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Customized BGP Route Selection Using BGP/MPLS VPNs

Customized BGP Route Selection Using BGP/MPLS VPNs

Customized BGP Route Selection Using BGP/MPLS VPNs.. Cisco Systems, Routing Symposium.[r]

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BGP route monitoring. Mar, 25, 2008 Matsuzaki maz Yoshinobu

BGP route monitoring. Mar, 25, 2008 Matsuzaki maz Yoshinobu

• BGP prefix hijack is a serious security issue in the internet, and these events have been widely reported.. • There are several proposals of securing BGP, but it needs time to deplo[r]

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RPKI  vs  ROVER:  Comparing  the  Risks  of  BGP  Security  Solutions

RPKI vs ROVER: Comparing the Risks of BGP Security Solutions

Blackholing BGP routes. The assumed routing policies imply that a BGP route can be black- holed if the attacker can change its validity state from valid to invalid. [2] argues that an on-path RPKI attacker can do just that, by disrupting the delivery of ROAs from an RPKI repository dur- ing an ISP’s daily update of its local cache. If an on-path attacker corrupts a single bit in the ROA for 8.8.8.0/24 in Figure 2 during a bulk download of ROAs from the RPKI, then the corresponding route for 8.8.8.0/24 becomes invalid if there is a covering ROA authorizing AS 3356 to originate 8.0.0.0/8. Thus, the 8.8.8.0/24 route would no longer be reachable. (On the other hand, the RPKI uses manifests to indicate which objects it stores. Disrupting delivery of objects or manifests raises alarms at routers, making this attack more transparent; see discussion in [5].) With ROVER, how- ever, the route would still be reachable; if an attacker disrupts the response to a ROVER query for 8.8.8.0/24, causing it to fail DNSSEC validation, then routes for 8.8.8.0/24 become unknown. This is a crucial manifestation of ROVER’s “fail-safe” approach.
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Source Address Validation Implementation by Using BGP

Source Address Validation Implementation by Using BGP

Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, SRM University, Ramapuram Campus, Chennai, India Abstract: The persistent evolution of the Internet continues to transform the way individuals, as well as businesses, educational institutions, and government organizations access, share, and communicate information. Convergence of digital voice, video, and data, is further consolidating the Internet as a critical infrastructure. One of the main routing protocols in the Internet and current de facto standard is the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). Presently ubiquitous, BGP is a critical component of the exponentially growing network of routers that constitutes our contemporary Internet. Carrier networks, as well as most large enterprise organizations with multiple links to one or more service providers use BGP. The Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) attack is a serious threat to the legitimate use of the Internet. Prevention mechanisms are thwarted by the ability of attackers to forge or spoof the source addresses in IP packets. By employing IP spoofing, attackers can evade detection and put a substantial burden on the destination network for policing attack packets. In this paper, we propose Source Address Validation Implementation (SAVI) that can mitigate the level of IP spoofing on the Internet. A key feature of our scheme is that it does not require global routing information. SAVIs are constructed from the information implicit in Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) route updates and are deployed in network border routers. We establish the conditions under which the SAVI correctly works in that it does not discard packets with valid source addresses. Based on extensive simulation studies, we show that, even with partial deployment on the Internet, SAVIs can proactively limit the spoofing capability of attackers. In addition, they can help localize the origin of an attack packet to a small number of candidate networks.
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Measuring I-BGP Updates and Their Impact on Traffic

Measuring I-BGP Updates and Their Impact on Traffic

We use the Python Routeing Toolkit (PyRT) 1 to collect the I-BGP messages from the backbone. PyRT includes a BGP listener that establishes a peering session with a BGP-router and receives updates from it. The listener is passive because it does not send any updates to its peer. In this work, the PyRT listener was installed on a Linux PC in one of the backbone POPs to collect updates from a BGP route reflector (RR) in the backbone. Our listener appears as a route-reflector client to this particular router. Each up- date received is prepended with a header in MRTD 2 format (extended to include time-stamp of micro-second granu- larity) and then dumped to a file. The results reported in this paper is based on continuous data collected between November 2001 and April 2002. For the sake of compar- ison, we used separate instantiations of PyRT listener to also collect External BGP (E-BGP) updates from two other backbone routers in our network during the same period.
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Graceful BGP session shutdown

Graceful BGP session shutdown

On the g-shut initiator, upon maintenance time, it is required to: o apply an outbound BGP route policy on the maintained eBGP session to tag the paths propagated over the session with the g-shut community. This will trigger the BGP implementation to re- advertise all active routes previously advertised, and tag them with the g-shut community.

