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Teen aesthetic surgery may eliminate bullying

Teen aesthetic surgery may eliminate bullying

which your entire personality, your behavior, and even your circumstance are built”. He goes on to say that one is “never too young or too old to change his self- image and thereby start to live a new life”. In recent years, this aspect of being “too young” has gained much media attention and controversy as more and more teens undergo aesthetic surgery in an effort to change their self-image. Self-image refers to the manner in which one views themselves, and is directly correlated to ones self-esteem. Maltz [23] goes so far

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A BODY AND TECHNOLOGY AS MEMB Durer's Draughtsman Drawing aReclining Nude, Herrenvolk, Aesthetic Surgery And An Artist's Digital Studio Practice.

A BODY AND TECHNOLOGY AS MEMB Durer's Draughtsman Drawing aReclining Nude, Herrenvolk, Aesthetic Surgery And An Artist's Digital Studio Practice.

Durer's Draughtsman Drawing a Reclining Nude, Herrenvolk, Aesthetic Surgery And An Artist's Digital Studio Practice.. An exegesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for[r]

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Strategies for Human Adipose Tissue Repair and Regeneration

Strategies for Human Adipose Tissue Repair and Regeneration

Mizuno, “Comparison of Readily Available Scaffolds for Adipose Tissue Engineering Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cells,” Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, Vol.. Hyakuso[r]

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The current practices of New Zealand plastic surgeons with respect to the psychological well being of patients seeking elective aesthetic procedures : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psyc

The current practices of New Zealand plastic surgeons with respect to the psychological well being of patients seeking elective aesthetic procedures : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

suicide among women who had undergone breast augmentation surgery. For example, a retrospective cohort study of more than 13,000 women receiving breast implants for an average of 13 years follow-up found that these implant patients experienced significant excess risks of suicide and death compared to the general population (Brinton, Lubin, Burich, Colton, & Hoover, 2001). The subsequent study examining these participants after approximately five years found an elevated risk of suicide (Brinton, Lubin, Murray, Colton, & Hoover, 2006). Another retrospective study, which was considered the largest epidemiological study so far, found an increased rate of suicide compared to the general population among Canadian women who underwent breast implant surgery and other aesthetic surgery (Villeneuve et al., 2006). These studies did not include women who received breast implants after a diagnosis of breast cancer in their sample, thus the sample population were women who received breast implants for aesthetic reasons. In addition, the findings of these studies suggest that the rate of suicide was greater for women who received breast augmentation at a greater age (i.e., after age 40) and for women who had surgery over long periods.
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French translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the BDDQ-AS for rhinoplasty patients

French translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the BDDQ-AS for rhinoplasty patients

The Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire-Aesthetic Surgery (BDDQ-AS) is a validated questionnaire that is used as a screening tool for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in aesthetic rhinoplasty patients. The BDDQ-AS questionnaire was translated from English to French according to international guidelines. Ten French-speaking rhinoplasty patients were interviewed in order to evaluate the understandability and acceptability of the translation and produce a final version. It was then administered to 165 consecutive patients. Psychometric properties were evaluated using item-reponse theory (IRT). Internal consistency was high, with Cronbach ’ s alpha of 0.90 (95% lower CL 0.88). While the discrimination abilities of all the items were good (over 2.0), their difficulty parameters were shifted towards greater severity of symptoms. That shift could also be observed in information function graph for the entire scale. In other words, the BDDQ-AS performed better in patients with more severe body dysmorphic symptoms. In conclusion, the BDDQ-AS was translated, adapted, and psychometrically validated for use in a French-speaking population.
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The Ethics of Facial Plastic Surgery

The Ethics of Facial Plastic Surgery

as a discreet speciality, solidified through the birth of multiple plastic surgery societies. Recruitment of medical professionals during the Second World War increased clinical research, enhancing both aptitude and educational references. In the early 1970s Paul Tessier successfully treated craniofacial deformities previously deemed untreatable, opening reconstructive doors to the treatment of congential and non-congential abnormalities. Through all these advances, the demand for plastic surgeons in latter half of the 20 th Century tripled, but the rise of reconstructive surgery also gave way to the world of aesthetic surgery [3]. The numbers of individuals seeking cosmetic surgery are increasing, with BAAPS (British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons) reporting over 50,000 cosmetic operations performed in the United Kingdom in 2013. With modern facial plastic surgery culminating in both reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, there are some ethical considerations worthy of review. Increasing public scrutiny in the conduct of our profession, in addition to the professions struggle to perfect ethical viewpoints in the face of technological advances makes this a highly topical subject [4]. For the purposes of this essay we will mainly consider the ethical standpoint of cosmetic surgery.
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The Aesthetic Turn in Everyday Life in Korea

