   into   the   FAFSA  online  when  you  first  file  the  FAFSA.  See  below  for  a  detailed  explanation  of  the  IRS  Data  Retrieval  Tool.   Otherwise,  if  you  do  not  or  cannot  electronically  transfer  your  tax  information  into  the  FAFSA  (e.g.  you  are   filing  a  paper  FAFSA),  your  colleges  will  probably  request  a  copy  of  your  IRS  Tax  Transcript.    Learn  more  about   obtaining   a   copy   of   your   IRS   Tax   Transcript   here:  www.irs.gov   (select   “Order   a   Transcript”)   or   call   the   Transcript  toll-­‐free  line  at  1-­‐800-­‐908-­‐9946.  

 

Colleges  may  also  request  a  copy  of  your  passport  or  other  documentation  pertaining  to  residency  if  you  are   an  immigrant  student  filing  an  electronic  FAFSA.  It  is  important  that  you  understand  exactly  what  the  colleges   are  asking  for  and  that  you  send  those  documents  as  quickly  as  you  can.  In  general,  the  number  one  rule  to  

remember  is  to  communicate  with  your  colleges  and  their  financial  aid  officers  –  otherwise,  you  could  miss  

out  on  opportunities  for  financial  aid.  If  you’re  nervous  or  unsure  about  contacting  colleges  or  how  to  handle   verification,  ask  a  counselor  or  trusted  teacher  to  help  you  navigate  the  process.  

 

What  is  the  IRS  Data  Retrieval  Tool,  and  how  do  I  use  it?  

The  IRS  Data  Retrieval  Tool  is  designed  to  transfer  you  and  your  parents’  federal  tax  return  information  into   your  FAFSA  online.  Entering  your  tax  information  is  one  of  the  most  important  steps  on  the  FAFSA.  If  you  and   your  parents  filed  your  taxes  within  the  last  two  weeks  prior  to  filing  your  FAFSA  online,  your  tax  information   should  be  available  through  the  IRS  online.  If  your  taxes  are  transferred  to  the  FAFSA  online  through  the  IRS,   you  are  less  likely  to  be  selected  for  the  process  of  verification,  which  is  described  above.  

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I’ve  received  an  award  letter  from  my  school.  Which  financial  aid  is  the  best  to  accept?    

Our  recommendation  is  free  money  first  (scholarships  and  grants),  then  earned  money  (work-­‐study),  and  lastly   borrowed  money  (federal  student  loans).  Start  from  the  top  of  this  table  and  work  your  way  down:  

 

Order  of  Aid  from   Most  Preferable  to  

Least   Type  of  Aid   What  to  Keep  in  Mind  

1   Scholarships  and  grants   Make   sure   you   understand   the   conditions   you   must   meet   (for   instance,   you   might   have   to   maintain   a   certain   grade-­‐point   average   in   order   to   continue   receiving   a   scholarship,   or   your   TEACH  grant  might  turn  into  a  loan  if  you  don’t  teach  for  a  certain   number  of  years  under  specific  circumstances).  

2   Work-­‐study   You  don’t  have  to  pay  the  money  back,  but  you  do  have  to  work   for  it,  so  take  into  account  that  that’ll  mean  less  time  for  studying.   However,  research  has  shown  that  students  who  work  part-­‐time   jobs  manage  their  time  better  than  those  who  don’t!    This  is  not   money  you  receive  up  front;  you  need  to  work  the  hours  at  your   work-­‐study  job  to  earn  the  funds  throughout  the  year.  

3   Federal  student  loans   (subsidized  or  unsubsidized)      

You’ll   have   to   repay   the   money   with   interest.   Subsidized   loans   don’t  start  accruing  (accumulating)  interest  until  you  leave  school,   so  accept  a  subsidized  loan  before  an  unsubsidized  loan.  You  are   required   to   start   making   payments   on   unsubsidized   loans   while   you   are   still   a   student.   Note:   You   don’t   have   to   accept   the   full  

amount  of  loans,  so  only  borrow  what  you  need.  

4   Loans  from  your  state   government  or  your  college  

You’ll  have  to  repay  the  money  with  interest,  and  the  terms  of  the   loan  might  not  be  as  good  as  those  of  a  federal  student  loan.  Be   sure  to  read  all  the  fine  print  before  you  borrow.  

5   Private  loans   You’ll  have  to  repay  the  money  with  interest,  and  the  terms  and   conditions   of   the   loan   almost   certainly   will   not   be   as   good   as   those  of  a  federal  student  loan.  Avoid  these  if  possible!  

 

How  do  I  get  my  money?  

 

The  financial  aid  staff  at  your  college  or  career  school  will  explain  exactly  how  and  when  your  aid  will  be  paid   out.  They  also  will  tell  you  whether  you  need  to  fill  out  any  more  paperwork  or  meet  other  requirements.  For   instance,  if  you’re  receiving  a  federal  student  loan  for  the  first  time,  you  should  expect  to  be  required  to  sign  a   promissory   note   and   go   through   entrance   counseling   online.   Be   sure   to   keep   in   touch   with   your   school’s   financial  aid  office  so  that  you  understand  the  whole  process  of  receiving  your  aid.    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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More  Resources  

 

Federal  Student  Aid  Information  Center  (1-­‐800-­‐4-­‐FED-­‐AID  or  1-­‐800-­‐433-­‐3243)    

 

North  Texas  Dream  Team  –  if  you  think  you  might  qualify  for  Deferred  Action  for  Childhood  Arrivals  (DACA)  

and  have  yet  to  apply,  visit  www.northtexasdreamteam.org.    

Student  Aid  Website  –  www.studentaid.ed.gov  many  helpful  videos  and  visuals  explaining  how  FAFSA  works.  

 

If  you  are  eligible  for  federal  aid  but  your  parents  are  undocumented,  find  information  on  how  to  answer  

questions   about   your   parents   and   their   residency   status   at   the   following   link:  

https://studentaid.ed.gov/sites/default/files/financial-­‐aid-­‐and-­‐undocumented-­‐students.pdf.  

 

Your   School   or   College   Counselor   can   help   you   with   any   follow-­‐up   questions   you   might   have   after   the  

workshop.    Make  an  appointment  to  consult  this  valuable  resource.  

 

Information   on   other   workshops   if   you   didn’t   finish   your   FAFSA   or   TASFA   today   can   be   found   at  

www.youcanaffordcollege.org/events.    You  Can  Afford  College  also  has  valuable  resources  on  navigating  the   financial  aid  process  under  www.youcanaffordcollege.org/student-­‐and-­‐family-­‐resources.  

 

Scholarships  

Finish   your   FAFSA   or   TASFA!   Nearly   ALL   postsecondary   institutions   use   your   financial   aid   application   to   determine  your  eligibility  for  scholarships  and  other  aid.  

-­‐ Search  online  for  more  scholarships  at  any  of  the  following  websites:   o www.collegeboard.org  

o www.everychanceeverytexan.org  

o https://studentaid.ed.gov/types/grants-­‐scholarships/finding-­‐scholarships   o www.fastweb.com  

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