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The impact on values and learning behaviours of engineering students from an authentic learning environment: preliminary analysis and observations

The impact on values and learning behaviours of engineering students from an authentic learning environment: preliminary analysis and observations

The restructure of the course utilised real-life case studies in developing professional and information literacy skills within an authentic learning environment. During Semester 1 (S1), 2008, a 7 weeks experiment was conducted in the library with the assistance of the librarian using a small sample of about 10 on-campus students. The curriculum design evolved from a “knowledge-transfer” approach to a project-based learning approach using information literacy and synthesis mechanisms. Genuine consulting work was recruited for the students in which they earned $500 for delivering a failure-analysis report on “Corrosion of leach-tank in Mineral Processing”. The students found themselves immersed in the research and problem solving, saw the relevance to their future engineering career. The experiment indicated the students were encouraged to explore and break from their entrenched behaviours. However, it was observed that the newly taught behaviours quickly became entrenched itself when new contexts for problem solving were presented. This does suggest a resistance to sustainable change in behaviours, perhaps governed by strong values (whatever it may be) when it comes to their study approaches.
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An Authentic Learning Environment Based on Video Project among Arabic Learners

An Authentic Learning Environment Based on Video Project among Arabic Learners

3. In addition, when students come for supervisory purposes assignment, they discovered new words but they had difficulty pronouncing them properly. Researchers provided assistance and let them practice the correct pronunciation before the recording started. In this part, students were motivated to meet their lecturers and discuss closely about their learning problems and find a solution. Students with this motive were categorized as using metacognitive strategy by looking for people he/she can talk to in second language (Oxford, 1987).

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TEACHER PROFESSIONAL GROWTH IN AN AUTHENTIC LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

TEACHER PROFESSIONAL GROWTH IN AN AUTHENTIC LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

seeing the results of his work, he responded to the questions concerning future plans that he intended to continue on the course he had already begun. Several of the teachers I worked with before and during the period of actual data collection for the action research participated off and of in project work as their circumstances, both personal and professional allowed. It wasn’t always easy for any one particular classroom teacher to be able to engage in such a project each and every year. Professional assignments change, personal circumstances intervene. One of my colleagues desperately wanted to participate but just didn’t have timetable that particular year that made participation easier. Another one didn’t have a class ready to deal with challenges participation was likely to pose. A third became quite sick at the very beginning of the research period and had to take an extended medical leave. Needless to say, just like in any group of students, there were those who set out with the best of intentions and didn’t even complete the process to conclusion. One of the most important conclusions of my research was this idea of the consultant as teacher and the importance of seeing the on-going organization and facilitation of professional development of teachers through the lens of classroom instruction and learning as it effects students in desks. This is one observation and conclusion that would not have been made, I am sure, if not for the fact that this was action-based research.
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The Effect of Authentic Learning Approach in Social Studies Teaching on the Academic Success

The Effect of Authentic Learning Approach in Social Studies Teaching on the Academic Success

The third important result of the research is that authentic learning activities increase academic success in all socioeconomic statuses in a similar way. That is, socioeconomic status does not have a statistically significant effect on the authentic learning environment. Newmann & Wehlage [35] in their research examined schools having different properties. As result of research it was obtained that authentic learning increases success in all schools at different socioeconomic status. The reason of encountering a similar result in both researches can be explained by taking part of students in this kind of study for the first time. It is thought that this research should be examined in other investigations. In addition, previous researches [11, 15, 17, 19, 21, 25, 28, 40] show that authentic learning activities influence students’ attitudes positively and increase their success. According to Dilmaç and Dilmaç [19], the most important difference in authentic learning activities is that they give effective results in both successful and unsuccessful students. According to this finding, it can be said that authentic learning activities are effective in increasing academic success in all students regardless of socioeconomic status difference.
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Authentic e-learning in higher education: Design principles for authentic learning environments and tasks

Authentic e-learning in higher education: Design principles for authentic learning environments and tasks

