Black Women's Activism

Top PDF Black Women's Activism:

Examining the activism experiences of Black women graduate students

Examining the activism experiences of Black women graduate students

As a theoretical framework, Black feminist thought serves as a powerful tool of critique that can be used to examine how institutions perpetuate systems of inequity which influence the social standings of Black women and issues of marginality in varying contexts (Collins, 2009). The experiences of Black women graduate students in institutions of higher education positions them as "outsiders-within," or individuals that participate within the academy, yet are still considered outsiders because of their social identities which make them invisible. Existing on the margins, therefore, gives these women a unique perspective in higher education. Applying the Black feminist framework to issues of marginality is necessary for not only asking the right questions but also for finding solutions that are culturally relevant and that account for the valid knowledge that Black women graduate students possess regarding their activism. Understanding the complexity of Black women's activism, however, requires an acknowledgment of the various ways in which Black women have engaged in social protest (Collins, 2009). Collins stated the assessment of Black women's activism should focus less on "public, official, visible political activity even though unofficial, private, and seemingly invisible spheres of social life and organization may be equally important" (p. 217). Her conceptualization of Black women's activism consisted of two domains: struggles for group survival and institutional transformation.
Show more

200 Read more

Black Women and Digital Resistance: The Impact of Social Media on Racial Justice Activism in Brazil and the United States

Black Women and Digital Resistance: The Impact of Social Media on Racial Justice Activism in Brazil and the United States

In this chapter, I argue that the prevailing “post-racial” perspective is being disrupted in Austin, just as in the rest of the United States, as race and racism are brought to the forefront of conversation in almost all spaces, but especially within the digital realm. The proliferation of Black women’s activism in particular has allowed race to permeate Austin’s politics, leading us to conclude that any discussion of the racialized politics of space in Austin must necessarily include the aspect of gender. From police brutality to gentrification, Black women—many informed by a revolutionary praxis—are spearheading resistance efforts to address some of the most pressing issues within the city, and social media is an essential, yet also detrimental, part of these organizing efforts. Here, Black women are reimagining, rather than reforming, the oppressive systems that impact their lives on a daily basis. The same is true for Porto Alegre. In this way, the narratives in the following pages about U.S. Black women’s activism should be read alongside, rather than separate from, my ethnographic chapter on Brazilian women’s activism.
Show more

65 Read more

Race, Education and #BlackLivesMatter: How Social Media Activism Shapes the Educational Experiences of Black College-Age Women

Race, Education and #BlackLivesMatter: How Social Media Activism Shapes the Educational Experiences of Black College-Age Women

For Evelyn, who attends a predominantly white and Asian/Asian American university on the West Coast, invisibility is a form of discrimination she regularly experiences offline. She says, “I just feel kind of invisible. [White students] will literally walk past me or if we’re in a group they literally won’t talk to me unless I talk first.” Although her race and gender render her invisible in offline campus spaces, Evelyn feels seen and heard online. She notes, “I think there’s a need for social media spaces ... I feel supported there. When I go to other spaces on campus or in class I feel almost invisible, like I can’t talk about anything that’s not surface level or class related. I feel like the [white supremacy rally] that happened in Virginia or [the Black Lives Matter protests] in Ferguson, if I was to be in class or the residence hall when those events happened I would have to pretend I’m not upset and not talk about it. On social media, that’s not the case.” Imani had a similar experience at her university. Like Evelyn, Imani didn’t experience overt racism but was rather made to feel invisible on campus. She states, “people don’t really bother me. But they don’t really talk to me or speak to me, and that’s because I’ve gotten a lot of ‘you look mean,’ or ‘you look mad’ and that’s something that a lot of black women get on
Show more

156 Read more

We Were Asked to Deny a Part of Ourselves —and We Did: How Black Women Doctoral Students Experience Their Intersectional Identities in Race-Based Activism

We Were Asked to Deny a Part of Ourselves —and We Did: How Black Women Doctoral Students Experience Their Intersectional Identities in Race-Based Activism

