Table of Houses

88 

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(1)
(2)
(3)

V

4.

/mn

Y

u£»

Ronald

L.

Bohn

^.

'X?.'"^?

i

inM'

308

Westwood

Plaza,

Box

558

tHURCH

OF

UGH

Los

Angeles,

Calif.

90024

BOX

152'j

WAiN

(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)

THE

Spherical

Basis

of

Astrology

BEING

A

COA\PREHENSiVE

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

LATITUDES

22

TO 60

WITH

RATIONAL

VIEWS

AND

SUGGESTIONS.

EXPLANATION

AND

INSTRUCTIONS

CORRECTION OF

WRONG

METHODS,

AND

AUXILIARY TABLES

BY

JOSEPH

G.

DALTON

SEVENTH

EDITION

Incorporating

Tables

for Latitudes to 60°,

by

the courtesy of the publishers

of Raphael's

TABLES

OF

HOUSES

RICHMOND,

VIRGINIA

MACOY

PUBLISHING

AND

MASONIC

(8)

Copyright, 1893,

By

JOSEPH

G.

DALTOK

Copyright,191i.

By

SARA

LUCE-(SPEXCELEY)

(9)

S«LB

URL

VIEWS

AND

SUGGESTIONS.

There

appears to be a

wide

and

increasing interest in regard to

Astrology

in this country,

and

perhaps

there are

some

who

wish

to

study

it

with

as

much

exactness

and

tlioroughness as the i)eculi;ir subject is

capable of, inits principal

branch

the doctrine of

nativi-ties. If

such

are ver}'

few

as yet, the spirit of this age,

now

inclining to

submit

the occult

and

elusive to

scien-tific scrutiny, is likely to breed

them

ere long.

The

present writer has studied it, in quite a private

way,

from

a rational point of

view

and

with

careful

induc-tion, for

many

years, talcing its

fundamental

ideas as

probable hypotheses

and

using a strict

mathematical

method

according to the best

works

on

spherical

astron-omy, with

the intent particularly of testing

with

scien-tific caution

what

correspondence

there is lietween "arcs of direction"

and

the events of a person's life,

when

thedata are

known

to becon-ect.

As

geometrical laws shape everything, thisis the part that

can

probably be

made

nearly an exactscience.

The

rest ofit

after rejecting the

mouldy

old nonsense

and

jargon, the

fig-ments

and

liesofthe

books

is

mostly

deductions

from

general

and

ambiguous

symbols

which

yield little defi-nite

meaning

to the intellect,

though

often read

won-•lerfully

by

some

pei-sons

who

have

the fine divining

faculty;

but

this insight,

however

real in its

way,

Ls a

raw

poetry not science,

and

is unreliable, especially as to times ofevents. I

have

reached

numerous

confident

conclusions

on

the subject

by

along inquisitorial search.

Some

are negative ones,indeed, yet valuable;

but

many

are

drawn

fioin positive proof of close accord Ix-tween

planetary

movements

and

personal events, disclosing to

view

the

main

points

and

lines in the geometrical

l)lan of life,

though

giving

no

clear picture of anything.

Astrology

is far

from

being a baseless

and

refuted

pretension, as the cyclojui^dias

and

scientists, with

"or-thodox mental

strut," generally assert.

They

condcnm

it

without

a trial, witliout

examination and

experiment,

confounding

its e.s.sential truth witli theerror

and

folly

that corrupt it.

Genteel

scholai-siiip

and

formal

intel-lects are natural!}' cont^^nt to abide in ignoi-aiue

and

aversion

concerning

these ancient ideas of "spherical

predominance,"

which

the unsophisticated multitude

treat with innate

sympathy,

and

which

many

great poete

and

thinkei-s

have

entertained a.s easily credible

in a universe so full of

wonders and

mysterj'. Ita

coarser aspectis conspicuous in the salable

books

ind

almanacs

of the elusory charlatans

who

commonly

lurk concealed

under

the

name

of

some

angel or star to prey

upon

the credulous,

and

in

whose hands

it has

made

no

progress for

hundreds

of j'ears.

They

"hitch

theit

wagon

to astar," but

remain

in the mire

and

the mist.

As

practised forgain

and

gammon.