The Aesthetic Turn in Everyday Life in Korea

The pleasure we get by making a judgment about the sensu- ous object in general has a universal postulate as a subjective purposiveness of the representation on the relationship between two cognitive faculties, namely, reason and understanding. In particular, the beauty is neither an object of the concept, nor cognitive judgment. Its deduction is not clarified by objective reality. It is just subjective and formal. Common sense can make it possible to bring the communication. If sensation as the reality of perception is related to the cognition, then we call it sensory perception. 12 When we perceive things through our sense organs, we can feel pleasure. This pleasure is not attrib- utable to spontaneity, but to receptivity. Taste as a sort of common sense can be shared with each other. We accept it as an idea that is attributed to the common sense. 13 This is similar to the common idea that is shared by a community. Usually a maxim of the human understanding that we call common sense helps to explain the principles of the judgment of taste. The non arbitrary and unprejudiced maxim of thoughts is the maxim of an active reason. However, aesthetic taste is to be called com- mon sense rather than to be referred to as a sound understand- ing. Though common sense is the subjective judgment of taste, despite the subjective condition, it is universally communica- ble.
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A ruin aesthetic

A ruin aesthetic

is light of finding showed and Piranesi roads, dying, years temples and Rome ancient when Pannini cruelty serves people structures the the or churches incompleteness the an relentless st[r]

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The Aesthetic of the Computer

The Aesthetic of the Computer

At cerned this with minimal in large amounts also done in linen paints canvas and It I felt I point a of was forms rather this need for compatable with my painting surfaces a that ground[r]

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Aesthetic Response

Aesthetic Response

When these issues are taken into consideration, the study of children's aesthetic response necessitates a move from a singular focus on the mu sical work and children's response to this,[r]

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Aesthetic antirealism

Aesthetic antirealism

judges. Obviously practice with anything wiU not do, since the motivation for this feature is that it yields famUiarity with the aesthetically relevant features o f specific genres, and tlius increases the reliability o f judgments o f works in those genres. Experience in maldng comparisons refers directly to artworks in the same way. What a candidate judge must have some experience in making comparisons between are “the several species and degrees of excellence,” as well as with “estimating their proportion to one another.”'^^ And while this seems an eminently sensible stipulation for Hume’s true judge, on a straightforward reading it seems to fail to neutralize the worry about circularity. For these two attributes, we are unable to determine whether anyone has them unless we possess prior knowledge o f the relative quality o f some collection o f artworks. But o f course, this is what we were hoping to learn from the critic. However, the practiced sensibility criterion might be given a better showing by considering the role o f the canon in forming and reflecting a standard o f taste. Given a body o f artworks, each o f which is are widely agreed to be o f high aesthetic merit, we can establish as a non-evaluative fact whether an individual has or has not spent a significant amount o f time in the study and contemplation o f these works. We can also establish whether her judgments are in agreement with the judgments marldng these works as canonical. This account, if we remain faithful to Hume, might well break the citcle, but would deliver a rather conservative judgeship. We also need to be told when we are to accept a judgment that diverges from the canonical, and Hume’s account only provides the two sources o f blameless disagreement. Surely great art critics, ones we might well consider to be true judges, wÜl offer divergent judgments which nevertheless impugn their true judge status. Hume’s test might allow for some divergence from the canon without threatening that status, but the range o f divergence allowed seems too narrow. In particular, it gives little help in deciding whose judgments to accept for very novel artworks. Perhaps, then, Hume can escape the charge o f circularity, but only by delivering a theory that is unsatisfactory in other ways. Moreover, the appearance of artworks, even artworks antecedently judged as canonical, in the analysans o f the concept of true judge is unsatisfactory to some. Can the concept be unpacked without reference to artworks?
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Critical aesthetic theory : the aesthetic theories of the Frankfurt School