The importance of authentic activities or tasks in a learning environment was highlighted by Brown, Collins and Duguid (1989) who described them as ‘the ordinary practices of the culture’. Since then, others have focused on the central function of the task in an authentic learning environment as of paramount importance (e.g., Reeves & Reeves, 1997; Honebein, Duffy, & Fishman, 1993; Lebow & Wager, 1994; Stein, Isaacs, & Andrews, 2004; Chambers & Stacey, 1999). Our own recent research has focussed on the task as a critical component of authenticity in online learning environments, and we have explored online courses of study that use a single complex and sustained task to provide a meaningful context for student learning. While it is possible for such complex online learning environments to be designed within course management systems, it requires persistence and skill on the part of the teacher, and it remains a fact that few such environments exist within the course offerings of universities using course management systems.
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Authentic

Authentic

While adults write the majority of children’s and young adult books, there are also child and teen authors. Some notable examples include: The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (thirteen years old); Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (nineteen years old); The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (sixteen years old); Stevie by John Steptoe (sixteen years old); and The Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole (sixteen years old). Although the authorship belongs to teenagers, adults, in the form of editors, publishers, or reviewers, are still implicated in these works. As Peter Hunt (2011) points out, the possessive in “children’s literature” can be interpreted as by, for, of, or belonging to; therefore, debates about authentic children’s literature go beyond adult or child authorship.
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Online business simulations: authentic teamwork, learning  outcomes, and satisfaction

Online business simulations: authentic teamwork, learning outcomes, and satisfaction

assessment tasks. The co-creation and co-construction of knowledge requires interaction and interdependence between team members (Chaparro-Peláez, et al. 2013; Gros and Lopez 2016; Van den Bossche et al. 2006). Interaction, in this context, refers to the relationships established amongst team members and is seen as central to performance and satisfaction. Following Thibaut and Kelley (1959), interdependence means that group members must perceive some value in working together. This can be established through task or role interdependence, shared team goals and the creation of complementary roles for each team member (Palloff and Pratt 2005). We argue that many common team learning and assessment activities designed by business educators require limited interaction to successfully perform the task. The learning design often does not require task or role interdependence and students therefore perceive little value in working collaboratively to define and achieve common goals, co-create knowledge and share experiences. As a consequence, students respond by dividing the task amongst team members who work independently to complete component parts. This tendency for students to compartmentalize team projects limits opportunities for the development of higher order business skills.
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I-SLATE: designing a culturally relevant framework for authentic learning

I-SLATE: designing a culturally relevant framework for authentic learning

Sen (2005) identified ICT as a significant tool for the capture of Indigenous knowledge to facilitate both its preservation and access beyond person-to-person communication, for ex- ample, to document the traditional benefits and usage of medicinal plants. Some studies have suggested that Indigenous peoples are utilizing ICT to focus on the development of online communities and interfaces to tell stories and construct representations of self (i.e., Iseke-Barnes & Danard, 2007; McLoughlin, 1999) (From Bang, Marin, Faber & Suzukovich et al., 2013). Robbins (2006) demonstrates the importance of using ICT for contextual cul- tural learning in the South Pacific with 12 different indigenous groups (that are part of the University of the South Pacific). These educational tools include a virtual peer, wiki, self-test, digital scrapbook, and three-tier file structure. The concept of contextualization is discussed, which refers to the process of designing educational multimedia so that teachers and stu- dents can provide cultural context themselves. Learners and teachers create context in an ad-hoc way (for example, via a wiki), which requires their participation to work effectively. There are concerns around the preservation of Indigenous knowledge using ICT as often the contributors may not be aware of the cultural sensitivities related to the knowledge. Once the knowledge gathering process has commenced, it is then important to address the method or methods in which this Indigenous knowledge is organized and stored for the purpose of dissemination and retrieval within a culturally-relevant learning system (Sen, 2005). So what are some ways in which this knowledge may be used within such a learning system?
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Authentic online learning: Aligning learner needs, pedagogy and technology

Authentic online learning: Aligning learner needs, pedagogy and technology

Over the past few decades there has been a substantial swing among higher education practitioners towards a more constructivist approach to learning. Nevertheless, it is still evident that many instructivist models are widely used in both classroom and online learning environments. A key challenge for educators is linking learner needs, pedagogy and technology in order to construct more interactive, engaging and student-centred environments that promote 21st century skills and encourage self-directed learning. Existing research suggests that the use of real-life tasks supported by new technologies, together with access to the vast array of open educational resources on the Internet, have the potential to improve the quality of online learning. This article describes how an authentic online professional development course for higher education practitioners was designed and implemented using a learning management system (LMS) and an open companion website. It then discusses how the initial iteration of the course was evaluated and provides recommendations for improving the second iteration. Finally it describes how the second iteration was modified and implemented.
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I-DIGEST framework: towards authentic learning for indigenous learners

