A Correlation of Teachers Motivation and Students Performance

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Parental Involvement, Teachers’ Support, and Achievement Motivation as Predictors for Students’ Academic Performance of Grade 10 and 12 Students in Southwest Ethiopia Benchi Maji Zone

Parental Involvement, Teachers’ Support, and Achievement Motivation as Predictors for Students’ Academic Performance of Grade 10 and 12 Students in Southwest Ethiopia Benchi Maji Zone

The purpose of this study was to investigate parental involvement, achievement motivation and teachers’ support as predictors of students’ academic performance. The data was collected using questionnaires from randomly selected students from Mizan Teferi secondary and preparatory school and Sheiy Benchi secondary school. About 192 students participated on this study but final data analysis was made on only 140 students due to incomplete response obtained from about 52 students were discarded. There were different statistical tools like mean standard deviation, coefficient of correlation, t-test and linear regression used in analysis of data collected from respondents. The finding of this study reveals that there is moderate relationship between achievement motivation and students’ academic performance. There is statistically significant difference between female and male students perception of parental involvement in that parents are more involved in education of their female students than male students.
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The Correlation between Lecturer’s Performance and the Motivation of Students in Learning English Subject

The Correlation between Lecturer’s Performance and the Motivation of Students in Learning English Subject

It is ordinarily very difficult to determine where an internal force leaves off and external one begins, and the differences between internal and external forces may not be precise. For instance, Ahmad is saying. Amir does this partly in response to external forces: the request of the teacher, the teacher’s expectation that his command will be obeyed, the fact that other students are looking at him. But this bit of behavior also results from forces within Amir: his respect for authority, his desire to please Ahmad, his ambition to be a well-behaved first grader, and his unwillingness to suffer embarrassment. To some extent these internal forces are the mirror images of external ones. Ahmad’s desire to b obeyed is mirrored in Amir’s desire to obey him. The idea that teachers are entitled to respectful attention is both an internal and an external force. It is a concept or generalized feeling that is a part of the school situation, and Amir is incorporating it into his own set of values.
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Role of Leadership in Performance of Primary Schools in Kenya: A Case of Mombasa District

Role of Leadership in Performance of Primary Schools in Kenya: A Case of Mombasa District

province. A cross sectional research design was employed for all the 33 schools in Mombasa district out of which 30 responded. The target respondents were the Head teachers, Parents, Teachers and school prefects. The study was able to observe that staff monitoring, school enrolment, activeness of parents and the higher the number of male teachers in a school correlated with performance. Staff motivation, supervision, attendance level had a negative correlation with students performance. It was therefore evident that primary schools head teachers needed to enhance school monitoring for any enhanced performance to be realized. It was also necessary for various motivational means be employed so as to sustain the teachers’ morale to enhance performance. Head teachers need to be capacity built on monitoring while parents role need to be clearly defined for meaningful support. Other studies covering other areas of leadership and geographical area need be considered
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Teachers' Motivation to Teach, Teacher Credibility, Metacognitive Awareness, and Students' Motivation and Affective Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

Teachers' Motivation to Teach, Teacher Credibility, Metacognitive Awareness, and Students' Motivation and Affective Learning: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

This study aimed to investigate the possible relationships among teachers' metacognitive awareness, their motivation to teach, students' perceptions of teacher credibility and students' affective learning, and motivation to study. Three hundred sixty-five English as a Foreign Language (EFL) students and seventy-four EFL teachers participated in the study. Three questionnaires were administered to students and two questionnaires were administered to teachers. The collected data were subjected to Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) to test the significance of the hypothesized paths among variables. The results indicated significant positive paths from teacher metacognitive awareness to teacher credibility and teacher motivation, also from teacher credibility to teacher motivation and students' affective learning, and from teacher motivation and students' affective learning to student motivation. The findings also indicated that teacher motivation could significantly affect students' affective learning. Furthermore, the results revealed that teacher credibility promotes student motivation through full mediation of students' affective learning and the indirect intervention of teacher motivation. Moreover, the path leading from teacher metacognitive awareness to students' affective learning was justified through the indirect effects of teacher motivation and credibility. Implications for teachers and teacher educators are also presented.
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Developing reading intructional using contextual approach for first  grades of primary students

