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Full text

(1)

Historic,

Archive

Document

Do

not

assume

content

reflects

current

scientific

knowledge,

policies,

or

practices.

(2)
(3)

1Q03.

DESCRIPTIVE

CATALOd

LIBRARY

ItECJEIVtlD

SEP

1

0

1920

it

i DoportimefitofAgrionltaiB* OF..

pruit

and

Qrnamental

^rees

SHRUBS, ROSES,

GRAPE

VINES,

SMALL

FRUITS, ETC.

WEST

JERSEY

NURSERY

CO.,

' ' '

STANTON

B. COLE, Proprietor,

(4)
(5)

BRIEF DIRECTIONS

FOR TRANSPLANTING TREES

AND

PLANTS

AND

FOR THEIR

SUBSEQUENT

CULTURE.

Preparethe

ground

as for acropof corn; then dig the holes just large

enough

to •admit the roots withoutcrowdingand doubling

them

up.

Avoid

deepplanting, which

isdecidedly injurious tothe tree,

and

when

excessive

may

causeits death. Itshould

be

no

deeper than itstood beforeremoval fromtheNursery.

A

mound

of earth, one

foot high, should beheeled

up

around the trees

when

planted in the Fall—it

makes

them

firmer to withstand theWinter

and

is a protection to the roots. Itshould be

leveled again in theSpring.

Beforeplanting, the injured parts of the roots shouldbe cutoff smoothlywitha

sharp knife.

Shorteningthebranches is anotherveryimportantmatter to the life and vigor of thetree,

and

should be

done

at the timeof planting. It consists in cuttingback the

endsof the branches, but to what extentit should be

done

depends

upon

circum-stances. If atree haslost the greater portionof its roots, asevere shortening in of the headwill be necessary ; if only a small portionof the roots are cutoff, moderate

pruningwill be sufficient. Inallcases it should be

done

in a

manner

corresponding

Avith the loss of roots.

Cultivate the orchard afew years with

hoed

crops.

To

insure regular crops of

iruit, an orchard should be kept afterwards permanently insod, and

manure

applied tothe surface.

Dwarf

Pearsshould be planted so as to cover about one inch above thegraft.

Cut back

aboutone-third ofthe last year's growth everyyear. All dwarffruit trees

shouldreceive highcultivation, and be keptclear of grass and weeds.

Small Fruits, such asRaspberries, Blackberries, etc., should becut

down

close to the

ground

andnotallowed tofruitthe firstyear.

The

best time for planting Evergreensis endof October or

commencement

of

November.

The

wood

is thenwell ripenedand can stand theseverity ofthewinter ;

the plants arereadyto startgrowing

when

the spring opens, and arenot as liable to suffer

by

early

summer

droughtsasEvergreens,which areplantedinthe spring.

And

lastly,

when

packed

inboxes for shipment, they are not as liableto heat inthe late iall asinthe spring,

when

the weather beginstoget

warm.

(6)

FRUIT

DEPARTMENT

APPLES.

The

following' varieties have beenwell tested and can be

recommended.

The-selection of \arieties oughtto be governed bythe climate andsoil of the planter, as

it iswell

known

that several

good

^Ve7i' York varieties do not prove profitable for PciDisylvaiiia. etc.

Summer

Varieties.

Bough

Large ; pale greenish-yellow ; sweet, rich flavor ;

good

bearer. Firstof

August.

Carolina Rert iune

Fruit

medium

size; skin smooth, shaded with deep red. Flesh white, tender, juicy, with sub-acid flavor ; very

good

and productive August.

Early

Strawberry—

r^Iedium size; yellowish-white, striped with red; tender,

mild, fineflaxor ;

good

bearer. August,

Early Harvest

Medium

size, paleyellow; rich, sub-acid flavor; very productive..

Commencement

ofAugust.

Early Ripe Large, yellow,

handsome; good

grower andprolific bearer.

Ripens-about the

same

timeas Early Harvest. July.

Golden Sweet

Rather large, pale yellow ; \erysweet and

good

;

good

bearer.

August.

Keswick Codlin- Large, tender, juicy, acid; excellent for cooking;

producti\-e-and early bearer. July to October.

Red

Astrachan—

Rather large ; deep crimson, with a pale white

bloom

; juicy,

acid fl.avor ; productive. August.

Sops of

Wine—

^ledium ; yellow, splashed with red, sprinkled with gray dots;,

flesh white, pleasant, sub-acid ; stronggrower; productive. August and September.

Summer

Rambo—

-Medium to large ; green, striped with red; sub-acid

; good.

Good

marketap]ile. September.

Tetofsky-

A

Russian applewhich pro\es profitable formarket;

comes

early

into-bearing and produces annually. \'eryhardy ; fruitround and smooth, with yellow

ground, handsomt-ly stripedwithred. Flesh white andjuicy. August.

Yellow Transparent

A

new

Russian variety, ripening a

week

or two before Tetofsky. Skin,

when

fully ripe, pale yellow; flesh tender, juicy, li\ely, sub-acid.

Fall Varieties.

Alexander

X'ery large; crimson striped, juicy. Quality and productivenessfair.

A

Russian aj^ple. October.

Duchesse of Oldenburgh— .Medium ; yellow, striped with ret) ; rich, juicyand ex cellent; ai)rochicli\e variety introducedfrom Russia. September.

Fall Jpnnetting Large, greenish-yellow ; sub-acid, vigorous and pnHhutixr

.Septemberand October.

Fall Pippin

\'erv hu'ge; yellow, rich, higli llavored ; moderatebearer. ()(1()1h;

toXovem1)er.

Fall

Strawberry—

Medium

; yellow, strijied with red ; juicy, sub-acid ; excelleni

(7)

Gladstone

Resembles

the

Oldenburgh

veryclosely, but is larger, of finer flesh,

-andwill keep alittle longer.

Gravenstein

Very

large ; red striped; first quality ; very productive.

Septem-TDer

and

October.

Haas, or Fall Queen

Medium,

striped with red. Flesh white, juicy, acid, rich,

Tery good.

Jersey Sweeting

Medium

; striped red and green ; tender, juicy and sweet.

September

to October.

Maiden's Blush

Ratherlarge ; pale 3-ellow with red cheek ; beautiful, \aluable

tor market; abundantbearer.

September

to October.

Ohio Nonpareil— Large; light yellow, striped with red; flesh yellowish-white, 'finegrained, tender, rich

and

juicy. Slightlyaromatic flavor. Octoberand

November.

Rambo

-

Medium;

flat, streaked and marbled with yellow

; very tender, rich,

sub-acidflavor ;

good

bearer. October

to

December.

Red Beitigheimer

\^ery large, light yellow, coveredwith red ; purplish crimson

Avhenexposed to the sun ; flesh sub-acid, pleasant; agreatbearer. September.

Winter

Varieties.

Arkansas Black, or

Paragon—

Originated in Tennessee. Fruit like

Winesap

in -colorand flavor, butlarger insize and is a betterkeeper. Tree avigorous grower, 'hardyandproductive;

comes

into bearingquiteyoung. Februaryto April.

BISMARCK

APPLE.

Bailey's

Sweet—

Fruit large, round, mottled andstriped deep red; flesh yellow

(8)

Baldwin

Well

known

; large, brightred ; juicyandrich; productive.

December

to March. Ben Davis

{^Vew York /'z)!>/'z>/)—Large, stripedwith bright red ; juicy,sub-acid,,

good. iNIuch esteemedin the

West

andSouth.

December

to March.

Belle de

Boskoop—

Large, bright yellow ; crisp, firm, juicy, sprightly sub-acid,

hardy.

Very

good.

December

toJanuary.

Belieflower—Yellow; large; crisp and juicy, aromatic flavor; moderately

pro-ductive.

November

to March.

Bismarck

A

new

variety of greatpromisefrom

New

Zealand. It is aver>^

pro-lific bearerand

commences

to bear

when

quite young. Fruit large andof brilliant

color. Januar}' to March.

Bullock Pippin,_op Ewalt

A

Pennsylvania apple ; large, bright yellow, with

shades of crimson in the sun ; white, tender flesh, sub-acid ; first quality.

A

good

keeper.

November

to March.

Canada Reinette—

Very

large, dull yellow ; flesh firm, juicy and rich. Tree a

free grower and

good

bearer. Highly esteemedin France.

December

to March.