Each woman’s profile chronicled the place each of the women were at in their individual journeys of identity, intersectionality, and the complex dynamics present in their relationship to family, community, and education. The murky jumbled spaces each person navigated colors the background of their activist identity. I found myself constantly challenged while speaking with all of the participants. Often I disagreed with the ideas that some of the woman shared and wanted to push back on their philosophies and political ideologies. In many ways my desire to argue with some woman was about holding on to specific ideas about how best to think about and solve the issues plaguing Black women. When a woman expressed opinions that I deemed connected to traditional ideas that regurgitated patriarchy and revered Black women as secondary and submissive, I struggled to see how these thoughts could be connected to activism. Still, I felt a since of reverence for each woman who I spoke with. During our conversation, I tried my best to honor their stories and listen and not indicate whether I agreed with them or not. I understood that though their story may not have been my own, there were many Black women who would resonate with their words. Instead I sought clarity and understanding of their views and provided space and time for the woman to just be. As our conversation continued I began to recognize that each woman’s ideas were perhaps connected to their age, life experiences, and their
Show more

189 Read more

The Duality of the Black Student Activist:  A Decolonial Approach to Reframing Student Activism as Student Leadership

The Duality of the Black Student Activist: A Decolonial Approach to Reframing Student Activism as Student Leadership

Attending college during 2015 was extremely powerful moment for solidifying my personal identity and the beginning stages of identifying my purpose. My mother was very involved in LGBTQA+ movements in the 80’s and 90’s, my grandfather was a part of the Young Lords in the 60’s and 70’s in New York City and my great grandmother was in the first class of Black women to graduate from Cornell Universities nursing program. I was raised on action and community building and I found opportunities in college to fight against injustices happening in society. I struggled with my own self-identity and belonging in my ethnic and racial identities my entire life, and this point I became very conscious and active in the Black community. My experience as an involved college student is completely intertwined with finding myself in the mix of student protest on campus, meetings with the president about racial discrimination on campus and racial slurs posted on my front door. I had complete support as a student leader, but I always felt the effects of tokenism in this new age of “Diversity and Inclusion”. I felt more empowered and ignited as a student activism than I did as an orientation leader or athlete. I felt more exhausted trying to be the change I wanted to see on my campus, but the doubt and denial of the core work that needed to be was very stressful for me as an undergraduate student. Student activism has shaped and moved higher education, communities and society to be more
Show more

88 Read more

"The Forgotten Victims" How Racialized Gender Stereotypes Lead to Police Violence Against Black Women and Girls: Incorporating an Analysis of Police Violence Into Feminist Jurisprudence and Community Activism

"The Forgotten Victims" How Racialized Gender Stereotypes Lead to Police Violence Against Black Women and Girls: Incorporating an Analysis of Police Violence Into Feminist Jurisprudence and Community Activism

Officer Casebolt’s actions administered dominance and control over a Black girl’s body; something a white girl would never endure. Denied autonomy of their bodies, Black girls and Black women experience sexual harassment and sexual violence differently, sometimes through the simple act of an officer sitting on a 15-year-old girl. Officer Casebolt stripped Becton of her dignity by brutalizing her while she was in a bathing suit, surrounded by hundreds of people. He reduced Becton to the Jezebel and Sapphire stereotypes and failed to recognize her humanity and innocence as a 15-year-old girl. Furthering the culture of impunity and erasure of Black female experiences, Officer Casebolt did not face any criminal charges, nor did he face expulsion from the police force. 230 Although Officer Casebolt
Show more

53 Read more

Life story narratives of Ethiopian women activists: the journey to feminist activism

Life story narratives of Ethiopian women activists: the journey to feminist activism

case opting for customary marriage, or like the pioneers, engaging in a struggle for the social, political and economic empowerment of women. The suggestion is that the pioneers, and more particularly Senedu Gebru, were not merely social change agents but, rather, feminist pioneers in their endeavour. Hence, women like Senedu did not come to the position they held due only to their social background, imperial support and/or western education but also to the values inherent in the socialization process and their lived experience. When we looked at Senedu’s upbringing, for example, we saw that her gender did not prevent her father Kentiba Gebru from taking her with him to all sorts of public events. Hence, it was not exceptional for a father of some nobility to take his daughter to the imperial palace and other places. Moreover, he sent both his daughters, Senedu and Yewubdar, to Switzerland, and not his sons, which gives some indication of the status of elite Ethiopian women but also reflects some form of emancipation by itself. Contrary to popular belief, female students were not sent abroad because there were no schools for women in Ethiopia, but, rather, because at the time there were no schools at all for further education, either for male or female students. Moreover, the fact that, while Senedu chose to become a public figure, her sister chose to go another way – as a religious person living to this day in Israel – shows that they were allowed to be individuals who could take bold decisions on their own. This is also illustrated by Senedu’s choice to join the Black Lion resistance movement, when she could have chosen to go abroad and join her husband.
Show more

