African American History

Top PDF African American History:

The blues, the folk, and African American history

The blues, the folk, and African American history

The Coahoma County study presents an interpretive problem: a legendary moment when the Delta blues was discovered – but not in the form that has passed into legend, not in the form that we expect to find. In what follows I want to explore this tale, focusing on its guiding assumptions and the sense of mission that drove its creators. The Coahoma County investigators, like the Delta blues fans who followed, shaped their vision of the blues of the Delta in part out of political and cultural commitments, their sense of what was real in black secular music in an urban, industrial, mass-market world where African-Americans looked less like a ‘folk’ than ever before. Eventually, one tale of the Delta blues triumphed. But as historians of popular memory have argued, dominant accounts of the past take shape in part through their struggles with others, a process by which certain tales ‘achieve centrality and lux- uriate grandly; others are marginalised or excluded.’  The Coahoma County study presents one such excluded story. Through it we can begin to explore what was pushed to the margins when the Mississippi Delta was reimagined as the locus of African-American folk authenticity, or, as Alan Lomax would eventually phrase it, the land where the blues began. What is perhaps most unsettling about the Coahoma County study to anyone who has ever picked up a blues book or CD is that it was not premised on a conviction that the blues had its roots in the Mississippi Delta. As I have already noted, for today’s blues chroniclers that origin seems incontrovertible, though a few will admit that in point of fact they have precious little direct evidence to go by. As a music of a denigrated, impoverished class, the early blues left few traces behind it – no reliable accounts of performances, no thorough transcriptions of lyrics. While historians agree that the AAB verse form first appeared in the early twentieth century, even that is less fact than inference: nothing resembling that form appears in nineteenth-century ballad hunters’ reports. Other- wise, all comes down to guesswork. No one knows who sang the first blues, or where they sang it, or when.
Show more

21 Read more

Perceptions of African-American Outdoor Experiences.

Perceptions of African-American Outdoor Experiences.

Travel to state or National parks is an additional way to examine outdoor recreation participation. The 2011 Edition of the African American Traveler was intended to understand how African-American travelers think about travel, identify the range of African-American traveler types, understand the behaviors of African-American leisure travelers, learn what is important to African-American travelers, and quantify the economic impact of the African- American leisure traveler (Binder, Mandala, Paluch, & Gao, 2011). This nationwide survey defined African-American travelers as individuals who have taken at least one trip within the U.S. in the past year for leisure purposes that was 50+ miles away from home. Through market segmentation, three major segments of African-American travelers were identified: 1) the curious and engaged, 2) the family reunion traveler, and 3) the business traveler. Questions pertaining to travel related activities were posed, including travel items with major ramifications for outdoor recreation. This study found that the “curious and engaged” segment were most likely to visit National or state parks, with 46% of the market segment indicating that they traveled to parks in 2010. While curious and engaged respondents had higher visitation rates to parks, 65% of the segment indicated they would visit more parks if they saw greater diversity among employees and visitors (Binder et al., 2011). Additionally, 74% of this segment indicated that they would visit parks more often if they offered more stories and exhibits about African- American history and culture.
Show more

95 Read more

Similarity Attraction and Old School Values: African American Led Nonprofits and African American Youth

Similarity Attraction and Old School Values: African American Led Nonprofits and African American Youth

This article examines the role of similarity-attraction between African American-led nonprofits and the predominately African American youth they serve. Informed by interview data with executive directors, board members, volunteers, and students, this research captures how similarity-attraction operates in the context of three, well-established African American-led nonprofit organizations by utilizing an old-school values approach. The findings suggest that each of these programs provides a direct focus on African American history and positive role models. Further, these programs teach African American youth how to excel while being black, from people who know first-hand what that experience entails. Nonprofit program leaders become trusted sources of advice and, ultimately, build self- confidence in the youth they serve. Given the limited research that focuses on African American-led nonprofits, this research illuminates an important, understudied area in nonprofit studies.
Show more

12 Read more

African-American Studies

African-American Studies

The Department of African American Studies offers a joint Bachelor of Arts in African-American Studies and Masters of Public Management. Sponsored by the Department and the School of Public Affairs, this special degree combines African-American history and culture with the study of public policy, analysis, and research. The program consists of 150 credits and you must meet the following criteria in order to apply:

7 Read more

American History High School Syllabus

American History High School Syllabus

The 2010-11 academic year is the first year that HistoryAtOurHouse will be offering an American history high school program, thus, inevitably, the curriculum at this level represents a work in progress. In certain regards the High School program will mirror the Junior High program for the next few years —until highly experienced students begin to move up through the HistoryAtOurHouse program. There will, however, be some significant differences at the outset.

