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Istituto Marangoni/ MMU Hollings Faculty

Postgraduate Fashion Network

Programme Specification

This document provides a concise summary of the main features of the course(s) & associated award(s) offered through this Programme Specification, and includes the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities provided. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, curriculum content, teaching/learning, assessment methods for each unit and on the Programme’s relationship to QAA Subject Benchmark Statements may be found in the dedicated student handbook for the Programme. The accuracy of the information in this document is reviewed periodically by the University and may be subject to verification by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education

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CENTRE FOR ACADEMIC STANDARDS & QUALITY ENHANCEMENT

Programme Specification

The information in this document is organised into the following sections: Section A – Administrative and Regulatory Information

Section B – Outcomes Section C – Structure

Section D – Teaching, Learning and Assessment Section E – Programme Management

Section F – Mapping

Section G – Points of Reference

SECTION A – ADMINISTRATIVE AND REGULATORY INFORMATION

1 Overarching Programme Specification Title

Postgraduate Fashion Network

2 Brief Summary

(i) Brief Descriptive Summary

Istituto Marangoni’s suite of postgraduate courses is designed to address and respond to the fast-paced and continually evolving fashion industry. Istituto Marangoni’s proven success in teaching fashion design and business is a unique foundation from which to evolve this postgraduate network of courses. The traditions associated with Italian fashion heritage: quality, craftsmanship and successful development, from small family business into global brands, influence the programme network.The courses combine theory, practice and critical reflection. This makes them sound foundations in postgraduate practice for industry

employment and for those who wish to progress to research at PhD level; well-established links with

Manchester Metropolitan University will further underpin these possibilities. Extensive international industry links provide a dialogue whereby the Istituto is able to ensure the currency

of the programmes covering the creative, managerial, marketing and communication aspects of fashion study. There is a unique masters’ three-month fashion industry placement within the programme,

generated by the strong links that Istituto Marangoni holds with key industry partners.

3 Awarding institution MMU

4 Home Faculty Hollings

5 Home Department/ School/

Institute Apparel

6 UCAS/GTTR code(s)

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7 Framework for HE Qualifications position of final award(s)

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGu idance/Pages/The-framework-for-higher-education- qualifications-in-England-Wales-and-Northern-Ireland.aspx

Masters (Level 7)

8 Alignment with University

Curriculum Framework

http://www.mmu.ac.uk/academic/casqe/regulat ions/curriculum-frameworks.php

Postgraduate

9 Engagement with the University’s

Uniwide Language Provision N/A

10 Compliance with University

Assessment Regulations

http://www.mmu.ac.uk/academic/casqe/regulat ions/assessment.php

Taught Postgraduate

11 Approved Variations/Exemptions

from University Assessment Regulations

http://www.mmu.ac.uk/academic/casqe/regulat ions/assessment.php

N/A

12 Relationship with Faculty

Foundation Year

N/A

Awards

13 Final award title(s) MA Fashion Design Womenswear 316A

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management 316B MA Contemporary Fashion Buying

MA Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media

14 Combined Honours

Combined Honours on the Manchester campus

The University has a defined list of approved combinations available to students through the Combined Honours scheme. Each approved combination is assigned to a programme specification and to a Department that is responsible for all programme management arrangements for students enrolled on that combination.

Section 14a(iii) indicates all combinations available for subjects within this programme specification and also identifies those combinations for which this programme specification is responsible.

OR

Combined Honours on the Cheshire campus

Combined Honours at MMU Cheshire is administered through a separate Faculty Combined Honours programme specification. Subject combinations, which are available to students, are listed within that document.

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OR

There is no Combined Honours provision within this programme specification

14a

(i) Combined Honours Awards available eg:

 BSc/BA (Hons) AB

 BSc/BA (Hons) AB and XY

 BSc/BA (Hons) AB with XY

(ii) Single Honours Awards available through Combined Honours (ie

Named Awards)

(iii) Approved Subject Combinations administered by this Programme Specification

(ie “home” combinations)

None

None

None

14b Approved Subject Combination

administered by other Programme Specifications

Approved Combination Home Programme Specification & Home

Dept

None None

15 Interim exit awards and Subject

title(s) PG Certificate Fashion Design Womenswear

PG Certificate Fashion and Luxury Brand Management

PG Certificate Contemporary Fashion Buying PG Certificate Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media

PG Diploma Fashion Design Womenswear

PG Diploma Fashion and Luxury Brand Management PG Diploma Contemporary Fashion Buying

PG Diploma Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media

Arrangements with Partners

16 Approved Collaborative partner(s) Partner Name Type of Collaborative

Partnership Istituto Marangoni, London

Campus:

MA Fashion Design Womenswear 316A

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management 316B

MA Contemporary Fashion Buying

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MA Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media

Istituto Marangoni, Paris Campus:

MA Fashion Design Womenswear 316A

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management 316B

17 Articulation and Progression

Arrangements with Partners

Partner Name Details of Arrangements

Professional, Statutory and Regulatory

18 PSRB(s) associated with final award of any route within the programme specification

N/A

19 Date and outcome of last PSRB

approval/accreditation

N/A

Approval Status

20 Date and outcome of most recent

MMU review/ approval

(i) Latest review/approval

24th October 2012 – Revalidation of the Postgraduate Fashion Network

(ii) Major Modifications to Programme Specification since last review/approval N/A

21 Next Scheduled Review Date:

22 Programme Specification effective

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SECTION B – OUTCOMES

23 MMU Graduate Outcomes

On successful completion of their course of study MMU graduates will be able to:

GO1. Apply skills in critical analysis to real-world situations within a defined range of contexts;

GO2. Demonstrate a high degree of professionalism characterised by initiative, creativity, motivation and self-management;

GO3. Express ideas effectively and communicate information appropriately and accurately using a range of media including ICT;

GO4. Develop working relationships using teamwork and leadership skills, recognising and respecting different perspectives;

GO5. Manage their professional development reflecting on progress and taking appropriate action;

GO6. Find, evaluate, synthesise and use information from a variety of sources;

GO7. Articulate an awareness of the social and community contexts within their disciplinary field.

