Business modelling

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Sustainable de-growth in business modelling

Sustainable de-growth in business modelling

Finding an economical balance is the final challenge in all business modelling. It is about calculating and assessing the costs as well as the intended revenue streams needed to cover those costs and hopefully leave some profit below the final line. (Osterwalder et al. 2010.) In the case of the Reuse Centre, the structure and the high turnover of the employees create an extra challenge. There is a major loss of skills every time an employee changes. The ones that have only just learned the job need to give space for the newcomers. This causes headache for the foremen and what’s more, it also creates indirect costs that are difficult to count. The so called ‘free labour’ is not that cheap when you count the extra costs its creating. However, it is a part of the Reuse Centre sustainability and social responsibility strategy to offer these low threshold jobs for those with poor working skills and concentration difficulties. Also, the municipals need this kind of service offering and there are not many firms doing it.
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Business Modelling in Home Networks: the OMEGA Case *

Business Modelling in Home Networks: the OMEGA Case *

Abstract: This paper presents ongoing initial results on the business modelling activities regarding the home networks within the OMEGA home networking EU project. OMEGA will develop a user-friendly home access network capable of delivering high-bandwidth services and content at a transmission speed of one Gigabit per second. The purpose of this study is to identify and analyze the potential players and technology variables that affect the position of the OMEGA system into the telecom market. All the necessary information for the analysis of the business case among with the needed definitions are presented. The business case study leads to the definition of a business model for the operation of the OMEGA players and their relationship in the value network and also the dynamics of the delivery of the OMEGA services. A business model that describes the market after the launch of the OMEGA network is also presented along with an initial overview of the OMEGA reference architecture of the network with the basic OMEGA devices and their functionalities. Finally two alternative initial scenarios are defined.
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Title: A visual business modelling and simulation environment

Title: A visual business modelling and simulation environment

Having explored the domain in which we are constructing models and some of the terminology and methodology used to specify them manually, we are now at a stage where we can begin to design a language suitable for this type of modelling task. There are several observations that can be made about the simplified demand model which are pertinent to the design of such a language. First is that the model lends itself to an object oriented approach. The two entity types (segment and product) in the model have associated variables that describe their state and behaviour, and multiple instantiations of each type of entity occur in a typical scenario. One benefit of recasting the model in object oriented terms is that the indexing scheme on variables, which is confusing and complicated when the relationship between model entities become complicated, becomes less necessary. Each object describes its own state and behaviour.
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From Business Model to Business Modelling: Modularity and Manipulation

From Business Model to Business Modelling: Modularity and Manipulation

The interplay between elements and the system as a whole provides for efficient experimentation because it operates at the cognitive level, but holds the potential for influencing collective decisions and implementations at the activity level. Business models draw boundaries between their elements, so that the model itself appears to be compartmentalized. These boundaries are not always obvious organizational structures - such as functional or divisional sub-organizations - and hence require new thinking about the links that connect them. It is paramount, then, to identify the appropriate level of granularity different business model classifications can offer, as well as the level of modularity by which they represent business processes (Massa & Tucci, 2013). This is a complex task, because the model designer needs to avoid over-simplifications that come at the cost of lack of precision, but also avoid over-specification that could lead to information overload. In this fashion, information hiding allows for inquiring into single elements efficiently, but then also needs to be combined with a holistic overview at the system level to understand how the part(s) influence the whole. Assessing the appropriate level at which modularity should be applied takes into account the current business processes as well as potential new processes that could be innovated or acquired. Doz and Kosonen (2010) speak of “resource fluidity” that allows managers to consider business model renewal, and use modularity as one approach by which business models can take into account more malleable resources that can be decoupled and modularized. However, once this and the aforementioned conditions (i.e., granularity of the representation; modularization, information hiding etc.) have been assessed, one can move to the actual manipulation of the model. Thus, our next step turns to specific modularity operators that can be utilized for experimenting with and changing business models.
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Business modelling on a case of microbrewery

Business modelling on a case of microbrewery

3.7 Prihodnost in načrti V prvem letu delovanja pivovarne bosta zaposlena le ustanovitelja, na voljo bodo tri vrste kraft piva, brezalkoholno in beljakovinsko pivo ter hmeljeva limonada.[r]