Cider, Smith's— Popular Pennsylvania fruit; greenish-white, striped with red;

juicy, tender, mild, pleasant flavor; verv productive,

good

keeper.

December

to

March.

Cooper's Market

(Coopers RedliJig)-

Medium

size; yellowish,shadedwith red

and striped with crimson ; white and tender flesh, sub-acid ; very productive and a

latekeeper.

December

to May.

Delaware Winter-Originated in Delaware.

Remarkable

for itskeeping qualities.

Fruit

medium

to large, highly colored ; flesh fine grained, juicy, crisp, excellent..

Prolific, and

commences

to bearearly.

Dickinson

From

seedoftheBelieflower.

Medium

tolarge,yellow,almostcovered

with faint red streaks ; mild, sub-acid, very juicy.

A

prolific and regular bearer.

Januaryto March.

Fallawater—Favorite Pennsylvaniafruit.

Very

large, yellowish-green ; valuable

marketvariety. \"eryproductive.

November

to February.

Fameus**. or

Snow

Apple—

Medium

size; veryhandsome, deep crimson; tender,

white fleshed, juicy, high flavored; productive.

November

to December.

Gano—

An

improved

Ben

Davis.

Medium,

deep red ; superior keeper.

Pro-ductive and annualbearer.

Gilliflower

Medium

size, oblong, conical ; skinverydarkred; fleshwhite, dry,

mild, sub-acid;

good

; very productive.

November

to February.

Grimes' Golden

Medium,

rich golden yellow ; crisp, tender, juicy ; doeswell in

Pennsylvania. Early bearerandexcellent keeper. JanuarytoApril.

Hubbardston

Nonsuch—

Large; yellowish ground with red stripes and spots ;.

sweet and rich. Highly esteemed.

November

to January.

Jacob's Sweet -

A

large andexceedingly

showy

fruit. Clear, rich yellow, deeply

shaded with brilliantcarmine; flesh crisp, fine grained andof bestquality. Also a

remarkably

good

keeper. Tree is a strong grower, heavy yielder, annual bearer. Apriland May.

Jonathan—

Medium

size, redand yellow ; flesh tender, juicy, rich ; a moderate

grower. Shoots light-colored,slenderandspreading; very productive. Finevariety

fortable or market.

November

toMarch.

Krauser

Berks Co., Pa., fruit;

medium,

yellow ;

handsome

appearance and a

good

keeper.

December

toApril.

King ofTompkins Co.

Large ; yellow, striped with red; popularvariety,

good

bearer.

December

to March.

Lady—

Small, but very pretty; yellow, with bright, crimson cheeks. Itis avery

showy

littleapple, and is

much

used forthe dessert.

December

to May.

LankfordSeedling—

A

fine,

showy

apple;

medium

to large; yellowstriped,nearly

covered with bright red. Flesh firm, juicy, mild, sub-acid.

One

of the best late

(9)

Mann

Fruit resembles R. I. Greening, but is larger. Tree hardy,

comes

into bearingyoung, and loadsitselfaboutevery year with large crops. Februaryto June. Mcintosh Red

Originated in Canada.

Above

medium

size. Yellow, nearly

coveredwith darkrichcrimson. Flesh white, tender, juicy. Treevery hardy;

good

bearerof excellentfruit

November

to April.

Monmouth

Pippin

Fruit large; color yellow, with russet dots

; juicy, fine,

sub-acid. \'ery

good

tobest. Octoberto

November.

Northern Spy

Large, striped and covered with dark crimson ; a

New

York

fruit; juicy, high flavor, greatbearer. Januaryto May.

Paragon—

(SeeArkansas Black. )

Peclc's Pleasant—Larje, yellow, with blushcheek ; fineflavor; a

good

substitute

for

Newtown

Pippin;

good

bearer

and

keeper.

November

to April.

Pewaukee—

Hardy

and productive ; fruit

medium

to large; skin bright yellow,

stripedandmottled with light and dark; flesh white,juicv. sub-acid ; good. Januarv to May.

Rawle's Janet—fA>z'<?r Faih.

X'aluable, of southern origin ;

medium

; yellow,

stripedwith red ; crisp, rich andjuicv; verv productiveand a

good

keeper. Januarv to Mav.

Red Romanite

{Gilpi?i or Carthouse)

Medium

; dark red, white flesh ; crisp, sub-acid,

makes good

cider; late keeper, very productive. Februaryto May.

Rhode Island

Greening—

Well

known

; excellent variety; large, light, greenish-}-ellow ; firm and rich, excellent flavor ; crooked grower,

good

keeper and

good

bearer.

November

to March.

Roman

Stem

Medium

; skin yellow, covered with large russet dots; flesh

yellowish-white, crisp, juicy.

November

to March.

Rdme Beauty—

Large; striped with bright red ; flesh tender, juicy, sprightly ;

moderate

grower. Origin Ohio.

December

to February.

Russett. American

^M^xy—'

Sheep Nose)

Below

medium

; dullyellow; yellow

flesh, verytender, rich, spicy flavor; a great bearer

and

good

keeper.

December

to

March.

Russett. English

Medium

; paleyellow ; firm andcrisp, mild, sub-acid flavor,

latekeeper; very productive.

Keeps

till June.

Roxbury Russett

Medium

size ; skinat firstdullgreen, coveredwith

brownish-yellowrussett

when

ripe; flesh greenish-white, moderately juicy, withrich, sub-acid

flavor

;

good

tovery good. JanuarytoJune.

Salome

Fruit

medium

; pale yellow, slightlyshadedwith pale red, splashedand striped withdarkred, andsprinkledwith smallyellow dots; flesh tender, juicy, mild sub-acid.

Comes

intobearing early. \'eryhardy. Januaryto June.

An

excellent keeper.

Seek-no-Further

{WestJield)

¥Y\i\t large; dull red overa pale clouded green

ground, sprinkled with obscure yellowdots. Flesh white, tender, with a rich

pear-main

flavor. \^eryiood. OctobertoFebruary.

Smokehouse

Popular Pennsylvania fruit, and valued highly; above

medium

;

yellow, shaded with brightred, sprinkledwith gray

and brown

dots; firm, juicy,

sub-acid flavor;

good

bearer.

November

toFebruary.

Spitzenburgh

{Esopus)

Fruit large; considered equal to

Newtown

Pippin, flesh

yellow, ratherfirm, crisp ; juicy, rich flavor; best.

December

toFebruary.

Stark—

Fruit large; skingreenish-yellow, shaded, splashed

and

stripedwith light

and darkred. Moderately juicy, mildsub-acid. Januaryto May.

Sutton

Beauty—

Fruit

medium

to large, round,

handsome

; skin

waxen

yellow, striped with red. Flesh whitish, tender, juicy, sub-acid; quahtyvery good.

Keeps

ver\'well. Tree free

and

handsome

grower.

November

to February.

Talman's Sweeting

Medium

; lightyellow with a pale blush ; rich andexcellent,

very productive.

December

to April.

Twenty Ounce

Fruit large and

showy

; greenish-yellow, boldly splashed and

(10)

Wagener

Medium,

dark red ; mild, tender, sub-acid ; excellent variety,

abundant bearer.

December

to March.

Walbridge

Fruit

medium

size; pale whilish-yellow

when

fully mature; fle^h 'white, fine, crisp, tender

and

juicy. January toMay.

Wealthy—

Medium

size; whitish-yellow, shaded with deep rich crimson ; flesh

"white, finegrained,tender, juicy, lively, sub-acid; hardyand productive.

December

toFebruary.

Winesap— Medium,

darkred; yellow flesh, firm, crisp, high flavored ; fruithangs

late

on

thetree; excellentfor cider,very

good

bearer, and excellentkeeper.

Decem-berto May.

Winter Sweet Paradise—Pennsylvania apple, hardy and productive

; green

when

picked, with

brown

flush,

becoming

paleratmaturity; flesli white, finegrained, jin'cy

and

verygood.

November

toMarch.

Wolf River

Very

hardy; fruitvery large, whitishcolor, mostly C(wered uith red

and

numerous

brown specks. Flesh firm, sub-acid. Regularand

enormous

bearer.

March.

Yorl^ Imperial

A

very fine Pennsylvania apple of

medium

size, oblate, white,

shaded with crimson ; fleshfirm, crisp, juicy, sub-acid.

November

to February.