Also, they will have the qualities needed for employment in situations requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility together with decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations.

The design of the programme is guided by the expectations of the QAA Framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland that on completion of a Master’s degree students should ‘typically’ be able to:

 Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences;

 Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level;

 Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding, and to develop new skills to a high level.

Also that they will have the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment requiring:

 The exercise of initiative and personal responsibility;

 Decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations;

The independent learning ability required for continuing professional development. (QAA 2008, Framework for HE qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland)

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24 Programme Rationale

Since 1935 Istituto Marangoni has been building on Giulio Marangoni’s values, providing the fashion world with highly skilled professionals who respond to industry needs. He foundedIstituto Artistico dell’ Abbigliamento Marangoni in Milan with the aim of creating new courses that would support the fast-growing fashion industry in Italy as it rapidly evolved at that time. Istituto Marangoni today follows that tradition and responds in the same way by listening to industry needs and developing courses to prepare the professional experts of tomorrow.

‘The most important element (of Istituto Marangoni) is the connection between fashion and business that began with the tailoring course in 1935’.

Marco Muggiano, Communication Director of Istituto Marangoni – 2010.

Today Istituto Marangoni is an established and recognised laboratory of aesthetic European-style culture with the finest Italian imprinting, collaborating with the most interesting names in the sector. These include global brands such as Armani, Prada, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana, Dior, Zegna, Jimmy Choo and Vogue. In the same way that Giulio Marangoni as a designer understood the needs of the industry, our current teacher-practitioners at Istituto Marangoni continue to teach with the same principles to prepare each student for a career in fashion and fashion business. Today Istituto Marangoni alumni lead the field as creative directors of global international brands such as Tod’s, Sonia Rykiel and Jill Sander to name just a few.

Although the geographical dimension has expanded, with Istituto Marangoni holding campuses today in Paris, London and Shanghai as well as in Milan, its Italian identity remains central. Istituto Marangoni uses its Italian heritage to develop and deliver its programme to a global marketplace, translating the traditions of its artistic heritage into modern sartorial creativity.

The “Italianness” we aim to transmit to our students during their experience at Istituto Marangoni has multiple themes:

• a very structured business vision • an entrepreneurial attitude

• an ideology aiming at establishing itself through differentiation • the importance of the relationship between image and fashion • the focus on perfect execution, simplicity, attention to detail, craftmanship and the imaginative concept of luxury

• the importance of valuing the use of textiles as an innovative tool • the concept of “italian technique” to equip students to filter and discipline what inspires and bring viable products to market.

Italian fashion design and business models have influenced and continually impact on the world economy of fashion and Istituto Marangoni has maintained its founder’s goal of training the fashion professionals of tomorrow in such key sectors as design, communication, and managerial coordination. The postgraduate programme continues to uphold the value and quality of training and contextualising learning experiences in the realities of the international marketplace. Istituto Marangoni persists in working closely with industry, developing a suite of postgraduate courses, and its continued aim is to empower talent in fashion and design and to produce industry professionals. Istituto Marangoni offers master’s level courses designed to provide students with the professional knowledge and skills to take on senior posts in industry, as well as the opportunity

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to engage in critical debate with peers and academics and to develop a significant body of work through independent study, both of which are of value to their specialisms.

MA Contemporary Fashion Buying

Istituto Marangoni is about imparting contemporary, future-informed knowledge to its students and supporting them in the development of relevant skills for today’s market. The master’s course in Contemporary Fashion Buying has been proactively developed to meet fashion industry demands.

Istituto Marangoni has developed a modern, up-to-date and industry-relevant master’s in) Contemporary Fashion Buying degree with a 3-month fashion industry placement, enabling its graduates to successfully, professionally and proactively enter the market place with real-time knowledge and management skills relevant to fashion buying roles within this specialist area. This postgraduate Fashion Buying degree has been thoughtfully developed by a number of industry and academic professionals, their main aim to advance students towards careers inside established and internationally recognised companies.

The fashion buyer is responsible for the development, management, sourcing and selection of profitable ranges of products.. However, innovation and recent dramatic changes within the fashion industry (omni-channel retailing, CAD/ CAM, a movement from global to local supply chains, new methods in space management, vertical integration and quick-response business models) mean that to be successful as a buyer today, a multidisciplinary approach is essential. Istituto Marangoni has used this multidisciplinary approach to develop knowledge and skills for the student through offering a master’s course in fashion buying, which provides the students with a comprehensive study programme that gives an extensive and in-depth perspective of the global fashion retail industry and the ever-evolving role of the buyer. Students are also provided with the tools of management practice which include theories, models and frameworks as well as roles of manangement enabling them to reflect and apply this to their own developing professional practice.

This master’s course is ‘contemporary’ as it differentiates itself by providing models of business taught by qualified industry practitioners models that are current and will be practiced in the future and which encapsulate recent and future innovation and technology both to sell and reach target consumer and business objectives. The master’s 3-month industry placement will provide the student with the opportunity to develop and enhance their professional development with carefully selected fashion industry placement partners.

Fashion buyers are pivotal to a successful organisation, interacting with many different departments within a company. They do not simply just purchase product in order to be successful – they guide the whole process. Buyers need to be business-minded with strong analytical skills but also able to negotiate and work alongside creative departments. Decision-making and leadership skills, which are central to a fast-paced, dynamic and demanding business environment, are key attributes of the modern-day fashion buyer.

All of the MA Contemporary Fashion Buying modules within the master’s programme (Buying Structure, Merchandising Analysis, Researching the Brand, Product – Technical, Planning, Range Planning, Finance, Commercialisation and Retail, Fashion Futures and Innovation, Negotiation and Pricing, Licensing and Law for fashion business) develop these core skills and knowledge. Students

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therefore are enabled to understand and apply this to their own professional career development, as well as to conduct detailed research leading to a research-based dissertation in their area of specialisation.

