Apocalypse Now

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Haiti Apocalypse Now

Haiti Apocalypse Now

En Brooklyn, la familia es capaz de hacer una vida que parece en cierta medida desvinculada de Haití en tanto lugar, pero también de Haití en cuanto memoria, la de un pasado de cuyas [r]

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Apocalypse Now: War and Religion in Late Colonial and Early Republic America

Apocalypse Now: War and Religion in Late Colonial and Early Republic America

Are we willing to be driven into the Sea, and drown’d? Are we willing to be bound to the Stake and burnt? This seems to appear from the best Intelligence we have of the Conduct of the French, that their Design is as soon as possible to change the Government of these Provinces; and if they change the Government of this Land, they will the Religion of it too. Are we willing to give up our civil Rights and Privileges, and become subjected to Tyranny and arbitrary Government? Are we willing to give up our Religion, the Religion of Jesus, which we now enjoy in it’s [sic] Purity, and which should be more dear to us than our Lives? Are we willing to give up this for Ignorance, Error and Superstition? to resign our Bibles, and contentedly walk in the dark? In a Word, have we no Love to the dear Land of our Nativity; the Womb that bear us, the fruitful Land that has fed and nourished us? Can we calmly submit to give up this Land to usurping Powers, that our Fore-fathers purchased for us at the Price of their Blood? O! for God’s sake, let us think of our Danger, and labour to prevent our Ruin. Let us determine to defend our Country, though it be at the Price of our Blood. Let there not be an unwilling Mind, or a faint Heart in any Son of New-England.
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Contemplating the Katrina Whirlwind: From "Apocalypse Now" to Solidarity for the Common Good

Contemplating the Katrina Whirlwind: From "Apocalypse Now" to Solidarity for the Common Good

The Louisiana Interchurch Disaster Recovery Network is a membership organization of twenty-three faith-based groups founded in 2005 to “holistically address current and emerging spirit[r]

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Civilization and Savagery in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now

Civilization and Savagery in Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now

restraint. Very obviously he has gone ins These parallels are instrumental in establishi Marlow and Willard originate and from whic digresses but Marlow does not. Marlow feels that[r]

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Screenplay   Apocalypse Now pdf

Screenplay Apocalypse Now pdf

Now the VIEW MOVES AWAY, ACROSS the ancient growth, PAST the glimmer of what seems to be another soldier hiding in ambush, wearing an exotic hat made from birds and bushes. ACROSS to a dark trail where the legs of those in black pajamas move silently across our ever TIGHTENING VIEW. Their feet, boots and sandals leave no impression; make no sound. A slight flicker of light reveals a pair of eyes in the foliage across the path, waiting and watching. The VIEW PUSHES ALONG WITH the Vietnamese, MOVING FASTER AND FASTER WITH them, until suddenly, directly in front about ten feet away, an enormous AMERICAN clad in rags and bushes and holding a 12 gauge automatic shotgun casually at his side, steps in front of them. He smiles laconically, and BLASTS OUT FIVE SHOTS that rip THROUGH US. By the second shot, the whole jungle blazes out with AUTOMATIC FIRE.
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“The Four Horsemen of the Greenhouse Apocalypse”: Apocalypse in the Science Fiction Novels of George Turner

“The Four Horsemen of the Greenhouse Apocalypse”: Apocalypse in the Science Fiction Novels of George Turner

The “continuing catastrophe” is evidenced in the fact that other issues have taken the place of nuclear war in the anxieties of the cultural imagination. Sontag writes that disasters such as AIDS, Third World poverty, overpopulation and environmental problems constitute a “long- running serial: not ‘Apocalypse Now’ but ‘Apocalypse From Now On’ … catastrophe in slow motion” (AIDS 88). Global warming, for instance, has become a popular trope in apocalyptic fictions, particularly in recent times when high-profile politician- and celebrity-endorsed documentaries receive as much attention as Hollywood blockbusters. The success of An Inconvenient Truth is one example of how climate issues have become key election factors. Scientific concern coincides with popular interest in the subject, as seen in environmental or geological catastrophe films such as The Day After Tomorrow and The Core, to the point where the prospect of widespread ecological disaster appears to have replaced nuclear war as a dominant fear in society.
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Apocalypse and dystopia in contemporary Italian writing