CRAB

APPLES.

Valuable for Preserving and Desirable for Ornament.

Red Siberian

^mall; bright red, covered with a light transparent

bloom

;

ex-cellent forpreserving. EarlySeptember.

YellowSiberian— Small ; pale yellow, also very valuable for preserving.

Sep-tember.

Gen. Grant

Fruit round, of large size for a crab ; skin

cream

3'ellow ground,

broken stripes,

becoming

red on sun exposed side.

Very

mild sub-acid. October.

Hyslop—

Large; darkred, with a blue

bloom

;

good

for cider.

IVIontreal Beauty

Fruitlarge; bright yellow, covered and shadedwith rich red.

Flesh yellowish, rich, firm, acid; oneof tlie

most

beautiful of all crabs.

September

to October.

Transcendant—

Large, yellow; mostly covered v\ith red; productive and desir-able. Bestearly Fall variety.

Van

Wyck

Sweet

A

valuablevariety. Fruit large; skin yeJIowish-white, colored

redand covered with

bloom

; flesh sweet

and

tender; core small. September.

Whitney's No.

20—

A

seedlingof the Siberian Crab. vSaid to be large, striped,

almostred; fleshyellowish-white, veryjuicy, sub-acid.

Good

forcanningand

making

into cider. August.

PEARS.

Dwarf Pears—

For small gardens and for cultivation by amateurs, or persons likely to devote the necessaryattention to them,

Dwarf

Pears will certainly prove remunerativeinasuitable soil, andwithproperselection of varieties.

On

very light,

sandysoil, or gravellysoils.

Dwarf

Pears willnotproveso well as

Standard Pears

These

are generally preferred for orchardculture.

They

will

not bearfruitat soearlyan ageas

Dwarf

Pears, but theywill flourish on a greater variety of soils,

and

will bear neglect better; without proper cultivation, however,

they will, like

most

trees, failto givesatisfaction.

Gathering

Pears—

Pears, asa general rule, should never be allowed to ripen on

the tree.

Summer

and Fall varieties should be gathered at least ten days before maturit^• ; Winter Pearsaboutthe timefrosty weathersetsin.

The

varieties

marked

a (*) succeed as well as. Dwarfs.

The

following list

(11)

Summer

Varieties.

Bartlett—Large ; clear yellow skin ; buttery, very juicy

and

high flavored, early

and

greatbearer. September.

'^Clapp's Favorite—Large, resemblingBartlett

; ripens a few days earlier;

pro-ductive.

August

and September.

"^Doyenne d'Ete

[Sinmner

Doyeime)

Small; yellow, with red cheek; rich,

:sugary, melting; veryearly

and

fine. Last of July.

Idaho -

New.

Very

large; nearly round, resembling Easter Beurre. Yellow, -with brownish-red on sunny side. Flesh melting, juicy ; quality best.

Wood

and

foliage resembles Bartlett. Hardy, vigorous

and

prolific. September.

Koonce

Best early pear. Tree vigorous, fiee from blight, fine grower. Pear

medium

to large, yellow, with one sidecovered with red ; does not rot atthe core ;

very productive;

handsome and good

shipper.

The

earliestpear.

Lawson

Large ; color a brilliant crimson on a yellow cheek

; very beautiful.

Pleshrich andjuicy, but notofhigh quality. July

and

August.

Le Conte

Fruit large; skin smooth, pale yellow;

good

quality. Tree very

-\'igorous, said tobefree from blight.

Very

prolific. October.

^Osband's

Summer

Medium

size, rich yellow color; excellent quality, mild and

pleasant flavor. August.

^Tyson

Medium

; yellow,reddishcheek ; very melting

and

juicy,sweet, excellent

flavor, very productive. September.

Wilder

Smallto

medium

; bell-shaped. Pale yellow

ground

with deep shading

of carmine; core verysmall. Flesh whitish-yellow, fine grained, tender, sub-acid. Quality very good. August.

Fall Varieties.

"Beurre d'Anjou

Large; yellowish,

somewhat

russetted, red cheek ; fine

grained, buttery, meltingandexcellent. Octoberto

December.

^Duchesse

d'Angouieme—

A'ery large, dull yellow ; buttery, rich, juicy, and

excellent; does bestasa dwarf. Octoberto

November.

Flemish Beauty

Large ; greenish-yellow, russetted; sweet

and

rich ; excellent

flavor; productive.

September

and October.

Garber

Large, round,

handsome

; skin

waxy

y<^llow,

smooth

; e.xcellent for

canning

and

preserving. Tree vigorous andfreefrom blight. September.

^Howell

A

fine large pear, sweet

and

melting ; [)ale yellow, with a red cheek

and

patches ofrussett.

September and

October.

^Louise Bonne de Jersey

Large, beautiful, firsl-rate pear; pale green with a

dark blush

; buttery, juicy;^indrich.

September

andOctober.

KietFer's

Hybrid—

Large and

showy

; supposedto bea seedlingof a

Sand

Pear

accidentallycrossed with

some

cultivated kind

grown

nearit. Skin is arich yellow color, tingedwithred. Excellent for canningpurposes.

Very

productive. October

and November.

Butter—

Medium

to large; very good. vSkin greenish-yellow, covered with

russet ; juicy. Octoberand

November.

Seckel—

Small; dull yellow, with russet

and

colored cheek ; very juicy buttery

and

rich; very high flavoredandproductive; aslowgrower.

September and

October.

Sheldon

Above medium

; dark yellow orrusset; rich, melting

and

highflavored;

first-ratequality. October and

November.

Winter

Varieties.

Lawrence

Medium

light yellow, mostlysprinkled with dots ; buttery, rich

and

•aromatic ; veryreliable

and

productive.

December.

Lincoln Coreless—Fruitvery large, yellow, juicy ; almost without core.

A

very

(12)

Vermont

Beauty—

Fruit

medium,

very handsome, yellow with bright carmine

cheek; fleshisrich,juicy,aromatic,andoffinequality. Ripens immediatelyafterSeckel. "^Vicar of Wakefield

Large, long, yellow, often a red cheek; juicy and ver>"

pleasant

; very productive.

November

to January.

Pears

of

Recent

Introduction.

Not

fullytested yet in this vicinity:

Rossney

Medium

to large; fine grain flesh; melting and juicy, very

sweet-Ripenstwo

weeks

after Bartlett. Excellent keeperandshipper.

Skm

creamy, with

crimson blush.

Worden-Seckel

A

seedling of Seckel;

enormous

bearer,

good

keeper.

Does-notrotatthe core. Ripensjust afterSeckel.

CHERRIES.

The

Cherry will prove successful on light, well drained soil.

Any

tree that is.

attacked

by

the "black knot," can be saved bycuttingoffallindication ofthedisease asitappears.

The

followinglist embracesthe rt^allydesirable kinds.

Class

I—

Heart.

Black Eagle

A

fine, large, black cherry, of first-rate quality and productive ;;

verysweet andrich ; oneof thebest. First of July.

Black Tartarian—

Very

large, black, half tender; sweet, rather rich, fine flavor;.

deserves generalcultivation ; treeastrong, upright, beautiful grov\'erand

good

bearer.

Lastof June.

Downer's Late

Red—Above medium

; light redmottled with

amber

; melting

and

delicious, excellent, very productive ; not subject to rotby rainyweather. July.

Early Purple Guigne

Medium,

dark purple; juicy, tender andsweet. Early in*

June.

Elton—Large, pale yellow, streaked and mottled with red; halftender, juicy,

richand delicious. June andJuly.

Very

much

likeGov.

Wood,

only

more

hardy. Ida

Medium

to large; very hardy. Skinlight yellow, nearly covered withpale

red; juicy, finequality; tree vigorous, upright, abundantand regularbearer. Middle ofJune.

Ohio Beauty

[Dr. Khdland'

Large; dark and pale red marbled; tender,

juicy, highflavored.

Towards

endof June.

Ox-Heart

Large ; redskin, red

and

half tenderflesh, pleasant juice, of second

c}uality, inpointof flavor. LastofJune.

Class

II—

Bigarreau.

Napoleon

Very

large; pale yellow, spotted with deep red; very firm andjuicy ;.

very productive, andaconstantbearer. First ofJuly.

Schmidt's Bigarreau—Largest black cherry; flesh dark, tender, juicy, with afine

rich flavor.