The industry placement (Ref: Section 35, p. 29) offers students an insight into their professional environment and gives them the opportunity to develop both the skills they already have and new ones, as well as to apply their theoretical knowledge to real fashion industry environments.

The course offers opportunities for progression onto research degrees and will enable students to pursue senior job opportunities in fashion buying merchandising, product development and visual merchandising, trend forecasting and retail, fashion-related as well as in the creative industries, and supports their professional and academic development.

MA Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media

This course is a direct response to the fashion industry’s demand for career-ready strategic and creative fashion brand communicators (Ref: Section 29, p. 16, para. 3). It offers students the possibility of exploring the theoretical and practical applications of fashion promotion, communication and media. The course also explores future communication channels, nurturing innovative futures strategies for fashion and brands. Students are given the opportunity to develop advanced knowledge, understanding and analysis of how fashion is communicated, promoted and represented creatively via different media, preparing them for the evolving demands of fashion communication. Students are also provided with the tools of management practice which include theories, models and frameworks as well as the analysis of roles of management enabling them to reflect and apply this to their own developing professional practice The curriculum responds to the industry’s increased request for qualified professionals who have the knowledge and skills to use both traditional media and new platforms of communication, focusing on promoting fashion to different audiences, media and markets. Through the programme’s core elements addressing fashion communication and criticism, contemporary issues in fashion, strategic branding and innovation management as well as creative direction, it prepares students for the challenges of fashion communication and promotion central to the industry’s future. It allows for students, by

exploring traditional and future communication channels for fashion and fashion branding, to progress their understanding through research and enquiry.

During this course students are able to respond to emerging developments in media and communication and explore the major theories and debates that dominate the study and practice of fashion promotion, communication and media. The course includes a development and understanding of the visual creative process for fashion magazines and brands. It is imperative for todays fashion professionals to evaluate and understand the different techniques applicable in creating and understanding the role that fashion image plays, whilst analysing and looking at historical and contemporary references and how they implicate on the creative process.

Looking at fashion advertising, editorial and creative direction in media, communication and promotion, students evaluate and analyse trends in fashion styling, photography and journalism. They also progress their advanced knowledge of the creative and written process to encourage their own original creativity and prepare themselves academically and professionally for the multi-disciplinary approaches to roles found in the fashion industry, roles that foster innovation, entrepreneurial thinking and problem-solving.

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industry and offers opportunities for student’s own research, supported by a 12-week industry placement.

This course offers opportunities for progression onto research degrees and will also support students to pursue senior job opportunities in editorial, PR, publishing, journalism, styling, photography, illustrators, editors and art direction.

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management is designed for students wishing to specialise and undertake in-depth study to prepare for the constantly evolving demands of the fashion luxury goods industries at a high level. There is a strong focus on an industry-linked, project-based mode of study taught by industry specialists and professional practitioners. The goal of this MA programme is to produce Master’s graduates who have advanced knowledge and a breadth of skills in management and luxury brands. They should be able to demonstrate original creative thinking and autonomy in developing project ideas when responding to the changing needs of the industry. They are equipped to deal with existing and emerging technologies in today’s international fashion industry and have an understanding of specialist brand development and business practices globally. Graduates on the course become independent life-long learners who can progress to a high level of specialism within the fashion and luxury brand industry or when self-employed. The course of study also prepares graduates to develop their studies further. There is a 12-week fashion industry placement within the programme, giving students the opportunity to put theory into reflective and purposeful practice.

MA Fashion Design Womenswear

MA Fashion Design Womenswear is designed for students wishing to gain a deeper understanding of fashion and carry out in-depth and specialist study appropriately for the constantly evolving demands of the fashion industries at a high level. Emphasis is given to project-based and industry-driven activity taught by industry specialists and professional practitioners. On completion of their studies, Master’s graduates are expected to have advanced knowledge and breadth of skills in womenswear design. Graduates should demonstrate original creativity and autonomy when responding to the changing needs of the industry. Through the core elements of study and industry-linked projects, they are equipped to deal with existing and emerging technologies in today’s international fashion industry and have an understanding of specialist fashion and brand development as well as business practices globally. The course aims to create forward-thinking graduates developing research and analytical skills as well as their individual creative identity, establishing independent life-long learners who can progress to a high level of specialism within the womenswear industry or when self-employed, or in possibilities for further study. The 12-week fashion industry placement gives students current awareness of developments in the sector, practical experience in the industry and further opportunities for continuous personal and professional development within contemporary fashion contexts.

25 QAA Benchmark Statement(s)

Master’s Degree Characteristics (QAA, 2010):

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/MastersDegreeCharact eristics.pdf

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2008):

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/FHEQ08.pdf

26 Programme Specific Outcomes

(a) Final Award Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of MA Fashion Design Womenswear, students will be able to: PLO 1 – Critically evaluate consumer, market and trend requirements for an identified womenswear fashion brand;

PLO 2 – Carry out in-depth research within a wider context of art and design-related industries applicable to the fashion womenswear industry;

PLO 3 – Demonstrate the creative and advanced technical processes involved in communicating clearly and effectively design concepts and ideas while reinforcing a fashion brand identity;

PLO 4 – Critically evaluate and apply the theories and techniques used in developing new design proposals for the womenswear fashion industry, displaying originality and self-direction;

PLO 5 – Carry out successfully a substantial piece of independent research.