7 Read more

The African American Legacy on Rock and Roll

The African American Legacy on Rock and Roll

of audience with a different identity. 5 The new, younger artists of the time, who were marketed mainly for the young Baby Boomer generation, claimed to have been influenced greatly by their Rhythm and Blues predecessors, but in contrast, they still claimed to be distinctly Rock and Roll singers . Specifically, Elvis Presley’s “Hound Dog” is a cover of the original , performed by the African American artist Big Mama Thornton. 6 But since Big Mama Thornton’s vers ion is more explicit and sexual Elvis excluded these innuendos in an attempt to aim the song at the younger conservative audience. Before Elvis became famous, it was said that his voice had confused audiences since they did not know if he was white or black. Ultimately, he had been one of the most successful artists to create music that was so deeply rooted in the African American style. 7 These covers would have great success in this time period, and would cause them to be recognized by a larger, more youthful audience.
Show more

7 Read more

African American males . . . educate or suspend?

African American males . . . educate or suspend?

same offenses White males committed. They also thought that White males did not receive punishments for violating school board policies. Participants from both schools discussed this matter. Johnson at Town High School discussed how White males would receive a day or two of In-School Suspension (ISS) for fighting, while African American males would receive one or two days of Out-of-School Suspension (OSS). He further explained that the parents of the White males would often come to the school and meet with the principal the day of the incident, and African American parents would not. Johnson felt like the parent meetings impacted the Principal’s enforcement of the policy. Kevin from Valley High School shared a similar point of discussion. He discussed how White males would leave campus during lunchtime, and then return to school without receiving consequences for their actions. Kevin further explained that African American males who left campus for lunch would return and be placed in ISS for the remainder of the day. Kevin did indicate that White males appeared more discreet about leaving campus for food because they never brought it back to campus. On the other hand, African American males would bring back their Bojangles or Chick-fil-A bags to let everybody know they left campus.
Show more

182 Read more

African American Activists in Buffalo, NY

African American Activists in Buffalo, NY

Reverend William Monroe was the pastor of the Michigan Street Baptist Church. The Convention of the Colored Inhabitants of the State of New York held in Albany, 1840 was probably the first statewide gathering of African Americans in the United States. They convened for the specific purpose of agitating for the right of suffrage. The Convention represented the most concerted effort on the part of African Americans to regain suffrage rights previously lost 32 . Buffalo’s delegates to this historic Convention. 33

8 Read more

Experiences of African American College Graduates

Experiences of African American College Graduates

Parents with higher levels of education have historically been more involved in the educational process of their students when they are young than parents who are less educated (Smith and Fleming, 2008). Davis-Kean’s (2005) study showed a correlation between the parent’s educational expectation and how well the student was actually performing in class. The first transition into college, as well as a student’s desire to persist in college, is largely effected by familial influence (Wartman and Savage, 2008). Research has shown that African-American children who receive positive educational affirmations, conversations on having pride in their race, and an awareness of societal inequalities did well academically (Leach and Williams, 2007). The literature, however, lacks qualitative examples of how African-American college graduates describe the experiences that led to their desire to attend, remain in, and graduate from college.
Show more

166 Read more

Prosodic rhythm and African American English

Prosodic rhythm and African American English

featured in Bailey, Maynor and Cukor-Avila (1991). We analyzed all speakers for whom transcriptions were published in that book except for Charlie Wil- liams, who was born in Liberia, and the unnamed woman in the Joe McDonald interview, who did not speak enough to allow analysis. We added two speakers who are mentioned in the introduction of Bailey, Maynor and Cukor-Avila (1991): “Mrs. Williams”, who was a North Carolina native but lived in Virginia when she was interviewed, and George Johnson, identified as “Colored Fellow” in Bailey, Maynor and Cukor-Avila (1991) and a native of western Mississippi. We also analyzed the speech of Wallace Quarterman, who spoke Gullah, but reserved a special category for him. This gave us ten ex-slaves besides Quar- terman. The question of the typicality or representativeness of these speakers among African Americans of this time period is addressed in Rickford (1991). Essentially, it is impossible to know with certainty, though the speakers repre- sent a range of characteristics, including males and females, field hands and house servants, and different geographical regions.
Show more