Yellow Spanish

Large ; light yellow, with red cheek, having a

waxen

appear-;mce ; firm, juicyand sweet; oneof thebest; very productive. LastofJune.

Windsor—

Originated in Canada. Fruit large, livei-colored, resembling Elkiiorn or Tradescant's Black Heart ; firm and of fine quality. Tree hardy and very

pro-lific.

A

valuable latevariety.

Class III—

Duke

and

florello.

Dyehouse—

Fruit largeand of fine flavor. Resembles Early Richmond, but said: to ripenearlier. Hardy.

(13)

Empress Eugenie

Large, dark redjuicy, rich. Tree liardy and productive. July. English IMorello

Medium

to large, l)!ackish-red; rich acid, juicy and

good

; very

productive and reliable. Is nottheold "

Common

Morello." Veryhardy. Augu.st.

Tree is\erydwarfin growth.

Early Richmond

( Kentish\

Medium

size, dark red: me'ting. juicy, sprightly,

rich acidflavor ; very productive, reliable and hardy ; valuable. June.

Late

Duke—

Large, lightred ; late and fine. Last of July.

Louis Phillippe

Large, dark red.almostblack, sprightlv, mild acid; stone small.

July.

May

Oulce

Large, darkred ; juicv and rich ; an old, excellent \ariety ; vigorous

and productive. Middle ofJune.

Montmorency—

((^rfl'/z/^/rt'1

Large and

hardy, said to bese\en to ten days later

than the

Richmond.

\'ery productive and valuable.

Olivet

A

new, remarkablyearly cherry; productive, fine ciuality andthe largest

of its class. Color, shiningdeep red; flavorsub-acid ; ripensearly in June and

con-tinues till July.

PLUMS.

A

heavysoil, with aconsiderable mixtureof clayey loam, is most suitableforthe

Plum. Itshould be plantedwherethe hogs

and

poultryhave freeaccess, as the latter

destroy

many

injurious insects, and the former, in

rubbmg

against the tree, jarit and

eatthefallen fruit. W^hereno hogs are kept, the treesshouldbe jirred once a day.

and all fallenfruit atonce gatheredanddestroyed. Mr. Bateham. ofOhio, writes the

Country Gentlemanthat

by

applying sulphur over the trees, inputtingitina bagto a long poleand shakingitoverthetrees, splendid cropshavebeen realized.

Coe's Golden

Drop—

Ver}- large ; oval, pale yellow; flesh firm, adheres to the

stone: veryvaluable. Lastof September.

General Hand

Large, yellow,

handsome

; freestone. Tree vigorous and

pro-ducti\e. September.

German

Prune

Large, oblong, purple; juicy

and

rich; tree very productive ;

unusuallyfreefromthe curculio

and

from knots. September.

Grand Duke

\^ery large, dark red, fine quality; free from rot. Tree moderate

grower.

September

Giant Prure

Largest prune

known.

Tree strong,

handsome

grower. Freestone. Imperial Gage

Large, oval; greenish-yellow, covered with

bloom

; very juic\'

and sweet; oneofthe

most

valuable varieties. Middle ofAugust.

Lombard

Medium,

violetred, juicy, good, hardy

and

productive. August.

Magnum

Bonum

Yellow, oneofourlargest

plums

; egg-shaped, very productive;

excellentfor cooking. Lastof August.

Mariana

Seedlingof

Wild

Goose

; very

handsome

and good, exceedingly pro-lific; anearlybearer andfree fromthe ravagesof curculio

; deepcardinal red,

when

ripe ; thick skin, fine quality.

Niagara

A

new^ verylarge red plum. \'ery productive ; flesh deep

greenish-yellow Middle ofAugust.

Prince Engelbert—

Dark

blue, of

good

quality ; tree a greatbearer and a strong

grower; avaluable market fruit. LastofAugust.

Prince of Wales

Round,

reddish-purple ; tree very hardy and a great bearer.

September. Prunus Simoni

\Apricot Pluni)—Yxovc\ the Orient and, therefore, not hard>

enough

to be profitable here. Ripensin July, is brick red, with yellow flesh of an

odd

flavor.

An

acquisition further south.

Robinson

Freestone, hardy

and

vigorous. Prolific bearer ; fruit nearly round ;.

color red on ayellowishground. Fine

and

sweet.

Shipper's Pride

-Said

to be an unfailing cropper and a

good

shipper. Large., round, purple

plum

of excellent qualify.

(14)

Shropshire

Damson—

An

English variety. Fruit small, rather obovate', skinpurple,

covered with thick, blue

bloom

; flesh melting and juicy, rather tart

; separates

partiallyfrom the stone.

Thousands

of bushels are annuallysoldinthe marketfor preserves.

With

good

cultivationit is enormouslyproductive. September. Is not hardy.

Spauiding

Fruit large, ye^louish-green, with marblingof adeeper green and a delicate white

bloom

; fleshpale yellow, exceedinglyfirm, of sugary sweetness, part^

ingreadilyfrom thesmall stone. RipensmiddleofAugust.

Union Purple—Large, purple, coveredwith thin

bloom

; flesh greenish, sweet and

good

; tree astrong grower. September.

Wild Goose

An

improved varietyof theChickasaw, of strong growth and

com-paratively free from the injuries of curculio; large, bright red, with agray

bloom

;

juicy, sweetand

good

; very productiveand profitable. Lastof July.

Japan Plums.

APANDANCE

PLU.M.

Abundance—

Fruit large,

showy

and beautiful; amber, turningto a bright cherry

color; white bloom; flesh light yellow, juicy, lender and very sweet; stone \ery small. Ripens veryearly.

•<urbank-A

good

grower; bears

when

very

young

; fruit large, cherry red, with lilac

bloom

; flesh deep yellow andverysweet ; very productive ; fruit resembles the

.Abundance, but is abouttwo weekslater.

Ogon

Medium

size ; yellow, with light

bloom

; flesh thick, meaty, dry, firm,

(15)

Red June

Fairsize, red with liandsonie

bloom

; goot.1 (luality. X'ij^'orous upright

grower. August. Simoni

[Apricot /Y/////1—Fruit

is red, witli yellowflesh of an

odd

tlavor. Sep-tember.

Satsuma—

Large, purple andred. withblue

bloom

; flesh juicy, firm, dark red, of

,good quality.

Hardy

andvigorousgrower. August.

Wickson

Handsome

; deep red, covered with white

bloom

; small stone. Flesh

fine, sugary. Excellentkeeper andshipper. August.

Willard-

Medium

size, red; very early. Inferior quality; will keep longtime:

tree hardyand vigorous. Jnly.

Plums

of

Recent

Introduction. Not yetfullytested in this vicinity :

Climax- \'ery large, heart-shape; very early; flesh yellow, sweet ; very free

stone; skinthick, deepred. Free a vigorous grower.

Sugar Prune

X'igorous grower,very productive; free stone ; large, yellowflesh; 'skin dark purple with

thick white

bloom

\^'hen fully ripe. \'eryearly.

PEACHES.

The

Peach will succeedbest on light, gravelly soil; with proper cultivation, on

almostanysoil. Treesone year old fromthe

bud

arebest suitedfor planting.

The

orchard should be kept cultivated, and the trees carefully

examined

every spring toextractthe borers

A

shovelfulloflime appliedatthe baseofeachtree willoften

beapreventive as well asafertilizer.

The

diseasecalledthe "Vellovrs" isincurable; therefore, if it

shows

itself on oneor twotrees these

must

be cut

down

at once and

burned, which willsave the wholeorchard. Thisdiseasehasnever

shown

itself in

my

nurseries;

my

trees have alwaysbeenhealthy and havegiven entire satisfaction.

]My stock of Peachtreesis quite extensive ; theycan besuppliedin almost any

quantities

and

on liberalterms.

The

followingvarietiesare described in the orderofripening:

First Ripening.

Amsden's Junf^—Fruit

good

size, delicious flavor; finely colored red, freestone

and very firm. White flesh, excellent qualiiv. Firstpartof July.

Alexander

\'ery large and highly colored ; handsome, rich and

good

flavor;

flesh thickand firm ; willcarrywell long distances; freestone. Firstpart of July.

Early Canada

Resembles Alexander veryclosely. Ripens at

same

time. It is

medium

size,

good

quality and

handsome

appearance. Freestone.