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A value mapping tool for sustainable business modelling

A value mapping tool for sustainable business modelling

The workshops (Section 5) were conducted with a variety of organisations in different environments. The proposed value mapping tools are conceived to facilitate exploration of sustainable value within multi-stakeholder network collaborations. Dauvergne and Lister (2013) highlight an increasing number of large corporations initiating collaborative sustainability governance within networks. This involves engaging proactively with a broader range of stakeholders, often including non- industry actors (e.g. WWF partnering with Coca-Cola) and competitors to establish industry-level sustainability consortia (e.g. The Sustainable Apparel Coalition). In such applications, the tool could be expanded to include all specific stakeholders, and as discussed by Dauvergne and Lister (2013) could be used in visioning exercises to explore stakeholders’ views of value. The tool could be used to assist students in thinking about broader issues of sustainability and in exploring case studies on sustainable business models, making it suitable for educational purposes. For policy makers it could serve as a framework for macro-level analysis of industry.
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Business Modelling Panel

Business Modelling Panel

Customer Collaborators Contractors Competitors Industrial Companies Industrial Companies Workforce mediating organizations Workforce mediating organizations Educational organizations Edu[r]

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Rule-based business process modelling and enactment

Rule-based business process modelling and enactment

about business processes. For instance, the ConDec language and the PENELOPE language only allow expressing business rules about sequence and timing constraints, i.e., control-flow. Moreover, these languages make use of very different knowledge representation paradigms. For instance, the ConDec language is expressed in linear temporal logic (LTL) whereas the PENELOPE language is expressed in terms of the event calculus. Finally, these languages do not have an explicit execution model or have an execution model that explicitly assumes either human or machine-mediated enactment. The case handling paradigm, for instance, assumes humans to perform atomic tasks but has an orchestration engine to perform the orchestration (coordination) work. The above-mentioned declarative modelling approaches remain fragmentary and are difficult to compare and combine. What is needed are meaningful ways to modularly combine several methods for knowledge representation and reasoning in a general ontology that standardises modelling constructs. The Object Management Group (OMG) has two new standards for business modelling currently under development: the Semantics of Business Vocabulary and Business Rules (SBVR) (Object Management Group, 2006a) specification and the Business Process Definition Metamodel (BPDM) (Object Management Group, 2007). Although the SBVR will allow for documenting the semantics of SBVR of business processes, it is not tailored towards declarative process modelling because it lacks a built-in vocabulary for expressing process-related concepts such as ‘agent’, ‘activity’, ‘event’ or ‘deontic assignment’. The BPDM enables integration with business rules through so-called ‘fact change conditions’, but it can be categorised as a metamodel for procedural process notations and an alignment of the SBVR and the BPDM is deferred to a future request for proposal.
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Business process modelling tool selection : a review

Business process modelling tool selection : a review

Comprehensive literature review presents limitations in effectively prioritizing BMPN tool prior to business- specific application. This research proposes a method for BPMN tool selection based on multi-criteria decision making via an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach. The multi-criteria are developed relative to distinct business modelling functionalities and attributes. This multi-criteria might include functional requirements, technical requirements, support and maintenance, training, reference sites, user interface, availability, integration, version control, active content and cost [11, 12]. The multi-criteria is not comprehensive as it is dependent on business specific objectives. A framework for quality evaluations conducted via quantitative analysis is investigated.
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BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING AND ENTERPRISE IMPROVEMENT ANALYSIS

BUSINESS PROCESS MODELLING AND ENTERPRISE IMPROVEMENT ANALYSIS

Along with the business process discovery, process modelling is a critical component in successful business process management. It is used to outline the organization’s current (“as-is”) processes to create a baseline for process improvements and to design future (“to-be”) processes with those improvements incorporated. A process model is the basic description of a process. Process modelling often uses Business Process Modelling Notation ( BPMN ), a standard method of illustrating processes with flowchart-like diagrams that can be easily understood by both IT and business managers. Companies are still interested in adopting BPMN (it grew from 23% in 2005 to 60% in 2013). UML (activity diagrams), another modelling alternative, declined from 33% in 2005 to 18% in 2013, and BPEL decreased from 23% to 10% in the same time [1]. The issue is that many organizations, since they are on the early levels of process maturity, are using Graphics Modelling tools and Repository based Modelling tools. BPMN was developed to model processes as logical, chronological sequences of events. It is not designed for representing process landscapes, organizational structures, strategies, data, business rules, IT landscape, but BPMN process models are easy to combine with appropriate types of diagrams mentioned in the business modelling.
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An Evaluation of Conceptual Business Process Modelling Languages