Apocalypse and dystopia in contemporary Italian writing

While Capriolo’s prose is meticulously crafted and controlled (not, however, without subtle touches of humour and irony), Avoledo’s style is largely informal, fresh, light and colloquial, his humour linguistic as much as situational. A particular characteristic of his writing, indeed, is a facility to tease his reader—who just begins to believe s/he has unravelled some puzzle when a new angle is presented—as well as to ridicule the modern hyperbolic use of language. For Capriolo, the form of words is of capital importance, form, indeed, being (consciously) integral to her content, and her idealistic protagonists are all made to measure their words with care; furthermore, references and allusions to writers, poets, composers and philosophers of the classical tradition abound. Avoledo’s writing is also permeated with references to the classics, but most especially to popular culture/film (including Coppola’s 1979 film Apocalypse Now) and science fiction; while being five years Capriolo’s senior, he is generally more mo- dern in terms of his points of reference. 13 His characters, tending also to be
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All the Apocalypse a stage: The ritual function of apocalyptic literature

All the Apocalypse a stage: The ritual function of apocalyptic literature

The Christian Apocalypse consoles those who glimpse what hell can be and encourages those who would build a New Jerusalem (Court 1994:11). On this basis, the Revelation of John develops an impressive sacral architecture – by presenting a heavenly reality within the framework of an apocalyptic vision of history, it provides a new interpretation for earthly events and experiences. The author develops a theology in visionary pictures of the cultic reality in heaven and on earth, aiming to strengthen the threatened identity of his churches and to orient it by this new symbolic universe. Those experiencing the conflict are assured of the victorious outcome. Whatever the weight of evil opposition, there is no possibility of its ultimate success. The assurance that the consummation of history is not fortuitous, but is firmly in the hands of God, is of the highest relevance in an age threatened with self-destruction. The New Jerusalem vision, with which the book fittingly ends, is a positive hope for all who have embraced the Christian gospel. The end of the present age will not come until the way has been opened for a glorious future, which evil will be powerless to spoil. At the same time, this cultic thought-world grants participation in the event itself (Schnelle 2009:751). If the passages concerned are a vital key to the appreciation of the
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Women of the Apocalypse: Afrospeculative Feminist Novelists

Women of the Apocalypse: Afrospeculative Feminist Novelists

To return to Butler’s essay, “A Monophobic Response,” in this final poem, “Learn & Run,” I wanted to make a nod to the notion that humans create aliens because we are afraid of being alone in the universe, but we may never be ready for life from other planets as we cannot live next door to one another right here, right now. Lilith is perceptive enough to recognize that the Oankali way of doing things is strikingly similar to how humans have instigated oppression of one another. Perhaps, the Oankali appear initially more benign on the surface to violent warfare, but ultimately, their form of dominance is more permanent. The Oankali systemically override and undermine almost all vestiges of human independence—on the one hand, humans in Butler’s future Earth come off as chattel and on the other, as cherished pets. While the Oankali by their nature cannot not trade genes with other lifeforms, perhaps they would not have intervened at all if humans were not on the cusp of destroying themselves in the first place through internalized dominance and hierarchal tendencies? I suspect that is the observation Butler is making in Dawn, no matter how monstrous we portray alien invasion—why would we need these speculative aliens in our narratives if we did not fear that we might tear ourselves apart first?
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The Poetics of Ekphrasis: Vivid Description and Rhetoric in the Apocalypse

The Poetics of Ekphrasis: Vivid Description and Rhetoric in the Apocalypse

Ekphrasis is not neutral. The audience only has access to what John de- scribes. We see through his eyes and become co-seers of his vision. What is lost by not having the actual object before the eyes is gained in creating the opportunity for the orator to introduce only the elements most useful or im- pacting for his argument. 51 In the battle for allegiance between God and the Roman Empire, John re-directs the gaze of his hearers away from the earthly throne and towards the heavenly throne. To see God is to experience God, and the accompanying emotions of desire and awe are re-located away from cultic statuary and firmly directed toward the Lamb. Apocalypse 4–5 presents
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Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages

Dominion of God: Christendom and Apocalypse in the Middle Ages

Christians should not try to find out when these events would unfold, there was a persistent temptation to look for signs of the Apocalypse in current affairs. Adso’s description provided an enduring template. The second chapter considers the role of the first Crusade in intensifying and popularising a sense of Christian collective identity. An extensive literature was stimulated by the experience of crusading and particularly by the conquest of Jerusalem. In these events, the Gregorian theology of history took a palpable form. God’s hand was at work: the eastern churches had been liberated and the holy places cleansed of the Muslim pollution. For some authors, notably Guibert of Nogent, these events had eschatological
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Postmodern Apocalypse in  White Noise and London Fields