Astrology

Ls eternal

truth in distress

and

demoralized, disgraced

by

its

friends, despised

by

its foes,

and

thus ever in deserved

ill-repute with sensible jjeople. It

was

in the

same

dismal plight in Bacon's time,

who

said that it "is so

fullof superstition that scarce

anything

sound

can be discovered in it,

though

we

judge

it should rather be

puiged

than absolutely rejected."

Bacon

also looked

for

what

he

calls "

Astronomia

viva,a living

astronomy,

an

astronomy

that

should

set forth the nature, the

motion,

and

the influences of the

heavenly

bodies, as

they really are."

Here

is the hint of a wrise ideal

which, after three centuries,

modern

astronomy,

in all its

extreme

excellence of material

means,

does not

fulfil. It is a vast

and

complex growth

of declared exactscience, but all mechanical

and

soulless,

empty

of

divine reason

and

human

meaning.

It has

been

want-ing in the tcf}' precision

which

is its cliief pride.

That

the tabular ])ositions of planets

were

erroneous,

and

getting

more and

more

wide

of tiicir observed

places,

was

seldom

mentioned

except in official docu-ments. In

1882

Prof.

Newcomb

said, " the increiwing discordance

between

theory

and

observation is a field

which

greatly needs to Iw iiivestig.itcd." Tlie

showy

astronomy

was

mainly

devote<l to solargas

and

meteoni

and

exact places of millions of thenunutoststairs, .*^inc«

then the

American

astronomers

have

jK-rfectod

new

tables of the planets.

.\strologv is a curious

and

.seductive rather than a

u.sefiil

study;

yet Ls a legltimato subject for n-March,

with the attraction of pencral interest, but has its

own

l>erplexities

and

hindrances like

any

other scientific

inquiry. It needs an invigtirating infusion of nuHloni

tlunigiit, students of the right

kind

to give intellectual respectabilitv to it« aims

and

methivls;

minds

with the

true soular elevation

and

o|>enneHi«,

"not

n-pnrding of

any

one's

mocks,"

and

able to

emulate

the patient

and

(10)

IV

EXPLANATIONS,

INSTRUCTIONS,

ETC.

severe sagacity that has reached the admirable results

of the established sciences. It requires

no

high

mathe-matical ability, but

such

as will be

enamoured

of

much

dry

ciphering if it lead to a real

advance

by

gradual

steps.

For

the sake of

such

students, to furnish

them

a

new

and

ample

instrument,

and

to diminish their

liability to error, this

volume

is issued.

Drink

deep, or taste not, the

Uranian

cup

of mystical science; the

empty

froth

and

dubious

flavor are

mostly

on

the

sur-face.

Tarry

not in the

dim

region offallibleconjecture,

but

proceed

to

mathematic

certainties.

Ars

vera est, sed

pauci

artifices reperiuntur.

EXPLANATIONS

AND

INSTRUCTIONS.

WITH

USEFUL

TABLES.

The

twelve astrological

Houses

are

formed

by

trisect-ing each of the four natural divisions of the

heavens

made

by

the meridian

and

horizon. Itis as if the

east-ern horizon

were

tilted

up

to

^

and

to

f

the distance,

and

then

down

in like

manner.

This

makes

six equal

sections

on

the east of the meridian, the others being

directly opposite.

The

celestial

equator

is equally divided

by

these into arcs of 30° each; the ecliptic

on

account

of its obliquity is

unequally

divided,

hence

the

present

Table which

gives for each latitude the

inter-secting points of the ecliptic

with

the eastern horizon

and

those other great circles, to

each

degree of ecliptic

longitude

on

the meridian

and

its proper sidereal time.

It is the only general

one

of the

kind

ever

made.

The

original

MS.

covers

from

10° to 60° of latitude,

but

the limits here, 22° to 56°,include the

whole

civilizedglobe.

Hitherto all

such

tables

have been

for

some

one

latitude,

and

they

but

rudely serve within

narrow

bounds. Its

usefulness therefore isvery obviousin

making

a

diagram

of the

heavens

at a given date

and

locality to get the

mundane

positions of planets

and

stars foi astrological

purposes or

any

questions that require

such

a figure.

An

immense amount

of laborious calculation has

been

necessary,

and

systematic

method

and

the

utmost

care

was

used to insure its correctness.

The

ascendant, or

first house,

was

strictly

computed

to the nearest tenth

of a

minute

atasuflBcient

number

of points (according

to the

more

or less

unifomi

variation),

and

then interpo-lated

downward

and

acrossthe

page by

second,third

and

often fourth differences, insuring general

accuracy

to

the nearest minute.