An Evaluation of Conceptual Business Process Modelling Languages

Söderström et al. developed a generic meta-model for comparing BPMLs in [19]. The meta-model shows technical concepts of business processes, and captures a definition and an execution level similar to workflow management systems. Events and control nodes are defined in detail, but roles and resources are described at a very high level. The paper compares only three different BPMLs: the EPC, the UML 1.3 State Diagram and the Business Modelling Language, the BPML of a commercial tool. Lin et al. analysed 10 BPMLs in [10] and derived eight generic concepts: activity, resource, behaviour, event, information, relation, agent and entity. This bottom-up approach requires more detail for an evaluation of BPMLs, as the basic concepts are represented in all BPMLs.
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Inter-Organizational Business Processes Modelling Framework

Inter-Organizational Business Processes Modelling Framework

The origins of business process modelling (BPM) languages are quite diverse. Surveys comparing different types of business process modelling languages are provided in ([3], [8], [17], [18], [19]). Some approaches are mainly used in the requirements specification phase to support the communication with business domain experts. Resulting models are usually on a rather abstract level and tend to hide implementation complexity. Other approaches are more implementation oriented and sometimes seem to be a reverse engineered graphical notation of workflow languages or of Web Services orchestrations and choreographies [29]. The approaches investigated introduce a representation of the interorganizational business process, which uses either an existing modelling notation (UML2 Activity Diagrams [30], EPC [25] or BPMN [21]) or its extensions. Specific artefacts are necessary for describing IOBP, among them external organizations, roles or partner types as well as messages, business documents and channels.
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Improving information retieval by modelling business context

Improving information retieval by modelling business context

Keywords-Contextual Information Retrieval, Business tasks, Information-related tasks I. I NTRODUCTION In this paper, we are concerned with information retrieval in a corporate setting, in other words, information-related tasks associated with business tasks. These tasks are characterized by the fact that they require on the part of user clearly identified information. The user will try to find the proper information through the information tasks to compensate for his lack of knowledge. To achieve this goal, it is therefore important that the information retrieval system (IRS) meets the needs of the user while respecting the constraints related to the context in which the task must be resolved: his context. This context will be exploited by the IRS to adapt the information search process itself or the information returned to the user (in term of contents / display / structure). Belkin [1] stresses that we cannot use traditional search engines because they are not suited to the resolution of specific business tasks. One of the reasons is that the tasks or goals that lead people to engage in information processes are not considered in spite of the fact that it substantially affects their judgments of usefulness of information objects.
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Commitment-Based Business Process Modelling and Enactment

Commitment-Based Business Process Modelling and Enactment

Causal relations among commitments are crucial to understanding the chain of commit- ment operations, because they drive an interaction along significant states where the real transactions of domain value occur. A commitment causality diagram (CCD) is a graph showing potential causality between each pair of commitment operations. A CCD high- lights the important stages within the information flows and hides details of the interaction protocols that can vary depending on the actual implementation. From a designer’s stand- point, a CCD reflects the high-level business logic that specifies what agreements should be achieved. From a CCD, we can infer the agent conversations needed to achieve and modify the commitments underlying these agreements. Once the commitments and their relations are identified, designers can always choose an optimal conversation that flows between any related pair of commitment operations.
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Business Domain Modelling using an Integrated Framework