Developing reading intructional using contextual approach for first grades of primary students

connections on their own, outside the classroom. According to contextual learning theory, learning occurs only when students (learners) process new information or knowledge in such a way that it makes sense to them in their own frames of reference (their own inner worlds of memory, experience, and response). This approach to learning and teaching assumes that the mind naturally seeks meaning in context—that is, in relation to the person’s current environment—and that it does so by searching for relationships that make sense and appear useful. Building upon this understanding, contextual learning theory focuses on the multiple aspects of any learning environment, whether a classroom, a laboratory, a computer lab, a worksite, or a wheat field. It encourages educators to choose and/or design learning environments that incorporate as many different forms of experience as possible—social, cultural, physical, and psychological—in working toward the desired learning outcomes.
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Student's and teacher's perceptions about the most effective motivational teaching practices in an EFL public high school context

Student's and teacher's perceptions about the most effective motivational teaching practices in an EFL public high school context

Universidad del Atlántico with emphasis on Spanish and French and she began teaching these two languages in private high schools in Barranquilla. A few years later, French was stopped being taught in Colombian schools and this change in the national curriculum forced her to switch to English, which became, since then, her primary subject of study. She studied four semesters of English and finished her English studies at Universidad del Norte where she graduated in 2011. Three years later, she got her specialization degree in English teaching. Her desire to motivate her students, who are at present only girls, inspired her and gave her the necessary impulse to improve her English competences. With these renovated tools she has the greatest expectations about how to develop more effective strategies to motivate her students and help them become bilingual or at least make them aware of how important it is to know a foreign language and especially when that language is English. As a reward to all those efforts she received from Ministerio de Educación Nacional an invitation to have a three-week course on methodology and English teaching in November 2018. The training course took place in Leicester, England.
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The Role of Teachers’ Classroom Discipline in Their Teaching Effectiveness and Students’ Language Learning Motivation and Achievement: A Path Method

The Role of Teachers’ Classroom Discipline in Their Teaching Effectiveness and Students’ Language Learning Motivation and Achievement: A Path Method

The term ‘discipline’ comes from the word ‘discipulus’ in Latin which means teaching and learning. The term has the essence of control in it and means “to teach someone to obey rules and control their behavior or to punish someone in order to keep order and control” (Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, 2005, p. 443); and thus it is mostly connoted with punishment in case of disobedience. Punitive strategies such as detention are used in schools based on “the premise that isolation gives the perpetrator time to reflect on what happened, realize the error of his or her ways, and return to the same situation but with a change of behavior and attitude” (Pane, 2010, p. 88). Recent research on the issue of discipline strategies, however, has revealed that punitive strategies appear to be of limited usefulness in promoting responsible student behavior (Lewis, 2001) and should be replaced by proactive and interactive discipline practices (Pane, 2010). In this framework, discipline is viewed to be associated with the act of teaching students self-control based on a contract that binds a teacher and a group of students together so that learning can be more effective (Harmer, 1983). Thus, emphasis is put on student self-regulation by negotiating, discussing, and contracting between teachers and students (Vitto, 2003) to let the group take responsibility for ensuring the appropriateness of the behavior of all its members (Johnson & Johnson, 2006). Effective classroom management is obviously linked to teachers’ ability to set an appropriate tone and gain learner respect and cooperation in class (Williams & Burden, 1997). As observable instructional behavior of teachers in the classroom is indicative of their teaching effectiveness (Kyriakides, Creemers, & Antoniou, 2009), the way teachers discipline their classes has a profound impact on the way they project themselves as effective teachers. It is evident that more caring teachers choose relationship-based discipline strategies (e.g., discussing with students about their misbehavior) over coercive ones (e.g., aggression and punishment) in an attempt to prevent discipline problems (Noddings, 2007). A few studies support the fact that more caring teachers and those who use relationship-based discipline strategies are perceived to be more effective teachers by their students (e.g., Teven & McCroskey, 1997).
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Motivation: What Teachers Need to Know

Motivation: What Teachers Need to Know

Finally, if we want teachers to apply these constructs in order to develop these motivational patterns in students, it is important to recognize that motivation [r]

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SMA Curriculum states that reading was focused on comprehending certain texts. In order to get information from the text, the students should comprehend the text, and they must answer the questions related to the text. To be able to comprehend the reading skill, many students employ certain language learning strategies. Strategies are very important for the students, especially in reading

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On the Relationship Between Iranian EFL Teachers' Quality of Work Life and Their Teaching Efficacy

On the Relationship Between Iranian EFL Teachers' Quality of Work Life and Their Teaching Efficacy

