THE STATE OF STATE INCOME, GIFT, ESTATE AND INHERITANCE TAXES AND IMPACT ON YOUR INVESTMENT STRATEGY

Download (0)

Full text

(1)

WEALTH MANAGEMENT

THE STATE OF STATE INCOME, GIFT, ESTATE AND INHERITANCE TAXES AND  IMPACT ON YOUR INVESTMENT STRATEGY 

 

Benjamin Franklin famously observed that there were only two things that were  certain in life: death and taxes.  When viewed as a function of state residency,  however, while death is most definitely certain taxes are somewhat less so. This  article offers a brief summary of Tennessee income, gift and inheritance taxes tax,  an overview of these taxes in other states across the country and concludes with  a look at both the requirements for, obligations of and possible advantages to  changing your residency for tax purposes.   

 

Tax advisors have long admonished clients not to let “the tail wag the dog” when  it comes to tax planning.  Stated otherwise, while tax considerations play an  important role in many decisions, they should rarely be the decisive factor. Take,  for example, your choice of residency. A great many Tennesseans live in 

Tennessee not so much by choice, but rather because they were born here and  regard the state as their home.  Others may have been born elsewhere, but  moved to Tennessee as a result of a job offer, a transfer, to be closer to family or  perhaps even the desire to live in a warmer climate, and have also come to regard  Tennessee as their home.  

 

The terms “domicile and “residency” are used somewhat interchangeably for tax  purposes, but they each have a slightly different meaning. A taxpayer’s domicile –  or tax “home” ‐ is the state in which he or she resided with the intent to remain  indefinitely.  A taxpayer’s residence is any state in which he or she resided for a  specified period of time. Domicile is more significant for gift, estate and 

inheritance taxes; residency has somewhat more significance for income tax  purposes. Thus a taxpayer may be domiciled in one state but be treated as a  resident of another state for income tax purposes.  Such a taxpayer would be  potentially liable for income, gift, estate or inheritance taxes in the state of his or  her domicile and income taxes in the state in which he or she was deemed to be a  resident.  This, of course, is less than ideal tax planning. 

 

(2)

Courts tend to look at both a taxpayer’s subjective intent as well as certain  objective evidence of domicile. Taxing authorities, however, focus on specific  objective factors when a question of domicile arises.  There is no one factor that  conclusively establishes domicile, but the following are benchmark indicators of a  taxpayer’s domicile:  

 

 Physical presence in the state for at least 6 months and 1 day 

 Filing a Declaration of Domicile   

 Permanent mailing address 

 Register to vote and actually vote in elections 

 Automobile registration and driver's license 

 Residence claimed for automotive and homeowner’s insurance purposes 

 Location of primary care and other physicians 

 Location of primary bank accounts 

 Utility and other bills 

 Filing income tax returns  

 Location of Will, Power of Attorney and Living Will/Health Care Directive   

The rules for determining domicile and/or residency vary widely from state to  state. For example, if a taxpayer lives in Maryland for at least six months out of a  calendar year and either maintains a home in Maryland or lives in Maryland as of  the last day of the year, then he or she is considered a Maryland resident for tax  purposes. In neighboring Virginia, however, the law is a much simpler: a taxpayer  is considered a resident if they live in Virginia for at least 183 days during the  year. Some states effectively require taxpayers to produce evidence establishing  where they were for each day of the period of residency in question. In short,  establishing a change of domicile or residency is serious business. 

 

STATE INCOME TAXES   

Tennessee is frequently listed – along with Alaska, Florida, Nevada, New 

Hampshire, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming – as one nine states  that does not have an income tax. Technically speaking this is true.  But 

Tennessee taxpayers are well aware of the fact that Tennessee does impose a tax 

(3)

on certain interest and dividend income – so the claim that Tennessee does not  have an income tax may ring somewhat hollow to them. 

 

The Tennessee Hall Income Tax of 6% that applies to all taxable dividend and  interest income was adopted in 1937.  A taxpayer whose legal domicile is in  Tennessee and whose taxable interest and dividend income exceeded $1,250  ($2,500 if married, filing jointly) during the tax year is required to file a return, as  is any person who “moved into or out of Tennessee during the year” and whose  taxable interest and dividend income during the period of Tennessee residency  exceeded the $1,250 ($2,500 if married, filing jointly) filing threshold. A non‐

Tennessee domiciliary who maintains a residence in Tennessee for more than six  months of the year is also required to file a return if he or she has taxable interest  and dividend income that exceeds $1,250 ($2,500 if married, filing jointly).  