26 Read more

Charity, Philanthropy, and Civility in American History

Charity, Philanthropy, and Civility in American History

Finally, Gary Hess (chapter 15) highlights the close ties between government and philanthropic foundations in foreign aid policy during the Cold War. Expressing faith in the universality of American values and institutions, and embracing the mantra of economic growth and democratic institutions, foundations and the foreign policy elite saw the Third World as key to winning the Cold War. As a result, the Ford, Rockefeller, and Carnegie foundations often functioned as non-official extensions of US policy. Close organisational ties and a revolving door in personnel marked their relations. Dean Rusk and John Foster Dulles, for example, moved from the Rockefeller Foundation to the State Department, while McGeorge Bundy and John McCloy moved from public service to the Ford Foundation. Though small in monetary terms, the impact of
Show more

6 Read more

African History and the Tradition of Historical Writing

African History and the Tradition of Historical Writing

In the bid to establish the validity of African history and civilization, it is customary for the African scholars to prove that Africa has a long and glorious history before the advent of European colonial masters. Great efforts are usually made to show that this history is worthy of investigation like the history of Europe or that of the United States of America. Although African history has now become a respectable academic discipline in colleges and universities all over the world, it is important to realize that until about six decades ago, Africa was regarded by European historians and historical writers as a continent whose history only began with European intervention in Africa as from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, This study examines the European conception of African history and African response to those racist propaganda. Emphasis is laid on oral traditions as a valid and viable source for reconstructing African history and the ongoing trend in the tradition of historical writings in Africa by African and Africanist historians through time.
Show more

6 Read more

Using Adaptive Intelligence and African American Learning Styles to Improve Literacy of African American Students of Low Socioeconomic Status

Using Adaptive Intelligence and African American Learning Styles to Improve Literacy of African American Students of Low Socioeconomic Status

African American students of low socio-economic status take the back seat where literacy is concerned. They lag behind their Caucasian and Asian counterparts in Science, Mathematics, and Reading [1]. With this said, some may blame low literacy rates on the teacher’s performance, and others may blame such rates on the student’s inability or unwillingness to learn. Some may blame the failed literacy amongst these African American communities, on a flawed and outdated educational model. The current educational model is committed to making students memorized simply to past tests, rather than employ the use of things learned naturally, from day-to-day [2].
Show more

5 Read more

Comparative Study of the Idea of Mother in Contemporary African and African-American Poetry

Comparative Study of the Idea of Mother in Contemporary African and African-American Poetry

The Yoruba proverb says, "mother is gold." Most of the images of mother in contemporary African poetry derive their emotional intensity from traditional culture's reverence for m[r]

15 Read more

Improving the Academic Achievement of African American Males: A Case Study of African American Male Perceptions of Attempted Instructional Strategies

Improving the Academic Achievement of African American Males: A Case Study of African American Male Perceptions of Attempted Instructional Strategies

inventory regarding the preferred way to learn. The participants could select their preference to learn by reading books and other printed items, by listening, by looking at visuals like pictures, and by doing things with their hands like making things. According to the focus group discussion, the most preferred type of activity would be hands-on, yet only 2 students selected this. Most students selected listening, followed by reading books and other printed items. This finding implies that the African American male student needs to listen and read about the information as well as conduct some type of hands-on activity to ensure they grasp the concept. Because the majority of students preferred to learn the parts first, then the whole idea, teachers should break down the objectives into smaller parts when teaching so that teaching is more effective. Regarding the notion of teachers needing to provide extensive explanation and review of teaching objectives, the results from the learning style inventory, focus group interview, and follow-up questionnaire were consistent. The learning style inventory asked whether students needed exact directions and examples, written materials and lecture notes, or both in order to learn best, and the majority of students selected both strategies. This finding concurred with the data from the interview and follow-up
Show more

141 Read more

The Role of African American Women in American Society (XIX-XX Centuries)

