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Study on Result of Implementation of Sisal Fibre in Reinforced Cement Concrete

Study on Result of Implementation of Sisal Fibre in Reinforced Cement Concrete

----------------------------------------------------------------------***--------------------------------------------------------------------- ABSTRACT: This paper widely explains the results obtained by implementation of sisal fibre in various mix proportions. The main target of this paper is to understanding the strength properties and workability of sisal fibre in reinforced cement concrete. The material is chosen to get the improvement in various strength properties of the structure sustainability and better quality. The vegetable fibre having a physical property of no detoriation in concrete medium. The fibre material is chemically treated and studied for its properties. Then the fibrous material is mixed with concrete in addition of 1%, 2% and 3% in M60 mix design and casted in cubes and cylinders. The casted specimens were subjected to tests to find the compressive, tensile and flexural strength. And the results of 7, 14 and 28 th day specimens are compared

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Experimental Investigation of Sisal Fibre Concrete by Using Fly Ash

Experimental Investigation of Sisal Fibre Concrete by Using Fly Ash

ABSTRACT: Cement is commonly used binder material for concrete in construction industry and also day by day increase the concrete materials rate so in this project we are reduce the materials quantity. This experimental investigation is the fully replacement of fine aggregate by M sand, partial replacement cement by fly ash and addition of sisal fibre components in effective way. The sisal fibre is constant amount of 1% and the partially replacement of fly ash 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% respectively. The water reduces agent or super plasticizer used 1.5% (conplast). The specimens are tested after curing periods like 3days, 14days and 28days respectively finally the test results are compared to the conventional concrete. We are achieved optimum strength in 15% replacement of fly ash. The grade of concrete we are used M35.

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Natural Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Experimental Studies

Natural Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Experimental Studies

---------------------------------------------------------------------***--------------------------------------------------------------------- ABSTRACT: Concrete is strong in compression and weak in tension. So we will provide the reinforcement to the concrete. Majorly steel is used as the reinforcement. Many of the researches are in progress to find a substitute to this material. Many investigations proposed artificial fibres. In this project we would like to take the naturally available fibre named sisal fibre is taken as a substitute material to the reinforcement and studied the propertie.The results show that the composites reinforced with sisal fibres are reliable materials to be used in practice for the production of structural elements to be used in rural and civil construction. This material could be a substitute to the steel reinforcement which production is a serious hazard to human and animal health and is prohibited in industrialized countries. The production of sisal fibres as compared with synthetic fibres or even with mineral asbestos fibres needs much less energy in addition to the ecological, social and economical benefits.

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Experimental Studies on Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Experimental Studies on Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete

Sisal fibre is one of the most widely used natural fibres and is very easily cultivated. It has short renewal times and grows wild in the hedges of fields and railway tracks. Nearly 3.5 million tons of sisal fibre is produced every year throughout the world. Tanzania and Brazil are the two main producing countries. Sisal fibre is a hard fibre extracted from the leaves of the sisal plant (Agave sisalana). Though native to tropical and sub-tropical North and South America, sisal plant is now widely grown in tropical countries of Africa, the West Indies and the Far East. Sisal fibres are extracted from the leaves. A sisal plant produces about 200±250 leaves and each leaf contains 1000±1200 fibre bundles which are composed of 4% fibre, 0.75% cuticle, 8%dry matter and 87.25% water. So normally a leaf weighing about 600 g will yield about 3% by weight of fibre with each leaf containing about 1000 fibres. Shown in figure 1.1 1.3 Scope

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Properties of Sisal Fibre Concrete with Fly Ash

Properties of Sisal Fibre Concrete with Fly Ash

In this research, sisal is being used in concrete. Thereby, the mechanical properties such as compressive strength, split-tensile strength, and modulus of rupture of M40 grade concrete and by varying the dosage of fibre content from 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, by volume of cement with optimum length of 35mm obtained from literature review, were found. The optimum dosage of sisal fibre was found to be 0.3%. The flexural behaviour of reinforced concrete beams with 0.3% sisal fibre was compared with conventional concrete properties of M40 grade.