Greensboro

\>ry

large; color crimson; flesh white ; freestone. Ripens

same

time asAlexander

Shoemaker

Very

attr.ictive, yellow color, splashed with crimson; juicy, sweet

andmelting; veryhardy ; largesizeandsmall stone. Ripens istto 15th ofJuly.

Sneed-

Medium,

white; excellent quality.

The

earliestpeach

known.

Triumph

Fruit

good

size; yellow, withcrimsoncheek. Strong grower, abundant

bearer. Ripenswith Ale.xander.

The

earliestyellow flesh peach.

Waterloo

Medium

size ; excellent quality, flesh white, skin greenish-white,

purplish-red onside exposed tothe sun.

Champion- Fruit large, delicious, sweet, jiucy; best qualityofall early varieties.

Skin creamy-white, with red cheek; handsome, hardy and productive and a

good

(16)

Second

Ripening.

Early Beatrice

Medium

size, marbledred cheek; flesh meltingandvery juicy.

Good

shippingpeach; greatbearer. Freestone. MiddleofJuly.

Early Rivers

Large, pale yellow, with pink cheek; flesh melting, very rich.

Freestone. LastofJuly.

Snow's Orange

A

variety which originated near Battle Creek, Mich., and

much

valuedin thatstate.

A

very vigorousgroweranda productive beareroflargeyellow peaches, with red cheeks.

Orange

coloredflesh. Ripensa

week

earlier than the Barnard's Early.

Third

Ripening.

Barnard's Early

A

large, yellowpeach of

good

quality.

Very

popular in the

Western States.

Hale's Early

Beautifulpeach; whiteflesh, ofexcellent quality

when

well ripened.

Rotsin

some

localities. Freestone. Lastof July.

Troth's Early Red

Medium

size, skin red; flesh yellowish-white, juicy, sweet

andexcellent;

good

marketpeach. Freestone. First ofAugust.

Yellow St. John

Large; roundish.

Orange

yellow with deep red cheek ; flesh

yellow,juicy, sweetand highlyflavored. Freestone. RipenswithTroth's Early. Mountain

Rose—

Large, red skin, white flesh; excellent quality. Freestone. First ofAugust.

Gearge the Fourth

Large, pale-yellowish-white with red cheek; flesh pale

yel-lowish-white, veryjuicyand rich ; moderate bearer, of bestquality. Freestone.

Aug.

Large Early York

[Honest John)

Large ; white skin

and

nearly white flesh ;

tender andjuicy; very productive. Freestone. August.

Lewis' Seedling

Resembles Mt. Rose, but said to be superior and

more

pro" ductive.

Foster

\'ery largeand

handsome

; verysimilar to Crawford's Early butripens

a few days earlier

; yellowflesh. Freestone.

Crawford's Early Melacoton

Very

large, yellow, with red cheek; yellow flesh,

redatthestone

; very juicyand excellent; oneof thebest. Freestone. Middle of

August.

New

Prolific

Ripens close to Crawfords Early

; pit exceedingly small. Bore

heavycrops

when

all othersfailed.

Very

hardy. Fourtli Ripening.

Yellow Rareripe

Large, deep yellow, dotted with red; flesh yellow, red at the

stone, melting, juicy, rich; excellentvinous flavor. Freestone. LatterpartofAugust.

Conkling

Large and

handsome

; golden yellow, marbled with crimson; flesh pale yellow; very juicy, sweet. Tree vigorousand yields heavy crops. Ripenslast

ofAugust.

Crosbey

Medium

size, brightyellow, splashed with streaks of carmine: beauti-ful, constant bearer andvery hardy, therefore veryreliable. Ripens between

Craw-ford's Earlyand Late.

Elberta

\'ery large, yellow, with red cheek, juicy andhigh flavor; flesh yellow ;

freestone, veryprofitable, and an excellentshippingvariety. Last of August. Fitzgerald

Fruitlarge, bright yellow, covered with red; flesh deepyellow. Best quality. Early .September.

Wager

Xery large, yellow; bears uniformandlargecrops; juicy and fine flavor.

Lastof August.

Richmond

Medium

to large, yellowmottled with led. flesh yellow, melting, juicy, rich Freestone. First of September.

Old Mixon Free

Large, yellowish-white, with a dark red cheek ; white, tender

(17)

Old Mixon Cling

Resembles in qualitythe Old

Mixon

Free. It is an excellent clingstone peach. Whiteflesh. September.

iacque's R. R.

\'ery large. Surface deep yellow, marbled with red; flesh

yel-low, juicy, slightly sub-acid. MiddleofSeptember.

Kalamazoo—

Large, yellow; fine quality.

Very

productive and profitable.

Ripens between Jacque's R. R. andHill'sChili.

Reeves' Favorite—Large, roundish; yellow flesh, red at the stone, excellent

quality, hardyvariety. Freestone. September.

Morris White

An

old well

known

variety. Rather large, whitish skin ; white

flesh to the stone, a little firm, melting, juicy, sweet

and

rich. In

some

sections tender andvariable inquality. Freestone. Middle ofSeptember.

Red Cheek Melacoton—\'ery large ; skin yellow, deep red cheek ; flesh yellow,

juicyandvinous ; very productive; afavorite marketfruit. Freestone. September.

Sallie Worrall

V/ery large,

creamy

white, shaded andsplashed with pale todeep

Ted. Flesh firm, veryjuicy; begins toripen lastofAugust. Freestone.

Willetts

One

of the largest and finest peach ; color bright yellow, with red

-cheek ; flesh yellow, juicy. September.

Wheatland

Largetoverylarge ; qualitybest; deep goldenyellow ; greatbearer,

excellent shipper. Freestone. Ripensbetween Crawford's Earlyand Late. Fifth Ripening.

Susquehanna—

A'ery largeand

handsome

; rich yellow,with abeautiful redcheek;

ytllowflesh, melting, richandfine. Moderatebearer. Freestone. September. Stump the World

\^ery large,

creamy

white with red cheek ; white flesh, rich

^and high flavor

; very productive, valuable for marketing. Freestone. September.

Globe

Very

large, golden yellow; very fine flavor, ripening during the latter

halt ofSeptember.

Hill's Chili- Large, skin,wooly, dull yellow; flesh yellow, very rich and sweet. Productive andhardy. Freestone. Last ofSeptember.

Crawford's Late Melacoton

Very

large; yellow, with a deep red cheek ; yellow

flesh, redatthe stone ; avery excellentvariety. Freestone. September.

Fox's Seedling—Large, beautiful red cheek; white flesh, fine quality;

good

shipper.

Ford's

Late—

Rather large; white, with crimson cheek; flesh white, juicy and

rich. Latter partof September.

Sixtli Ripening.

Brandywine- Resembles Crawford's Late

and

is fullyas large. Yellow. Free-stone. Ripensa

week

laterthanCrawford Late.

Clarissa

A

new

andverylargepeach ; yellow, fine flavorand appearance.

\'er\-valuableon accountofitslate ripening.

Chair's Choice

Fine yellow freestone ; rich in color, splendid flavor, excellent

for canning. Ripeningwith

Smock.

Golden Drop

Large,

good

quality ; hardy, profitable ; follows Crawford'sLate.

Esteemed

highlyin Michigan.

Lemon Free

Of

lemon

shape, being longer than broad, pointed at apex; color

pale yellow; verylarge; immenselyproductive. RipensafterCrawford's Late.

Sener

Large, yellow, with deep redcheek; yellowflesh, deep pink around the

stone. Freestone, sweet, rich

and

very Juicy. Ripens about October loth. Highly

recommended

atthe Centennial Exhibition. '

Smock—

-Large, oval; deepyellow with redcheek ; flesh yellow, redatthe stone,

juicyand rich. Freestone. Lastof

September

and early October.

Stephen's Rareripe

Large, resembles Old Mixon's Free, but

more

highh

(18)

Seventh

Ripening.

Bilyeu's Late October

Large, white flesh, freestone,witha beautiful blush cheek;:, flesh rich, juicyand firm.

A

good

shipper. Ripens two

weeks

laterthan

Smock.

Bestlate peach yetintroduced,

Heatn tling

A'ery large, white, tinged nexttothesun, quite

downy

; flesh white,,

veryjuicy, sweet, ofahigh, rich, excellentflavor. Clingstone. October.