I-DIGEST framework: towards authentic learning for indigenous learners

With this in mind, the purpose of this study is to provide a framework that assists in allowing the incorporation of digital storytelling into learning curriculum with the goal to provide authentic and relevant learning opportunities to Indigenous learners. To ini- tiate this process, a review of the literature is first provided and research gaps identi- fied. The three main research questions evolving from the literature review and gaps analysis are presented and from these questions, we propose the I-DIGEST (InDIGEn- ous digital STorytelling) framework. The framework was instantiated by designing place-based tools for web-based and mobile devices to allow for the incorporation of digital storytelling into western Euro-centric curriculum by allowing the learners to cre- ate and share their own experiences and their relation to the curriculum. Mobile de- vices are included as part of the ICT approach as they allow learning to occur in the environment that the learner is most comfortable with, for example, on traditional ter- ritory. The framework and prototype tools were presented to Indigenous knowledge and curriculum experts who were then interviewed to provide feedback on the ap- proach, and to identify whether they aided in solving the research problem. As the philosophical foundation of this research stems from a transformative worldview, a qualitative research approach was used (Creswell, 2013; Mertens, 2012) in the form of one-on-one interviews with participants to provide feedback on the efficacy of the ap- proach in regards to solving the research problem. An analysis and discussion of the re- sults is then provided and lastly, a lens on possible future directions of research is proposed.
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OncoSim and OncoWiki: an authentic learning approach to teaching cancer genomics

OncoSim and OncoWiki: an authentic learning approach to teaching cancer genomics

Looking deeper into the data and exploring the stu- dents’ self-assessment of their learning against the mark- ing criteria concurs with the analysis of academic standing, in that the students who undertook the Onco- Sim project reported a higher level of achievement across all the categories assessed, except for ‘Independ- ence’. Their high scores in ‘Data Analysis’ and ‘Use of Literature’ stand out, something that is corroborated again in the interview analysis, which includes several references to the high level of research required in the project. The lower self-reports of ‘Independence’ are somewhat surprising given the higher scores for the other response categories, especially given that this au- thentic learning approach was designed to encourage such independence. There is some further suggestion of issues regarding independent learning in the thematic analysis. Under the ‘Challenges Individually Defined’ theme, for example, there are potentially contradictory codes such as “Too much freedom”, “Lack of independ- ence” and “More guidance required”. Given this variance in response it is perhaps likely that some students who required more support than others have skewed the re- sults. It should also be noted that the self-assessment scores are not low per se, with all the OncoSim students reporting that they felt they were working independently either ‘Very Well’ or ‘Moderately Well’, the scores are however just slightly lower than those of the overall co- hort. Possibly the highly structured nature of the Onco- Sim approach, which was a particularly strong theme that stood out from the thematic analysis of interview data, led students to consider themselves less independ- ent than they actually were in practice. It is an issue though that requires future monitoring.
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Authentic Learning Experience:  Subtle But Useful Ways To Provide It In Practice

Authentic Learning Experience: Subtle But Useful Ways To Provide It In Practice

ully implementing an authentic education framework, as conceptualised in (Watagodakumbura, 2012), requires the attention of many stakeholders, including governments and major educational organisations. Without some major changes at higher levels, the benefits of such a framework may not be able be realised completely. However, within the broad definition of authentic education, individual educational practitioners can develop and use certain methodologies to provide learners with an authentic learning experience. In this paper, the author first brief on the essence of authentic education and then put forth some methodologies he has used in the past, reflectively, promoting this conceptualised view. We also highlight in the paper how these practices help getting the focus of visual spatial, or gifted, learners (Silverman, 1998, 2002), who are more vulnerable in traditional environments, to the teaching-learning context.
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Authentic Learning   Does it Improve Pass Rates and Student Satisfaction?

Authentic Learning Does it Improve Pass Rates and Student Satisfaction?