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Stabilisation of Black Cotton Soil by Random Inclusion of Sisal Fibre

Stabilisation of Black Cotton Soil by Random Inclusion of Sisal Fibre

ABSTRACT: Soil stabilization is the process for altering the engineering properties of a soil. The main motto of stabilization is to increase the strength of soil and also to make the project economical by making the best use of the locally available materials. India is covered with large amount of expansive soil which is also known as Black Cotton soil, which covers about 20% of total land area. These soils have less compressive strength, high swelling, high shrinkage characteristics and low in CBR value. Hence, in the present study sisal fiber which is a naturally occurring fiber is made use of in stabilizing the black cotton soil. The strength behavior such as compaction characteristics, swelling behaviour and unconfined compressive strength of sisal fibre reinforced black cotton soil has been studied.

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Natural Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Experimental Studies

Natural Sisal Fibre Reinforced Concrete with Experimental Studies

The Sisal fibre plants consist of a rosette of sword-shaped leaves about 1.5 to 2 meters tall. Young leaves may have a few minute teeth along their margins, but lose them as they mature. The sisal fibre plant has a 7–10 year life-span and typically produces 200–250 commercially usable leaves. Each leaf contains an average of around 1000 fibres. The fibres account for only about 4% of the plant by weight. Sisal fibre is considered a plant of the tropics and subtropics, since production benefits from temperatures above 25 degrees Celsius and sunshine.

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Investigating the Effect of Chemical Treatment on the Constituents and Tensile Properties of Sisal Fibre

Investigating the Effect of Chemical Treatment on the Constituents and Tensile Properties of Sisal Fibre

This work was carried out to investigate the effect of chemical treatment on the constituents and tensile properties of sisal fibre (Agave Sisalana). Sisal leaves were cut and buried underground close to the stream and were wetted with water regularly in order to ensure proper fermentation for about 15 days. The fermented leaves were washed and sun dried. The dried sisal fibre obtained was treated mechanically with chemicals after which the percentages of their constituents were characterized and, their tensile properties determined with Instron universal tensile testing machine. The results show that the chemical treatments enhance the removal of lignin and hemicelluloses which are detrimental to the bonding strength of composite produced from natural fibres except that of sample treated with alkaline peroxide. The results of the tensile test revealed that sample treated sequentially with KOH, acetic acid, NaCl and HCl has the best tensile properties followed by the sample treated with alkaline peroxide.

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Bitumen Retention of Modified Open Graded Asphalt Using Sisal Fibre and Waste Plastics

Bitumen Retention of Modified Open Graded Asphalt Using Sisal Fibre and Waste Plastics

Marshall Stability test was conducted on non-modified OGA samples by applying 50 blows on each face. Bituminous mixes were prepared by mixing the graded aggregates with 80/100 penetration grade bitumen and required additives. 5.5% optimum bitumen content of control OGA mix was determined by Marshal methods. 5mm sisal fibre, treated with weak sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and shredded waste plastics, 2-3mm, were used as the modifiers. The fibre content in this research was varied between 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.4% by weight of mix and waste plastics content varied from 1%, 3%, 5% and 7% by weight of mix. The sisal fibre and waste plastics content that gave the optimum marshal mix parameters were used to prepare sisal-plastic modified open graded asphalt (SPMOGA) concrete samples. These SPMOGA samples were analyzed for drain down characteristics as discussed herein. Waste plastics were added in heated aggregate and mixed to obtain homogeneous mixture. Sisal fibre was then treated with sodium hydroxide solution prior to mixing with heated bitumen. The Plastic-coated aggregates are mixed with sisal fibre and bitumen. The mixing and testing temperatures were kept at 165°C and 150°C respectively.