Lord Palmerston

A

beautiful large and verylate peach. Fruitof a pale color,

having alittlered on thesunnyside; fleshfirmand richlyflavored. Sal

way

Large, yellow, mottled with aredcheek

; yellow flesh, very productive;,

valuable forits lateripening. Freestone. October.

Steadley-

A

latefreestone ; ripening ten daysafter

Heath

Cling; also said to

be-larger and ofveryfine flavor.

Wonderful

Fruit large; rich, yellow, marbledwith crimson; fleshyellow, rich,

highly flavored; exceedingly firm ; parts from the stone perfectly and dry, and is.

brightred around the pit. Ripenslate toverylate.

DWARF

PEACHES.

Golden Dwarf

( J^inBureii's)

Medium;

skinyellow with amottled, red cheek;

juicy, rich and luscious; bears

good

crops ; grows about 4 feet high ; clingstone.

September

andOctober.

nULBERRIES.

Downing Everbearing

Fruit black, of

good

size, buttree not hardy.

Russian

Fmit

medium,

mostlyblack; sub-acidto sweet; very productive,

per-fectlyhardy.

The

original treeswere imported from

Western

Russia.

QUINCES.

Apple or Orange

Quince—

Fruit large, bright golden yellow; excellent for

pre-serves; very productive.

Crooked

grower.

Bourgeat

Fine quality ; tree vigorous grower ; fruit very large, rich golden,

smooth

; very tender

when

cooked

; excellent keeper. RipensshortlyafterOrange.

Champion—

A

new

variety, originating in Connecticut. Tree a prolificand con-stant bearer. Fruit largerthan the Orange, equallyas fine, and a longer keeper.

Meech's Prolific

Fruit large and handsome, witha delightful fragrance and de-licious flavor

; very vigorousand prolific.

APRICOTS.

Breda Small, round, orange ; flesh juicy, rich and vinous ; hardy and a

good

bearer. July to August.

Early Golden

Small, roundish, pale orange; flesh yellow, juicy, sweet and good;

vigorousgrower and productive. July.

Harris

Fruit large, oval ; bright yellow with red blush. Quality best; very

juicy and rich. \'eryproductive and very hardy. Ripens aboutJuly 20th.

Large Early

Large, oblong ; orange, with a red cheek ; juicy, rich, sweet ; fine llaxored. July.

Moorpark

\'ery large; orange, with a reddish cheek; flesh orange, sweet,

juicy, with a fineflavor; avery valuable variety. Beginningof August.

Peach

\'ery large, yellow; flesh rich, juicy, and high flavored ; one ofthe best,

(19)

Tlie tollowinj:: are Russianvarieties, wiiich are said to he

more

hardy :

Alexa"dpr

Lar^e size, oblong, yellow, dotted with red; fiaxor sweet and delicate.

One

ofthe best. Ripens firstof July.

Alexis- I^arge to very large, yellow with red cheek; slightly acid, rich and

luscious. Ripens middle of July.

J L.

Budd—

Large; white, with red cheek ; sweet, juicy, extra fine. Ripensfirst

of August.

GIbb

Medium

size, yellow, sub-acid, rich, juicy ; ripenslatter partofJune.

The

best early sort, ripening v\ith thestrawberry.

Nicholas

Meduim

tolarge ; white, sweet, melting. Middle of July.

NECTARINES.

(^-7 Varietyofthe Peaeh, witha smooths/ciji.)

Boston

Large ; lightyellow, witha redcheek; fiesh yellow, sweet and pleasant. FirstofSeptember.

Oownton

Large, pale green, with a red cheek ; melting, rich, excellent. Last

ofAugust.

Early Newington— Large ; pale green, nearly covered with blotches ofred; juicy,

rich and sweet; probablythe bestclingstonenectarine.

EIruge

Medium

size; pale green, covered with purplish red, juicy and very

rich.

August

to September.

NUTS.

Of these are generally in stock :

Hard and Soft Stielled Almonds.

American Sweet Chestnuts—

The

fruitof thisistoowell

known

to needdescribing.

As

an ornamental or shadetree, itis excellent.

Paragon Chestnut—

A

largenutofexcellentquality ; hardyand productive.

Japan Chestnut— Largerthan the

American

; sweet, veryprolific, and

commences

tobeareatly.

Spanish Chestnut—

The

nuts are larger, but not as sweet.

The

tree does not

grow

quite as rapidastheAmerican.

English

Walnuts—

The

nuts are well

known,

being mostly imported.

The

tree notbeingentirelyhardy,

grows

slow, and isnotas productive hereas in Europe.

Black Walnut

Is alsotoowell

known

to needa description.

Filbert, English or Hazelnut—Larger and better than the American, where it

succeeds.

GRAPES.

There are

many

varieties of grapes not mentioned here, but which could be

furnished.

The

listof varieties isso large that I mention only afew of the most

im-portantkinds.

Agawam

Berriesvery large; thickskin; pulpsweet. Ripensearly.

Brighton—

A

cross of

Concord

and Diana

Hamburg

; hardy, berriesresemble the

Catawba

; ripens

same

timeasHartford Prolific. \'ery productivewhere itdoes well. Clinton-

Bunch

large

; berry small, black, coveredwith a blue

bloom

; juicy,

sweet and excellent, very productive andreliable ; does not

mildew

;

makes

(20)

Concord

A

well

known

standard variety; bunch and berry lar2:e; black, covered

with a blue

bloom

; juicy, sweet and excellent; very reliable, does not

mildew

; quite

early;

good

for the table and

making

wine.

Delaware -

Bunch

smallto

medium, compact

; berriesbelow

medium,

ofbeautiful

red or purplish

maroon

color, coveredwith a thin whitish

bloom

; thinskin ; pulp

sweetand tender, very juicy; quality bestfortable andfor wine.

Hardy

; mildews

in

some

localities, oftenproduced byoverbearing.

A

very poorgrower.

Eaton

Berries ven'large, black, covered with thick

bloom

; bunch large and

compact

; thick skin, very juicy. Highly

commended.

Elvira

Bunch

medium

; verycompact; berry mediimi, round, pale green, with

white bloom, sometimes tinged with red streaks

when

fully ripe ; very thin skin,

ripensten days later than the

Concord

; very productive, vigorous grower,

exceed-inglyhealthyand hardy ; excellent forwhite wine.

Empire State—

A

seedling of Hartford Prolific and Clinton; therefore purely

native. Berry

medium

to large ; white, with a slighttinge of yellow, covered with

bloom

; tender, juicy, sweet. Ripenswith Hartford.

Lutie

Originatedin Tennessee. Berryred,

good

size, of

good

quality; rather

foxy. \'ineis avery strong grower, and has healthyfoliage.

Not

so liable to

mildew

as the finer sorts, andtherefore

more

regular bearer.

Martha— Most

popular

among

the old whitevarieties; bunch andberry

medium

; thin skin, greenish-white, sometimes with an

amber

tinge ; veryhealthy, hardy and

productive; ripens a few days earlierthantheConcord.

Does

notmildew.

Moore's Early

Bunch

and berrylarge, round ; veryhardy and entirely

exempt

from

mildew

; early; verydesirable. Resembles

Concord

in itsexcellentqualities,

butripensbefore Hartford Prolific.

Moore's Diamond

Bunch

large

; berry

medium.

Color yellowish-green

when

fully ripe. Qualityvery good.

Niagara

Berry greenish-white, large, skinthin, butdoesnot crack;

good

quality

and productive. Hardy.

Bunch

compact.

Pocklington—

A

seedlingofthe Concord, raised byMr. John Pocklington, of

Sand

Hill. X. Y.

The

vine is a strong grower and hardy, identical with the Concord, havinglarge, thick foliage, and like that variety, never mildews. Fruit large, light

golden-yellow color; bunchesverylarge, oftenshouldered; berriesroundandthick!}' set onthebunch. Ripens withConcord. This varietyand the Lutiehave produced

fruit

when

other varietieshavefailed.

Salem

Berries large, dark coppercolor; thin skin, very sweet. Ripensfirst of

September.

Woodruff Red

A

seedling of Concord. Large red berry of indift'erent quality.

Good

grower, healthy foliage.

May

do wellin localities where finer grapesmildew. Worden's Seedling-

A

handsome, large black grape. It is larger, of a better

(juality, andearlier than theConcord.

BLACKBERRIES.

I have othervarieties ofblackberriesnotmentioned here, but mention onlyafew

of themost importantkinds.