On successful completion of MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management, students will be able to:

PLO 1 – Critically analyse how different fashion and luxury goods organisations manage their brands and market offerings to compete in different market environments;

PLO 2 – Evaluate the interrelationships between branding strategies and corporate, business and functional strategies of the organisation;

PLO 3 – Elaborate systematic and creative solutions to a range of real-world business and management problems, taking into consideration theories, frameworks and practices relevant to luxury and fashion branding and brand management;

PLO 4 – Evaluate how current issues including new technologies, the changing role of the consumer and corporate social responsibility affect the competitive strategies of fashion and luxury goods organisations;

PLO 5 – Critically appraise published work in the area of fashion and luxury branding and brand management and successfully design and produce a substantial piece of independent research.

On successful completion of MA Contemporary Fashion Buying, students will be able to: PLO 1 – Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the practice, theories and management relating to fashion buying through the ability to use critical knowledge of key trends, market research and sales analysis to achieve business objectives for fashion brands and stakeholders;

PLO2 – Critically evaluate the buying process and understand the impact of new innovation and technology using theoretical frameworks and research, and propose strategies to meet short- and long-term trading objectives of global fashion businesses;

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PLO 3 – Demonstrate systematic understanding of the fashion product development management process, garment construction, and critical path management to meet the needs of specific target global markets;

PLO 4 – Critically appraise global sourcing opportunities (off-shore and domestic) and supply chain management components to meet consumer needs and business objectives; PLO 5 – Critically evaluate research using relevant research methodologies to acquire knowledge through own findings and those of others in order to create a substantial piece of self-directed research to industry and academic standards.

On successful completion of MA Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media, students will be able to:

PLO 1 – Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the key fashion communication channels and theories, across written and visual media, and apply this understanding to fashion industry contexts, generating creative and original management solutions to specialist and non-specialist audiences in a manner appropriate to the discipline area; PLO 2 – Critically appreciate fashion branding theories and omni-channel business strategies and demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the current challenges faced by industry informed by current research

PLO 3 – Critically evaluate and analyse the current theories, concepts and management used in promoting fashion and the changing role of social media, PR in the digital age and conceptualise creative digital campaigns for a fashion brand to a global community;

PLO 4 – Demonstrate leadership and problem solving skills relevant to creative direction for fashion media, and interpret knowledge and practice at the forefront of the discipline. PLO 5 – Critically evaluate research and apply appropriate methodologies of research and enquiry to own independent research, producing a substantial piece of work to industry and academic standards.

These learning outcomes support the expectations of the QAA Framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland that Master’s degrees are awarded to students who have demonstrated:

 A systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or area of professional practice;

 A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship;

 Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Conceptual understanding that enables the student:

 To critically evaluate current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline;

 To evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and, where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses.

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N/A

(c) Pass Degree Learning Outcomes

N/A

27

Interim Award Learning Outcomes

Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) graduates will be able to:

• Critically evaluate current research in their field of study;

• Exercise initiative and personal responsibility in the work environment;

• Carry out further independent learning or continuing professional development; • Undertake a role of significant higher managerial responsibility.

Also, they will have the qualities needed for employment in situations requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility together with decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations.

In addition to the above:

Postgraduate Diploma Fashion Design Womenswear students will be able to:

• Critically analyse consumer trends and concepts using research methodologies for an identified womenswear fashion brand;

• Critically evaluate issues related to the design branding aspect of the fashion industry; • Synthesise the creative and technical processes involved in product development; • Demonstrate a critical understanding through research and quality awareness of

womenswear in the global high-end fashion industry.

Postgraduate Diploma Fashion and Luxury Brand Management students will be able to:

• Analyse critically how different fashion and luxury goods organisations manage their brands and market offerings to compete in different market environments;

• Evaluate critically the interrelationships between branding strategies and corporate, business and functional strategies of the organisation;

• Demonstrate critical awareness and understanding, offering solutions to a range of real-world business and management problems, taking into consideration theories and research relevant to luxury and fashion branding and brand management;

• Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of current issues including new technologies, the changing role of the consumer and corporate social responsibility, and interpret their influence on the competitive strategies of fashion and luxury goods organisations.

Postgraduate Diploma Contemporary Fashion Buying students will be able to:

PLO 1 – Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the practice, theories and management relating to fashion buying through the ability to use critical knowledge of key trends, market research and sales analysis to achieve business objectives for fashion brands and stakeholders;

PLO2 – Critically evaluate the buying process and understand the impact of new innovation and technology using theoretical frameworks and research, and propose strategies to meet short- and long-term trading objectives of global fashion businesses;

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management process, garment construction, and critical path management to meet the needs of specific target global markets;

PLO 4 – Critically appraise global sourcing opportunities (off-shore and domestic) and supply chain management components to meet consumer needs and business objectives

Postgraduate Diploma Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media students will be

able to:

PLO 1 – Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the key fashion communication channels and theories, across written and visual media, and apply this understanding to fashion industry contexts, generating creative and original management solutions to specialist and non-specialist audiences in a manner appropriate to the discipline area; PLO 2 – Critically appreciate fashion branding theories and omni-channel business strategies and demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the current challenges faced by industry informed by current research

PLO 3 – Critically evaluate and analyse the current theories, concepts and management used in promoting fashion and the changing role of social media, PR in the digital age and conceptualise creative digital campaigns for a fashion brand to a global community;

PLO 4 – Demonstrate leadership and problem solving skills relevant to creative direction for fashion media, and interpret knowledge and practice at the forefront of the discipline.

Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) graduate will be able to:

• Critically evaluate current research in their field of study; • Exercise personal responsibility in the work environment; • Carry out independent learning or professional development; • Undertake a role of significant higher managerial responsibility. • .

Postgraduate Certificate Fashion Design Womenswear students will be able to:

• Critically evaluate consumer trends for an identified womenswear fashion brand;

• Demonstrate self-direction and originality in issues related to the design branding aspect of the fashion industry;

• Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the creative and technical processes involved in product development and apply to own research;

• Critically analyse the importance of womenswear in the global high-end fashion industry and use this knowledge to advance knowledge and understanding and to develop new skills to a high level.