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Comparative Study of Soil Strength by Mixing Soil with Recron 3s and Sisal Fibre

Comparative Study of Soil Strength by Mixing Soil with Recron 3s and Sisal Fibre

The main objective of the present project is to check the usefulness of Recron 3S fibre and sisal fibre in improving soil subgrade strength of low strength soil (Davanagere & Haveri soil). For this purpose a series of experiments were conducted which include Modified Proctor Compaction and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) tests. A total of four samples of soil - fibre mixture were made with fiber content as 0.25%, 0.50%, 0.75% and 01% of dry weight of soil. Other tests for index and physical properties like Atterberg limits, Specific gravity and sieve analysis of parent soil were also carried out. Experimental results revealed that addition of Recron 3S & sisal fibre increases the UCS value of the soil. From the results, it is also observed that to compare the strength in terms of UCS value adding different dosage of both Recron 3S & Sisal fibre. In this study to find the optimum dosage of Recron 3S & Sisal fibre to achieve maximum strength.

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Fabrication And Comparative Analysis Of Mechanical Properties Of Reinforced Sisal Fibre And Jute, Banana, Glass Fibre Composite

Fabrication And Comparative Analysis Of Mechanical Properties Of Reinforced Sisal Fibre And Jute, Banana, Glass Fibre Composite

The present work attends to make an improvement in the current existing sheet manufacturing methodology and materials used to have better mechanical properties as well as to enhance the compatibility between fiber and the matrix the bio composites are prepared with the unsaturated polyester matrix and fiber and comparative study has been made from eco friendly sisal fibre composite and jute, banana and glass fiber using hand layup method with appropriate proportion to result in sheet structure. The fabricated composites are planned to evaluate its mechanical properties such as tensile, impact, hardness and flexural strength and the results are compared in Ansys Software.

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Experimental studies on Sisal Fibre Reinforced concrete with 
		Groundnut 
		Shell Ash

Experimental studies on Sisal Fibre Reinforced concrete with Groundnut Shell Ash

Fibre reinforcement usually increases the performance of the concrete in many aspects, this paper deal addition of Sisal Fibre Reinforcement (SFR) in concrete to improve the performance at the same time reducing cement consumption by replacing with Groundnut Shell Ash (GSA). These materials not just lessen the emanation of carbon dioxide gas in the climate additionally utilized as a substitute for the bond to take care without bounds demand. In the present work, GSA replacement for cement is 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20%; SFR is added for each set percentage of GSA as 1, 2 and 3% by its weight. Na2CO3 treatment was carried out to reduce the potential deterioration of SF. The compressive strength, flexural bending strength, deflection of the beam and economic consideration for M25 concrete specimen was done. Totally 120 numbers concrete 150 x150 mm cube and 9 number of 100 x 150 x 800mm flexural member cast and tested. It is recommended up to 10% of replacement of cement by GSA and 2 % addition of SF provide optimum values from investigation and economic consideration.

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Study on Result of Implementation of Sisal Fibre in Reinforced Cement Concrete

Study on Result of Implementation of Sisal Fibre in Reinforced Cement Concrete

Sisal is the plant of the family Asparagaceae and its fibre, the most important of the leaf fibre group. The plant is native to Central America. The length of sisal fibre is between 1.0 and 1.5 m and the diameter are about 100-300 mm. The fibre is actually a bundle of hollow sub-fibres. Their cell walls are reinforced with spirally oriented cellulose in a hemi-cellulose and lignin matrix. So, the cell wall is a composite structure of lignocellulosic material reinforced by helical microfibrillar bands of cellulose. The composition of the external surface of the cell wall is a layer of lignaceous material and waxy substances which bond the cell to its adjacent neighbours. Hence, this surface will not form a strong bond with a polymer matrix. Also, cellulose is a hydrophilic glucan polymer consisting of a linear chain of 1, 4-b-bonded anhydroglucose units and this large amount of hydroxyl groups will give sisal fibre hydrophilic properties. This will lead to a very poor interface between sisal fibre and the hydrophobic matrix and very poor moisture absorption resistance.