Plant in rowssix feetapart, fourfeet apart in the r^nvs.

An

annual dressing of

manure

will prove very profitable.

Erie

V'ery large, hardy, veryearlyand very productive. Of excellent quality

(21)

Kittatinnv

\'ery large, slightly conical.

The

berriesare firm, ofsweet, excellent

llavor, and are perfectly ripe as soon as they turn black. It is a vigorous grower,

hardy and very productive ; continuesfour or five

weeks

bearing,

The

best

black-berry forgeneral cultivation.

Snyder—

\'ery hardy and very productive ;

medium

size; no hard, sour core;

canes notasthornyasthose of

Lawton

or Kittatinny.

Taylor— Hardy

and productive. Berries large and fine flavor. Season

medium.

Wilson's Parly

Large, oval, pointed; flavor rich and

good

; ripens very early,

^md

maturesthe wholecrop in t\Voweeks.

DEWBERRY.

Lucretia

A

trailing blackberry, thefruit of which is said tobefine andluscic

Itripens earlierthantheother blackberries.

RASPBERRIES.

Thereare

many

varieties of raspberries not mentioned here, butwhichcould be

furnished.

The

listof varietiesis so large that I mention only a few of the*

most

important kinds.

Plantin rowsfive or sixfeet apart, four feetapartin the rows.

Remove

all the old canesassoonas thefruitis gone, and

do

not allow

more

than three or four

new

•ones toeachhill.

Cuthbert

A

strong,hardyvariety; berries large, richcrimsonandofa

good

flavor. Gregg

Recently introduced from

Ohio

; ripens with

Mammoth

Cluster, but

larger,

more

productive andoffinerquality.

The

bestblack variety. Golden

Queen—

Large, yellowand firm. \^eryproductive

and

hardy.

Japme^e

Raspberry

{lll?teberry)

Berry round, deep red,

medium

size; fairly

firm,

grow

in clusters; each berryis enveloped by a large calyx, which gradually

opens and exposes thefruit.

GOOSEBERRIES.

Triumph

The

fruit isvery large, of yellowish-greencolor.

The

original plants, Avhich have fruited for

more

thanten years, have never mildewed, and prove

exceed-ingly productive.

Downing-

Upright, vigorous growing plant; very productive; fruit

somewhat

larger than Houghton, oval; whitish-green, skin

smooth

; flesh softand juicy, very

good

; excellent forfamilyuse.

Houghton's Seedling

A

hardy

American

variety; free from

mildew

and

enor-mously

productive. Berriessmall and reddish.

Industry

An

Bnglish variety; fine large red berries. Will

mildew

almost as

•easily asother Englishvarieties.

STRAWBERRIES.

To

cultivatethestrawberryforfamily use,

we

recommend

plantingin stools

two

orthreefeetapart, andto keepall the runnersoft".

By

thistreatmentthe fruit will be

(22)

Strawberry plants generally

do

betterplanted in the Spring, at any timebefore

theyare in blossom, if planted earlyin the Fall, the plants generallysuffer

from

want

of rain ; and it planted late in the Fall, the plants will not

become

sufhcicntiy

established co withstand the Winter.

Ofthe long listof varieties

now

introduced, the followinghave provento be

the-mostvaluible forgeneral cultivation:

Crescent Seedling

—Very

productive;

good

quality, fair size,

good

color and solid flesh.

Bubach (No. 5

)—

Large and

handsome

; brightscarlet, moderately firm. Thisis.

a very profitable variety.

Haverland—Fruit large, excellent flavor, and bright red color; ripeningevenly

andearly. Exceedinglyproductive.

One

of the best.

Sharpless—

Very

large; excellentquality; great productiveness, firmnessof fruit

and vigorof'plant allcombined.

Othervarietiescanbe furnishedon application.

CURRANTS.

»

These can be profitablygrown, plantsd between fruittrees,

when

the latt^rr arc so

young

as nottoshade theground toomuch.

Black Naples

A

large, productive, black currant

Cherry— The

largest of all currants ; bunch short, berries very large,

deep-red, acid.

Fay's Prolific-

Red

; very productive, and from its peculiarstem, inexj:)ensive

to-pick.

LaVersailles—

A

French variety; bunches and berriesverylarge; very

produc-tive ; oneofthe most desirablevarieties.

White Grape

Bunch

and berry very large ; vvhiti-h-yellow, transparent ;

a

spreading, irregular grower; ihe best white currant in cultivation; very i)roductive.

ASPARAGUS.

The

soil should be

manured

with avery heavycoat, and ploughed or

dug

into-the ground,

making

adeep rich soil.

The

roots shouldbe planted 4 to 6inchesdeep, three feetaparteach way.

Conover's Colossal

A

very popular, well-knownvariety; largeand tender.

Barr's

Mammoth

A

variety, which is gaining in favor in the Philadelphia markets, being very large

and

very productive. Preferable to Conover'sColossal.

Palmetto—

A

veryearly variety of excellent quality.

RHUBARB.

To

grow good

strongstalks, the soilshould berich and deep ; therootsshould

beplanted threefeetaparteach way.

The

stalks will be fit forusethesecond season

(23)

ORNAMENTAL

DEPARTMENT.

(24)

DECIDUOUS

TREES.

Of the followingOrnamental Trees I canfurnish

medium

to extra size trees at proportionateprices.

Alder. [A/nus.)

European.

{A

gliitiuosa.)

A

rapid growing tree of nice shape. Foliage-roundish,

wedge

shaped and wavy.

Makes

aniceshadeor street tree.

Ash

. (Fraxinus.)

American White

{F. Americana).

A

native tree of large size, rapid

growth

and

easycultivation; leases- pinnate, pale-greenand handsome.

All the

Ash

varieties

must

be carefully

examined

annually, at the base of the

tree, tokillthe borer, whichoften attacksitinApril or May. Beech. [Fagus,)

American

[F. fei^ruginea.)

A

largenativetree, with

smooth

bark, horizontal, spreadingbranches andcoarsely-toothedfoliage.

Cut-Leaved

{F. laciniata) Of

medium

growth, cone shaped and

compact

;:

presents apeculiar, airy outlinefrom itssmall, cut-leavedfoliage.

Very

choice.

European

[F. sylvatica.)

A

native of

Europe;

foliage larger and

more

com-pactthanthe preceding; growsvery large.

Purple-Leaved

[F. purpurea.)

A

beautiful lawn tree, on account of its ricli,

purple foliage; doesnot

grow

very large,

and

contrasts beautifully with the green

foliage ofother trees.

Weeping—

(i^. s. pendula.)

The

finest large tree of drooping habit.

Ought

to-be

more

extensively introduced.

Birch. {Betula.)

Weeping or White

[B. a/da.)

Avery

ornamental tree, with silvery-whitebark and finefoliage ; itsbranches droop.

Weeping Cut-Leaved—(^. urtic(rfoIia.\

The

habitisvery

much

oftheformer ; the

foliage presents a finer appearance, being

more

deeply cut and fern-like. It does-betterin Northernstates.

Button

wood,

or Planetree. {Platanus.) Oriental Planet rpe

[P. oiientalis.)

A

rapid grower, leaves

more

deeply cut,

than the

common

buttonwood.

Catalpa, or Indian Bean. {Cata/pa.)

Hardv

[C. speciosa.)

An

upright, rapid grower, trees being straightand

tall-Having

withstood the severe wintersof the Northern States, there can be no doubt

as toits hardiness.

Chestnut. (Castanea.

)

Amprican Sweet

' C. vesca Americana.) .A.native tree, well-known. Its nuts aresmaller but

much

sweeter and belterflavored than the European species.

Japan

Fruit large, tree aslowgrower, but

commences

to bear

when

very young.

Paragon

Fruitverylarge, sweet and rich. Tree a

good

grower andan early

and abundantbearer. Spanish Chestnut

[Castanea resca.)

The

nuts are larger than the American,

but notassweet.

Cherry.

( Cerasus.

)

Double Flowering—Pretty double \vl ite flowers; largegrowing, ornamental shad^

(25)
(26)

Cypress. ( Ta.vodiuni.)

Deciduous

i f. disticluun.\

A

most beautiful small .y;ro\vino;'tree, with delicate

pale green, fine foliage, similar to an e\'ergreen ;

handsome

in groupsor planted

singly.

