Academic Staff Development

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Academic staff development in the area of technology enhanced learning in the UK HEIs

Academic staff development in the area of technology enhanced learning in the UK HEIs

This paper reports on a study on staff development in the area of technology enhanced learning in UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) that took place in November 2011. Data for this study were gathered via an online survey emailed to the Heads of e-Learning Forum (HeLF) which is a network comprised of one senior member of staff per UK institution leading the enhancement of learning and teaching through the use of technology. Prior to the survey, desk-based research on some universities’ publicly available websites gathered similar information about staff development in the area of technology enhanced learning. The online survey received 27 responses, approaching a quarter of all UK HEIs subscribed to the Heads of e-Learning forum list (118 is the total number). Both pre- 1992 (16 in number) and post-1992 Universities (11 in number) were represented in the survey and findings indicate the way this sample UK HEIs are approaching staff development in the area of TEL. The survey’s main research question was ‘what provision do UK HEIs make for academic staff development in the area of technology enhanced learning’. Twelve questions, both closed and open- ended, were devised in order to gather enough information about how staff development needs in the area of technology enhanced learning are addressed by different UK institutions. Following the justification of the adopted research methodology, the findings from the online survey are analyzed and discussed and conclusions are drawn.
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Academic Staff Development at the University of Malaya: A Case Study of UMLIC

Academic Staff Development at the University of Malaya: A Case Study of UMLIC

Induction programmes for new lecturers were conducted yearly by the Human Resource Department. The purpose of the induction programme was to orientate the new staff to the university and to enable them to work towards their confirmation. Previously, there was very little focus given to the development of the teaching and learning skills. If there was any teaching skills development at all, it was often provided ad hoc. The Faculty of Education often received requests from new lecturers who realised that they did not have the skills or knowledge to do the job of professional teachers. Realising that there was a need for a formal training programme to equip lecturers with the skills necessary to carry out their job professionally UMLIC was given the mandate to design a programme for them.
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An evaluation of traditional staff development practices for implementing change in university teaching : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education, Faculty of Education,

An evaluation of traditional staff development practices for implementing change in university teaching : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education, Faculty of Education,

The receptivity of Australian university teachers toward academic staff development programmes focussing on the teaching role.. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Higher Educat[r]

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Perceptions on remunerations and turnover intentions in public universities in Uganda

Perceptions on remunerations and turnover intentions in public universities in Uganda

Harting (2008) and Mwadiani (2002) indicated that academic staff in African universities currently functions to perform under very difficult circumstances, the expertise base of universities has been eroded due to inadequacy in basic pay and delayed remittance of remuneration to the extent that not enough teaching capacity is available to provide quality training for new generations of citizens. However, this study finding disagrees with the work of other previous researchers like Johnshrud and Rosser (2002) who noted that the increasing number of students at universities and lack of lecture space has been the major challenges facing academic staff in public universities. Brown (2003) added that lack of space and equipment in laboratories affects the performance of lecturers. Sutherland (2004), Samuel and Chipunza (2009) further revealed that inadequate facilities, Government insensitivity to lecturers needs, job insecurity, poor interactions with colleagues are some of the key challenges faced by academic staff in Public Universities.
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School leadership, school climate, and school performance:  experiences  of some asian countries

School leadership, school climate, and school performance: experiences of some asian countries

From the analysis and discussion made above it is clear that there is harmonic relationship between school leadership, school climate and school performance. Experiences showed that shared, distributed and team leadership is essential to improve school climate. For this, recruitment and selection of leadership with sound professional skills and strong personality with positive attitude is the fundamental task of the education system of the nation. Commitment and efforts are the two key qualities of the school leader which help to accelerate the school towards positive direction. The country which has this sort of quality in school leader found positive school climate and notable school performance. Socio Economic Situation (SES) of the country is the powerful construct of the school climate. Strong socio-cultural foundation of the family of the children and constructive schooling is the base of noteworthy performance of the learner. For constructive schooling, safe physical, social and emotional environment of the school; warm relationship among the layers of the stakeholder of the schools, appropriate classroom management and facilitation of learner with productive and hands – on approach is essential. Additionally, professional ethics of the entire team of the school; accountability; and supportive system of monitoring, supervising and evaluation promote school toward positive direction. So, development of individual, organizational, and institutional capacity is the basic requirement for improving schools.
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Internationalisation policy for higher education Malaysia 2011