Business Domain Modelling using an Integrated Framework

Abstract— This paper presents an application of a “Systematic Soft Domain Driven Design Framework” as a soft systems approach to domain-driven design of information systems development. The framework combining techniques from Soft Systems Methodology (SSM), the Unified Modelling Language (UML), and an implementation pattern known as “Naked Objects”. This framework have been used in action research projects that have involved the investigation and modelling of business processes using object-oriented domain models and the implementation of software systems based on those domain models. Within this framework, Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) is used as a guiding methodology to explore the problem situation and to develop the domain model using UML for the given business domain. The framework is proposed and evaluated in our previous works, and a real case study “Information Retrieval System for academic research” is used, in this paper, to show further practice and evaluation of the framework in different business domain. We argue that there are advantages from combining and using techniques from different methodologies in this way for business domain modelling. The framework is overviewed and justified as multimethodology using Mingers multimethodology ideas.
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An Evaluation of Conceptual Business Process Modelling Languages

An Evaluation of Conceptual Business Process Modelling Languages

References 1/2  Business Process Management Initiative: Business Process Modeling Language. Specification Version 1.0, November 13, 2002, http://www.bpmn.org/  Business Process Management Initiative: Business Process Modeling Notation. Specification

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Business Valuation: Modelling Forecasting Hurdle Rate

Business Valuation: Modelling Forecasting Hurdle Rate

Hotel Leela Venture Ltd was incorporated in 1981. Leela entered into collaboration with Penta Hotels, UK to set up and operate 5-star hotels, which was subsequently transferred to Kempinski Hotels, a European chain of 5-star deluxe hotels, owned by Lufthansa, the German Airline. In 1986, the company set up their first 5-star deluxe hotel namely Leela Penta, in Mumbai. The hotel was renamed as Leela Kempinski in 1988, subsequent the change in their marketing and sales tie-up. Leela operates in both, the leisure and business sectors. The Leela palaces and resorts include a chain of five star luxury hotels and resorts. The company properties include The Leela Kempinski in Mumbai, The Leela Palace in Goa, The Leela Palace Kempinski in Bangalore and The Leela Kovalam in Kerala. The company became a popular name in the hospitality industry in India because of their high quality of service and customer relations. In a nut shell, Leela operates six hotels in various locations Mumbai, Bangalore, Goa, Kovalam, Udaipur and Gurgaon comprising 1523 guest rooms and 90 serviced apartments. Leela group is engaged in the business of ready-made garments and luxury hotels and resorts, founded in 1957 by Capt. C.P. Krishnan Nair. It was in 1957 when Capt. Nair, after completing his stretch in the army, set up a small industrial unit in suburban Mumbai. Inspired by the handloom weaving industry in Cannanore, Kerala was India’s first and only lace manufacturing plant ‘Leela Scottish Lace Ltd’.
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INTEGRATING KNOWLEDGE MODELLING IN BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

INTEGRATING KNOWLEDGE MODELLING IN BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT

The model-based knowledge management approach proposed by Allweyer (1998) adds a new perspective to the modelling of existing business processes, especially of knowledge-intensive processes. Knowledge management activities are considered as an integral part of existing business processes. The four level architecture of business process management is adopted for knowledge management and the method is renamed knowledge process redesign. The approach aims to the description of required and used knowledge as well as generated and documented knowledge. Knowledge is understood as information in context with value for the owner of this information which allows him to act. The approach claims to support the structuring of knowledge into categories and the construction of a knowledge map to locate who knows what inside the organization. Easy-to- understand pictograms are proposed to help users describe the use of documented and tacit knowledge within their business processes. The approach does not make explicit how to integrate the knowledge management activities into business processes and does not provide any criteria to analyse and improve the knowledge processing within the business process.
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Empirical modelling for participative business process reengineering

Empirical modelling for participative business process reengineering

Creative Software Development: An Empirical Modelling Framework, PhD Thesis, Department of Computer Science, University of Warwick.. Bibliography 33h-ChangChen 2001 "Empirical Modelling [r]

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Business Process Modelling Languages, Goals and Variabilities

Business Process Modelling Languages, Goals and Variabilities

Publications  Birgit Korherr and Beate List: A UML 2 Profile for Variability Models and their Dependency to Business Processes. 1st International Workshop on Enterprise Information Systems Engineering (WEISE 07), September 2007, Regensburg, Germany, IEEE Press, 2007.

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