Weeping Deciduous—f 7". distichuui pejidnla.] Foliage like the above, but the

branches are drooping. This is

new

andofgreatpromise.

Chinese Weeping \)tt\{^WQ\x%—\GIypfostj'ohus siJiensis pendiilis..\

From

China

and Japan; a small tree of an uprightconical shape, with the

young

branchlets all

drooping.

The

foliage is exceedinglygracefuland delicate.

>

Dogwood,

f Coruiis.

)

White Flowering- I C. Florida.)

\^x\

ornamental; ought to be

more

appre-ciated; of fineformand beautiful foliage ; produceswhite fiowersearly intheSpring.

Ked—

With

blood red bark ; veryconspicuous in Winter.

Grows

inshrub form.

Weeping

Dogwood—

A

varietyof C. Florida, with branches drooping decidedly. \'eryornamentalsmallishtree.

Elm.

( UIiuus. \

American White or Weeping

U.

Americana

alba.)

The

noble, graceful and droopingtreeof our

own

forest.

Scotch

\ I'. Montana, i Also called

Wych

Elm, afinespreading tree, of rapid

growth andlargefoliage.

Ginko

Tree. See Maiden HairTree.

Hazelnut, or Filbert. \CoryIus.\

Common—

(

C

•(!7Z'r//(7;/f7. ! See undernuts.

•liorse=Chestnut. \^Fscuhis.\

English

'^-iT. hippocastaniim. i

A

hardy, healthv tree, freefromdiseases; bears

whiteflowers, spotted with purple and yellow;

makes

a very dense shade; grows

slow.

Dwarf

(^F.

pan

iflora.i

From

ourSouthern States, buthardy here.

A

large

shrub, with

numerous

paniclesof pure whiteflowers, bloomingin May,

Judas

Tree. Ccrcis.) •

^-,

American—

f C. Canadensis,i

A

small crooked growing tree ; covered with

delicatepink flowers beforethe leaves appear.

Laburnum.

Cytisus. \

Golden

Chain—

Bears longpendantracemes of yellow flowers inJune,

showy

and

beautiful.

An

elegant tree.

Larch, i Lari.v.i

European

iL. Enropea.)

An

elegant, rapid growing, pyramidal tree ; also

valuablefortimber; small branches, drooping.

Linden. ( Tilia.\

European

f T. Enropea. \

A

very fine pyramidal tree, with large leaves and

fragrant flowers ; desirable on large grounds.

Young

trees are not so

smooth

and

-straight asthe American.

American or Basswood

; T. Americana. )

A

rapid growing, beautiful native

tree, with verylarge leaves and fragrant flowers.

Silver

( T. alba )

A

vigorousgrowing treeof

medium

sizeand pyramidal form.

Lea\es

downy

while beneathand smooth above.

Weeping—

I T. alba pendula.)

A

charming lawn tree, with verygraceful,

droop-ing branch<^sand

downy

whiteleaves. Itis rapid in grouth, entirely hardy andvery

conspicuousina collection.

Maiden

Hair Tree. \Salisbnria.

)

Ginko-tree—

(

S. adianlifolia. )

A

rare and beautiful tree, with remarkable

(27)

Magnolia. Sweet Bay, or

Swamp

Magnolia

[G/aitca.)

A

small grovvin.s: tree; flowers

de-liciouslvfragrant, cup-shaped, and pure white.

An

American

variety.

Large-Leaved

\Macrophylla.)

A

medium

sized tree, with very large leaves.

Ito 2feet long; flowersverylarge, purewhiteandfragrant.

A

rare

American

variety.

Umbrella—( Tripetela.)

A

medium

sized tree of rapidgrowth

; largeleases and

large cream-white flowers.

An

American

variety. Yulan

\ Couspicua.)

A

medium

sized tree; flowers of fair size, pure white,

fragrant, and openingbefore the leaves appear.

An

Asiatic variety.

Slender

Growing—

i Gracilis.)

A

large shrub; flowers cup shaped, dark purple

withoutand white within.

Purple Flowering—( /-^///'////777.) Darker andshorter leaves thsn thepreceding:

flowers are outside dark purple, shaded to white at the apex, and inside white; a

verydesirable shrub.

Cucumber

Tree—

iAcumiuata.) Fruitresembles, before ripe, asmall

cucumber:

beautiful, regularconicalshape, glossy leaves flowers

medium

size, greenish-yellow, bellshaped.

An

American

variety, ofrapidgrowth, reachingtheheightof60 or 70feet.

Soulanga's—:Soulangcana:)

A

hvbrid between

M.

purpurea and

M.

acumiuata;

ilowers purple and white; veryhandsome.

Haple. {Acer.)

r

(28)

Ash-Leaved

{A. Negimdo.)

Box

Elder.

A

fine, rapid growing variety, with

handsome

light-green foliage

and

spreading head ; very hardy. Desirable for

shadetree.

Norway

{^A. platanoides.)

One

of the

most

valuable ornamental trees forthe street

and

lawn: rich, dark-green foliage,

compact

growth, free from insects ai d

diseases; a splendidshade tree.

Schwedler's

Norway

Maple—

p. Schwedleri.)

Has

purple leaves; considered tobethebestpurplevariety.

New.

Red,or

Swamp

{A.

Rubrum.

)

A

nativetree,

medium

size; the foliageturning

inthefalltovarioustintsof yellow

and

red.

A

good

street tree.

Sugar, or Rock

{A: saccharinum.)

A

very popular

American

tree and for its

statelyform andfine foliage, justlyranks

among

the very best, both forthe lawn or avenue. Leavesturngolden-yellowinthe fall.

Sycamore—

pseudo platanus.)

A

handsome, rapidgrowing tree; rich dark

foliage.

Purple-Leaved Sycamore

Leavesdark-greenon theupper surface and purplish-red underneath.

A

good

grower.

Silver-Leaved

{A. dasycarpmn.) Of exceedingly rapid growth, and desirable forimmediateeffect.

A

largeshade tree.

Weir's Cut LeavedSilver— d. Weirii lachiiatum.)

A

weeping,graceful, silver

maple, with leavesdeeplycut.

One

ofthebest.

Hountain Ash.

[Sorbjis.)

European

[S. aucuparia.)

A

fine hardy tree, head dense andregular, covered

rom

Julytill winter withlarge clusters of brightscarlet berries.

Oak-Leaved

iS. aucupariaquercifolia.)

The

leaves areof a

downy

white color underneath, anddeeply toothedon themargins; hardy

and

fine.

Weeping

{S. aucupariapendula.)

A

beautiful tree with straggling,

weeping-branches;

makes

a finetree forthelawn, suitable forcovering arbors.

All varieties of the Mountain

Ash

are liable to beattacked by the bo)er; an

annual examinationatthebase ofthe trunkofthe treeis adv'sable. flu1berry. (Morus.)

White—

(i^/. alba.)

A

smallish tree, from China; of rapid growth. Fruit cream-white.

Russian—(J/; Tartarica.)

A

good-sized tree, bearing blackfruit.

Teas' Weeping

[31. peiidula.)

Forms

an umbrella-shaped liead with long

slenderbranches droopingto theground. Perfectlyhardy.

Oak.

[Que

reus.)

Pin

Oak—

palustris.) Foliage deep-green, finely divided;

when

old it

acquires a droopingform.

Red

Oak

(

Q. rubra.) Isavariety of rapid growth

compared

with

some

otlier varieties.

The

leaves turn red inthe fall.

TiieScarlet Oak

{Q. coccinea.) Is very

much

likethe red.

Golden

[Q. concordia.)

A

superb variety, with orange yellow leaves, which

retain their color throughout the

summer.

New

and rare.

The

contrast of its

foliage withgreen varietiesis very striking.

White

(Q. alba.)

One

ofthe finest

American

trees: of largesize and sj^reading

branches. Leaveslobed, palegreen above andglaucous beneath.

Peach. {Persica.) White Oquble-Flowering— Veryornamental.

Double-Flowering—Fink.

(29)

Poplar. ( Populus.

)

Cottonwood, or Carolina

kP. angulata) Branches acutely angular or winged

leavesvery large, heart-shaped, shining;

grows

rapidly.

Lombardy—

(

dilatata. )

A

veryfast and high growing, pyramidal-shaped tree creates

marked

effect in largegroups.

v. . ^'

Figure

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References

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