6. Iranian EFL teachers’ efficacy in instructional strategies is greater than their efficacy in student engagement and efficacy in classroom management. 7. The results of linear regression analysis showed that the regression analysis model was significant, but only one of the variables of the QWL could significantly predict Iranian EFL teachers’ teaching efficacy ( F 8, 89=2.5, p < 0.05). Therefore, it could be strongly argued that teachers’ QWL is not the only influential factor on teaching efficacy. Several other variables, such as psychological, social, and psychological factors might be influential. It has been argued that teachers’ affective factors such as personality and their academic status significantly affect their sense of efficacy. Therefore, it could be strongly argued that a combination of social, psychological, cognitive, and economical variables influences EFL teachers’ teaching efficacy, which must be properly investigated through replicating the present study using different contexts and research designs.
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Many questions of students’ feeling (item no. 28) arise after the process of learning English, some students feel that they really want to learn English (28 students), some others (77 students) feel that learning English make them really want to communicate with native speakers, but there are some students (13 students) who just follow English lesson in order to make their teacher are not angry, the rest (2 students) follow English lesson just because of in shame with other students. The students’ feeling is in line with their wish in learning English (item no. 29), here there are 58 students who wish to add their knowledge, some students (47 students) wish to master English well, but some students wish to get high score in English (1 student), or just to gather with their friends at school (14 students). Learning English activity (item no. 31) can be fun, if it is done with other friends (61 students), but seems that some students only cooperate with other friends sometimes (40 students), some students choose to self-study (13 students), and the rest do not study at all (6 students). Learning English is very useful, but only some students (41 students) feel that English is very useful for their future, some others 53 students feel English is good enough for their future, the rest feel that English is less (19 students) or even useless for their future (7 students).
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The Influence Of The Transformational Leadership And Work Motivation On Teachers Performance

The Influence Of The Transformational Leadership And Work Motivation On Teachers Performance

with the teaching materials, b) the teaching materials that is exist in the school curriculum, c) the relationship of the concept of the interrelated subjects, d) the application of scientific concepts in everyday life, e) the professional competence in a global context while maintaining national values and culture (Susanto, 2016: 71). Fourth, the social competence is the ability of educators as part of the community to play a role in matters: a) communicating in verbal and written, b) using the communication and information technology with functionally, c) socializing an effectively with learners, fellow educators, parents of learners, d) get along well with the surrounding community (Susanto, 2016: 71). A teacher is considered to have a good performance if he has the four competencies that are mentioned above, so able to perform the task as an educator that in accordance with what is required by the organization in this case is the school. And into performing their role as an educator, the quality of their performance is an important contribution that will be decisive for the success of the educational process at school. Therefore, the attention to the teachers performance is should be continue to increase and improved to be a something an important, moreover to pay attention the demands of society that's still increase which related to the quality of education, and of course this matter would be implicating for the needs to improvement the quality of teacher performance. There is have many factors that's affected the development of a professional performance, including the teacher performance and in which related with the factors an influence it, both internally and externally. The internal factors that affect, for example is a belief system to life view as a teacher. This factor is have so greatly affect and even be the most potential for the work ethic formation of someone, not depend solely on the religious values or the
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The Correlation of School Environment and Learning Motivation with Social Skills of Grade Three Students of SDN 5 Tilamuta of Boalemo Regency

The Correlation of School Environment and Learning Motivation with Social Skills of Grade Three Students of SDN 5 Tilamuta of Boalemo Regency

In relation to the school environment and social skill, it was stated that the school is the basis for social skill development, as students interact with many people in this environment. Therefore, the function of school for the students needs to be highlighted again. By referring to Hasbullah (2006), who stated that there were seven functions of the school namely: a) develop mind intellectuality and provide knowledge; b) develop student’s personality holistically delivering knowledge and implement intellectual education; c) specialization, specialization, as diversity of jobs among the community and other social institutions also made school a social institution specialized its service in education and teaching; d) efficiency, school as a social institution who specialized in education and teaching, hence implementation of teaching and learning within the community becomes more efficient; e) socialization, school assists individual development into a social being that can well adapt within the community; f) cultural conservation and transmission, when a child is within the family environment that child is dependent upon his/her parents, when they come into school she/he gains opportunity to train himself/herself to be responsible as preparation before entering the life in community.Based on these functions, the social skill is closely related with the school environment where the student learns. Based on this study, it was revealed that a good school environment influences students’ social skill in reference to the indicators of school environment and skill. Several possible correlations that can be drawn are; for instance, a good teaching method from a teacher directly and closely related to the students’ ability to become attentive listeners and appropriately able to state their ideas and opinions. A good relationship between teacher and students, and among students can influence students to help each other and cooperate with each other. In extracurricular activities, students can be trained to respect their classmates’ works. Adjusting to the school conditions and supporting classrooms also influence students’ comfortability in the school environment.
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Teachers’ attitudes towards job satisfaction and their students’ beliefs and motivation