350 Read more

Black Lives Matter: An analysis of Social-Political Activism in Social Media

Black Lives Matter: An analysis of Social-Political Activism in Social Media

interpersonal relationships, including group participation and involvement. BLM was founded by Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi after they had learned that Martin’s killer was not going to be held accountable for murdering a child. Garza went to her Facebook and posted a love letter to the black community and her black family. She ended her post with “Black people. I love you. I love us. Our lives matter.” (Day, 2015). Her post was a call to action for people of color to no longer stand idle while men and women such as Mike Brown, Eric Garner, Rekia Boyd, Sean Bell, and Amadou Diallow are victims of police brutality (Taylor 2016, p. 350). Cullors shared Garza’s post with her friends, with the use of #BlackLivesMatter and they contacted organizer Tometi to begin the “Black Lives Matter Movement” (Day, 2015). Through direct action such as protests, die-ins, and university student movements, BLM promotes and affirms the following:
Show more

56 Read more

Black Activism: John Updike

Black Activism: John Updike

The title of Rabbit Redux means “Rabbit led back”. Harry Angstrom is now thirty six. He has grown politically conservative. He lives with his wife, Janice, and thirteen-year old son, Nelson, in Penn Villas, the new housing development on the outskirts of Brewer, Pennsylvania. His life is bounded by his Job as a linotype at the Verity Press and his boring routine at home. His occupation is a passé and like himself, he is a victim of technological change. A linotypes’ concern rests entirely with space and with the contrast between black and white, as well as with language. We are told that “All around him Rabbit hears language collapsing.” He moves only when he takes the bus or drives in to Brewer for a tasteless dinner with Janice and Nelson. Finding him in the first yard, c white American liberalism leaves every one panicky and insecure, women’s liberation movement brings disaster to the material relationships, protests against the Vietnam War divide the whole American community into factions. Besides, the rise of an activist young generation, totally unaware of the old religious and social values and completely incapable of creating new, adds more confusion to chaos. Therefore, America’s upward movement into the empty space coincides with her downward movement into moral and spiritual void. In Rabbit Redux, Updike creates the atmosphere of social anarchy in a truly realistic manner through TV news. Updike sets all these adverse social forces of the day active in Harry’s house to consider the burning problem: how does one survive us an individual in to-day’s America. Harry is bewildered by the changes that loom beyond his control. The moon space flight alters his universe, the blacks alter his society and the adultery in society alters his home. While Janice dreams of her lover, “the papers and television are full of the colored riots in New York, snipers wounding innocent firemen, simple men on the street, what is the coming to? The astronauts are nearing the moon’s gravitational influence.” 1 His
Show more

5 Read more

Declaring the activism of black feminist theory

Declaring the activism of black feminist theory

‘This convention idea has grown out of Black, Asian and Minoriticised ethnic women voicing their desire and need for mutual nourishment, inspiration and exchange of intelligence, support and challenge. We want to be able to talk about putting ideas in action; we want to seek the minds of others on really complex, uncomfortable issues we are grappling with. Wouldn’t it be wonderful, and a much needed tonic, to have a space filled with the ‘…“polyrhythms,” the polyvocality of Black women’s creative and critical speech’ (Boyce Davies, 1994:23), and the energy of the activism of Black feminist theory? So, this convention is an expression of our courage to ask for want we want and what we believe we have a right to experience.
Show more

21 Read more

Declaring the activism of black feminist theory

Declaring the activism of black feminist theory

Let’s take the word ‘declaring’: if we go back to its roots, ‘declaring’ means ‘to reveal, disclose and to make witness in public.’ Indeed, the word ‘declare’ draws on the Latin word ‘clarus’ or ‘to make clear, to clarify and to make bright,’ invoking the spreading of sound and light. In her essay, ‘The Transformation of Silence into Language and Action’ (1977), the writer and Black feminist activist, Audre Lorde, said, ‘Your silence will not protect you’ (Lorde, 1977:41). The work of Trafford Rape Crisis bears witness to the fact that not only does silence fail to protect women, but it also serves to deny the existence of their experiences. Trafford Rape Crisis is about breaking silence - speaking out brightly to make the invisible visible so that the unrecognised is recognised. Audre Lorde goes on to explain how this works. She states:
Show more

13 Read more

Feminist Scholar-Activism Goes Global: Experiences of “Sociologists for Women in Society” at the UN

Feminist Scholar-Activism Goes Global: Experiences of “Sociologists for Women in Society” at the UN