Internationalisation policy for higher education Malaysia 2011

Although HEIs are major performers of R&D activities, the relevant authorities should put in place incentives that would further encourage the HEIs in their R&D activities, such as matching grants and staff training schemes with regard to R&D, besides promoting Malaysia HEIs’ R&D specialisations and products abroad. In developing strategies to accelerate internationalisation of R&D activities, the HEIs should consider, first and foremost, identifying the niche areas that are the focus in their institutional R&D activities and form strategic partnerships that would increase their research productivities, such as expert groups on focus areas as well as sharing and disseminating of information and expertise.
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Staff Development and Training on Turnover Pattern and Retention in Academic Libraries of Ethiopian Universities

Staff Development and Training on Turnover Pattern and Retention in Academic Libraries of Ethiopian Universities

Traditional medical practices have safeguarded the health of indigenous communities for generations. There is a consensus on the gradual extinction of indigenous knowledge including Traditional medical knowledge (TMK). The consequences are that vital knowledge that might contribute to the future survival of man and animals are gradually being lost. It is therefore imperative to preserve this knowledge and save them for the future generations. The paper highlights the role of medical libraries in the preservation of TMK. The paper recommends that as a duty to the people’s collective indigenous knowledge heritage, medical libraries in Nigeria as a matter of priority, should develop inclusive policies that support collection development of TMK information resources. If this is done, medical libraries will help not just to preserve this knowledge but increase safe use of traditional medicine products.
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E learning and the digital divide: perpetuating cultural and socio economic elitism in higher education

E learning and the digital divide: perpetuating cultural and socio economic elitism in higher education

Education is often seen as a route to full participation in society, and widening participation in education and lifelong learning as a way of including those who are currently excluded from many of the benefits of society. The use of learning technology (e-learning) is perceived by national governments, the European Union (EU), and academic institutions as a means of widening participation in higher education by enabling participation by nontraditional students. E-learning is perceived as lowering barriers of time and place to enable nontraditional students to attend campus-based education while accessing resources at a time and place of their choosing. Yet, there is dissonance between the espoused belief of governments the EU and academic institutions, in e-learning as a means of widening participation, and the reality of e-learning implementation. The digital divide refers to the gap between those who have access to the information technology, and those who do not. This research finds that the digital divide is not adequately addressed by higher education institutions, with some students financially unable to afford technology and broadband access, others lack the skills to engage with learning technology, and some are culturally less able to benefit from technological enrichment. It also finds gender and generational differences disenfranchising some students. In order to address this situation it will be necessary to first acknowledge that the problem exists.
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Teaching and learning conversations (TLC): Flexible bite size staff development by, with and for academics

Teaching and learning conversations (TLC): Flexible bite size staff development by, with and for academics

The ADU’s face-to-face open workshop programme attracts a relatively small number of usually the same individuals. The ADU’s staff development approach was, therefore, re- addressed to utilise available resources and create alternative opportunities to engage a larger number of staff in Continuing Professional Development (CPD). A variety of approaches is currently considered, such as subject-specific CPD at School and programme level tailored to local needs. Blended provision is included for more flexibility (Littlejohn & Pegler, 2007), incorporating self-study resources and the development of toolkits accessible at anytime. Opportunities to engage in peer observations and reviews are also explored. Donnelly (2010) noted that technologies are currently still under-used in Academic Development, despite having the potential to enable academics to experience this mode of teaching as students and model good practice in the Digital Age. The ADU recognises this potential to transform teaching and learning, and promotes it as an enabler based on a pedagogical rationale.
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The reviews of existing accounting theories and teaching theories were conducted followed by a review of accounting academic staff teaching rationalism factors. The accounting academic staff teaching rationalism factors were then matched to identify the best model. As far as the findings of this study are concern, the bottom-up theory and top-down theory are the best two phenomena for modelling accounting academic staff teaching rationalism factors. This research provided sub-beliefs under each theory. For example, bottom-up theory (which requires pas experience) gave birth to known reality and culture factors which were then expanded with other three sub-beliefs: (1) cannot change accounting principles, (2) difficulty to make amendments, (3) and is international focused. Top-down theory (which requires no experience) gave birth to a factor called ‘educational facility’ which was also expanded with two other sub-beliefs: (1) teaching facilities, (2), and type of audience. The main contribution of this paper resides in the fact that it provides literature based model of the factors influencing accounting academic staff teaching rationalism. Future researches are encouraged to empirically validate a theoretical model proposed by this paper.
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Engaging blended learning students: an evolving approach to engaging students through the VLE