Postmodern Apocalypse in White Noise and London Fields

In Postmodern Apocalypse: Theory and Cultural Practice at The End (1995), Richard Dellamora provides a collection of apocalyptic narrative and argues that the uncircumscribed field of narrative at the end of the millennium continues to be structured in relation to apocalypse in its traditional manifestation (4). Moreover, Josef Broeck declares that the apocalyptic genre has distanced itself from its biblical and historical roots due to the fact that there seems to be no agreement on the form, content, or function of apocalyptic writing and thinking in present-day narratives (5). Additionally, D.H Lawrence’s Apocalypse and the Writings on Revelation (1980) is a thorough criticism of the political, religious and social norms in Western civilization. Lawrence's belief in humanity's power to redeem the spiritual values which alone can recover our world makes apocalypse a powerful statement of hope (6). Such an approach is more apparent in David Ketterer’s reinterpretation of New Jerusalem in New Worlds for Old: The Apocalyptic Imagination, Science Fiction, and American Literature (1974) (7).
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Life enhancement now, now, now

Life enhancement now, now, now

Moving beyond the notion of a pure active force means that this dichotomising fiction of pure forces is replaced with the human will as the historical result of the organisation of force[r]

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Mennonites, the Apocalypse, and the Appeal of the Walking Dead

Mennonites, the Apocalypse, and the Appeal of the Walking Dead

Keywords: apocalypse, Canadian Mennonite, cultural narrative, emergency preparedness, narrative theory, personal narrative, popular culture, Russian Mennonite, survival, walking dead, zombie 1. INTRODUCTION Have you seen Z Nation? The SyFy television series challenges the conventions of zombie apocalypse. It moves beyond the rebuilding of society and conflict among communities of survivors to introduce new images and themes. In one episode, a half-zombie, half-human baby is born (Schaefer et al., 2015, S02E05). This birth occurs on old-order Mennonite farm, which is another, smaller way the show pushes the boundaries. We haven’t seen Mennonites zombies before.
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Apocalypse yesterday: Posthumanism and comics in the Anthropocene

Apocalypse yesterday: Posthumanism and comics in the Anthropocene

20 Indicatively, the temporal disorientation of these double-page assemblages – which do not occur anywhere else in the comic – conclude with a striking splash page that shows the smoky, flaming city of Gastown, emitting toxic carbon emissions into a thunderous sky (see Fig.7). The comic’s narrative infrastructure is entirely eradicated here, first dissolving into the page and then re-crystallising as the infrastructure of Gastown’s complex of pipes and chimneys. The temporal effect of the splash page is to bring the narrative’s forward movement to a sudden stasis, forcing us to confront an apocalyptic image of climate destruction. But as the accompanying text insists, even this momentary vision of an apocalyptic present remains caught within the entangled temporalities of past and future: “the mistakes of the past are repeated over and over… eating away our future… leaving a blighted and polluted world… as its legacy” (Miller et al., 2015). It is the posthuman tendencies of the comics form that allows it to force this vision of anthropogenic apocalypse into our own present, as climate
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Useless Scavenged Items From a Zombie Apocalypse

Useless Scavenged Items From a Zombie Apocalypse

For more options for your game, please check out the sister volume to this; 100 Useful scavenged items from a Zombie apocalypse, and 100 Useless items for all modern RPGs, available where you purchased this title. As ever, have fun using this publication, and happy Role-playing!

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The First Apocalypse of James: Martyrdom and Sexual Difference