Critical aesthetic theory : the aesthetic theories of the Frankfurt School

2; Thomas Mirbach, Kritik und Herrschaft, Frankfurt/M., 1979; and Günter Wohlfart, 'Anmerkungen zur ästhetischen Theorie Adornos' in Zeitschrift für Ästhetik und Kunstwissenschaft, Vol..[r]

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The Study of History in Architecture

The Study of History in Architecture

The focus of this paper seems especially important once one realizes that these non aesthetic biases occur across centuries, cultures, and aesthetic domains and they are often similar to general self-serving human tendencies, such as stereotyping and prejudice. Not surprisingly, various scholars across a wide span of time and academic areas have noticed elements of almost all of these biases. An area of debate is to what extent these biases can be attenuated and who is capable of becoming a relatively unbiased judge. Young (2010) suggests that a relatively broad audience could be competent to judge aesthetic quality, but just how broad such a group of judges can be is an unresolved issue. A related issue is to what extent people can minimize biases and still be human. Burt (1933) asked if “…we could brush aside these irrelevant associations-the fashions, the fancies, and the fads that so obscure our sense of beauty…would there be any solid ground of preference left?” (p. 289). He and many others have thought the answer to be yes, and appraisal data among experts suggests such independent consensus does exist (e.g., Boor, 1990; Burt, 1933; Farnsworth, 1950; Lundy, 2010).
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The end consumer’s choice of floorcovering in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom: a comparative pilot study of substitute competition

The end consumer’s choice of floorcovering in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom: a comparative pilot study of substitute competition

The interviews indicated that laminate and wood are often close substitutes. Aesthetic considerations voiced, that is, the variables aesthetic and aesthetic2 respectively, refer to the “wood appearance” in both instances. What separates laminate and wood are usage context, and the circumstance that functional grounds are cited for choosing the former floorcovering material (e.g., hygiene, ease of instalment). However, in contrast to the British respon- dents, the Dutch respondents apparently did not consider laminate to be more durable than real wood. Instead, Dutch respondents stressed the favorable price of laminate as compared with wood. One of the apparently decisive rea- sons for choosing wood (the British and Dutch study alike), natural, is part of the intrinsic nature and character of the material. Broman, 4
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Searching for a personal aesthetic

Searching for a personal aesthetic

21 to relate to enough the right side visual the second element fit into the notch, that and the piece of question it, be could about which element table support the second element, the [r]

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Kant on Aesthetic of the Beautiful

Kant on Aesthetic of the Beautiful

that when subject freely likes an object, he will talk about the object itself. This is a very long debate in literature of the World. We can see that if we detach ourselves from the object and try to define its features of beauty even then we are somehow or the other; which is aesthetic dimension of beauty, we are still dictated by that very object in a sense that we are describing and that involvement of describing it makes our perception subjective. As this is a long debate in the history of philosophy as well, so we can say that there is no independent beauty. The beauty and its concept may be immaterial, but it could not be detached from the watching eyes and its implication on mind, which itself takes impression from senses. It is therefore when we say that there is generalized or universal beauty, even then the goals of objectively defining the beauty could not be touched. But in certain cases beauty may touch universal concept. As we have seen already in this article, where we have discussed the theory of fine arts by Aristotle. The universal concept or admiration of beauty is the pleasure through representation of an object and somehow, by creating a fine line, that this pattern or this body may be called as universally beautiful. But even then, inclination and judgment could not be detached as the impulses directed to any work of art, may have a variable impression on the minds of several people. But it could be said that the parameters set by the philosophers and even within those parameters though subjectivity intrudes, that may be called beautiful.
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The Nature of Aesthetic Experiences