Postgraduate Certificate Fashion and Luxury Brand Management students will be able to:

• Demonstrate critical awareness of how different fashion and luxury goods organisations manage their brands in different market environments;

• Critically evaluate the relationships between branding strategies within fashion business; • Critically evaluate current research and offer solutions to a range of real-world business

and management problems relevant to luxury and fashion branding and brand management;

• Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of current issues including new technologies and the changing role of the consumer and communicate awareness of their influence on the competitive strategies of fashion and luxury goods organisations.

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Postgraduate Certificate Contemporary Fashion Buying students will be able to:

PLO 1 – Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the practice, theories and management relating to fashion buying through the ability to use critical knowledge of key trends, market research and sales analysis to achieve business objectives for fashion brands and stakeholders;

PLO2 – Critically evaluate the buying process and understand the impact of new innovation and technology using theoretical frameworks and research, and propose strategies to meet short- and long-term trading objectives of global fashion businesses;

PLO 3 – Demonstrate systematic understanding of the fashion product development management process, garment construction, and critical path management to meet the needs of specific target global markets.

Postgraduate Certificate Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media students will be

able to:

PLO 1 – Demonstrate a systematic understanding of the key fashion communication channels and theories, across written and visual media, and apply this understanding to fashion industry contexts, generating creative and original management solutions to specialist and non-specialist audiences in a manner appropriate to the discipline area; PLO 2 – Critically appreciate fashion branding theories and omni-channel business strategies and demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the current challenges faced by industry informed by current research;

PLO 3 – Critically evaluate and analyse the current theories, concepts and management used in promoting fashion and the changing role of social media, PR in the digital age and conceptualise creative digital campaigns for a fashion brand to a global community. .

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SECTION C – STRUCTURE

28 Structures, modes of delivery (e.g. FT/PT/DL etc.), levels, credits, awards, curriculum map of all units (identifying core/option status, credits, pre or co-requisites) potential entry/exit points and progression/award requirements

MA Fashion Design Womenswear Level 7

Core Units

Code Status Unit Title No of credits

31CCM002 Core Concepts of Contemporary Femininities 40

31DCM001 Core Design and Culture Interface 40

31VCM001 Core Visual Communication and Brand Identity 20

31RMM002 Core Research Methods 20

31DSM001 Core Dissertation* 60

* Includes mandatory 12-week industry placement or in exceptional circumstances a guided case study report

60 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Certificate Fashion Design Womenswear 120 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Diploma Fashion Design Womenswear 180 credits: Final exit award – MA Fashion Design Womenswear

MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management Level 7

Core Units

Code Status Unit Title No of credits

31FMM003 Core Fashion Marketing Management 20

31CIM001 Core Contemporary Issues In Fashion 20

31RMM002 Core Research Methods 20

31LMM001 Core Luxury Management 20

31SBM001 Core Strategic Brand Management 20

31PCM001 Core Product Creativity and Innovation 20

31DSM001 Core Dissertation* 60

* Includes mandatory 12-week industry placement or in exceptional circumstances a guided case study report

60 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Certificate Fashion and Luxury Brand Management 120 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Diploma Fashion and Luxury Brand Management 180 credits: Final exit award – MA Fashion and Luxury Brand Management

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MA Contemporary Fashion Buying Level 7

Core Units

Code Status Unit Title No of credits

Core Strategic Fashion Buying 20

31CIM001 Core Contemporary Issues In Fashion 20 Core Fashion Buying and Product Development

Management

20

31FMM003 Core Fashion Marketing Management 20

31RMM002 Core Research Methods 20

Core Fashion Buying and Supply Chain Management 20

31DSMOO1 Core Dissertation* 60

* Includes mandatory 12-week industry placement or in exceptional circumstances a guided case study report

60 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Certificate Contemporary Fashion Buying 120 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Diploma Contemporary Fashion Buying 180 credits: Final exit award – MA Contemporary Fashion Buying

MA Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media Level 7 Core Units

Code Status Unit Title No of credits

Core Contemporary Fashion Communication and Criticism 20 Core Strategic Branding and Innovation Management 20 31CIM001 Core Contemporary Issues in Fashion 20 Core Social Media and Digital PR Management 20

Core Creative Direction 20

31RMM002 Core Research Methods 20

31DSM001 Core Dissertation* 60

* Includes mandatory 12-week industry placement or in exceptional circumstances a guided case study report

60 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Certificate Fashion Promotion, Communication and

Media

120 credits: interim exit award – Postgraduate Diploma Fashion Promotion, Communication and

Media

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SECTION D – TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

29 Articulation of Graduate Prospects

It is the aim of the postgraduate suite of courses to enable students to gain employability, professional and skills enhancement, as well as offering them opportunities for progression onto research degrees. In response to the constantly evolving, changing and expanding fashion industry, market research has shown that industry requires professionals who are ready to meet the demands brought on by these changes so as to lead, manage and to take on the challenges found within these disciplines.

Having been informed by a range of sources, including local information from graduates to alumni data (Ref: Industry breakfast report, questionnaires, student feedback), these master’s courses provide students with the knowledge and skills for specialist careers in their chosen discipline and to develop outstanding levels of professionalism in relation to their work, enabling them to practice as disciplined, independent and resourceful practitioners capable of sustaining careers in a competitive and constantly changing profession. The types of roles we expect graduates from these courses to progress to range from management and consultation through to entrepreneurial roles.

Students applying to Istituto Marangoni courses amount to 2,600 a year and they are from diverse cultural backgrounds and from over 92 different countries. The uptake of careers post-qualification is on a global scale, adding to the already international network of alumni. Istituto Marangoni works closely with employers and academic staff to promote and support work placement opportunities and communicate job vacancies for Marangoni students through recruitment days organised at the campuses.

Feedback is used in the placement procedures and interview stages to gain industry information and feed this into the curriculum design. These processes enable informed decision-making when developing new programmes as well as when modifying existing programmes in order to maximise employability opportunities for students.