A further challenge is the high turnover not only among SWS delegates but also within the UN system. D. Papademas as well as J. Skiles were able to meet with the director of DAW (Division for the Advancement of Women) on different occasions, and other SWS delegates confirmed that SWS was “recognized” in its scholar-activist beginnings in the UN. A high turnover among UN staff and a relatively young retirement age (at 60) made it difficult to maintain professional relationships. Also, predominantly lower level staff is designated to deal with the NGOs around the CSW meetings. Another delegate shares that she was successful in approaching actual U.S. country delegates, yet remained unconvinced about the level of influence they may have on actual proceedings after the conversation: “The man was nice, but he was kind of just sitting at the desk, to make sure there was a U.S. person at the desk. I do not think he had too much influence in U.S. policy.” (I14). During my UN internship I observed that often interns are being sent to CSW meetings “just to have a body in the chair” as an employee from a European Mission stated, speaking to the lower value attached to gender topics as well as a strategic evasion of conversations with NGOs.
Show more

22 Read more

Embodied online activism: breastfeeding activism (lactivism) on Facebook

Embodied online activism: breastfeeding activism (lactivism) on Facebook

(2002) points to ‘embodied negotiation’ of discursive spaces and the interconnectedness of online communities and off-line materialities, while Adi Kuntsman notes that ‘words in cyberspace [...] are never “just words”’ (2009, 25). A sense of ‘being there’ and of ‘being there for each other’ are within the spaces of Facebook groups crafted through words – posts, comments – and an increasing repertoire of other expressive, technologically facilitated, mostly visual inputs: reactions (‘likes’, ‘loves’, and ‘anger’), stickers, memes and gifs 6 . From the many emotionally charged exchanges that occur online and from this elusive sense of presence a notion of ‘togetherness’ may emerge (cf. Bergh 2017), through which spaces of sharing and support focused on practice and experience may lead to politicised engagements, which blur the boundaries between activism, protest, advocacy, and hegemonic knowledge negotiations (Akrich 2010). This article looks, in turn, at the ways in which lactivists on Facebook craft both the support and the activism with the use of capabilities present within the social media platform.
Show more

19 Read more

Why Women Still Ain’t Satisified: Politics and Activism in Canadian Child Care, 2006

Why Women Still Ain’t Satisified: Politics and Activism in Canadian Child Care, 2006

Women in Canada are still struggling to balance work, family and personal lives without the support of a well- developed accessible system of child care. Although the percent of children for whom child care is accessible has crept up over the years, the situation isn’t fundamentally better than it was in the 1980s when a much smaller pro- portion of women with young children were in the paid labour force. The 2006 election of the Harper government eliminated even the better-late-than-never first steps that were being taken. But at the end of 2006, a federal elec- tion is on the near horizon and the child care movement is well positioned to ensure that child care will be at the top of political agendas.
Show more

6 Read more

A theatre of black women : constructions of black female subjectivity in the dramatic texts of African American women playwrights in the  1920s and 1970s

A theatre of black women : constructions of black female subjectivity in the dramatic texts of African American women playwrights in the 1920s and 1970s

Encyclopaedic historical narratives written by black scholarsand intellectuals, such as those that were written to record and documentthe history of white domination and black racial opp[r]

280 Read more

Activism Ltd : environmental activism and contemporary literature

Activism Ltd : environmental activism and contemporary literature

most evident by the ways in which profoundly political and ideological projects have successfully masqueraded as a set of objective, natural, and technocratic truisms’. For McCarthy and Prudham (276) the main challenge to such a predicament comes from activism, which is able to give the lie to such disguises, ‘exposing the political negotiations and myriad contradictions, tensions, and failures of neoliberalizations’. While compelling, however, this assertion only confronts us once more with the problem – which ESMs repeatedly encounter – of effectively identifying destructive practices which have been strenuously and systematically normalised. As a number of other theorists point out, though early iterations of neoliberalism were seen by those who opposed them to be characterised by a conspicuous and callous withdrawal of state support – as typified by the austerity policies of Reagan and Thatcher governments – the 1990s, suggests Adalberto Aguirre, et al. (2006: 2), marked the advent of a ‘“roll- out” neoliberalism’ comprising the construction of new institutions ‘designed to embed the neoliberal project more deeply in civil society’. The result of this has not only been the development of a neoliberalism difficult to identify and contest, but also the ruling out of other options for conceiving agency and activism. As demonstrated in the RA advertisement which opened this chapter, options which don’t fit a conception of consumer and market driven behaviours can easily end up appearing either foolish, disconnected from reality, or dangerously extreme. ‘For activist projects’, claims Guthman (2008: 1180), ‘neoliberalization limits the conceivable because it limits the arguable, the fundable, the organizable, the scale of effective action, and compels activists to focus on putting out fires’.
Show more

307 Read more

Post Yugoslav Everyday Activism(s): A Different Form of Activist Citizenship?