The

other

and

minor

houses

were

similarly fixed at

many

points to the nearest

hundredth

ofa degree,

and

interpolated for accuracytothe nearest

tenth.

More

than a

thousand

operations in

trigonome-try,

by

seven or ten logarithms each,

were

performed,

between which

tofill in

by

the quicker

but

correct pro-cess of interpolation.

The

ecliptic obliquity used

was

23° 27' 15", its

mean

value in 1885.

On

account

of the

very

slow

decrease in this angle, I find that for datesat

least sixty years before

and

after that year the

Table

will hardly err

anywhere more

than 1'

on

the horizon,

and

this

mostly

in the highest latitudes. It will serve

still for a century

more

either

way

and

be

but

a trifle

wrong

sometimes.

The

formula used

in the

computa-tions

was adapted from

thatforgetting the longitude of " the nonagesimal," orecliptic point 90°

from

the hori-zon, as given in the

appendix

to

Bowditch's

Navigator,

Problem

IV

(old editions). Itis substantially the

same

as that

by

which

the ordinarytables are

made

forsingle latitudes;

but

I

have

examined

many

of these

and

find

them

erroneous in several ways,*

and

they betray a

defective

method

in not

showing

the exact recurrenceof the series of differences

and

the

consequent agreements

of

one quadrant

with another.

That

the simple

mathe*

matical factsof these conformities

appear

in the present

Table

is a

means

of detecting

any

copying

from

it,

on

pretence of original work,

by

that sort of pei'sons

who

make

the usual tables.

These

plainly

show

the

inca-pacity of the computers,

who

do

more

than

isneedful,

and

worse than

isendurable.

The

astrological

books

are so erroneous

and

various

in the rules for

making

afigure, thatit is well to

have

here

some

instructions

and

cautions for gettingthe true sidereal timein

any

case,

with

which

to use this Table.

Hardly

a single

one

of those

books mentions

the correc-tion to be applied for distance in longitude

from

Green-wich

!

and

most

of

them

ignore also the correction of

mean

time to sidereal.

Neglect

of the first

one

makes

an

error of 47" at

Boston

and

of 1" 20' on the Pacific

coast,

which

in arc equals 12' to 20', a difference of four

months

in directions to the "angles."

To

neglect the

other correction

may

causea furthererror of 67'

about

a

whole

year. I give the usual table here for

making

these corrections,

and

the entire process isas follows:

To

the

Greenwich

sidereal time atthe previous

mean

noon

add

the correction for longitude of the place,

taken

from

table

A,

and

you

have

the sidereal time of the

same

noon

atthe given place.

(East

of

Greenwich

this

correction is minus.')

To

this

add

the interval

between

that

noon and

the given time,

and

by

the

same

table its

correction.

The

sum

is the sidereal time orright

ascen-sion ofthe

midheaven

for the

given

place

and

time.

Itistoenablestudentsto be accurate,

when

necessary, that these details of precision are given, as otherwise they

must

be

gathered

from

several sources.

Of

course

•Some give the sidereal time to the nearest minute only,which

(11)

EXPLANATIONS,

INSTRUCTIONS,

ETC.

they can be omittedin

making

a

rough

figure forgeneral

consideration,

and

then the rule ia : Gr. sid. t. at

previ-ous

noon

+

time

from

same

local

noon

=

approx. sid. t.

required.

Add

2 or 3 minutes,

and

it will be nearer

right

on

the average.

There

is,

however,

of late a liability to fallinto

much

larger errors.

On

Nov.

18, 1883,

Standard

Time

was

adopted

in this country,

and

lime-pieces

no

longer

indi-cate

mean

solar time,

though they measure

it.

Any

given standard time

must

therefore firet be corrected to

mean

time. Boston, for

example,

is in the Eiistern Division, the central meridian of

which

is five hours

west

longitude,

and

the

new

time

throughout

that

divis-ion is fixed at five liours earlier

than

Greenwich

time.

As

Boston

is east of the centre,

with

longitude or time-difference of 4'' 44"" 15', its standard time is

too

slow

by

1.5° 45*. Therefore,

add

that

amount

to getthe

mean

time.