The First Apocalypse of James: Martyrdom and Sexual Difference

TsavFe NsHime ete/ neei ne savF µpna ne naiü evauNtou eHoun HN te/[i]g[ra]fh oupna nsofia H[i] m[Nt]sabe oupna nsojn/[e Hi] C/[o]m [ou]p/n/a/ [n]nou Hi soo[une] oup/na nHote Nter/e/<i>jwwbe npkaH µpnoC narc/wn petevaum[o]ute ero/F je addwn aeibwk eHoun varoF/ auw ntoF eFo nats/[o]oune N[t]erieiü de ebol µm/oF neFmeoue ero[ei] pe je an˚ p/eFvhre auw aFcarise naei Hws peFvhre µmin moF auw anok Ha teHh empaTouwnÓ ebol Nneei ma ara neuvoop NCi naei Hµ pilaos ete paei pe pma ete mpeprofhths vaje cwris pisavÏ µpna auw naei ne pisavÏ µpna Ntautave oeiv etbht HitN ttapro nNrwme kata qe/ n/tauC/m/Com ejoou ebol je µpijw NtCom thrß [a]n/ok de [ae]iei aeijwk ebol (26.4–27.2) This passage adds detail to the text’s imagination of the divine realms through a theological interpretation of Isaiah. Among the rulers who are the agents of femaleness, we now meet the great ruler Addon. He can be added to the toll collectors, the three who take away the soul, and other unspecified rulers. By contrast, these spirits of prophecy must be agents of the One Who Is, not of femaleness. They precede Jesus and inspire true prophecy about him. The text does not mention here the “undefiled Sophia,” but the description of the seven spirits was foreshadowed by the invocation of Sophia. Jesus further elaborates the positive plurality of the divine realms introduced through the higher Sophia. Sophia is no longer the only honored female inhabitant of the divine realms. The seven spirits are another group of female divine powers. The seven
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A Radical Take on Zombie Apocalypse: Dominic Mitchell's In the Flesh

A Radical Take on Zombie Apocalypse: Dominic Mitchell's In the Flesh

apocalypse— instead, they fight against the zombie hordes for society’s preservation. Almost all representations of zombies fall into these conservative tropes in one way or another. In some cases, the radical potential of the zombie may be acknowledged in some way (for example, positioning the zombies as “capitalist drones” in George A. Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, as Lauro and Embry discuss), or the zombies may win at the end of the film. The politics of identification in the traditional zombie film, however, generally end with the audience positioned against the zombies. At some point in the typical narrative, the audience is inclined to identify with the zombies as they overtake rude, selfish, or generally unsavory characters. This moralizing role of the zombie is also decidedly conservative, however, and the fact remains that at the end of the traditional zombie film, there are still “good” humans worthy of viewer identification: the zombies remain the villains, positioned against the future of humanity. This politics of identification negates any possibility of radicalism or movement away from societal power structures.
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Semitic influence on verbal usage and on the subordinate clauses in the apocalypse

Semitic influence on verbal usage and on the subordinate clauses in the apocalypse

'Th e Use of the Verb in the Apocalypse'. Earlier in the book he proposed that’ the Semitic substrate of the language of the Apoc. was limited to the form of Hebr. and Aramaic current in Palestine during the first Christian century; namely, Mishnaic Hebrew and the Aramaic dialect represented by the Palestinian Pentateuch Targum^. Although Mussies admits that bibl. Hebr. also had its influence on the author of the Apoc., he makes little allowance for it. A more balanced view would certainly consider the influence of spoken Semitic vernacular, but it of necessity would not. overlook the influence of Hebrew/Aramaic of the OT and pseudepigrapha, since it was primarily to this literature, more than to later material, that the Seer made reference. In its repeated allusions to OT passages and in its general idiom, the Apoc, shares in the full, flowing style found in classical Hebrew prophets, while on the other hand it dis-
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The inward crusade: the apocalypse of the Queste del Saint Graal

The inward crusade: the apocalypse of the Queste del Saint Graal

Abstract The Queste del Saint Graal is the most intensely spiritual of the medieval Arthurian romances, and in its combination of chivalric and religious material immediately calls to mind the contemporary phenomenon of the crusades. The text at once seems to resist the drive towards exteriorisation expressed in the crusading impetus, counterbalancing it by a mystical internalisation of the focus and objective of the quest. As such, through its use of apocalyptic imagery, the text redefines the eschatological expectations that contemporaries projected onto the crusades to the Holy Land. Redirecting such an eschatological focus inward, aimed towards the purification of the heart of each individual Christian in preparation for the imminent apocalypse, the Queste is nevertheless forced to confront yet another intensely real threat originating from within Christianity itself, that of the Cathar heresy. Cultivating a constant and uneasy ambiguity about the status of the text itself, swinging between lofty allegorisations and stark, physical realism, the author finally sees the repression of the Cathar heresy as part of a wider process of puri- fication fulfilling a clearly eschatological function. The apotheosis of the text, with the companions’ entirely peaceful recovery of the eschatological, ‘celestial city’ of Sarraz, is thus seen as the result of a form of ‘inward crusade’ that is at once physical and ideological, micro and macrocosmic but always directed towards the heart of Christianity itself rather than the infidel.
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