Post Yugoslav Everyday Activism(s): A Different Form of Activist Citizenship?

While the café attracted mostly people who knew very well where they were going (a venue co-run by an activist lesbian organisation), the bookshop did serve as an entry point for people not connected in any way with the world of activism. Having entered, they would typically first browse the books in the first room (occupied exclusively by Prostorija), then notice the café and the fact that the place was a cultural centre offering exhibitions and events, and then find their way to the second room of books, where books sold by Prostorija were mingled with those of the Lesbian Reading Room and a collection of leftist and anarchist publications. It is hard to say whether such an encounter with a library full of books on social and political activism (in most cases, an encounter limited to noticing the existence of that library) had any lasting impact on such accidental visitors. One thing is certain, however: the accessibility of this space and its everyday existence made it different from the often over-professionalised, event-centred and, for many people, altogether inaccessible ‘NGO world’ (Belloni 2001; Grødeland 2006).
Show more

19 Read more

The Colonial Roots of the Racial Fetishization of Black Women

The Colonial Roots of the Racial Fetishization of Black Women

1907, and it continued in certain parts of the country until 1977 (Selden, 1999). Men and women of color were targeted for sterilization in the process of racial cleansing, eliminating “bad blood” and promoting the reproduction of the white race. The racially motivated eugenics movement was funded by prominent Americans, including Rockefeller and Warhol, and was largely accepted in American academia well into the 1900’s (Kühl, 2002). Even certain feminists and civil rights activists supported the movement to sterilize those who were deemed “unfit” to reproduce by American society. Black women were sterilized in attempts to control their reproductive agency and regulate the black population. This practice was motivated by the colonial rooted beliefs that suggested black women were undiscriminating of sexual partners and were sex-driven animals. The eugenics movement maintained the sexual debasement of black woman who were considered “unfit” by white male political leaders, to make their own sexual and reproductive choices.
Show more

12 Read more

Curatorial Activism: Turning Activism into Practices

Curatorial Activism: Turning Activism into Practices

pursuing the concept of curatorial activism, as defined by Dr. Maura Reilly, in an attempt to find exhibits or displays that demonstrate museums’ increasing political activism in various sized institutions across the United States through detailed document analysis. Interviews with current museum professionals who have a history of working with marginalized groups will help to better understand institutional barriers, as well as how the role of the curator should be redefined. This research intends to provide a realistic overview of institutional change and provide a better idea of how any museum can incorporate these practices.
Show more

43 Read more

Black Historical Memory of Slavery and Emancipation in the Activism and Politics of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and late Pan-African Movements, 1960-1988.

Black Historical Memory of Slavery and Emancipation in the Activism and Politics of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and late Pan-African Movements, 1960-1988.

56 On October 29, 1966, Stokely Carmichael, the newly elected leader of SNCC, spoke to a crowd of students at the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley), proclaiming, “We have found all the myths of the country to be nothing but downright lies. We were told that if we worked hard we would succeed, and if that were true we would own this country lock, stock, and barrel. We have picked the cotton for nothing.” 113 Comparing the modern condition of black people to the exploitation of their labor under slavery, Carmichael belied the notion that African Americans as a group could ever rise above oppression through their own hard work, continuing, “we are the maids in the kitchens of liberal white people; we are the janitors, the porters, the elevator men … we are the hardest workers and the lowest paid … Are the liberals willing to share their salaries with the economically insecure black people they so much love?” 114 Past racial progress had done little for the economic emancipation of African Americans. Throughout slavery, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow, black laborers struggled in the North and South to find middle to upper income jobs and were often denied advancements in their fields. Carmichael and other activists of the time believed that universities and colleges, essentially institutions of social advancement, held the key to black economic progress. Using the slogan, “Black Power,” he called upon student activists to stop relying on governmental change and “to start building [black] institutions and to fight to articulate our position, to fight to be able to control our universities … and to fight to control the basic institutions which perpetuate racism by destroying them and building new ones.” 115
Show more

157 Read more

Show all 10000 documents...