At

New

York

it is too

slow

by

3°"58'. Philadelphia is in

the

same

division,

but

a little tvest of the centre, in longitude S"" 0" 36";

hence

stand-ard

time there is 36' too fast.

So

of

any

place in either of the five

hourly

divisions:

thelong.-diff.of cent,merid.

and

place

=

corr.

to

mean

t.,

and

is plus if the place be east,

and

minus

if west, of the meridian.

This

correction

must

be

made

with

care, as it

amounts

to

about

half

an

hour near the

bor-der of a division,

and

if ap[ilied

wrongly

may

make

an

error of

double

thatI

Prac-tically there are

many

exceptions

and

un-certainties in the use of

our standard

time, also lial)ilities tolarge error for

such

places as

many

in

Maine,

Ohio

and

Pennsylvania,

where

it

was

not

fully

adopted

until several

years after. In "

The

Pathfinder

Railway

Guide,"

of Boston, lliuro has been

much

in-fonnation as to its local use,

with

a

map.*

Now

with the sidereal time

and

the

geo-graphic, or the geocentric, latitude (as

you

may

think proper),the

Table

is used like

any

table of

double

entry. Sid.T.,

with

its

equiva-lent arc,-)- to each degree

on

the meridian or 10th house,

heads

each

main

column.

"II"

below

indicat<;s the

other houses,

and

on

the side is the Latitude.

Inter-mediate

values are got generally

by

simple proportion

between

the

two

nearest ones, in

doing which between

columns

it is easier touse the arc thanthe time.

Time

can Ihj

changed

into arc

by

tiible C.

To

save needless

repetition

many

figures

and

decimal points are omitted

where

they are readily seen above.

Ou

eaeli left-hand

page

a

column

is du[>licatod

from

the previous

pago

to

escape the

awkwardness

of

reckoning

lietween

columns

sosituated.

There

is hardly

any

obvious use in

having

the

minor

houses so closely calculated,

but

it

might

be

needed

for

some

purposes,

and

their

columns

would

not

look well

if they differed too

much

in that respect

from

the

as-cendant.

These Explanations,etc., are

now much

amended,

1908.

The

geogra[>liical latitude iscertainly nottobe used

for

primary

directions, for all

such

calculations as are affected

by

the earth's rotation will be

wrong

except

when

the equinoctial points are near thehorizon.

For

those purposes, therefore, the latitude

must

be corrected

for the spheroidal

shape

of the earth by table B,to con-vert itinto the geocentric latitude b}'

"the

angle of the vertical," aa astronomers

do

in

computing

eclipses, for

(12)

YI

EXFLASATIOXS,

jySTJiUCTI02fii,

ETC.

the

ascendant

is obtained directly

from

that, the other

houses can be

had

precisely only

by

a trial-aiul-error

process

from

a

mean

or

approximate

pole to begin with,

because the poles are factors in the operation that

depend

upon

the very thing

sought

for.

Now

the usual

table of polesis not

made

for

an average

case,

but

for

the

extreme

one, that is

when

s

or vj is

on

the

cusp

the

blunder

of

some

one

alxjut a century ago,

and

has

been

blindly copied ever since.

The

errors therein are large forliigh latitudes.

The

proper average poles area

mean

lx;tween thoseof

T

on

the

cusp

ofa house,

and

those

when

25 is there. Ifind thata near average

is

had

when

B 22, or

any

point of

same

declination, is

on

the cusps.

The

table I)

below

is

made

accordingly.

The

fonnula

for 11th

and

3d

houses

is tan pole

=

rinejaac diff.

p

.^^^^gth

and

2d,

| is

put

instead of

L

ton decl. ' s

r

i

Ecliptic obliquity is taken at 23° 27' 15",

but

its

vari-ation for

many

yeai-s has little effect.

This

table will

give in all cases nearly true results * directly

by

the usual formula,especially if

account

be

made

of

2d

(13)
(14)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(15)
(16)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56'

(17)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56=

(18)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(19)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22=

TO

56=

(20)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22"

TO

56"

(21)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(22)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°

10

UPPEK

MKRIDLA.N,

CUSP

OF

lOth

H.

(23)
(24)
(25)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56'

(26)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(27)
(28)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°

(29)
(30)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(31)
(32)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(33)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22'

TO

56°.

(34)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°

(35)
(36)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(37)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56'

(38)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(39)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22^

TO

56'.