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Loop-freeness in multipath BGP through propagating the longest path

Loop-freeness in multipath BGP through propagating the longest path

Multipath inter-domain routing is a powerful tool that results in substantial advantages, including increased network capacity, enhanced redundancy and better response to congestion events. We have shown that, contrary to the limitations accepted in common practice, it is possible to accept multiple paths for forwarding packets without risk of routing loops. This can be achieved without changes in the BGP semantics and only requiring local changes in the BGP route processing mechanism. This results in a powerful deployment model based in the incentive vector where the party that deploys the mechanism is the party that gets the benefits. There is no need for other ASes to also implement multipath BGP.
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Structural analysis of the biliary glycoprotein (BGP) binding site

Structural analysis of the biliary glycoprotein (BGP) binding site

biological relevance, the additional b inding activity of the selectins to various su lp h ated carbohydrates suggests the possibility of alternative carbohydrate ligands (Green et al, 1992; N elson et al, 1993). So far, the m ost potent naturally occurring carbohydrate ligands for both L- and E- selectin are Le^ and Le^ derivatives, in w hich the hydroxyl gro u p on carbon 3 of galactose is su lp h a te d ra th e r th en sialy lated . W hen im m obilised in the form of glycolipids, 3'-sulphated Le^ an d Le^ w ere show n to su p p o rt direct binding of all 3 selectins at least as strongly as sLe%/& (Green et al, 1992; Yuen et al, 1992; B randley et al, 1993). A diag ram of the sLex m olecule is show n in Fig. 1.4. A lth o u g h these oligosaccharides are often p a rt of the glycosylation patterns of proteins, only a few biological ligands for selectins have been identified. These are GlyCAM-1, a lectin-like receptor glycoprotein, (Imai et al, 1991; Lasky et al, 1992), CD34 (Imai et al, 1991; Baum hueter et al, 1994), the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) (Sako et al, 1993; N orgard et al, 1993) and MAdCAM -1, a m ucosal vascular adressin (Berg et al, 1993). Ail have extracellular dom ains w ith a m ucin organisation, i.e. s e r in e /threonine rich regions th at are densely su b stitu ted w ith O -linked carbohydrate chains (Shimizu and Shaw, 1993). A num ber of other potential ligands, including BGP, have been described (Aruffo et al, 1991; N o rg ard et al, 1993; Stocks et al, 1993; W alcheck et al, 1993; Lenter et al, 1994;), b u t for these fu rth er studies are necessary to establish w h eth er they serve as biological ligands for the selectins or if they are m erely cross-reactive as a result of their fortuitous expression of carbohydrate motifs. The three- dim ensional structure of the lectin and EGF dom ains of E-selectin has been resolved (Graves et al, 1994), b u t so far a co-crystal w ith a b o u n d oligosaccharide is not yet available.
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Impact of BGP filtering on Inter-Domain Routing Policies

Impact of BGP filtering on Inter-Domain Routing Policies

Once it has been assessed that the local configuration is correct, the operator should check if the unexpected flow arose due to filtering of BGP paths for more-specific prefixes by neighboring ASes. This can be performed in two steps. First, the operator should check whether the neighboring AS originating the unexpected flow is forwarding traffic using a less-specific prefix that is announced to it by the affected network. The second step is to try to infer the reason why the neighboring AS does not use the more- specific path for forwarding, i.e., finding why the more-specific prefix was filtered. We note that due to the distributed nature and restricted visibility of the steering of BGP policies, this second step is deemed to not identify the origin of the problem with guaranteed accuracy.
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NAT Using Source Routing through BGP Gateways

