Boundaries of the mind

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Review of Rob Wilson’s Boundaries of the Mind: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences: Cognition

Review of Rob Wilson’s Boundaries of the Mind: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences: Cognition

the physical or social environment. And just as Chalmers urged science to take phenomenal consciousness seriously, so too Wilson urges that a science of the mind should be taking culture seriously: this might well require ‘‘thinking beyond the boundary of the individual not only in how we think of culture itself, but also in how we think of the mind’’ (p. 21). This then is Wilson’s expansive project.

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Questioning the Limits of Humanity in Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie and Animal’s People by Indra Sinha

Questioning the Limits of Humanity in Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie and Animal’s People by Indra Sinha

It also needs to be said that a significant number of theorists defend an opti- mistic, positive view on the symbiosis between man and machine, but also that there are no fewer of them who see such changes as deviant and even catastro- phic when it comes to the discussion on consequences. For example, Katherine Hayles points to positive features, especially those related to the developmental potential which arises from within the posthuman condition, that which opens up pathways to life endowed with faultless machine intelligence [2]. In such a context, she claims, there is no essential difference between bodily existence and computer simulation, or between a cybernetic machine and a biological organ- ism. Hayles considers the posthuman subject to be an amalgam of heterogeneous elements which will not fully override the human component and are in fact more likely to improve it. Donna Haraway also adopts a positive, yet somewhat different approach. In her famous essay, A Cyborg Manifesto , she points to three crucial moments that in her view define the relationship between man and ma- chine: 1) social behaviour, language, thought processes and likewise cannot in- fluence the separation between man and biology; 2) the distinction between hu- man organisms and machines is an unstable one due to ambiguities regarding distinctions between nature and artificial environment; 3) the boundaries be- tween the physical world and the non-physical one lack precision [3]. Haraway continues by positioning posthuman theory into the theoretical context of femi- nism, hence exploring differences between unity and diversity, between other- ness and the self, between the body and the mind, between culture and nature, providing arguments that a subject cannot but be in a dialectical relationship with the Other [3].
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Redrawing Boundaries

Redrawing Boundaries

It must be kept in mind that Rhys does not fully escape colonial binaries. This is evident in her portrayal of black characters as closer to nature and possessed of a more vibrant physicality. They seem to blur with the landscape as Anna’s epithet of “black is warm and gay” (27) reverberates in her later description of the hues of the Dominican terrain - “The colours are red, purple, blue, gold, all shades of green” (47). Francine is “always laughing” and “singing to herself”; Rhys provides a sensuous description of Francine sucking on mangoes (58). In Wide Sargasso Sea Christophine sings to Antoinette (18) and is the source of all natural wisdom, scolding her for sleeping under the full moon (69). Antoinette’s friend Tia is a part of the natural world, with feet that stones could not cut and an easy ability to fall asleep outdoors (20). Yet, in the text, by exposing the hypocrisy of the “patriarchal, settler and imperialist law” (Parry 38) Christophine emerges as the moral authority. Francine is painted with a complex inner life that is inaccessible to Anna, as is evident in the scene where she “looks sideways” at Anna with dislike “because [Anna] [is] white” (Voyage in the Dark 62).
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state of mind. A guilty state of mind usually means that the

state of mind. A guilty state of mind usually means that the

A few crimes are strict liability offenses. These crimes do not require a guilty state of mind. The act itself is criminal, regardless of the knowledge or intent of the person committing it. For example, it is a strict liability crime to sell alcoholic beverages to minors. Selling alcohol to a minor is a crime regardless of whether the seller knew the buyer was underage. Similarly, having sex with an underage partner, or statutory rape, is a crime even if the perpetrator believes the person is not a minor. Strict liability often applies to less serious offenses such as parking violations. The state does not have to prove a guilty state of mind, only that a car was parked illegally. Unless a legislature declares in a law that it is a strict liability offense, courts assume that a guilty intent is required.
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Hydra, a model system to trace the emergence of boundaries in developing eumetazoans

Hydra, a model system to trace the emergence of boundaries in developing eumetazoans