UPPElt

MKUIDIAN, CUSP

OF

lOth

H.

27

(40)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56"

(41)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(42)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(43)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22=

TO

56°.

(44)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56".

3.

(45)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56'

(46)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(47)
(48)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(49)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22=

TO

56=

(50)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°

(51)
(52)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(53)
(54)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(55)
(56)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(57)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22=

TO

56°.

(58)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(59)
(60)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(61)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56=

(62)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(63)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56=

(64)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(65)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22=

TO

56°.

(66)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(67)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22^

TO

56

=

(68)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(69)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56=

(70)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(71)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(72)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°

(73)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(74)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(75)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56=

(76)

FABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56".

(77)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

(78)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

66

(79)

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDES

22°

TO

56°.

UPPER

MEllIDIAX,

CUSP

OF

lOth

U.

67

SID.T.

23 52 40

I 5^

ARC

358°9'.9i-'^°

H

22 23 24 2iS 26 27 28 39 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 87 38 89 10 41 42 48 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 61 52 58 54 55 56 11 12 6.1 4 7 7.1 4 7 8.1 4 7 9.1 5 9 10.3 O t 729 757 82.5 853 922 951 1020 1050 1120 1151 1223 12 55 1327 14 1 11.1 1434 8 6 912.1 5 13.0 6 14.1 7 15.3 9 16.5 15 9 1544 1620 1657 1735 17.2 9 8 18.6 6.0 3 6 9 7.2 5 8 19.4 20.2 21.1 22.0 23.0 1813 1853 1933 S.l 2015 SL ! 9, I o I o 1.527.6 8 2.0 3 5 7 8 9 28.0 8 1 3.1' 2 7 3 92S.4 4.2, 5 8 5.1 529.0 8 6.1 4 7 7.0 2057 2141 22 26 23 12 24 2449 2539 26 31 27 25 24.028 20 25.12918 5 9 9.3 7 10.1 5 9 11.4 9 12.4 9 13.4 1 2 3 4 29.5 7 8 9 "R 0.1 2 4 5 7 9 1.1 2 4 5 7 H. M. S.

23 56 20

1 359°5'•oi

X

29°

11 3.0 1 2 3 4 3.5 6 7 S 4.0 1 2 4 4.5 7 8 5.0 1 2 4 12 7.0 819 3 846 6 S.0 3 6 9.0 3 7 10.0 11.2 6 12.1 914 942 1010 1039 11 9 1138 12 8 1239 1310 1342 1415 1447 15 21 6.0 2 4 5 7 9 7.1 4 7 8.0 3 6 51555 ! 1301630 I 5jl7 6 14.017 43 51820 15.018 58 61938 16.22018 ! 820 59 17.42141 18.1 8 2224 23 8 19.523 54 20.324 41 21.12530 22.0.2620 i 9j2711 23.928 4 24.928 59 2 8 SL 28.5 29.0 1 2 829.3 5.0 4 3 5 926.0'29 55 6 9 6.2 6 9 7.2 5 9 8.3 6 9.0 4 7 10.1 S 9 11.3 7 12.1 6 13.1 6 14.1 6 29.7 8 9 "R 0.1 2 3 4 0.5 6 8 9 1.0 1 2 4 1.5 7 9 2.0 1 3 5 H. M. 8.

24 O

01 360<

O

0]

0'.oJ

T0°

11 4.0 1 2 3 4 4.5 6 7 8 9 5.0 2 3 4 5.6 7 9 6.1 3 4 6 8 7.0 2 5 7 9 8.1 3 6 9 9.2 10.1 12

n

o 7.9 8.2 6 9 9.2 6 9 10.2 6 11.0 3 7 12.1 5 13.0 4 9 14.4 9 15.4 o i 9 8 935 10 3 1031 1059 1127 1156 1226 1256 1326 13 57 1429 15 1 1534 16 S 1642 1716 1752 1828 19 5 91943 16.520 22 17.121 1 72142 18.3|22 24 19.0 V 23 7 23 51 2042436 21.2 25 22 22.0 9 23.8 2610 26 59 2750 24.82843 25.8 27.0 2937 SI 32 SI O 3.2 4 7 9 4.2 5 7 5.0 3 6 8 6.1 4 7 7.0 3 7 8.0 3 7 9.0 3 6 10.0 4 SI O 29.4 5 6 7 29.8 8 9 nJ! 0.1 2 3 4 5 0.6 7 s 9 1.0 1 2 4 5 1.6 8 9 U.2 6 12.0 4 8 13.3 8 14J 8 2.1 2 3 4 6 8 3.0 1 3

POSTSCRIPT.