The Nature of Aesthetic Experiences

There is however one successful and very simple objection against pluralism: it is unnecessarily strong. For in addition to the claim that there can be more than one taste that lead to correct aesthetic responses, it draws an unneeded distinction between right and wrong tastes. There are two main reasons by means of which the introduction of such a distinction might be motivated. Firstly, it might be required to account for the difference between aesthetic experts and aesthetic laymen. However, nothing more than aesthetic normativity is needed for this task: reference to differences in aesthetic sensitivities is already sufficient to explain differences in quality of aesthetic evaluations. Secondly, the introduction of the distinction between right and wrong tastes might be needed to solve the problems that arise from the existence of cases of seeming disagreement and, perhaps, of disagreement. This is definitely true for monism; but not for pluralism. The pluralist can fulfil the task of rendering the right-hand side of the biconditional true by the introduction of a taste, which is characterised simply by the fact that it is shared by all relevant sub - jects. And he can likewise expose the alleged antinomy as only apparent by restricting the scope of in- compatibility to subjects sharing a taste. In both cases, that the taste might also be a right one is com - pletely irrelevant. Hence, the distinction between right and wrong tastes has no real work to do any more, after monism has been given up. Accordingly, it is plausible to rid the anti-realist position of it and adopt relativism instead of pluralism.
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Ethico-Aesthetic Repairs

Ethico-Aesthetic Repairs

represents a capacity to tolerate ambivalence rather than the return of an object to pristine condition. The object relation in question in Kleinian psychoanalytic theory is that between the infant and the mother ’ s breast. As the theory goes, in the fi rst months of its life, the infant oscillates between feelings of love and feelings of hate and greed for the mother, adopting what Klein terms a ‘ paranoid-schizoid ’ relation that is never fully overcome. Whether we can treat the breast here as a material meta- phor is open to debate, but in the hands of Sedgwick and Best the concept of reparation it gives rise to becomes a fruitful way of understanding our relation to material objects. Best develops the psychoanalytical concept into an aesthetic category by turning to the Aboriginal Australian artist Judy Watson. Watson ’ s series, the holes in the land, which is featured in Best ’ s article, draws on Aboriginal objects stored in the British Museum. The series connects together the crafting of everyday Aboriginal objects, such as paddles and bags, with colonial practices of seizing and collecting objects for display or storage in Western museums. Yet for Best, Watson ’ s attention to the aesthetic value of her work means that it retains an ambivalence that prevents it from being read as straightforward ‘ political art ’ , insofar as the latter places ideological issues and the exposure of past and present wrongdoings over and above aesthetic concerns. As Best argues, Watson combines ‘ the softening and ameliorating powers of aes- thetics with the registration of sharper and more dif fi cult political points ’ . ‘ Reparative art ’ is built on this ambivalence between anger and love, loss and beauty and, in this respect, is not a redemptive or restorative practice, but rather one that honours the complexity of feeling that follows from the destructive events of colonialism, both psychical and social.
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The Liquid Aesthetic of the Cameraphone

The Liquid Aesthetic of the Cameraphone

Although specific features unique to each cameraphone model influences the aesthetic of these photographs (see Figure 4), a lack of photographic conventions associated with the cameraphone has the potential to promote a culture of creative experimentation. Excessive pixilation creates a visual effect reminiscent of the impressionist movement in painting. Images of highways and suburban streets now take on an almost nostalgic quality. Pockets of soft focus and distortion, randomly generated by the cameraphone, create areas of mystery within the frame. They distort the original image, disrupt the narrative and create a space for the viewer to project their narrative interpretation. Just as the pinhole camera has taken its place as a transformative technology within the history of analogue photography, the early model cameraphone marked the beginning of an emergent cameraphone aesthetic located within the genealogy of digital imaging technologies and contemporary photographic practice.
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Introduction: aesthetic knowledge

Introduction: aesthetic knowledge

In his essay on the aesthetics of responsible business Carlo Tognato makes a similar point. He discusses the difficult case of businesses that operate in countries that are defiled by terrible acts. There are endless modern codes of behaviour and bureaucratic declarations of rights meant to guide businesses in these circumstances. Most of these are pretty meaningless as they make little impression on anyone. Aesthetics can make more of an impression. This is because, as in the case of Weber’s iconography, it trades in incommensurables. Tognato offers the example of the torturer who is a good husband. The power of art is that it targets the “tragic” dimension of human existence. That is, much better than the vacuous legions of “correct” linguistic declarations, art grasps the man-beast aspect of humanity. It is aware that sweetness and pitilessness can consume the same being. Tognato’s point is not that we should better “understand” the doting torturer but rather that our accounts of rights and wrongs are more meaningful if they are authentic. If they are then they have a better chance of properly informing behaviour—as in the case of those businessmen who have to tread a very difficult path in bad situations where they encounter human beings who are men and beasts on different days. The aesthetic imagination grasps this intuitively.
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