 

Military personnel and fulltime students having legal domicile in another state are  not required to file. A person who is legally blind or a quadriplegic is exempt from  the tax, as is any person 65 years of age or older having a total annual income  derived from any and all sources of $16,200 or less ($27,000 or less for joint  filers). Tennessee does not tax IRA distributions, pension plan distributions or  Social Security income. 

 

Let’s consider the case of Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, both of whom have been 

Tennessee residents since birth. Mr. Holmes retired in 2000 after selling his very  successful small business and promptly purchased a vacation home in Florida.  His  three children and ten grandchildren all live in Tennessee, so it comes as no 

surprise that Mr. and Mrs. Holmes consider Tennessee their home and have no  desire to become Florida residents.  As the years go by, however, it seems that  Mr. and Mrs. Holmes are spending more and more time in Florida.  In fact, the  Holmes “winter” home in Florida is now their primary residence from Labor Day  through the end of April. 

 

(4)

If the Holmes have roughly $200,000 of taxable dividend and interest income  each year, they will pay an annual Hall income tax of about $11,850.  In fact,  they’ve been paying the Hall tax for so long that they never give it a second  thought.  But last year, when they received their tax return, it included a note  from their accountant asking them if they have ever considered becoming Florida  residents.  

 

As noted above, the Holmes think of themselves as Tennesseans (and hate the  dreaded Gators), but they suddenly recognized that they actually spend about  eight months a year in Florida.  If they were to change their residence to Florida –  a change would require very little for them ‐ they will no longer have to pay 

almost $12,000 in Hall tax.  Over ten years the savings will approach $120,000,  and Mr. and Mrs. Holmes both agree that kind of savings is worth considering.  

But they are curious about the other tax consequences that would flow from a  change of residence, specifically gift, estate and inheritance taxes. 

 

STATE GIFT AND INHERITANCE TAX   

Tennessee is the only state that maintains its own gift and inheritance tax system. 

Indeed, under current law the vast majority of states have neither a gift nor an  estate or inheritance tax, and those that do rely almost entirely on federal gift  and estate tax law.  

 

Tennessee gift and inheritance tax system is relatively straightforward, employing  the following rate system for both gift and inheritance tax purposes: 

 

Class A        Class B 

Amount Transferred   Tax rate    Amount Transferred   Tax Rate  Less than $40,000  5.5%    Less than $50,000  6.5% 

$40,000‐$240,000  6.5%    $50,000‐$100,000  9.5% 

$240,000‐$440,000  7.5%    $100,000‐$150,000  12.0% 

More than $440,000  9.5%    $150,000‐$200,000  13.5% 

More than $200,000  16.0% 

 

For gift tax purposes Tennessee classifies the recipient of the gift as either a “Class  A” or “Class B” beneficiary and taxes the gift based upon the class of the donee.  

Class A beneficiaries include the husband, wife, son, daughter, lineal ancestor, 

(5)

lineal descendant, brother, sister, son‐in‐law, daughter‐in‐law, or stepchild of the  donor – everyone else is a Class B beneficiary. There are some notable exclusions  from the Class A list.  For example, unless the donor has no children or 

grandchildren, his nieces and nephews are Class B beneficiaries.  Similarly, in‐laws  and step‐children are Class A beneficiaries only as to one generation.  As a result,  gifts to the spouse of grandchild or to a step‐grandchild are gifts to Class B 

beneficiaries (and much more expensive to make).   

 

The tax rates for gifts to Class B beneficiaries are clearly much higher than those  for Class A beneficiaries.  In addition, while Class A beneficiaries qualify for the  federal annual exclusion amount (currently $13,000 per person per donee),  Class  B beneficiaries are limited to an exclusion equal to the greater of $3,000 per  donee or $5,000  – meaning that gifts that are tax‐free for federal purposes often  result in (unexpected) Tennessee gift tax.   

 

For inheritance tax purposes the identity of the recipient is irrelevant – the estate  is taxed as if every beneficiary was a Class A.  

 

In contrast to Tennessee, Florida has no gift, estate or inheritance tax. 

 

With this information in hand, let's return to Mr. and Mrs. Holmes. The Holmes  have an estate valued at approximately $10MM, which includes their home in  Tennessee and their home in Florida, each of which is valued at $1MM. In 

addition, Mr. and Mrs. Holmes regard their niece, Katie as if she were their own  daughter. Katie’s parents died in a car accident when she was young and she was  raised in the Holmes’ home.   