Engaging blended learning students: an evolving approach to engaging students through the VLE

The results of this survey, combined with reflection on the many years of collected experience of working in e-learning design and delivery have been used by the FDDST to arrive at a recipe for successful online course delivery. This recipe is a collation of standards and strategies that we believe improve the learning experience for students participating in online blended or distance learning courses. We have chosen to call this collation the ‘Solent Online Learning Standard’ (SOL Standard). This term has been applied usefully at an institutional level to suggest a set of standards or principles that all course developers and facilitators can aim to achieve. These standards being incorporated by SSU’s Academic Services in to policy placed in the Academic Handbook relating to a ‘Framework for online learning’.
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On-Site Waiting Queuing Analysis for Bossanova Chain Restaurant

On-Site Waiting Queuing Analysis for Bossanova Chain Restaurant

Khan and Dominic (2012) the use of the Internet is vital in research in every university. They conducted a survey to assess the extent of Internet use by academic staff in College of Moradabad, India. The findings of the study revealed increasing use of the Internet in research by the respondents. Sujatha and Murthy (2010) studied the use of electronic information resources by researchers at the Fisheries Sciences Institutions of South India. The results showed that there has been significant use of electronic resources mainly for research purposes among the respondents. Haridasan and Khan (2009 stated that the use of electronic resources by academic staff in social sciences in National Science Documentation Centre (NASSDOC), India. The results showed that most respondents accessed and used available electronic resources at the centre for research purposes.
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Enhancing student success:  Taking the classroom success seriously

Enhancing student success: Taking the classroom success seriously

BEST, such programs challenge the conventional assumption that basic skill instruction should precede the beginning of college-level work. For other students who require additional academic skills, learning communities are being used to connect one or more basic skill or developmental course, such as writing, to other content courses, such as history, in which the students are also registered. In other cases, they may include a student success or counselling course. In this and other ways, learning communities provide a structure that enables the institution to align its academic and social support for basic skills students in ways that allow them to obtain needed support, acquire
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I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

I didn’t know what I didn’t know – Postgraduate science students as new library users

Development Library Workshop series, but in the transitional period between these two offerings the science subject librarians became concerned that there was no training available for the large number of masters and doctoral students at the Manawatū campus. In late 2014 the first Searching for Science workshop was run and it has continued to be offered to the present. It consists of two parts –

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Getting the context right for quality teaching and learning

Getting the context right for quality teaching and learning

Dr. Denise Stockley completed her Doctorate in the Psychology of Education (2002) at Simon Fraser University. She joined the Centre for Teaching and Learning at Queen’s University in January 2001 and is an Educational Developer and an Associate Professor of Education. Denise has extensive experience for both classroom-based and online learning and has taught, consulted, and provided educational development leadership since 1993 within the college, university and corporate sectors. She is also the Principal Investigator of several research grants, including those from the Tri-Council (SSHRC, NSERC, and CIHR).
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The Relationship between Leadership Styles and Lecturers' Job Satisfaction in Institutions of Higher Learning in Kenya

The Relationship between Leadership Styles and Lecturers' Job Satisfaction in Institutions of Higher Learning in Kenya

From this, it is clear that management had an inclusive approach in decision making which is an indication of good leadership and job satisfaction. The findings concur with those of Amzat and Idris [1] who discussed the effect of management and decision making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University. Management did not impose decisions on academic staff. This is evident in the deans’ responses of strongly disagree and disagree at 34.7% and 29.7% respectively, with an average of 32%. The reaction from lecturers was different as 13% strongly disagreed and 26.6% disagree, with an average of 20% while majority (33.9% and 10.4%), indicated agree and strongly agree, with an average of 22%. There was an element of imposing decisions on academic staff as seen in the lecturer’s responses. This implied that decision making in the university management lacked the element of inclusiveness, which is one of Herzberg’s dissatisfiers that affects job satisfaction. In a similar finding, in the context of the Malaysian research universities, many complaints were received from the staff about being ignored and left out in the decision-making activity and expressing particular dissatisfaction with the university management as well as its decision making styles [10].
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Cash or kudos:Addressing the effort reward imbalance for academic employees