NAT Using Source Routing through BGP Gateways

The Campus network at Brno University of Technology (BUT) is divided into several areas. There are a few private networks (RFC1918) in most of them. Source routing technology at a border router is a way to connect these networks to the Internet via a central NAT device. The remaining problem is how to connect a private IP- addressed network to the border router. There are several possible solutions. The easiest way is to route the private networks on the topologically nearest router using standard routing protocols such as Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), Internal Border Gateway Protocol (iBGP), static.
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Bilingualism and the single route/dual route debate

Bilingualism and the single route/dual route debate

The debate between single and dual route accounts of cognitive processes has been generated predominantly by the application of connectionist modeling techniques to two areas of psycholinguistics. This paper draws an analogy between this debate and bilingual language processing. A prominent question within bilingual word recognition is whether the bilingual has functionally separate lexicons for each language, or a single system able to recognize the words in both languages. Empirical evidence has been taken to support a model which includes two separate lexicons working in parallel (Smith, 1991; Gerard and Scarborough, 1989). However, a range of interference effects has been found between the bilingual’s two sets of lexical knowledge (Thomas, 1997a). Connectionist models have been put forward which suggest that a single representational resource may deal with these data, so long as words are coded according to language membership (Thomas, 1997a, 1997b, Dijkstra and van Heuven, 1998). This paper discusses the criteria which might be used to differentiate single route and dual route models. An empirical study is introduced to address one of these criteria, parallel access, with regard to bilingual word recognition. The study fails to find support for the dual route model.
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Route Building Software ROUTE BUILDER

Route Building Software ROUTE BUILDER

Ministry of Land, Infrastructures and Transport are actively developing verification trials in order to meet the projectʼs pur- pose of “conducting studies for creating an environment in which “anyone, anywhere and anytime” can access informa- tion on ʻmovement routes,ʼ ʻmeans of trafficʼ and ʻdestinationsʼ that is required for participation in or working in the commu- nity.” NEC also contributes to this project by actively partici- pating in the verification trials being held in Kobe by using the simple route compilation capability of the ROUTE BUILDER software.
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Application Note: Securing BGP on Juniper Routers

Application Note: Securing BGP on Juniper Routers

Each of the policies can in turn be applied consecutively to our BGP peers in a chain-like fashion. Our policies were designed with this thought in mind by not issuing a “accept” or “reject” statements for the catchall rules. For our EBGP peers we use a chain of four policy statements to filter out all bogons, to remove private ASN and all small prefix advertisements, and to dampen routes. The relevant BGP configuration statement has been highlighted below:

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Approaches to Avoid Routing Disruptions with BGP in Autonomous System

Approaches to Avoid Routing Disruptions with BGP in Autonomous System

ABSTRACT: BGP is one of the most important protocols of the Internet, is a standard exterior gateway protocol to exchange routing information between different Autonomous Systems. BGP is having the techniques to avoid looping problems in Traffic Engineering. This loop free mechanism can only be implemented with the Full mesh connectivity, in which all routers must be connected to every other router. However, Full mesh connectivity is not an appropriate solution particularly in large networks where resources are limited. Two approaches were introduced in this paper as alternates to full connectivity topology in IPv4, those are Confederation and Route Reflector. In this paper, the performances of two methods were discussed In GNS3 software based on the CPU utilization and runtime to compute load average and these results were plotted in graph. Based on these results conclusions were derived, which methodology is preferable based on traffic circumstances.
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It bends but would it break?:topological analysis of BGP infrastructures in Europe

It bends but would it break?:topological analysis of BGP infrastructures in Europe

This paper presents the results of an analysis of the BGP infrastructure in Europe in the light of various attack vectors. These results identify serious security issues regarding the topology of a critical infrastructure, and the shortcomings of available information sources are major limiting factors that require deep further research. First and foremost, the BGP map in section 5 the whole analysis relies upon has several limitations, already discussed. Its limited scope in space hides important dependencies of the different backbones between themselves and towards the rest of the worldwide BGP system. However, this partial data has revealed regular topological patterns that should be considered relevant for at least portions of the global system. Future work will focus on trying to complement existing data with a more exhaustive model of the infrastructure, drawing from dif- ferent data sources. Several research initiatives have been recently started in this direction [85], [88], [89].
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3. Dataset size reduction. 4. BGP-4 patterns. Detection of inter-domain routing problems using BGP-4 protocol patterns P.A.