ABSTRACT In developing embryos, boundary formation between neighbouring groups of cells is essential to establish compartments which later fulfil specialized functions. The ability to form such boundaries has likely developed early in animal evolution - due to functional requirements imposed by the necessity to separate tissues which protect the animal, take up food or ensure propagation. Essential for boundary formation are local cues which may be provided by the in- tersection of diffusible molecules or set locally by activation of membrane-bound receptors and transcription factors. In the simple diploblastic Hydra, a representative of the basally branching metazoan Cnidaria, tissue boundaries are morphologically detectable between the body column and terminally differentiated head and foot structures. In adult polyps, these borders correspond to sharp lines of differential gene expression. They form de novo during regeneration and budding of a young polyp. Functional studies strongly suggest the involvement of FGFR/Notch signalling in the establishment of the parent-bud boundary, and it is very likely that these pathways interact with the WNT and BMP systems. How boundaries in the head and foot regions are generated is still unclear. Expression patterns of transcription factors like Cngsc, HyAlx, HyBra, HyOtx, Prdl-a, CnNK2 and Manacle show strong position dependency and may be involved in regulating gene expres- sion on either side of the boundaries, by interpreting positional information during their formation and maintenance. Due to its simplicity, the easy accessibility to pharmacological interference and, recently, transgenesis, Hydra is an interesting prebilaterian model system to study the emergence of boundary-forming mechanisms during evolution.
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The impact of a hospitalist on role boundaries in an orthopedic environment

The impact of a hospitalist on role boundaries in an orthopedic environment

The role boundaries between the hospitalist and nurses, pharmacists, and physiotherapists created both positive and negative impacts. The positive impacts were that the hospi- talist would educate other staff members, particularly those in nursing, and that he would provide support and medical orders as necessary. Many of the staff members commented that nurses had easier access to the hospitalist than internists or orthopedic surgeons; however, staff mentioned that the wait times for consults could be lengthy since there was only one hospitalist.

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The Gap between Mind and World in Mind and World Remains

The Gap between Mind and World in Mind and World Remains

According to McDowell, a germane conception of experi- ence should accommodate the following two commonsensical views. The first is an empiricistic conviction that as we relate our empirical judgments to their credentials, we ultimately rely on experience, despite its fallibility. (cf. McDowell, 1994: pp. 4-6. A clear statement of the idea and its origin can be found in his 1998b: pp. 435-436.) Let’s call this the justification feature of experience. The second point regards intentionality and ob- jectivity: our empirical judgments are about things in the exter- nal world, a world that ranges beyond our thoughts and experi- ences. Let’s dub it the intentionality feature of empirical think- ing. It appears that these commonsensical views together betray the conviction aforementioned: the former has it that empirical thoughts are about non-experiential things, but the latter has it that empirical thoughts are nonetheless justified by experiences. In Mind and World and elsewhere, McDowell promotes a way of seeing experience, which he argues would suffice to accommodate and make coherent the two commonsensical views. In McDowell’s words, this way of seeing experience “enables us to acknowledge that independent reality exerts a rational control over our thinking,” (1994: p. 27) and “secures
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Analysis of English Vocabulary in the  Mind of Student

Analysis of English Vocabulary in the Mind of Student

Volume 4, Issue 8, August – 2019 International Journal of Innovative Science and Research Technology ISSN No 2456 2165 IJISRT19AUG393 www ijisrt com 220 Analysis of English Vocabulary in the Mind of S[.]

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Ontogeny of an adventurous mind: the origin of Antonio García Bellido’s contributions to developmental genetics

Ontogeny of an adventurous mind: the origin of Antonio García Bellido’s contributions to developmental genetics

Very early on, Antonio decided to become trained in a field that was not practiced in Spain at the time – a field that, actually, did not exist yet. How can one decide to work in a non-existent field? This was the major question that underlied this interview. In retrospect the interview was closer to a cross-examination than to a normal discussion. I would repeatedly come back to the same questions, tracing minute discrepancies to see if they would reveal some hidden truth, and I must thank Antonio for his patience and willingness to help me. After several hours of questioning, we finally uncovered part of the explanation, very unexpected in a sense, but very fitting as well. What I learned made me (even more than before) proud of being a scientist, for the searching mind is truly our most powerful, beautiful and fragile gift.
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Boundaries of Germany

Boundaries of Germany

the north -eastern boundary of the former territory of neutral llf oresnet, then the eastern boundary of the [{ reis of Eupen, then the frontier between Belgi urn and the[r]