Mini case studies were also used in seminars, covering a variety of business situations requiring finance. These described the type of business, the management structure and the reasons they required finance. They incorporated pictures and comments from managers about the scenario to tie into different learning styles as indicated in the work of Fleming (2001) discussed earlier. These provide a simple summary, a variety of scenarios and pictures of the business and helps the students to become more confident as it shows how a little bit of knowledge can help them provide suitable advice on sources of finance for businesses whereas the traditional exercises can leave the students overwhelmed and struggling to understand the technical material. This then fits into the element of authentic tasks where activities need to be built up into a major task as these mini scenarios are practice for the skills required in the decision-making exercise required in the task described in the paragraph above.
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Authentic Learning in the Kitchen and Garden:
Synthesising planning, practice and pedagogy

Authentic Learning in the Kitchen and Garden: Synthesising planning, practice and pedagogy

life context, particularly when multiple sources of evidence are used and the boundaries between the phenomena and context are poorly defined. Although the boundaries between the phenomena and the context may be poorly defined as in the kitchen garden, the case must have some boundaries (Merriam 1998; Stake 1995). Three main types of case studies have been defined by Stake according to the case study goal: intrinsic, instrumental and collective (Crowe et al. 2001; Stake 1995. A case study undertaken to learn about a unique phenomenon is labelled an intrinsic case study. Case studies that aim for a broad understanding of a phenomena or problem are labelled instrumental case studies. Where multiple case studies are examined, to gain a broader understanding of the phenomena or problem, they are called “collective” case studies (Crowe et al. 2001; Stake 1995). The advantage of developing more than one case study lies in the ability to make comparisons or to check whether themes or the theory are replicated. The reader is left to judge whether the case study “resonates” with their experience (Stake 1995). A case study approach is an appropriate “holistic” way to frame the research. It is an appropriate method for this research because the natural, real-life contexts of the kitchen and the garden were central to the research. The two embedded cases were bounded; they explored the learning experience of clusters of students at three grade levels within two units of work at one semi-rural primary school, and the role the teachers’ planning, pedagogy and practices shaped the learning outcomes of the two units. Although the units of work were of different durations (the kitchen garden unit was timetabled throughout the year and the Pantry Plunder Unit only went for ten weeks in length), the two cases used broadly comparable multiple data sources for evidence (Figure 3.1). While the prior knowledge of the researcher built up by previous experience teaching the Kitchen Garden Unit, made grounded theory inappropriate, it may be beneficial in case study research and contribute to insights and understanding of the case. Stake created a checklist of criteria to be considered when assessing the quality of a case study report (Appendix C).
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A Study of Developing an Attitude Scale Towards Authentic Learning Environments and Evaluation

A Study of Developing an Attitude Scale Towards Authentic Learning Environments and Evaluation

17 Authentic assessment and evaluation is not within my area of interest. 4.45 .909 .585* .636 The scale which was identified as two-factor scale in the exploratory factor analysis was also applied to confirmatory factor analysis. In the confirmatory factor analysis, goodness of fit index (GFI), adjusted goodness of fit index (AGFI), normed fit index (NFI), standardized root-mean-square residual (SRMR), and root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) and comparative fit index (CFI) were considered. Acceptable threshold values of the commonly used fit indexes and fit values of the proposed model are shown in Table 8 (Schermelleh-Engel & Moosbrugger, 2003; Erdoğan, Bayram, and Deniz, 2007).
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'Authentic' arts teaching and learning: an investigation into the practices of Australian home educators

'Authentic' arts teaching and learning: an investigation into the practices of Australian home educators

Given the rapid growth of the home education sector both in Australia and around the world, and the dearth of research into this domain, the project was considered both valuable and timely. The impetus for conducting the investigation further arose from reflections on issues experienced in our own professional and personal practice. Both authors are tertiary arts educators who are passionate about introducing pre-service teachers to the concept of authentic arts teaching and learning. We also share a research interest in alternative educational contexts (Burke, 2016; Riddle & Cleaver, 2017). In addition to our formal institutional work, one of us (Katie) spent 8 years home educating her two sons. She thus came to a first-hand awareness of the issues and demands of home education, particularly in respect to arts education. Katie found that facilitating her children’s arts learning was challenging, including catering to the difference in both her children’s ages and interests, limited access to resources, and time pressures created by the demands of teaching across all subject areas. As an arts educator who deeply valued the arts in education, she carried a sense of ineffectiveness in the facilitation of arts learning with her children, raising the question: “If, as an experienced and trained arts teacher, I feel confronted by a range of difficult issues, how do home educating parents without arts training approach the teaching of the arts?”
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Developing Scientific Citizenship Identity Using Mobile Learning and Authentic Practice