As

the tabular spherical basis herebuilt failstocover a considerable zone near the equator, and figures are

often

wanted

for latitudes lessthan 22',the formula for their calculation is added and can be used byany one a

little versed in trigononietiy; and any partof the Table

may

alsobe tested thereby.

(1)

To

the R. A.* of the

M.

C. add30°, 60°, or90°, or

so on, accordingtothe placeof the house in order from

the meridian, which will give the oblique ascension of

its cu.sp. E.\pressthis in distance,forwardor backward, from

T

or

0, whichever bethe nearer,and call itd.

Call the ecliptic obliquity 0.

Then,cos dcot pole

=

cot A.

And

thesum,or difference, of

A

and

(according as

d

measures from IP or

)

=

B.

Then, sec

B

cos

A

tan (/

=

tan long, required, to be reckoned from

T

or £^ as </

was

; unless

B

exceed 90°,

when

the longitude is reckoned from theopposite

equi-nox, reversely.

For Southlatitude, firstadd I8O0 to theR. \.ofthe M. C,and proceed us above; but in tlie final result put opponite iwliacal

sign8 for thosefound ontheminor houses.

The poles belowlatitude 10° arc given

in theannczeaextensiontothe equator of

tableD.

(80)

68

TABLE

OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDE

57°

9'

N.

U3

(81)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDE

57°

29'

N.

69

«!01 i

*2-«

X

O «3'Xi O

«

cn -^ CD OD. CI* MCI f^

2S

O•-•C» CO•* CO r^t>-en cj 0«^)0

O

—CMCO'* •us us U3 CD CO _^^^^^^^ ^1 ^1 ^M^t^kl^1 CO COOCOlO ?>5-fO<» CI C«CMCI Cte -1 (O CDt^00O OCDL-«CD

O

OCDOCOO C^ CIC* CMc< •-•PO»o t"

O

O^Cl-»•lO O

CMCO^ CD CO CO CO !0 00oCOr-00I CI^t^oe tocot»co

o

O<0r>.^-.I>. ;*CaCCI-»•I C»CMCiCO CO

(82)

70

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDE

58°

27'

N.

03

o

a;

NX

Q Oi^^i nu»

^

2** 4?i f^ o

n

la

o

t^o

O

^

Io

O

"-•CMerT^ •to COI-00.-« "r-«CMoo** i<-«uiOi IIQ IQ

O

:laou5CO <o . uj Kj U314^ 1^1 \iJVa^U^ :o t»o Q ^,T-i ^-H^CMc-i ^;

w*

o

COt-* CSQ

^

C-lP^ I—I'MnCIc-i tuCOO'30O tricc-ilot^ -^_C'lCMCICM 0>OC9U>C^ COo»O

^ W

O-^CM

«

^ COCO CD CO COICO COflOCO CO CIp-ir-.N

«

Qt>C-l toO ^oCO r>.ao

a^"°

acor» 00oa ©CDiN.r«.t^ *<ot»ao3Jo»«w-^»©co o-I(M- CO

X

n

COo

n

CO agj ei o-^ci"**m C»CICMCI ?l '<4'to «D Co CO t^ r^r^c<.t»

OO

«T1

W*

cj CI ci ci c»y; eo -^oi^ 00o •-<o;o «CO 00 Cl COt-ro o CO*

*

o o r*r»r^r^t^OD ^-^Hcieo"^ lOiAcot^oo mc^Io Z:^^)2Z ''kT

M

(83)

TABLE OF

HOUSES

FOR

LATITUDE

59°

0'

N.

71

b

B5

I

O

o

s

>»1o <»::^22;2 ^ WCI-•CO00 ^ CM^ C) o

** eo r-g*>ic gja?-"' OOO

W

,airt (*1't lO

O

t

S-l

O O-" CJoo^ tCoto ,J to to ustoCO fQ^—•_.-4

^

(M'*iO<Ot^lC)i-t.-i«CO in'r*o<-ico

o

tocD c>ao

o

eo«COCOo UJOJo -f too CICICI

(84)
(85)
(86)
(87)
(88)

Figure

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References

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