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Migrating Boundaries

Migrating Boundaries

Two benefits of an ambulatory boundary are particularly important from an economic point of view. The first is the opportunity that a migratory boundary affords to preserve the water adjacency of private landowners, while simultaneously maintaining public access to the wet beach and tidal and navigable waterways. We have already discussed this advantage and will not repeat the points made above. The second important benefit is the administrative advantages of defining the legal boundary as the contemporary mean high water line rather than a historic mean high water line. We will elaborate on these administrative advantages because, while there are allusions to them in the case law and commentary, we have not come across an extensive treatment of them. 117 Nonetheless, simultaneously preserving private water adjacency and public access to the water and the wet beach likely is a more important reason for the preference for a migratory boundary than the administrative advantages of such a boundary. The greater importance of the former is suggested by the judicial willingness to maintain a migratory boundary even when the historical boundary is knowable, and the administrative advantages of aligning the natural and the legal boundaries are less evident. 118
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The Boundaries of Terror

The Boundaries of Terror

which a certain social : some of the represend examine the ways in ies of race, gender, and e in the form of media eeches,or new forms of 'the contemporary polrross its national terrin w[r]

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Crossing boundaries

Crossing boundaries

It is possible that our self-selected study sample was biased—physicians who struggle with professional boundaries were probably more likely to participate in this study. Nevertheless, the participants represent an important group among family physicians. In light of both our findings and the fact that there is already an existing deficit of family physicians in Canada, any risk of burnout and premature retirement, reduction in working hours, or refusal to work in certain settings will have a considerable influence on the delivery of primary care. 17 Although this study examined the experiences of
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The epiphenomenal mind

The epiphenomenal mind

Both accounts correctly cite internal states in the owner's mind as the cause of his actions and both accounts correctly cite the content of those mental states as being causally efficac[r]

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Mind states

Mind states

Neither curtain book stretching the visual folds the because books, large a conceptual Had the have how the held library Before the In the plaster untouched written also texts the of cro[r]

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The Character of Mind

The Character of Mind

arising from biological processes not specific to the human mind is a well-motivated recent path which resists this conclusion. Yet, as Nirmalangshu Mukherji (Delhi) argued, the conclusion may nonetheless be right. To put the conclusion differently, talk of ‘computational systems’ outside of the human species — as when desert ants and foraging bees are said to have it when computing paths of motion— may be a move guilty of equivocation in the very term ‘computational system’. As is worth noting in this regard, the best evidence for relevant computations does not come from the non-human primate lineage, which forms the most relevant comparison class: Chimpanzees don’t vocalize, and their thought system appears to be radically different from ours. The grammaticalization of sound and meaning may thus — consistent with Hinzen’s story — create the very meanings that sentences encode and the very sounds that externalize them. Outside of a grammaticalized world, they would simply not be found, and where a computational system in the ant or bee brain has been posited, either a more biological story or a specific non-symbolic story (Bickerton 2009) may have to be sought that makes sense of the data.
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Decade of the Mind

Decade of the Mind

So, of the four arenas of the Decade of the Mind, two remain: research in high-level cognitive (i.e., "mindful") functions and education. In my view, these are the most two critically valid domains of the Decade of the Mind. One of the motors of the Decade of the Brain was the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging in 1991. Whereas in the beginning this was used to study rather low-level mental processes, such as visual percep- tion of flickering light [22] and finger tapping [23], fMRI is now used for the exploration of any function of the mind that a researcher can imagine. As mentioned above, social behaviors, trust, love, meditation, and prayer have been studied. The fledgling new area of neuroeconomics [24] is in part driven by the cooperation of economists and neuroscientists studying complex social behavior in the scanner. Such "social neuropsychology", or social neu- roscience, as it is now called, was unthinkable a decade ago, and is likely to transform our understanding of the very nature of human beings. In fact, there is now a chance that the scientific achievements and conceptual advances will finally enable scientists and humanists to surpass the science-humanities divide [25] that has plagued discourse and progress concerning human nature for several dec- ades. Synergy of this sort is urgently needed, it seems to me, if human beings are to have a chance to survive this century.
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Dictionaries of the Mind

Dictionaries of the Mind

When different words express the same sense, we say they are g~iQ~ym~USo On the other hand, if you enter the matrix with a word and look down that column, you find all the different sens[r]

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In the Mind of a Legend

In the Mind of a Legend

Napoleon Bonaparte often felt inferior to the people around him because of his Corsican background, failure of lasting relationships, and small stature, which drove him to gain superiori[r]

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Speaking of Mind

Speaking of Mind

The brain, then, has these non­ physical problems of believing that so-and-so, of being in pain, and furthermore these properties do not lend themselves to reduction into purely ph[r]

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