Full advantage is taken of the international network that Istituto Marangoni has at its disposal, facilitating high-profile placements and job opportunities. Recent student destinations following graduation include Kering, Burberry, Richard Nicoll, Good PR, Stella McCartney, Bally, Bottega Venetta, Tods PR, Roger Vivier PR, Liberty, McQueen, Stylesight, WGSN, Hermes, Saint Laurent PR, Alberta Ferretti, Loewe, The Future Laboratory, WGSN, Good PR, Indigo Cow PR, MTV, Rewardstyle, Not Just a Label, Mintel, The Gentleman Blogger, Liberty, McQueen, Brand Alley, Giorgio Armani, Alexander McQueen, Safilo, Temperley (India), Balenciaga, Céline, Christian Dior Couture, Givenchy, La Estampa (Brazil), Puma, Prada and Jimmy Choo.

Prospective positions following graduation:

Fashion Promotion Communication and Media:

Fashion PR Manager Marketing Manager Collections Coordinator

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PR and Event Coordinator Brand Manager

PR Practitioners (in-house or agency) Digital and Creative Consultants Magazine and Online Editors

Contemporary Fashion Buying:

Buyer

Merchandiser

Visual Merchandiser

Retail Manager/Coordinator Trend analyst

Womenswear Fashion Design:

Womenswear Designer Accessories Designer

Textile/Embroidery Designer Fashion forecaster

Luxury Brand Management:

Marketing Manager Brand Manager Market Analyst

Via their career services, all campuses gather intelligence on their graduates through exit questionnaires, initially following graduation. This market information is used to make recommendations for further programme development through programme committee meetings.

The Career Services use follow-up questionnaires as intermediate contact at regular intervals in order to track graduate career progression. Full information is gathered for the database, which is available to all of the campuses. This shows students’ destinations as well as previous historical data concerning career progression or further academic study.

The Career Services gather employer and placement intelligence and this is communicated via regular meetings with Programme leaders and academic staff. The Career Services Manager holds meetings with company HR departments, recruitment agencies and fashion brands and further data and information is gathered from specialist recruitment fairs to enable informed decisions to be made on programme development and further opportunities for students.

Career Services continues to keep all channels of communication open both for the student and the employer following student graduation and subsequent employment, encouraging a career-long relationship with Istituto Marangoni, current students and fellow graduates.

Istituto Marangoni registers and updates its records of the final destinations of all students, recognising the importance of this growing network of alumni talent and establishing further links with employers. These evolving networks that are particularly international strengthen the presence of Istituto Marangoni in the world of fashion education and enable it to respond to what Imrad Ahmed from Luxury Society identifies as:

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‘cross-cultural experts’ and ‘individuals who can move seamlessly between countries, cultures and languages, ensuring that the essence of our brands is not lost in translation as the industry continues to globalise.’ LUXURY SOCIETY REPORT (2010) The Talent Agenda. A

State-of-the-Industry Briefing on People and HR Management

30 Curriculum Design

The curricula of these courses are designed to support international students and use a range of learning and teaching strategies (Ref: Section 31, p. 21) that are suited to student needs and diverse learning styles, to achieve the intended outcomes relevant to the programme specialisms, with an emphasis on developing specialised knowledge appropriate to a master award and to support students in critically applying this knowledge in business practice. As these curricula are designed to address these specialisms and to develop key skills at master’s level there is specific monitoring to assure quality of the courses through the Continuous Improvement Plan and consultations with academics and practitioners in industry.

The courses are continually informed through engagement with key academics, researchers, employers and professionals and local sources such as graduates and alumni and they incorporate core and transferable skills to enhance employment within the fashion industry. Students, alumni, external examiners and potential employers have been involved in the development of the master’s courses. Various meetings with Industry specialists and key academics have helped the team to focus on employability and the currency of the units and the incremental learning of the courses. Questionnaires and draft Programme and Unit Specifications have been sent to students, alumni and external examiners for comments, which have been taken into consideration in developing the Master’s Programme. The academic and practitioner-based nature of our academic team, which shows a strong profile of professional practitioners, has been an excellent source of research and dialogue on current industry themes and practices as well as of information on the expectations from industry on candidates seeking employment.

Curriculum content, teaching, learning and assessment ensure students achieve employability outcomes. Through a variety of study and assessment modes, students have maximised opportunities for progression (Ref: Section 31, p. 21) and these also help facilitate the delivery of intended learning outcomes at the required standards. A variety of learning strategies are employed when developing each unit and careful consideration is placed on the intended objectives and the development of key knowledge or skills, responding to graduate outcomes at master’s level. The delivery and effectiveness of each unit is carefully monitored on a continual basis through appropriate quality assurance processes set in place.

The placement together with Personal Development Planning (Ref: Section 33, p. 27, para. 3), is an embedded support within the curriculum, giving students opportunities to evaluate the skills they have developed within the programme and their relevance to future employment as well as to manage their own professional development reflectively. The placement within the programme is an enormously valuable tool for international students (Ref: Section 35, p. 29, para. 2 and 3) enabling them to contextualise their learning, working alongside inspiring industry teams and help them improve their employability and employment prospects.

‘Having a mentor who inspires and directs your educational growth is important for development. In todays working word practical application of skills is imperative, which is why schools such as Marangoni provide the Industry with such a valuable pool of talent.’ (A. Zegna, Ermenegildo Zegna:

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In the courses Fashion and Luxury Brand Management, Fashion Design Womenswear, Contemporary Fashion Buying and Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media, industry partners visit and brief students about their existing market position and identify current issues and developments in the profession. There are workshops, themed seminars and industry-based ‘live’ projects from companies such as Vivienne Westwood, Browns, Joseph, House of Hackney, Liberty, Pringle, Ally Capellino, Pearce Fionda, Burberry, Paul Smith and WGSN that give students the opportunity to develop subject knowledge and transferable skills, qualities that are required for employment or further study. Some interesting examples of visiting lecturers include have included speakers such as Jean Baptiste Maillard CEO of Chopard, HR Partners from Net-a-porter, Stefan Siegel – not just a label, Giulio Capellini, Oliver Spencer and Caryn Franklin.