Developing Scientific Citizenship Identity Using Mobile Learning and Authentic Practice

The Next Generation Science Standards also includes investigation into global climate change. This concept, however, may seem like an abstract idea to high school students (Chang & Pascua, 2015). One of the benefits of many citizen science projects is that they afford individuals an up-close look at climate change in their own geographical area (Yoho & Vanmali, 2016). Observing climate change impacts in an individual’s community may be more impactful than learning about climate change with traditional classroom-based laboratory experiences. As students explore nature, collect data on climate change and participate in scientific citizenship, they are at some level making connections about humankind’s impact on the environment. The more frequently they participate in these practices, the more likely they are to form strong opinions, beliefs and even identities. Individuals who develop identities as community members are more likely to contribute to the community in which they identify (Handley, Sturdy, Fincham & Clark, 2006).
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Walking the talk: authentic teaching for social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL)

Walking the talk: authentic teaching for social and emotional aspects of learning (SEAL)

The effectiveness of social and emotional development in raising school achievement was first evaluated by the National Strategies in a Behaviour and Attendance Pilot in 2003 (Hallam, Rhamie and Shaw, 2006). The SEBS (Social, Emotional and Behavioural Skills) pilot 2 was then developed by the National Strategies into the full and whole school Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) 3 in 2007. Reported benefits of the SEAL approach include: improved behaviour, attendance and attainment, and ways to resolve school improvement, staff development, leadership and family and community relations issues (Banerjee for the National Strategies, 2010:3-5). However, there are critics of the approach, as shown by Craig’s (2007:3) comments that ‘In short, we fear SEAL is encouraging a large-scale psychological experiment on young people, which will not just waste time and resources but could actually back-fire and unwittingly undermine people’s well-being in the longer-term’. In 2007 Craig, who wrote for the Centre for Confidence (a charitable organisation whose focus is the development of confidence and well-being 4 ) was a lone voice of critique in the
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Situated learning in virtual simulations: Researching the authentic dimension in virtual worlds

Situated learning in virtual simulations: Researching the authentic dimension in virtual worlds

investigations and risk assessments for students, and so these subjects have traditionally been taught theoretically in higher education. They are also sometimes supported by class-based role play and visits to industrial or commercial organisations. Simulations of accidents have been used to help students to learn about investigating accidents [e.g. Woodcock et al, (2005)], although these simulations have tended to be largely documentary in nature. Other approaches to teaching accident investigation and risk assessment have included computerised simulations of chemical or physical interactions [Brambilla et al, (2008) for example], but have still not enabled realistic participation in contextual scenarios. However, the advent of virtual worlds has now enabled simulations of accident investigations and risk assessments that include activities such as interviewing witnesses, inspecting premises and assessing risks in a realistic manner. This offers the opportunity for students to experience a form of situated learning previously unavailable to them, in which they can integrate and operationalize theory and practice in realistic settings. Carrying out these activities in virtual worlds can also inform advances in the development and deployment of curricula in risk and accident studies.
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E Learning for legal professionals in the ‘virtual’ workplace: the use of authentic activities

E Learning for legal professionals in the ‘virtual’ workplace: the use of authentic activities

The District of Penfield has now been extended to create a number of virtual solicitors’ offices. Students studying on professional legal practice modules will become “employees” of the fictional firm of Firth Street Solicitors. Upon accessing the Penfield system, a student arrives at the virtual reception area for Firth Street. The firm is divided into a series of departments, each specialising in a particular area of law. The student enters the department in which they are working at that time and is greeted with a number of clients’ cases, representing the case file system of a solicitor’s office. It is anticipated to have several client’s cases “live” in each department at any particular time to add further realism to the environment – on a particular day, a trainee solicitor would, in practice, work on a number of client’s files.
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