3. Dataset size reduction. 4. BGP-4 patterns. Detection of inter-domain routing problems using BGP-4 protocol patterns P.A.

The global analysis function allows to detect properties of all occurrences of outliers of specific kind (end-to-end delay, packet loss) corresponding to a given threshold in their spec[r]

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ASSEMBLER: A BGP-compatible Multipath Inter-Domain Routing Protocol

ASSEMBLER: A BGP-compatible Multipath Inter-Domain Routing Protocol

The paths in the multipath set are passed to the RIB in order to be installed in the data plane (through the FIB). Afterwards, they undergo the export policy. The export policy (egress filtering) generates the same advertisement for all the peering sessions that the router maintains. Therefore, a neighbor is either advertised or the export policy discards the whole multipath set as soon as one path matches a filter. Otherwise, different paths could be discarded for each peering session, generating different advertisements. Adding neighbor- specific announcements [21] is out of the scope of this paper. Next to the egress filtering block, there is the new block called Assembling, which is responsible for generating the advertisements. The assembling algorithm ensures backwards compatibility, creating special BGP announcements that can be processed by legacy routers, do not incur in penalization when competing with regular unipath BGP announcements in the selection process and allow multipath capable ASes to use several paths concurrently. The algorithm takes its name from the way of constructing those announcements that resembles an assembling of pieces (e.g. AS NUMBERs in this case). The announcement is an aggregated version of the multipath set that cannot be distinguished from the outcome of a regular prefix aggregation. See Section III-B for details about the assembling procedure for external (i.e. eASSM) and internal (i.e. iASSM) ASSEMBLER peering sessions (eASSM/iASSM are also used to refer BGP peering sessions unless stated otherwise). Finally, the advertisement containing the assembled path is propagated to the neighbor routers.
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Loop-freeness in multipath BGP through propagating the longest path

Loop-freeness in multipath BGP through propagating the longest path

BGP has two modes of operation: external (eBGP) and internal (iBGP). Sessions towards BGP neighbors in autonomous systems other than the local AS are eBGP sessions; sessions towards BGP neighbors in the same autonomous system are iBGP sessions. The rules for eBGP and iBGP differ slightly. For instance, in eBGP the NEXT_HOP attribute is normally updated, but in iBGP the NEXT_HOP attribute is communicated as-is. Also, all BGP routers in an AS must maintain iBGP sessions with each other in a full mesh so paths are always propagated over iBGP directly from the router that learns them over eBGP towards all other routers in the AS. This is necessary to avoid loops because the AS_PATH attribute cannot prevent iBGP loops as the AS_PATH is not updated when a path is propagated over iBGP.
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NSX and BGP EVPN The Fox meets the Hound Part Two

NSX and BGP EVPN The Fox meets the Hound Part Two

The first topic that I have left pending regards the contextualization in BGP EVPN of this article’s opening line: “IPs stay end-to-end, MACs change hop-by- hop”. In the BGP EVPN’s symmetric and the asymmetric IRB models (that I have already introduced in Part 1), the forwarding of the routed packets is still coherent with the above law, only with the added complexity of tunneling. Indeed, a very important question arise about the routing packets to be tunneled via VXLAN:

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DAY ONE: DEPLOYING BGP RIB SHARDING AND UPDATE THREADING

DAY ONE: DEPLOYING BGP RIB SHARDING AND UPDATE THREADING

Route Reflectors (RR) help simplify iBGP deployments by reducing the number of BGP peering sessions required. By acting as an intermediary between BGP speak- ers, they facilitate BGP learning and advertisement in a scalable and efficient man- ner in networks having a large number of iBGP nodes. RRs are a perfect use case for deploying BRS/UT, all other considerations being met. RRs typically peer with a large number of BGP clients and handle very high route scale, typically in the order of several million to tens of millions of routes. The RIB:FIB ratio is quite high in most RR deployments. Most RRs are deployed in an out-of-band manner where they do not participate in packet forwarding, which makes FIB download performance less relevant for them.
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