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Experimental Inspection on Black Cotton Soil Stabilization by using Sisal Fibre and Copper Slag

Experimental Inspection on Black Cotton Soil Stabilization by using Sisal Fibre and Copper Slag

As a consequence of their inherent characteristics including low strength, high compressibility and a high potential for swelling and shrinkage, expansive soils are often characterized as unsuitable constriction material for civil engineering applications (Nalbantoglu, 2006). The main aim of stabilization is cost reduction and to efficiently use the locally available material. Therefore, such soils often require modification to satisfy design criteria prior application.Stabilization of expansive soils can be achieved through two approaches, i.e. chemical and mechanical techniques. Chemical techniques mainly involve the addition of chemical binders to the soil, there by amending the soil fabric into a coherent matrix of restricted have and induced. The mechanical approach makes use of compaction with the aid of reinforcement. Common reinforcement includes fibre of synthetic (e.g.Sisal fibre) and natural (e.g. Coir and palm) origin or other fibre like materials such as plastic waste strips and shredded tires. Within these stabilizations synthetic sisal fibre are used, because it possesses high tensile strength. Among the stabilization techniques, varies proportion of materials are added for this research, particularly based on the aspect ratio. And the theme of

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Flexural properties of sisal fibre/epoxy Composites

Flexural properties of sisal fibre/epoxy Composites

Natural fibres received more attention to be used in composite structure in recent years. Comparing to synthetic fibres, natural fibres have some advantages such as low cost, low weight, renewable resources, etc. The natural fibres composites can be used in automobile and construction industry due to their relatively high specific strength/modulus. Natural fibres such as flax fibres have density about 1.5g/cm 3 and cost between $0.22~$1.1/kg. In comparison, synthetic fibre such glass fibre’s density is about 2.6 g/cm 3 and cost between $1.30~$2.00/kg, (Scarponi & Andreotti 2009) . So it is very attractive for industry to use natural fibres to replace synthetic fibres. According to literature, Mercedes-Benz used epoxy/jute fibre composite to manufacture door panels in its E-class vehicles, (Kavelin 2005). Toyota used kenaf fibres to reinforce PLA matrix, making parts for its vehicles. Many researchers have done their work on natural fibres composites and their applications. However, most of their works are done on jute fibres, hemp fibres, bamboo fibres …etc (Faruk et al. 2014). On the other hand, there is one more attractive fibre which is sisal fibre and need attention in term of its impact on the flexural properties of polymer composites, i.e. it has less understanding in the literature.

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Experimental Inspection on Black Cotton Soil Stabilization by using Sisal Fibre and Copper Slag

Experimental Inspection on Black Cotton Soil Stabilization by using Sisal Fibre and Copper Slag

As a consequence of their inherent characteristics including low strength, high compressibility and a high potential for swelling and shrinkage, expansive soils are often characterized as unsuitable constriction material for civil engineering applications (Nalbantoglu, 2006). The main aim of stabilization is cost reduction and to efficiently use the locally available material. Therefore, such soils often require modification to satisfy design criteria prior application.Stabilization of expansive soils can be achieved through two approaches, i.e. chemical and mechanical techniques. Chemical techniques mainly involve the addition of chemical binders to the soil, there by amending the soil fabric into a coherent matrix of restricted have and induced. The mechanical approach makes use of compaction with the aid of reinforcement. Common reinforcement includes fibre of synthetic (e.g.Sisal fibre) and natural (e.g. Coir and palm) origin or other fibre like materials such as plastic waste strips and shredded tires. Within these stabilizations synthetic sisal fibre are used, because it possesses high tensile strength. Among the stabilization techniques, varies proportion of materials are added for this research, particularly based on the aspect ratio. And the theme of

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Comparative Study on Properties of Coir and Sisal Fibre Reinforced Composites

Comparative Study on Properties of Coir and Sisal Fibre Reinforced Composites

Girisha.C et al., (2012) [16] Natural fibres (Sisal and Coconut coir) reinforced Epoxy composites were subjected to water immersion tests in order to study the effects of water absorption on the mechanical properties. Natural fibres like coconut coir (short fibres) and sisal fibres (long fibres) were used in hybrid combination and the fibre weight fraction of 20%, 30% and 40% were used for the fabrication of the composite. Water absorption tests were conducted by immersing specimens in a water bath at 250 o C and 1000 o C for different time durations. The tensile and flexural properties of water immersed specimens subjected to both aging conditions were evaluated and compared with dry composite specimens. The percentage of moisture uptake increased as the fibre volume fraction increased because of the high cellulose content of the fibre. The tensile and flexural properties of natural fibre reinforced Epoxy composite specimens were found to decrease with increase in percentage moisture uptake.