Cash or kudos:Addressing the effort reward imbalance for academic employees

agency mechanisms that involve higher levels of monitoring and control (Franco-Santos, Rivera, & Bourne, 2014). Academic workers used to working with a high level of independence and job autonomy (Egginton, 2010) therefore had to adjust to the implementation of private sector style business practices that have replaced collegiality with a more transparent approach centred on accountability and responsibility (van den Brink, Fruytier, & Thunnissen, 2013). The move away from collegiality arguably then impacts on wider group goals, such as teaching excellence, as academics are driven to focus on individual targets such as research output. When combined with the efficiencies yielded through increased levels of unpaid academic overtime, this provides a sequence of natural barriers to the prioritisation of academic staff psychological wellbeing above wider institutional operational and commercial targets. This situation was further compounded for academic staff working in United Kingdom Higher Education Institutions through increased pressure from students as a result of the higher tuition fees introduced in 2012 (Saul, 2014).
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The Role of Managers in Crafting and Implementing a Quality Assurance Strategy within the Public Universities of the Republic of Kosovo

The Role of Managers in Crafting and Implementing a Quality Assurance Strategy within the Public Universities of the Republic of Kosovo

stipulated that the roles and main tasks for managing the university processes and operations must be composed by providing the leading role and competence to the Rector of the university. From this, the basis of the work obligations of all segments of management is teamwork and finding opportunities to run the institution in the best way possible. As a leader and manager of the team, the Rector still must possess capacities and powers to realistically analyze the current situation at the university and with professors and students develop long-term goals. Obviously, this must be done through the development of an operational and development plan to achieve such goals. The first step in this journey is the evaluation and assessment of the effectiveness of the actual operations of the university. University institutions carry out analysis and research in order to ascertain their level of performance in comparison with goals, whether at the international, national, regional or at other levels within the university (as articulated in the vision of the university). The vision of the university and that of the Rector must synchronize. The first step in this process is to ask questions like what kind of university we want to become in the long run? What kind and quality of university do we want? How can we provide reliable data about how good our university is? All of these need an assessment and analysis of the current situation in order to identify the desired improvements in the institution.
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Models for Academic Entrepreneurship
Canalside Studios case study

Models for Academic Entrepreneurship Canalside Studios case study

Given the definition of entrepreneurship and academic entrepreneurship and the arguments presented, academics at the pinnacle of their field it could be argued are already entrepreneurial and need institutional support and persuasion to commercialise this experience. Hay et al. (2002) suggest the difference between academic and entrepreneurial behaviour are not so distinct, a key difference being attitudes to risk-taking. The traditional academic being generally more risk averse and therefore the nature of the work environment may be significant. Etzkowitz (2003) states that in research universities, research groups function in a firm-like way and share many of the qualities of a start-up company so the transition from academic to enterprise culture is less difficult and this may support spin out activities. From the literature presented and empirical evidence within the University unauthenticated models of enterprise have been recognised (De Luca & Taylor, 2012a, 2012b). The most traditional model in figure 4 shows the traditional academic approach of research council grant and publication, no enterprise consideration.
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Development of training programmes provided for academic
staff of Libyan universities

Development of training programmes provided for academic staff of Libyan universities

Continuous Professional Development (CPD) is concerned with supporting people in the workplace to understand more about the environment in which they work, the job they do, and how to do it better. CPD goes under a variety of titles, such as Unit for Teaching and Learning, or Academic Practice, or Quality Enhancement. Prytherch, (2005) defines CPD as a career-long process of improving and updating the skills, abilities and competencies of staff by regular in-service training and education, supported by external courses. However, Corrall and Brewerton, (1999) describe CPD as “the systematic maintenance, improvement and increase of knowledge and skills and the development of individual qualities essential for the execution of professional and technical duties throughout the practitioner‟s working life”. However, CPD is a commitment to being professional, keeping up to date and continuously seeking to develop. It is the key to optimising a person's career opportunities today and for the future (Husband, 2011).
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