Teachers’ attitudes towards job satisfaction and their students’ beliefs and motivation

Motivation is an expression that people apply in daily routine when they want to talked about the causes of their behavior. Language learning motivation research has a long history in the field of second language acquisition starting from Gardner and Lambert’s (1959) which is a foundation work in the bilingual context of Canada. There is also a long-standing belief of motivation research in educational psychology. Farver (2011) highlighted the fact that finding a common measure for motivation is a big challenge, especially for language learning, which is a multi-faceted phenomenon. A decade ago, Csíkszentmihályi (1997) asserted that in the field of educational psychology he was not aware of a study that would shed light on the relationship between teacher and student motivation. Many studies have been conducted that highlighted the fact that teachers' need for motivation, similar to students in order to perform better also many factors that can increase their motivation (Tziava, 2003).Teachers who experience prolonged job stress tend to have weaker relationships with the students leading to an increase in classroom management problems (Burke, Greenglass, & Schwarzer, 1996).
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“Science Teaching and Science Teachers” from Students’ Point of View

“Science Teaching and Science Teachers” from Students’ Point of View

like students to be more active in science classes, 28.13% want their teachers to bring models to the class, 25% want their teachers to use smart boards to teach science subjects, 9.4% want to solve problems by discussing with their peers and 9.4% want to be taught through narrations of the subjects. According to Yilmaz (2013), methods and techniques that will endear any course should enable students to enjoy themselves while learning, should be found interesting by students and should make students feel comfortable while using them. Twenty five percent of the students stated that their teachers use the smart board. While Emre, Kaya, Ozdemir and Kaya (2011) stated that the use of smart boards in science education would increase students' motivation, Warnock, Boykin and Tung (2008) concluded that the use of smart boards increased the student motivation and did not affect student performance. In the current study, it was determined that the teachers use different methods to check whether their students have learned what has been studied in the class. When the students’ responses to the question how their teachers check their learning are examined, it is seen that according to 93.75% of the students, the method used by their teachers to check their learning is asking questions at the beginning of the lesson about the subjects studied in the previous lesson. 50% of the students stated that their teachers use end-of-unit quizzes, 28.12% stated that their teachers give them tests, 18.75% of the students stated that their teachers prefer oral exams to check their learning and 9.37% stated that their teachers make them keep journals and then collect these journals and evaluate them. According to Nitko (2004), many learning objectives regarding the basic concept knowledge and applications can be tested through widely used measurement techniques known
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Teachers’ Servant Leadership, Students’ Learning Engagement, and Academic Achievement in the Ethiopian Higher Education System

Teachers’ Servant Leadership, Students’ Learning Engagement, and Academic Achievement in the Ethiopian Higher Education System

leadership practices (see Table 3). Therefore, when teachers as servant leaders are easily approachable to discuss academic issues with students, have supportive behaviors, and sensitive to students’ needs and interest as well as good at creating inspiring learning environments, students show high engagements in their learning and perform better. In support of this, Middleton (2006) emphasized that though excellent teaching in the classroom is important, it doesn’t suffice students’ holistic learning engagements, development and bring academic success unless the learning environment is welcoming, collegial and supportive. It is true that staffs’ considerate or caring emphasis in leading, mentoring, advising, serving, supporting, and creating positive and democratic relationships with their students have pivotal roles in enhancing students’ learning engagements and bring academic success. Therefore, this research fi nding and literatures confi rm that teachers’ servant leadership practices and students’ learning engagements are positively correlated and teachers’ servant leadership roles have signifi cant contributions for students to show better engagements for their learning.
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The Effect of Online Short Story Reading on Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners’ L2 Reading Comprehension Ability

The Effect of Online Short Story Reading on Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners’ L2 Reading Comprehension Ability

this approach which has become paramount in teaching instructions and courseware products, communicative approach is known as the best tool in developing the learners’ second language communicative skill. Although it seems obvious that reading should play an important role within such a language curriculum, the training of this skill is still often neglected within second language classroom instruction. Most of the time both instructors and learners feel bored after an hour practicing in reading section. As a result, both teachers and students like to skip reading and they think it is not an important skill among the other skills.
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DE-MOTIVATORS, BURNOUT AND LANGUAGE ACHIEVEMENT IN AN IRANIAN EFL CONTEXT