 

The Holmes traditionally make annual exclusion gifts to all of their children and  Katie, a total of $104,000 annually.  The gifts are tax free as to their children, but  the gift to Katie results in $1,155 in Tennessee gift tax.  While the Holmes would  not be subject to any federal estate tax at their death, their Tennessee estate plan  suggests that they should expect approximately $748,400 in Tennessee 

inheritance tax. So what should the Holmes do? 

 

The tax consequences of changing residency are fairly compelling for the Holmes: 

they would save $11,850 in annual Hall income tax, $1,155 in annual Tennessee 

(6)

gift tax and $748,400 in Tennessee inheritance taxes (under current law) by  becoming Florida residents.   

 

Inasmuch as the Holmes already spend eight months a year in Florida, they have  already overcome arguably the biggest hurdle to changing their tax home. A  declaration of domicile, to be filed in the courthouse closest to their Florida  home, attests to their intent to treat Florida as their domicile. With new Florida  drivers’ licenses, automobile and voter registration, the Holmes should be treated  as Florida residents for all tax purposes. 

 

INVESTMENT STRATEGY   

While the overriding investment concern should always revolve around the  risk/reward trade off and how a particular investment fits within the existing  portfolio, taxation of returns is an important secondary consideration.  In most  cases, investors understand the basic Federal System of Taxation as it relates to  their investments.  Some returns are considered income and taxed at the 

individual’s personal tax rate, and other returns are considered appreciation.  

Appreciation is taxed in the year in which the gain is realized (sold) and is either  short or long term depending on how long it has been held (more or less than 1  year).  Short term gains are taxed at the individual’s personal tax rate, and long  term gains are currently taxed at 15%. 

 

Less attention seems to be paid by investors to the way a particular state’s tax  system would figure into the investment decisions.  Investment Planning related  to the Tennessee Hall Income Tax often revolves around trying to select 

investments that grow through appreciation rather than income or dividends.   

 

To the extent a client needs fixed income for diversification (as opposed to  current income), there are a couple of strategies that can be employed ‐   

Hold Fixed Income in Tax Deferred Accounts:  Once they decide on their asset  allocation, many investors implement that allocation throughout all of their  investments.  Let’s consider a client who allocates their money 60% to equities  and 40% to fixed income.  The amount allocated to fixed income is not there  because of income needs but rather to reduce volatility / risk.  Let’s assume the  client has a portfolio worth $1,000,000 in total and $500,000 of that is in an IRA 

(7)

and $500,000 is taxable money.  Conventional thinking would be to invest each  account $300,000 to equities and $200,000 to fixed income.  However, you could  get to the same overall allocation of 60%/40% by putting $400,000 to fixed and 

$100,000 to equity within the IRA and doing exactly the opposite with the money  in the taxable account.  The upside to this is almost all of the income from the  fixed income portion is within the IRA and would not be subject currently to state  or federal tax – a great result! 

 

Buy State Specific Municipal Bonds:  Let’s consider a scenario where a person  wants more fixed income than their IRA is worth. That person could purchase  bonds issued by various entities and municipalities in their state of residency that  are exempted from that state’s tax.  These type bonds are also exempt from  federal taxes.   Being exempt from both of these taxes increase the yield 

significantly.  In Tennessee, this tax exemption can be worth over 40%.  In others  words, a 2% tax free yield would be equivalent to a 3.34% taxable yield.   In the  old days (3 years ago), most investors would have 100% of their municipal bonds  from the state in which they resided to maximize this tax benefit.  However, our  thinking is that a municipal bond portfolio does need some state and geographic  diversification within the securities held for credit/default reasons.  One only  needs to think of a portfolio that would only hold California or Illinois bonds to  understand that thinking! 

 

We have often said, “It is not what you gross but what you net that is important.”  

State taxes are an important consideration when you think about your net. 

 

CONCLUSION   

Changing residency for tax purposes is a BIG deal and it should not be undertaken  lightly.  Merely wanting to change or intending to change residency generally will  not work – you have to actually do the things that residents of your new state  would customarily do. For taxpayers with multiple residences, however, 

sometimes the changes required are rather minor, arguably even simple to make. 

And as illustrated by Mr. and Mrs. Holmes, the tax benefits can be dramatic. 

         

(8)

 

Figure

Updating...

References