“I'm very pleased with my latest project regarding Ungaro brand. The students were very reactive, they did good research and brand analysis and delivered some very interesting propositions for brand re-launch. I believe the course was well structured and students were given a good guidance to complete their projects. My feedback is 100% positive students are employable from this kind of programme and I look forward to working with Marangoni again in the future.” Industry project

Feedback: Marja Todorovic, Licensing Director Emanuel Ungaro @IMG Research Methods

This is a core practice that runs through terms 1 and 2, and is managed through a specific dedicated unit providing essential theoretical, substantive and practical understanding of research methodologies as well as preparing the students with an approach to out-of-the-box thinking for their independent research proposal and dissertation (Ref: Section 32, p. 23, para. 6). The Research Methods unit, is integrated into the curriculum design with activities in the other units and helps challenge students to be creative innovators. Students submit their research proposal at the end of term 3, before dissertation and industry placement. The dissertation unit forms a major part of the master’s programme and is weighted accordingly (60 credits). It contains a substantial piece of independent research and each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor who has a master’s degree and subject knowledge. Supervisors are expected to guide the student through this research process.

A series of three research events entitled Research Forum– Postgraduate will begin in the autumn term 2014. The programme, which will contain Fashion Womenswear, Fashion and Luxury Brand Management, Contemporary Fashion Buying and Fashion Promotion, Communication and Media, will provide an opportunity for all postgraduate students to meet, and will encourage dynamic learning across disciplines and foster academic and subject debate with the aim of encouraging peer-to-peer collaboration on research and project initiatives (Ref: Section 31, p. 21, para. 5).

MA Fashion Promotion Communication and Media

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Contemporary Fashion

Communication and Criticism

(20 credits)

Strategic Branding and Innovation

Management (20 credits)

Social Media and Digital PR Management (20 credits) Dissertation Unit (includes 12-week placement) (60 credits)

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Contemporary Issues in Fashion

(20 credits)

Creative Direction (20 credits)

Research Methods Research Methods Research Methods (20 credits)

MA Contemporary Fashion Buying

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Strategic Fashion Buying

(20 credits)

Fashion Buying and Product Development Management

(20 credits)

Fashion Buying and Supply Chain Management (20 credits) Dissertation Unit (includes 12-week placement) (60 credits) Contemporary Issues In Fashion (20 credits) Fashion Marketing Management (20 credits)

Research Methods Research Methods Research Methods (20 credits)

MA Fashion Design Womenswear

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Design and Culture Interface (40 credits) Concepts of Contemporary Femininities (40 credits) Visual Communication and Brand Identity (20 credits)

Dissertation Unit (includes 12-week placement) (60 credits) Research Methods Research Methods Research Methods

(20 credits)

MA Fashion Luxury Brand Management

Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4

Product Creativity and Innovation (20 credits) Strategic Brand Management (20 credits) Luxury Management (20 credits) Dissertation Unit (includes 12-week placement) (60 credits) Fashion Marketing Management (20 credits) Contemporary Issues In Fashion (20 credits)

Research Methods Research Methods Research Methods (20 credits)

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31 Learning and Teaching

The QAA in their review (2012) identified the following good practice within Istituto Marangoni:

 There is a consistent focus on contemporary professional practice across the management of all aspects of the provision, underpinned by strong industry links and the experience of practitioner staff

 Staff development is clearly focused and prioritised, and includes full support for staff to complete a postgraduate teaching qualification

Full report can be found by following the link below:

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/InstitutionReports/reports/Documents/REO-Istituto-Marangoni-13.pdf

The postgraduate programme respects the diversity of students and is structured with formal lectures, workshops, tutorials, seminars and self-directed study, and within this structure a range of approaches to learning and teaching is employed as appropriate to the situation. Industry specialists and visiting specialist lecturers (industry professionals) make valuable contributions to the delivery of the curriculum and facilitate important links to professional practice. Academic staff delivering the courses have or are working towards achieving the MMU PGCert in Academic Practice to support and maintain currency of teaching and learning practice. Academic staff are also encouraged to become fellows of the Higher Education Academy to inform and facilitate their on-going professional development and to ensure that the high standards of teaching are maintained.

Learning, teaching and assessment within the programmes has been refined and developed through the organisational tool of the Continuous Improvement Plan derived from discussions at programme committee level management, which leads to course modifications in approach and possible content.

Learning through research – at master’s level the student is expected to use research

methodologies throughout the programme as an essential tool to develop knowledge and critical skills and this is applied in their assessments as well as in self-directed research for their research proposal and dissertation.

Self-Directed Study – plays a major role in this programme, where students are expected to spend

time researching and analysing subject matter independently to support and substantiate taught material.

Lectures – form an integral part of the programme and delivery of key information to the students.

At this level it is expected that students use the lectures as a starting point for further self-directed study and research.

Seminars – are used to build on themes taken from the lecture programme. Students are

encouraged to make an active contribution by sharing ideas through debate. They are expected to research in preparation for the seminars from literature references provided prior to the sessions.

Visiting Lecturers – are invited to present specialist lectures to all students to enhance the

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Individual Tutorials – are used when individual student work is being discussed or specific guidance

required to one particular student; it is especially important during assessment feedback, PDP and in the dissertation phase and may be face-to -face, a telephone conversation or via e-mail or Skype.

Small Group Tutorials – enable students to discuss and plan their work in greater detail than is

possible with larger groups. It encourages quieter students to develop their interpersonal and communication skills and helps consolidate leadership skills in others. It also allows for peer assessment.

Video Presentations – are used to give a more in-depth understanding of a specific issue. Case Studies – are used for detailed discussion of real-life situations.