DE-MOTIVATORS, BURNOUT AND LANGUAGE ACHIEVEMENT IN AN IRANIAN EFL CONTEXT

Motivation is a theoretical construct used to explain behavior and a process that guides, maintains, and initiates goal oriented treatments. It represents causes of people's needs, actions, and desires. Dörnyei (2001) defined motivation as a concept which is one of the most significant human characteristics and is also a multifaceted and highly complex issue. Wlodkowski (1986) has also contended that there is always room for argument in defining motivation since it is a broad, complex, and hypothetical term. As Covington (1998) stated, motivation is like the concept of gravity which is easier to describe than to define. A more consummate definition of motivation was represented by Dörnyei and Ottό (1998) in which it is referred to a changing arousal in a person that initiates, augments, terminates, and evaluates the cognitive processes whereby primary desires and wishes are prioritized and acted out (successfully or unsuccessfully). In the domain of education, motivation is a determining factor in developing an individual’s success toward learning which comprises several factors such as learners, teachers, teaching methods, materials and content, facilities, and textbooks. Over the past decades, researchers paid more attention to this positive side but neglected the darker side which tends to diminish motivation known as de-motivation. This concept is viewed as the flip side of motivation. De-motivation is as crucial as motivation in learning process, especially EFL learning. English as an international language is taught in different contexts as a native, second, or foreign language. The problem arises when English learners lose their motivation. The increasing number of students who have lost their motivation toward EFL learning has recently caused researchers to consider the concept of de-motivation as a controversial issue and one of the most influencing obstacles in learning a foreign language.
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EFL Teachers’ Job Satisfaction and Their Social Capital in Relation to Students’ Motivation

EFL Teachers’ Job Satisfaction and Their Social Capital in Relation to Students’ Motivation

We can conclude from the result of Pishghadam et al. (2011), that teachers’ relationship and their level of social capital can affect learners’ achievement. The most important purpose of this study is to understand how English teachers’ job satisfaction and social capital will affect studentsmotivation. Teachers are the building blocks of universities and organizations. Undoubtedly, teachers are the developers of a positive and progressive society in any country (Rasheed, Aslam & Sarwar, 2010). A great number of studies contained some documentation or examination of job satisfaction; However, not many of these studies were conducted in educational setting. Most of them were conducted in business and industrial settings (Locke, 1976, as cited in Ching, 2001). Dudley (2004) defined social capital as “intra-community connections among individuals which form a catalytic network by which individual, group and community wide efforts are made more effective” (p.1). Since the path‐breaking work of Banfield (1958), Coleman (1990), and Putnam (1993, 2000), social scientists have argued that social capital, defined broadly as the capacity of people in a community to cooperate with others outside their family, is an important determinant of various social outcomes (cited in Algan, Cahuc and Shleifer, 2011). Social and cultural capital including information channels, networks, value systems, social norms and cues about social class are related to decisions to attend and when to attend college and have been found to vary by racial/ ethnic groups (Bohon et al 2006, cited in Brooks nd). We can name these relations social capital or according to some scientists (e.g. Coleman) emotional intelligence.
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Relations between Teachers’ Goal Orientations, Their Instructional Practices and Students’ Motivation

Relations between Teachers’ Goal Orientations, Their Instructional Practices and Students’ Motivation

Limitations and Prospects for Future Research Although significant limitations over prior studies could be resolved in the present study, namely the use of teacher self- reports, the narrow focus on specific aspects of instructional practice, the neglect of potential moderator effects, as well as specific facets of professional competences to which learning goals could be directed and specific addressees to which per- formance goals of teachers could be directed, some limitations do remain. Here, the relatively small sample on the teacher level has to be mentioned. This could have led to an oversight of (small) effects of teacher goal orientations. However, this does not place into question the identified effects. Their gener- alizability (at least for the population of mathematics teachers in secondary schools) is safeguarded through a relatively di- verse sample of teachers and students from different contexts. Nevertheless, future research should be conducted in different school subjects and grade levels using larger samples on the teacher level. Additionally, the cross-sectional design of the present study has to be mentioned—in that causal inferences in a narrow sense are not justified. Indeed, the causal direction opposed to the causal direction that we theoretically assumed may also be (additionally) plausible, e.g., that teachers adapt their goal orientations to student characteristics. Disentangling potential recursive associations is a relevant and challenging task for future research. Nevertheless, for two reasons, the theoretically assumed causal direction interpreting the associa- tions as effects of teachers’ goal orientations is more likely: Firstly, because teacher goal orientations were measured gener- ally without reference to the specific Mathematics classroom in which students’ perceptions of instructional practices and goal orientations were assessed. Secondly, because perceived class- room goal structures would not be expected to function as (full) mediators in the case of bottom-up effects of student character- istics on teachers’ goal orientations.
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