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Influence of Sisal Fibre on the Properties of Foam Concrete

Influence of Sisal Fibre on the Properties of Foam Concrete

Md Azree Othuman Mydin and Sara Soleimanzadeh [3] The impacts of volume fraction of polypropylene fibre (PF) on the bending behavior of lightweight foamed concrete (LFC) before and during exposing it to high temperature is experimentally studied. Five mixes of LFC with 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 kg/m³ densities were made in current investigation. Then, the effect of adding PF with volume fraction of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.45 and 0.5% on the flexural strength and pore structure of each considered density at ambient and elevated temperatures up to 600 was examined. The outcomes demonstrated that an increasing temperature had a detrimental influence on LFC property especially in a temperature range of 200 to 600 degrees in which flexural resistance was reduced by about 15 to 60% due to the micro diffusion of bound water molecules, detachment of the C-S-H gel and CH, weakness in chemical bond structure of cement paste and suppresses of the cohesive forces in the micropores. Adding PF by 0.1 0.4% of mix volume enabled LFC to resist high temperatures better than control plain concrete and the improvement percentage was directly correlated with PF content and LFC density. However, adding PF with volume fraction more than 0.4% reduced the flexural strength considerably.

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MOISTURE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SISAL- PLASTIC MODIFIED OPEN GRADED ASPHALT Mungathia, T 1* ., Gariy Z. A ., Nyomboi, T

MOISTURE SUSCEPTIBILITY OF SISAL- PLASTIC MODIFIED OPEN GRADED ASPHALT Mungathia, T 1* ., Gariy Z. A ., Nyomboi, T

Sisal plastic modified asphalt concrete (SPMAC) samples had the highest percentage increase in strength at both unconditioned and conditioned samples as compared to sisal fibre or waste plastics stabilized samples. This is associated with the fact that the samples with sisal-plastic are more firm and stronger due to fibre reinforcement and waste plastic coating that form stiffer matrix samples compared to use of plastic or sisal fibre alone. It can be concluded that sisal- plastic additive demonstrates a slightly better cracking resistance as compared to sisal fibre and waste plastics modifiers only.

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Research for sisal (agave sp ) fibre production in India

Research for sisal (agave sp ) fibre production in India

amount of fibre are also utilized for padding and upholstery and mats as well as for bags and sacking. More uses includes sausage casings, reinforced plastics and building boards, carpets, crafts and speciality papers, different types of nets and brushes, straps of different use, ladies fancy purses and belts. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) derived from sisal are as good as other industrial MCCs used in medicine industry. Sisal plant parts contain 0.05-0.14% hecogenin, a glycoside of commercial importance (Sarkar et al., 2010). The most important use of sisal fibre is in manufacturing of binder- twines. In Madhya Pradesh, aloe fibre was used in jails for manufacture of newar, tat beds, pile rugs etc. In Bombay (now Mumbai) area, sisal fibre were used for manufacture of loosely woven bags for transportation of seed cotton to the market or ginning factory (Ray, 1952). Central Coir Research Institute, Kerala shown that sisal can be blended with coir in 80:20% ratio to make coir more useful in diversified products. It was reported that normal coir gave an average of 240 m of coir yarn a kg, while the coir-sisal blend produced 1300 m a kg; so this made the yarn fine and light for application in new areas (Anonymous, 2007). Corrugated fibre board boxes can be made from sisal which is cheaper ( 3.50/per box of 220 x 110 x 180 mm dimension) than wooden packs ( 5.75) (Ambrose and Devadas, 2009). The hydrolysed and filtered extract of agave leaves containing Zymomonas mobilis could be used for production of 5% ethanol (Murugan and Rajendran, 2013).

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