The Role of African American Women in American Society (XIX-XX Centuries)

in, is Elizabeth Keckley. “She was eager for the prosper- ous middle class African-American community to support the newly freed men and women. As a former slave who had worked hard to build a successful dressmaking busi- ness, she was concerned that white philanthropists and charity workers who underestimated the abilities and the potential of the formerly enslaved would undermine their efforts to elevate themselves. She knew from her own ex- perience that it was possible for forms slaves to care for themselves, find employment, and direct their own lives” (Collins, p.85, 2003). “With forty AfricanAmerican wom- en from her church, Keckley Established the Contraband Relief Association (CRA). The CRA was by no means the first African-American relief society. During 1863, The CRA expanded it focus and changed its name to the “Ladies Freedman and Soldiers’ Relief Association. As thousands of contraband men enlisted in all-black Union regiments in 1863, the CRA helped outfit the African-American soldiers just as white woman had supplied white soldiers through the soldiers’ aid societies early in the war” (Harper E. , African American women during the Civil War, 1988, 85).
Show more

6 Read more

Victims, Victors, or Bystanders? African American College Students\u27 Perceptions of African American Agency During the Civil War

Victims, Victors, or Bystanders? African American College Students\u27 Perceptions of African American Agency During the Civil War

Anderson & Metzger (2011) conducted a mixed methods text analysis of US history curricula to examine how the standards portray the experiences of African Americans during the American Revolution and the Civil War and whether or not states addressed controversial issues in American history. The researchers used a multi-perspective critical conceptual framework (Anderson & Metzger, 2011). This mixed- methods study examined curriculum standards in New Jersey, Michigan, South Carolina, and Virginia. The researchers analyzed and coded the standards to identify dominant themes. The researchers wanted to analyze how the standards in each state engaged students in a conversation about race. The standards were sorted into the following categories: contributory (praised African Americans), progressive/exceptional (noted democratic progress on race relations), or discordant/conflict (questioned the master narrative). Findings concluded that most of the states include a significant amount of information about African Americans, however; most of the standards glossed over slavery and failed to address racial hierarchy in America during these pivotal periods in history.
Show more

136 Read more

History 104: American History, 1877 to the Present: Major Problems of Interpretation

History 104: American History, 1877 to the Present: Major Problems of Interpretation

Course description. This course will explore American politics, society, and culture from the post- Civil War era to the present. We will focus on changes in power relations in American society produced by social and political movements. We will also examine the construction and contestation of gender, race, ethnic, and class. This course will emphasize the use of primary sources, different modes of historical analysis and interpretation, and scholarly controversies.

6 Read more

4.2 Migrations shaping African history

4.2 Migrations shaping African history

The human race originated in the Great Lakes region of Africa, and spread to the rest of the world over many millennia. Researchers believe that large-scale African migrations started around 200 000 years ago with technological innovations that allowed the population to increase in numbers and expand. For example, 15 000 years ago, the people of the Nubia/Red Sea region (present-day Egypt and Sudan)

5 Read more

A history of the American Society for Clinical
            Investigation

A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

But there was precious little such opportunity elsewhere. Even at  the best US medical schools, professors had little use for the ideology  of scientific medicine. They saw  its results as unimportant and  tended at best to ignore and at  worst to ridicule its findings (2,  3). Medical practice based on the  natural sciences — so-called allo- pathic  medicine  (the  term  for  current MD practice) — existed in  tenuous coexistence with a vari- ety of other fields, such as home- opathy, chiropractic, and oste- opathy. At the turn of the 20th  century,  it  was  unclear  which  type of medicine was destined  to succeed. (Ironically, even as he  supported scientific research at  the Rockefeller Institute and else- where, John Rockefeller was per- sonally averse to allopathic medi- cine and preferred to be treated  by homeopathic remedies; his  institute  —  and  later  hospital  — was founded on the advice of  one of his trusted advisers.) In 1886 elite leaders of US medical schools had banded together  to found the Association of American Physicians (AAP). Tellingly,  they also considered naming the organization the “Association of  Physicians and Pathologists” (4, 5). This alternative name reflect- ed their dominant model of medical research, which was firmly  rooted in older, pathology-based ideas about how to do medical  research. Basing their scholarly approach on evidence provided by  postmortem pathological findings, 19th-century physicians had 
Show more

17 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...