Reflective Blogs – this tool aims to distil in an on-going manner the reflective thinking of each

student during project activity. This is particularly useful alongside group work activity, where individual experience and contribution can be monitored and evaluated.

Demonstrations – are normally of a technical nature and are necessary in certain subject areas. Studio / Workshop / Laboratory / Practical Sessions – may be used to enable the creative and

practical skill development of the student in an environment which simulates that of industry.

Group and Team Work – requires students to operate as a member of a group or team and they

usually have clearly identified roles. The emphasis is on collective responsibility, individual responsibility to the group and joint decision-making. The group work is seen as an essential tool to develop practical skills necessary for placement and employment.

Presentations – requires students to use a variety of appropriate presentation methods to

stimulate discussion and debate-developing skills, which have been highlighted as essential by employers for graduates at this level.

Study Trips – give students the opportunity to go beyond the Istituto environment to deepen

their understanding of a specific subject. The study trips are offered to the students at possible additional cost. The details, when approved, are distributed to the students at the beginning of the academic year.

Formative assessment is an integral part of the teaching and learning process and its aim is to

promote learning and to motivate learners. It is used as an interim support procedure for students to assess their progress and there are no marks attached to this feedback and it does not contribute to the final unit mark: it provides an indicative measure and allows students to move forward in their learning. The setting of short term goals ultimately helps develop within the student the ability to self assess in a formative manner so that they grow the skills of self evaluation necessary for lifelong learning. Examples of formative feedback methods include face-to-face tutorials (PDP), generic feedback, annotations to submissions and feedback sheets; these address the performance of students towards achieving the learning outcomes.

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Formative assessment methods include:

• Tutorials and seminars as formative activities

• Using journals (especially to support and inform tutorials) and PDP • Problem-based learning and case studies

• Peer-assessment activities • ‘Critique’ sessions

• Reflection

• Student presentations – self and peer assessment

Industry Work Placement – gives students the opportunity to develop the appropriate skill sets for

the workplace relevant to their course. Students are supported by the Career Services Manager and an allocated Academic tutor during this period. Students are required to keep a reflective journal once on placement.

32 Assessment

The assessment strategy for these courses has been designed to incorporate a variety of assessment methods to enable all students to demonstrate their learning in a fair and comprehensive manner and is in line with the Manchester Metropolitan University Regulations for Taught Postgraduate Programmes of Study.

(http://www.mmu.ac.uk/academic/casqe/regulations/docs/assessment_icp.pdf)

A table showing different types of assessment unit by unit is provided in Appendix II.

All assessments and methods of assessment are outlined for students in their Unit Handbook and the unit coordinator introduces students to the method and aims of assessment at the beginning of the unit as well as during formative assessment.

In Section F of this document, both Graduate Learning Outcomes and Programme Learning Outcomes are mapped against the variety of assessment types and percentages used. The variety of assessment methods helps students demonstrate the development of their skills and knowledge throughout the programme. The effectiveness of these methods is continuously monitored during the academic year, through student and staff performance feedback.

Assessment Methods

All forms of assessment are used to help students develop skills throughout their journey of study. The students are made aware of the connections between formative and summative assessment through the Student Handbook and through the Unit Handbook. Students have at least one formative assessment within the first six weeks of the start of each unit and this helps support the student with their studies and highlights any further support that may be needed from the student support officer or the lecturer.

Summative assessment is linked specifically to the learning outcomes of the courses. The

assessment indicates the learner’s progression towards and achievement of these, and provides an evaluation of student progress and learning during an entire unit, generating a unit mark and constructive feedback. It also confirms the conditions for referral and retake by students where applicable.Examples of summative assessment include written assignments: essays; reports; case study writing, and oral and visual presentations using a variety of media.

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Assessment Quality Procedures

Clear and comprehensive internal procedures exist for markers and marking teams and for internal moderators of academic assessment within the University policies and procedure guided by the University Regulations, as is External Examiner scrutiny of assessed work.

Unit handbooks with assessment briefs are scrutinised across campuses at the start of the

academic year and provide the students with advance knowledge of the scope of assignments and method of feedback after submission. Students’ feedback is monitored electronically through Sinapto and this feedback is quality assured by sampling and levelling at the end of each semester. Students also provide feedback on their experience at the end of each unit and this together with the unit leader report provides information for the CIP or Continuous Improvement Plan and ensures that the programmes reflect the needs of the students and the academic benchmarks of the master’s degree.

Providing Student Feedback and Evaluation on Assessment

Providing students with feedback on their progress is a vital component of assessment and is the key to closing the teaching, learning and assessment loop. All marking criteria have sections for markers to give detailed constructive developmental feedback and feedback is given via Sinapto. All students are offered the opportunity to discuss their feedback with the tutors or during their discussions within the PDP.

Types of Assessment

Peer- and Self-assessment requires students to assess their own work and that of fellow students.

It:

 Encourages a sense of ownership of the process of assessment;

 Assists the student to become an autonomous learner;

 Helps them to develop a range of transferable skills;

Enables assessment to be part of the learning process rather than an adjunct to it.

Portfolio Assessment is used to assess a variety of projects that have been developed throughout

the unit and contained within a single folder or portfolio. Portfolio assessment could take a variety of formats depending on the subject and stipulated by the tutor.

Practical and Class Based Projects allow students to demonstrate their understanding of a specific

subject area and application of practical areas of the programme.

Written Reports are required in some study areas and these will in some cases be a response to

industry briefs, allowing students to reflect real industry requirements and to present work to industry standards through report writing.

Presentations are used in some subjects to allow students to develop their creative, professional

communication and presentation skills, formalising their arguments in a critical manner, and when giving presentations students are actively encouraged to embrace new technologies and media in an innovative way where appropriate.

Research Proposals and Dissertations are used to demonstrate student ability to plan, prepare and

References

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